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Focus on Diabetes

Updated 5 days ago

Health & Fitness
Medicine
Science
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ReachMD takes an in-depth look at diabetes, a disease identified in nearly 1 in 10 Americans, which upsets the lives of millions more. Even more disturbing, the rates of new cases of diagnosed diabetes have risen almost twofold during the past decade. Nutrition, exercise and genetics are all factors in how the disease affects children, adults and the elderly, but that's only the beginning. How are surgical options changing the way we think about the disease? How close are we to a cure for Type 1 diabetes? Are there treatment lessons we can take from community-based initiatives abroad? Tune in to gain insights for your practice.

Read more

ReachMD takes an in-depth look at diabetes, a disease identified in nearly 1 in 10 Americans, which upsets the lives of millions more. Even more disturbing, the rates of new cases of diagnosed diabetes have risen almost twofold during the past decade. Nutrition, exercise and genetics are all factors in how the disease affects children, adults and the elderly, but that's only the beginning. How are surgical options changing the way we think about the disease? How close are we to a cure for Type 1 diabetes? Are there treatment lessons we can take from community-based initiatives abroad? Tune in to gain insights for your practice.

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iTunes Ratings

4 Ratings
Average Ratings
2
0
1
1
0
Cover image of Focus on Diabetes

Focus on Diabetes

Updated 5 days ago

Read more

ReachMD takes an in-depth look at diabetes, a disease identified in nearly 1 in 10 Americans, which upsets the lives of millions more. Even more disturbing, the rates of new cases of diagnosed diabetes have risen almost twofold during the past decade. Nutrition, exercise and genetics are all factors in how the disease affects children, adults and the elderly, but that's only the beginning. How are surgical options changing the way we think about the disease? How close are we to a cure for Type 1 diabetes? Are there treatment lessons we can take from community-based initiatives abroad? Tune in to gain insights for your practice.

Rank #1: Is a Low-Carb, High-Fat Diet the Key to Diabetic Management?

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Host: Barnett Mennen, MD
Guest: Sarah Hallberg, MD

Carbohydrates are our main source of energy and provide important nutrients for good health. However, they are also the main culprit behind elevated blood sugar and are problematic for diabetic patients trying to control their blood sugar levels.

Host Dr. Barry Mennen sits down with Dr. Sarah Hallberg to talk about carbohydrate restriction as a key to successful weight loss programs. She prescribes that adherence to a low-carb, high-fat diet is vital to patients for controlling their diabetes, with the possibility of being able to come off medications over time.

Dr. Sarah Hallberg is the Medical Director at Virta Health and Founder of the Indiana University-Arnett Health Medical Weight Loss Program in Lafayette, Indiana.

Mar 05 2018

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Rank #2: Hot Topics in Diabetes: What Endocrinologists are Talking About

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Host: Brian P. McDonough, MD, FAAFP

Dr. Brian McDonough welcomes Dr. Tina Thethi, Assistant Professor of Medicine in the section of Endocrinology and Metabolism at Tulane University Health Sciences Center. Dr. Thethi provides the inside scoop on diabetes topics of particular interest to endocrinologists in practice today, from pre-diabetes management to continuous glucose monitoring to novel drug research and development.

Jul 27 2015

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Rank #3: Regeneration of Insulin-Producing Islets in our Patients

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Guest: G. Alexander Fleming, MD
Host: Bruce Bloom, DDS, JD

Researchers are looking at hundreds of ways to treat and cure type one diabetes. Most of the advances so far have come in newly diagnosed children. Is there anything on the horizon to help adults with established type one diabetes? Dr. Alexander (Zan) Fleming, chairman and chief medical officer of Exsulin, joins host Dr. Bruce Bloom to discuss the new therapies for reversing established diabetes.

Nov 02 2010

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Rank #4: FDA Confirms Leg and Foot Amputation Risk with Diabetes Medicine Canagliflozin

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Based on new data from two large clinical trials, the FDA concluded that the type 2 diabetes medicine canagliflozin (brand names Invokana, Invokamet, Invokamet XR) causes an increased risk of leg and foot amputations. The FDA is requiring new warnings, including their most prominent Boxed Warning, be added to the canagliflozin drug labels to describe this risk.

