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Rank #168 in Social Sciences category

Education
Society & Culture
Health & Fitness
Medicine
Science
Natural Sciences
Social Sciences

Science for the People

Updated 4 days ago

Rank #168 in Social Sciences category

Education
Society & Culture
Health & Fitness
Medicine
Science
Natural Sciences
Social Sciences
Read more

Science for the People is a long-format interview podcast that explores the connections between science, popular culture, history, and public policy, to help listeners understand the evidence and arguments behind what's in the news and on the shelves. Our hosts sit down with science researchers, writers, authors, journalists, and experts to discuss science from the past, the science that affects our lives today, and how science might change our future.

Read more

Science for the People is a long-format interview podcast that explores the connections between science, popular culture, history, and public policy, to help listeners understand the evidence and arguments behind what's in the news and on the shelves. Our hosts sit down with science researchers, writers, authors, journalists, and experts to discuss science from the past, the science that affects our lives today, and how science might change our future.

iTunes Ratings

131 Ratings
Average Ratings
105
12
6
5
3

Just what I was looking for - thank you!

By YGlen - Apr 17 2014
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This podcast provides science content in a readily digestible format to keep me informed.

Outstanding show

By kmorgan - Dec 14 2013
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Great interviews and content.

iTunes Ratings

131 Ratings
Average Ratings
105
12
6
5
3

Just what I was looking for - thank you!

By YGlen - Apr 17 2014
Read more
This podcast provides science content in a readily digestible format to keep me informed.

Outstanding show

By kmorgan - Dec 14 2013
Read more
Great interviews and content.
Cover image of Science for the People

Science for the People

Updated 4 days ago

Rank #168 in Social Sciences category

Read more

Science for the People is a long-format interview podcast that explores the connections between science, popular culture, history, and public policy, to help listeners understand the evidence and arguments behind what's in the news and on the shelves. Our hosts sit down with science researchers, writers, authors, journalists, and experts to discuss science from the past, the science that affects our lives today, and how science might change our future.

Rank #1: #311 On Intelligence

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This week we're learning about how scientists and society measure intelligence, and the relationship between smartness and success. We're joined by cognitive psychologist Scott Barry Kaufman, to talk about his book "Ungifted: Intelligence Redefined." And we'll talk to Nathaniel Barr, postdoctoral fellow at the University of Waterloo, about research into the relationship between smartphone use and cognitive skills.
Apr 03 2015
1 hour
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Rank #2: #253 The Philosophical Breakfast Club

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This week, we're looking back at four remarkable minds whose weekly meetings set the stage for a revolution in science and technology. We're joined by science historian Laura J. Snyder, to talk about her book "The Philosophical Breakfast Club: Four Remarkable Friends who Transformed Science and Changed the World." And we'll speak to "Surly" Amy Davis Roth and Skepchick contributor Melanie Mallon, about the science track at CONvergence 2014.
Feb 21 2014
1 hour
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Rank #3: #304 Alan Turing

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This week, we're learning more about the groundbreaking work and too-short life of Alan Turing, the brilliant mathematician, codebreaker and philosopher who laid the groundwork for the modern age of computing. We'll spend the hour with Oxford University Senior Research Fellow Andrew Hodges, talking about his book "Alan Turing: The Enigma."
Feb 13 2015
1 hour
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Rank #4: #515 Humanimal

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Are humans special? We feel special, like we're somehow different from the rest of life on the planet. But are we really? This week, we spend the hour with Adam Rutherford, science broadcaster, writer, and author of the book "Humanimal: How Homo Sapiens Became Nature's Most Paradoxical Creature - A New Evolutionary History". We discuss the commone ways we think humans are different from other creatures and how, sometimes, those ideas turns out to be not quite correct. Along the way we also think a little more carefully about some of the deeply ingrained and sometimes subtle ideas people have...
Mar 01 2019
1 hour
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Rank #5: #377 Hearing From The Humanities

