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Rank #149 in Investing category

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Stephanomics

Updated 8 days ago

Rank #149 in Investing category

Business
Business News
Investing
Read more

Who will win the trade war, and how? If the job market is so strong, why does your paycheck seem so meager? What will drive the economy of the future? Stephanomics, a podcast hosted by Bloomberg Economics head Stephanie Flanders, the former BBC economics editor and chief market strategist for Europe at JPMorgan Asset Management, will take listeners on location each week to answer questions like these and bring the global economy to life.

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Who will win the trade war, and how? If the job market is so strong, why does your paycheck seem so meager? What will drive the economy of the future? Stephanomics, a podcast hosted by Bloomberg Economics head Stephanie Flanders, the former BBC economics editor and chief market strategist for Europe at JPMorgan Asset Management, will take listeners on location each week to answer questions like these and bring the global economy to life.

iTunes Ratings

209 Ratings
Average Ratings
161
13
7
11
17

Great podcast ! Don’t go on hiatus!!

By katandbrandon - Dec 02 2018
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This is a well produced and interesting podcast.

Very educational

By Mcb2491 - Dec 14 2017
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Great supplement to my economics and finance classes

iTunes Ratings

209 Ratings
Average Ratings
161
13
7
11
17

Great podcast ! Don’t go on hiatus!!

By katandbrandon - Dec 02 2018
Read more
This is a well produced and interesting podcast.

Very educational

By Mcb2491 - Dec 14 2017
Read more
Great supplement to my economics and finance classes
Cover image of Stephanomics

Stephanomics

Updated 8 days ago

Rank #149 in Investing category

Read more

Who will win the trade war, and how? If the job market is so strong, why does your paycheck seem so meager? What will drive the economy of the future? Stephanomics, a podcast hosted by Bloomberg Economics head Stephanie Flanders, the former BBC economics editor and chief market strategist for Europe at JPMorgan Asset Management, will take listeners on location each week to answer questions like these and bring the global economy to life.

Rank #1: 56: Actually, You Probably Can't Make It in New York

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And you might want to cross San Francisco off the list, too. In the past 30 years, the most expensive metro areas in the U.S. have seen their housing prices grow at a much faster pace than the least expensive markets, according to a new report out from Trulia. That rapid increase has caused certain areas - especially New York's long-envied Manhattan borough - to be closed off to not only the successful and wealthy, but those that were also raised by the successful and wealthy. Kate Smith and Dan Moss talk to one half of the Case-Shiller Index and the authority on housing prices, Robert Shiller, on what's driving the prices up and whether New York real estate is all it's cracked up to be.
Sep 28 2016
22 mins
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Rank #2: India: All Growth, No Jobs

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This week we focus on the two giants of the global economy: China and India. At first glance, China seems to be shrugging off the effects of U.S. tariffs, but Bloomberg economists looked closer and found that Chinese exports to the US in 1,000s of product categories had been hit hard and this trade had not also been replaced by U.S. production or exports from other countries. Host Stephanie Flanders gets the full story from Bloomberg economist Maeva Cousin. We also explore a great economic puzzle of recent times:  how can India grow by 6%-7% a year for 20 years without creating jobs for half of its potential workers?    

The world’s second most-populous economy has seen a step change in its economic performance in the past 20 years but job growth keeps coming up short. Less than half of the working-age population is in work or even looking for a job -- and nearly 80% of women are not in the workforce at all. Anirban Nag and Vrishti Beniwal go in search of an answer on the streets of New Delhi, and Stephanie asks Bloomberg Opinion columnist Mihir Sharma what it all means for India’s newly re-elected Prime Minister Narendra Modi.
Jun 27 2019
29 mins
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Rank #3: How Trade War is Reshaping China

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The force of the trade war unleashed by Donald Trump goes beyond peeved farmers and pricier gadgets. The entire economic model of modern corporations is up for grabs, just as China is undergoing a huge internal shift that's likely to upend supply chains. Frances Lim of Kohlberg Kravis Roberts shares with Daniel Moss of Bloomberg Opinion her conclusions from a recent trip to the epicenter.
Sep 13 2018
23 mins
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Rank #4: Death and Despair in White America

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We usually don't think about economics as a life-or-death subject. But for white Americans without a college degree, there's no other way to describe it. With job opportunities limited and an opioid epidemic in full throttle, death rates among this group are skyrocketing, an issue that probably helped elect Donald Trump as president. Anne Case and Angus Deaton, the married academic couple who brought this issue to the forefront, have just issued a followup paper to their groundbreaking 2015 study on the subject. Case returns to Benchmark to discuss the latest findings with Dan and Scott -- and offers her ominous take on what it portends for the future of the nation.
Mar 29 2017
26 mins
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Rank #5: The Benchmark Preview