Amputations of the toe and middle of the foot were the most common; however, amputations involving the leg, below and above the knee, also occurred. Some patients had more than one amputation, some involving both limbs.

Report side effects involving canagliflozin and other medicines to the FDA MedWatch program at fda.gov/medwatch.

A link to the full communication detailing specific information for health care professionals and the complete Data Summary can be found at fda.gov/DrugSafetyCommunications. If you have drug questions, contact the FDA at druginfo@fda.hhs.gov.

Released 5/16/2017

May 16 2017

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Rank #5: The Role of the Certified Diabetes Educator: A Team Effort

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Host: John J. Russell, MD
Guest: Candis Morello, PharmD, CDE

Candis M Morello, Professor of Clinical Pharmacy at UC San Diego Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, joins Dr. John Russell to talk about team-based care integrations of certified diabetes educators to help empower diabetes patients and improve long-term outcomes.

Diabetes Discourse, a non-certified educational series, is brought to you by AstraZeneca, pushing the boundaries of science to create life-changing medicines for people with diabetes. Content of this diabetes education is produced and solely controlled by ReachMD. This series is intended for healthcare professionals only.

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Aug 31 2015

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Rank #6: Injectable Medication as an Alternative Treatment for Diabetic Eye Disease

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[Read the Article]

Proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) is a leading cause of vision loss in patients with diabetes, resulting in up to 24,000 cases of blindness each year in the United States. Laser therapy has been the most common treatment used to help reduce severe vision loss, but the procedure has many side effects including permanent loss of peripheral vision and swelling of the retina.

A group of researchers from across the US tested an alternative treatment using an injectable medication called ranibizumab, to see if it would be as effective as the laser therapy. They studied more than 300 patients with PDR, assigning them to either receive standard laser therapy or an injection into the eye. In total, they treated close to 400 eyes.

Outcomes, especially loss of vision, were compared at two years. Over the two year period, researchers found that patients receiving the injections of medication had fewer side effects and did somewhat better in terms of vision loss than those who received laser therapy.

[Watch more videos of The JAMA Report]

Nov 25 2015

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Rank #7: Rates of Obesity and Diabetes Lower in More Walkable Neighborhoods

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[Read the Article]

Despite targeted efforts to reduce obesity through diet and exercise, these rates continue to rise. A new study from Ontario, Canada found that obesity and diabetes rates were lower in more walkable neighborhoods compared to less walkable neighborhoods, where they saw an increase in these rates.

Researchers from St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto studied almost 9,000 neighborhoods in Southern Ontario looking at walkability scores, along with government health data and survey results during a twelve-year period. They examined whether neighborhoods that were more walkable experienced a slower increase in obesity and diabetes compared to less walkable neighborhoods.

[Watch more videos of The JAMA Report]

May 30 2016

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Rank #8: Cardiac Screening for Asymptomatic Patients With Diabetes

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Guest: Steven Wittlin, MD
Host: Lee Freedman, MD

It is often thought that patients with diabetes have more "silent" heart disease than patients without diabetes: Coronary artery disease is a leading cause of death among these patients. But is screening all asymptomatic patients with diabetes for the condition prudent, or should we exercise caution when considering cardiac screening? Dr. Steven Wittlin, associate professor of medicine and clinical director of the endocrine/metabolism division at the University of Rochester in New York, makes screening recommendations based on the recent Detection of Ischemia in Asymptomatic Diabetics (DIAD) study. Dr. Lee Freedman hosts.

Oct 29 2010

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Rank #9: The Rising Diabulimia Epidemic: Safeguarding Diabetic Patients with Eating Disorders

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Host: Brian P. McDonough, MD, FAAFP

Diabulimia, defined as the manipulation of insulin treatments by Type 1 diabetic patients in order to lose weight, is a rising problem among teens and young adults in the U.S, particularly young women. Joining Dr. Brian McDonough to discuss this dual diagnosis phenomenon of diabetes and eating disorders, ways in which they exacerbate other disease processes, the long term consequences, and management priorities for phycisians is author and registered dietitian Susan Weiner. Susan is a recipient of the AADE Diabetes Educator of the Year award and has devoted much of her writing and clinical expertise to addressing diabulimia in at-risk patients.