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This week we're taking a tentative step into the humanities. We spoke with Jimena Canales, the Thomas M. Siebel Chair in the History of Science at the University of Illinois-UC, about her newest book "The Physicist and the Philosopher: Einstein, Bergson and the Debate That Changed Our Understanding of Time" to learn what happened when philosophy was pitted against physics in a historic intellectual battle. And we talked to Hannah McGregor and Marcelle Kosman, the scholarly hosts of the podcast "Witch, Please", about literary analysis and what critical thinking looks like in the world of literature.
Jul 08 2016
1 hour
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Rank #6: #438 Big Chicken

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We eat a lot of chicken. But we didn't used to. What changed? In part, what changed was the discovery that antibiotics could build a bigger, better chicken. Now, the big chicken may be suffering the results of too much medicine. This week, we hear from science journalist Maryn McKenna about her new book "Big Chicken: The Incredible Story of How Antibiotics Created Modern Agriculture and Changed the Way the World Eats." We'll also hear from zoonotic disease specialist Tara Smith about the challenges scientists face trying to get out of the lab and into the pigpen. This episode is...
Sep 08 2017
1 hour
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Rank #7: #511 Ok you worked out, now what?

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Ok, you got out the door and did a workout. Excellent work! Now you're sore. Rats. What do you do? Foam roll? Stretch? Stand butt naked in a tank pumping in liquid nitrogen? Put on specially branded pajamas? The recovery options are endless these days. But which of them work best? Heck, which even work at all? We're talking with Christie Aschwanden about her new book: "Good to Go: What the Athlete in All of Us Can Learn From the Strange Science of Recovery". Related links: ‘Good to Go’ tackles the real science of sports recovery - Review from Bethany...
Feb 01 2019
1 hour
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Rank #8: #249 Health Controversies Again

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This week, we're looking at controversial topics at the intersection of healthcare and ethics. Law professor and author Timothy Caulfield returns to discuss the rise of stem cell tourism at clinics worldwide. And science writer David Dobbs joins us to explain the showdown between the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and personal genomics company 23andMe.
Jan 24 2014
1 hour
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Rank #9: #300 Private Sector Space

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This week we're learning how private enterprise has jumped in to fill the gap left by shrinking government budgets for space exploration. We're joined by journalist Elmo Keep, to talk about her article on Mars One, a nonprofit planning to make a reality show out of a one-way trip to colonize the red planet.  And we'll get an update on the state of the for-profit space industry with Space News Senior Editor Jeff Foust.
Jan 16 2015
1 hour
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Rank #10: #492 Flint Water Crisis

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This week we dig into the Flint water crisis: what happened, how it got so bad, what turned the tide, what's still left to do, and the mix of science, politics, and activism that are still needed to finish pulling Flint out of the crisis. We spend the hour with Dr Mona Hanna-Attisha, a physician, scientist, activist, the founder and director of the Pediatric Public Health Initiative, and author of the book "What the Eyes Don't See: A Story of Crisis, Resistance, and Hope in an American City".
Sep 21 2018
1 hour
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Rank #11: #266 Always More Health Controversies

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This week, we're tackling more controversial topics in the realm of healthcare. We'll speak to Edward Archer, post-doctoral fellow in the Nutrition and Obesity Research Center at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, about the tendency toward psuedoscience in nutrition data gathering. And Dr. Keith Norris, editor-in-chief of the journal Ethnicity & Disease, joins us to talk about the intersection of race and medicine.
May 23 2014
1 hour
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Rank #12: #485 Fine Times with Wine

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How do you pick your wine? By its history? By its grape? By the picture on the bottle? Well you're about to get your wine world turned upside down. We'll hear about the history of this fabulous fermentation from Kevin Begos, author of the book "Tasting the Past: The Science of Flavor and the Search for the Origins of Wine". Then we'll talk with Erika Szymanski about the little microbes that make it all possible, yeast! On the way, we're going to have Science for the People's first ever wine tasting! Related links: Background music: Mozart Flute Quartet in D...
Aug 03 2018
1 hour
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Rank #13: #382 Risk of Going Nowhere