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(Bloomberg) -- Welcome to episode zero of the Bloomberg Benchmark Podcast! Every week, hosts Tori Stilwell, Dan Moss, and Aki Ito bring you a jargon-free dive into the stories that drive the global economy. In this short episode, Tori and Dan tell you what to expect.
Sep 04 2015
4 mins
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Rank #6: Big Data's Lens Into the U.S. Economy

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Most U.S. economic data, such as jobs and consumer spending, is based not on actual data, but on surveys of Americans and businesses. What if you could look at every single purchase that people make, or peek at the bank accounts of every small business? The JPMorgan Chase Institute is trying to do just that -- using the bank's vast customer data -- and sniff out trends in the economy that are invisible in the official numbers.
Nov 29 2018
29 mins
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Rank #7: 68: Taking the Long (240-Year) View of U.S.-China Relations

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Donald Trump has pledged to get tough with China on trade and currency, already tensing up relations with the world's second-largest economy. But it could be worse: President Woodrow Wilson signed a treaty that gave Japan control of part of China, and that didn't go over too well. John Pomfret joins us to take the long view of relations between the U.S. and China. The longtime China correspondent for the Washington Post and author of the new book "The Beautiful Country and the Middle Kingdom" joins Dan and Scott to discuss what the incoming U.S. president can learn from two centuries of contact, and how, as he puts it, stable ties with the U.S. can "make China great again."
Dec 21 2016
27 mins
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Rank #8: Surprise! Your Cash Is Now Worthless

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The nation's leader takes a sudden action that only a handful of people know about beforehand. His populist base loves it, even if it could disrupt the economy. Donald Trump's executive order on immigration? No, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi's move to invalidate more than 80 percent of currency in circulation, a bid to stamp out corruption. Three months later, do the benefits outweigh the costs? Or will the hit to the economy be felt for years to come? Cornell University professor Eswar Prasad and Bloomberg reporter Sho Chandra join Scott to share their recent firsthand experiences from India and help explain why the action might just end up working.
Feb 08 2017
18 mins
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Rank #9: Bitcoin's Big Problems

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Bitcoin was recently called a combination of a bubble, a Ponzi scheme and an environmental disaster by one of the world's leading authorities on finance and economics. But underneath that sensational description, cryptocurrencies are saddled with underlying technological flaws that will likely prevent them from living up to the hype or merely becoming a more commonly used currency. Hyun Song Shin, head of research at the Bank for International Settlements in Switzerland, discusses the topic with Bloomberg News economics editor Scott Lanman.
Aug 09 2018
24 mins
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Rank #10: 70: Cafe Con Leche Can Track Hyperinflation in Venezuela

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Everyone knows inflation is out of control in Venezuela. But the government long ago stopped publishing figures on a regular basis, leaving economists to dial up what are essentially wild guesses. Enter the Bloomberg Cafe Con Leche Inflation Index. It tracks just one item: A piping hot coffee at a bakery in eastern Caracas. Yet it provides a unique look at inflation in one of the world's most dysfunctional economies. David Papadopoulos, a Bloomberg managing editor in New York, and Fabiola Zerpa, a Bloomberg correspondent in Caracas, join Scott to talk about the gauge, and just how bad things really are in the nation.
Jan 12 2017
16 mins
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Rank #11: Why Everyone Needs to Care About the Fed's Shrinking Balance Sheet

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The Federal Reserve said this week that it's about to try something that's never been done on this scale in the annals of central banking: reduce its $4.5 trillion stockpile of assets. The ramifications could be felt everywhere from mortgage rates, to the cost of vacationing in Thailand, even to President Donald Trump's attitude toward the Fed. Bloomberg reporter Chris Condon joins Scott to explain what's happening and try to come up with a better name than "balance sheet normalization" for the whole process.
Jul 27 2017
15 mins
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Rank #12: Americans Get Lots of Government Money, And They Still Hate Washington

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Why do so many Americans ignore their hip pocket? Portions of the country where citizens are increasingly dependent on government programs, like Kentucky, have become the most conservative. This transformation in the nation's economics and politics goes beyond Donald Trump; some of the most anti-government lawmakers come from Kentucky. Cornell University's Suzanne Mettler discusses this paradox with Scott Lanman of Bloomberg News and Daniel Moss of Bloomberg Opinion.
Aug 23 2018
24 mins
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Rank #13: How Water Will Determine the Global Economy's Winners and Losers