Dec 19 2016

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Rank #10: Diabetes Research Suggests Better Long Term Outcomes with Early Insulin

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Host: Jennifer Caudle, DO

Host Jennifer Caudel, DO welcomes Jay Shubrook, DO, Director of Clinical Research and Diabetes Services at Touro University-California College of Osteopathic Medicine. Recorded on site at the American Osteopathic Association's annual medical education conference, Dr. Shubrook discusses a pilot study in which newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes patients were treated with early insulin rather than lifestyle changes and oral therapies alone. The results suggested not only good safety profiles, but also better long-term outcomes for patients.

Nov 30 2015

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Rank #11: Biomolecular Advances in Diabetes Prevention

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Guest: Carmella Evans-Molina, MD, PhD
Host: Bruce Bloom, DDS, JD

As the epidemic of type 2 diabetes in the United States grows, researchers are investigating hundreds of ways to treat and cure diabetes. Some of these methods include exogenous insulin, while other ideas being explored require more complex changes in our understanding of cellular biology. Dr. Carmella Evans-Molina, assistant professor at the Indiana University School of Medicine, who holds a faculty appointment in the division of endocrinology, diabetes, and metabolism and the Herman B Wells Center for Pediatric Diabetes Research, joins us to discuss molecular mechanisms of diabetes, and potential methods of prevention related to these mechanisms. Dr. Bruce Bloom hosts.  

Nov 01 2010

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Rank #12: Inhaled Corticosteroids and the Risks of Diabetes Onset and Progression

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Guest: Christopher Slatore, MD
Host: Mary Leuchars, MD

Systemic corticosteroids increase the risk of diabetes, but what about in patients who take high-dose inhaled corticosteroids? How do we best manage the risk-benefit equation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (or COPD)? Dr. Christopher Slatore, assistant professor in the division of pulmonary and critical care medicine, Portland VA Medical Center / Oregon Health and Sciences University, in Portland, Oregon, discusses the association between inhaled corticosteroid use and serum glucose concentration. Dr. Mary Leuchars hosts.

Oct 28 2010

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Rank #13: The Hygiene Hypothesis and Risk of Type 1 Diabetes in Children

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Guest: Carolyn Paris, MD
Host: Mary Leuchars, MD

Improved living conditions and hygiene may be contributing to the rise of type 1 diabetes in children, but does the "hygiene hypothesis" fully explain the onset of type 1 diabetes in this population? What factors might explain the increased incidence of type 1 diabetes among pediatric patients in the US, Sweden and Finland, in particular? Dr. Carolyn Paris, pediatrician and emergency medicine specialist at the Center for Clinical and Translational Research at Seattle Children's Hospital, explores the indirect evidence that examines environmental influences in the development of type 1 diabetes in children. Dr. Mary Leuchars hosts.

Oct 28 2010

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Rank #14: Weighing Metformin's Benefits & Risks in Patients With Renal Insufficiency

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Guest: Hugh Tildesley, MD
Host: Lee Freedman, MD

Metformin is often the first line of therapy for patients with type 2 diabetes: it is relatively inexpensive, available, and has proven efficacy. However, metformin is contraindicated for patients with renal insufficiency, a common comorbidity in diabetes. Do the benefits of metformin outweigh the risks for those with renal insufficiency, or should we use caution when considering metformin for these patients? Dr. Hugh Tildesley, clinical professor in the department of medicine, division of endocrinology at the University of British Columbia at St. Paul's Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, considers the safety of metformin in patients with diabetes. What approach should clinicians use when considering metformin for patients with type 2 diabetes who have some degree of renal impairment? Dr. Lee Freedman hosts.

Oct 26 2010

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Rank #15: The Cost of Diabetes to the Healthcare System

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Guest: Joanna Jiang, MD
Host: Bruce Japsen

The new health reform law will take steps to encourage patients to use preventive tests and screenings to head off chronic conditions, like diabetes, that extract a huge toll on the nation's medical care budget. Exactly how much does diabetes care cost the medical system, and where is the money going? Dr. Joanna Jiang, senior research scientist at the AHRQ (the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality), tells host Bruce Japsen about the origin of hospital costs and its surprising toll on the system.

Oct 20 2010

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