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This week we're airing a recorded panel, moderated by Desiree Schell, from the recent Skepchickcon track at CONvergence 2016 in Bloomington, Minnesota. As a safety and headline driven culture, how will we explore dangerous, distant places that are inherently unsafe without losing the public will or disrespecting the lives of those who go? Panelists include Abra Staffin-Wiebe, speculative fiction author; blogger and podcaster Jim Tigwell; trivia show host Sarah Prentice; and Rebecca Watson, creator of Skepchick. Special thanks to Kevin Eldridge and The Flopcast, who helped us record panels when our equipment failed! We're looking for Guest Hosts to join...
Aug 12 2016
1 hour
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Rank #14: #504 The Art of Logic

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How can mathematics help us have better arguments? This week we spend the hour with "The Art of Logic in an Illogical World" author, mathematician Eugenia Cheng, as she makes her case that the logic of mathematics can combine with emotional resonance to allow us to have better debates and arguments. Along the way we learn a lot about rigorous logic using arguments you're probably having every day, while also learning a lot about our own underlying beliefs and assumptions.
Dec 14 2018
1 hour
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Rank #15: #340 Mandatory Vaccination

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This week, we're talking about disease prevention, public health, and whether or not some types of vaccinations should be mandatory. We'll spend the hour in a panel discussion with Barry Bloom, Harvard University's Distinguished Service Professor of the Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, University of Toronto public health ethicist Alison Thompson, pediatrician and University of Pennsylvania vaccinology professor Paul Offit, and Nicholas Little, Vice President and General Counsel at the Center for Inquiry.
Oct 23 2015
1 hour
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Rank #16: #481 23 and You

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These days, all you need to do is fill a tube with spit and mail it off to find out all about your ancestors, and even about your risks for certain diseases. Loads of DNA sequencing and typing companies exist to tell you all about yourself. But how accurate are they? And how safe is that information? We'll speak with science writer Tina Hesman Saey about her big project sending off her spit to more companies than she can count. For science, of course. Then, we'll take out ethical concerns to bioethicist Kelly Hills, to talk about the potential pitfalls...
Jul 06 2018
1 hour
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Rank #17: #381 The Triumph of Seeds

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This week we're exploring the world of seeds: how they've become so successful, how they work, how humans depend on them, and what we still don't understand about them. We spend the hour with Thor Hanson, conservation biologist and award-winning author, about his book "The Triumph of Seeds: How Grains, Nuts, Kernels, Pulses, and Pips Conquered the Plant Kingdom and Shaped Human History".
Aug 05 2016
1 hour
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Rank #18: #256 Beauty is A Beast

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This week we're exploring the science of beauty products and procedures. We'll talk to cosmetic chemist Perry Romanowski, co-founder of thebeautybrains.com, about his book "It's OK to Have Lead in Your Lipstick." And we'll speak to cosmetic surgeon Dr. Elizabeth Hall-Findlay about plastic surgery tourism, and safety regulation in the industry.
Mar 14 2014
1 hour
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Rank #19: #298 Technocreep

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This week, we're learning about the ever-expanding streams of our personal information being collected by businesses and governments. We'll talk to author and futurist Tom Keenan about his book "Technocreep: the Surrender of Privacy and the Capitalization of Intimacy." And security expert Bruce Schneier returns to talk about the use and misuse of passwords to safeguard our most important data.
Jan 02 2015
1 hour
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Rank #20: #409 Trump War On Science

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This week we look at what's happening to science in the first days of the Donald Trump presidency, and what might happen if we don't take action in a world where science is growing increasingly political — whether or not we want it to. Librarian John Dupuis returns to talk about what's happened so far, why he's started a chronology of this administration's affects on science, and the similarities and differences to the Canadian War on Science he tracked previously. And we speak with Katie Gibbs, Executive Director of Evidence for Democracy, about the particular challenges and concerns of scientists...
Feb 17 2017
1 hour
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