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For years, oil was the major determinant of which countries rose to -- and lost -- power in the global economy. Today, that commodity increasingly is water. This week on Benchmark, we hear about the water crisis in Cape Town, where authorities are warning they may need to turn off the taps, from local Bloomberg editor Robert Brand. Then, we take a journey through global water issues with Helen Mountford of the World Resources Institute. They speak with Scott Lanman of Bloomberg News and Daniel Moss of Bloomberg View.
Apr 19 2018
23 mins
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Rank #14: Why Millions of Americans Still Live Paycheck-to-Paycheck

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Millions of middle-class Americans face an unexpected reality in today's era of economic growth: their paychecks vary so much that paying bills and saving for the future is exhausting and challenging month after month. This week on Benchmark, Dan and Scott speak with Jonathan Morduch and Rachel Schneider, whose book, "The Financial Diaries," vividly illustrates the financial struggles of more than 200 U.S. families.
May 31 2017
26 mins
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Rank #15: Trump Heartland Depends on -- And Loathes -- Globalization

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Even in Deep Red America, the cosmopolitan world of Chardonnay and dual passport-holders is alive and well. Right alongside is a middle class enmeshed in that same world -- yet infuriated by it, a rage that opened the door to Donald Trump. Sure, this alternate universe may be shrinking, but it's still kicking up a lot of dust. Such are the revelations from a series of coast-to-coast road trips by bestselling author Robert D. Kaplan. Driving between New York and San Diego, Kaplan marvels at the strength of America's geography and its ability to project global political and economic leadership -- if only the middle class still wants it.
Feb 02 2017
24 mins
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Rank #16: Fix Inequality Now? Be Careful What You Wish For

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Widening inequality is a blight on the modern economy and will ultimately undermine growth. But wait. Let's not hurry to fix it because history shows it can only really be addressed by total war, total revolution, state collapse or Black Death-like pandemics. That's the conclusion of Stanford professor Walter Scheidel, who joins Dan and Scott. Scheidel takes us on a tour-de-force of the rise and fall of inequality from cave societies through the bubonic plague to the two World Wars. He's not an optimist.
Feb 22 2017
17 mins
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Rank #17: The U.S. Economy's Silent Menace

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(Bloomberg) -- Every week, hosts Tori Stilwell, Dan Moss, and Aki Ito bring you a jargon-free dive into the stories that drive the global economy. In this episode, the team enlists Brookings senior fellow Barry Bosworth to discuss productivity. Productivity growth has come to a screeching halt in America, and economists are really worried. So what exactly is productivity? Why should you care? And what does it have to do with Twitter? Listen to find out.
Sep 11 2015
19 mins
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Rank #18: Can Technology Actually Save Jobs?

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Of the many forces driving the wave of hiring across the U.S. in recent years, technology is typically not on the list because automation and artificial intelligence tend to be seen as job-killing rather than job-enhancing. On this week's episode of Stephanomics, reporter Craig Torres visits a hospital where new technologies are actually creating the need for more -- not fewer -- employees.

Then, Stephanie interviews Larry Summers -- the Harvard University economist and former U.S. Treasury secretary -- for his predictions on technology and employment, plus his thoughts on the U.S. economy and Federal Reserve. Finally, Stephanie talks with Bloomberg reporter Jeanna Smialek about how central bankers may be reduced to using what one economist calls "poor man's monetary policy."
Apr 18 2019
28 mins
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Rank #19: Episode 25: Negative Rates -- Another (Delayed) 2008 Hangover

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The Bank of Japan's new rules on negative interest rates went into effect this week, with a quarter of the global economy now run by central banks that have deployed this unorthodox tool to stimulate growth. With stock markets in turmoil and recession fears running high, Federal Reserve officials are being asked if they'll consider going negative should economic conditions deteriorate. Karen Shaw Petrou, co-founder of Federal Financial Analytics, joins the hosts to explain exactly what negative interest-rate policies mean and what dangers -- and benefits -- may come with such an extraordinary step.
Feb 18 2016
30 mins
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Rank #20: Why GDP Is a Dumb Way to Measure Economic Output

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G, a D and a P. Three letters, lots of trouble. Gross Domestic Product is the world's most common way to measure the value of all goods and services produced in an economy. But does it really deserve its pedestal? Lorenzo Fioramonti, a professor at the University of Pretoria, tells Dan and Scott that the acronym should actually stand for "Gross Dumb Product." He argues that it's responsible for all manner of sins, ranging from the pillaging of a South Pacific island to an instrument used by austerity-craven northern Europeans to hammer Greece. Time for a revolution, Fioramonti insists. Just make sure investors don't crucify you.
Apr 12 2017
24 mins
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