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Rank #31 in Design category

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Visual Arts

About Buildings + Cities

Updated about 1 month ago

Rank #31 in Design category

Arts
Design
Visual Arts
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A podcast about architecture, buildings and cities, from the distant past to the present day. Plus detours into technology, film, fiction, comics, drawings, and the dimly imagined future. With Luke Jones and George Gingell.

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A podcast about architecture, buildings and cities, from the distant past to the present day. Plus detours into technology, film, fiction, comics, drawings, and the dimly imagined future. With Luke Jones and George Gingell.

iTunes Ratings

113 Ratings
Average Ratings
96
13
3
0
1

Great Deep Architecture Talk

By kincaidedward8 - Apr 11 2019
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Probably the least colloquial podcast that I regularly listen to, but in a good way.

Good stories and great insight.

By g symbol - Jan 20 2018
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I really enjoy the podcast. Keep up the good work.

iTunes Ratings

113 Ratings
Average Ratings
96
13
3
0
1

Great Deep Architecture Talk

By kincaidedward8 - Apr 11 2019
Read more
Probably the least colloquial podcast that I regularly listen to, but in a good way.

Good stories and great insight.

By g symbol - Jan 20 2018
Read more
I really enjoy the podcast. Keep up the good work.
Cover image of About Buildings + Cities

About Buildings + Cities

Updated about 1 month ago

Rank #31 in Design category

Read more

A podcast about architecture, buildings and cities, from the distant past to the present day. Plus detours into technology, film, fiction, comics, drawings, and the dimly imagined future. With Luke Jones and George Gingell.

Rank #1: 48 — OMA 1989 — Going Big

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Rem Koolhaas and the firm he founded with three partners in 1975 — Office of Metropolitan Architects, OMA — are fascinating, critical and provocative presence within the architectural culture of the 1970s and 1980s, riding the wave of the crisis of modernist collapse while positioning themselves outside or against all of the main tendencies in the post-modern.

In this episode we’re focussing on a particular, transitional moment, in which the early ‘paper’ projects start to be replaced by real buildings and large scale competition entries, culminating in three fascinating competition entries from 1989 — the Zeebrugge Sea Terminal, Zentrum für Kunst und Medientechnologie (ZKM) and Très Grand Bibliothèque (TBG).

Lee Rosevere ‘Baldachin’ from the album ‘Music for Podcasts 3’ on the Free Music Archive

Edited by Matthew Lloyd Roberts.

Support the show on Patreon to receive bonus content for every show.

Please rate and review the show on your podcast store to help other people find us!

Follow us on twitter // instagram // facebook

We’re on the web at aboutbuildingsandcities.org

This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

Feb 11 2019
1 hour 17 mins
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Rank #2: 03 – How To Run An Efficient Dystopia – Taylorism and Science Fiction Cities

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George & Luke survey three dystopian cities; the glass perfection of Yvegny Zamyatin’s ‘We’, the consumer World State of Aldous Huxley’s ‘Brave New World’, and the shattered ruin of George Orwell’s ‘1984’. Competing visions of technological progress gone awry, and the real-world ideas that inspired them.

We read:
Yvegeny Zamyatin ‘We’ tr. Clarence Brown (Penguin, 1993)
Aldous Huxley ‘Brave New World’ (1932)
George Orwell ‘1984’ (1948)

Music:
‘Shadows’, ‘Fearweaver’, ‘Bindings’ and ‘Demons’ from the album ‘Phantoms’ by Three Chain Links. From the Free Music Archive at freemusicarchive.org

Aug 24 2016
1 hour 34 mins
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Rank #3: 26 – Le Corbusier – 1 – Have Formwork, Will Travel

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We’re taking on the origin story of (for better or worse) the most important architect of the 20th century — Charles-Edouard Jeanneret aka Le Corbusier. His origins — petit bourgeois, Swiss, provincial — can make his eventual rise to world-enveloping notoriety and era-defining influence seem all the more unlikely. We’re digging into his childhood, family, education and travels as a young man before taking on a couple of early projects.

We discuss — 

  • La Chaux de Fonds
  • Charles L’Eplattanier, his teacher
  • Jugendstil & Art Nouveau

Early projects — 

  • Villa Fallet
  • Villas Stotzer & Jacquemet
  • Villa Jeanneret
  • Villa Favre-Jacot

Travels, and meetings with — 

  • Otto Wagner
  • Josef Hoffmann
  • Vienna Secession Building
  • Auguste Perret
  • Rue Franklin Apartments
  • Peter Behrens
  • Mount Athos

And a more detailed look at — 

  • Villa Schwob (including Colin Rowe’s ‘Mannerism and Modern Architecture’)
  • Maison Domino

We've been reading —

  • Nicholas Fox Weber ‘Le Corbusier: A Life’ (2008)
  • Jean-Louis Cohen ‘Le Corbusier: Le Grand’ (2014)
  • Oppositions 15-16 (1980)

Music — 
The final part of Beethoven’s 9th — the Ode to Joy

An excerpt from —  Mahler: Symphony No. 3: iii. Comodo. Scherzando. Ohne Hast from archive.org

Britt Brothers — ‘Alpine Milkman Yodel’ (1933) from archive.org

Thanks for listening!

Follow us on twitter // instagram // facebook

We’re on the web at aboutbuildingsandcities.org

This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

Nov 13 2017
1 hour 10 mins
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Rank #4: 39 — Catastrophe Curves — Early 90s Computer Architecture

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The 1990s were when computers really entered the mainstream of architecture. The rise of personal computing, with wider access to inexpensive machines, the world wide web, advances in software and hardware, all took place against the background of global political transformation that at the time was theorised as the End of History, the breakup of the Soviet Union, democratisation, and the apparent rise of a single, global, liberal capitalist world order.

But the exploration of CAD, rendering, generative design and CNC manufacture would all be theorised through a pre-existing set of ideas and agendas, drawing heavily on ‘French theory’ — Derrida, (and particularly) Deleuze — and a partially pre-digested blend of complexity mathematics. We find ourselves — among the blobs, deformed surfaces, landscapes and evolutionary forms — in a world of ‘affective singularities’, ‘the Fold’, pliancy, Catastrophe Theory…

We talk technology, key actors, and attempt a glossary of key concepts…

Under discussion — 
— Frank Gehry’s fish sculpture
— Revit / BIM
— The F117 and B2 defense projects
— Peter Eisenman
— John Frazer
— MIT Computer Lab
— the Bilbao Guggenheim
— Cardiff opera house
— Yokohama ferry terminal
— NOX’s Freshwater and Saltwater pavilions
— The Affective
— Catastrophe Theory
— D’Arcy Thompson
— The Fold
— Singularity
— Max Reinhardt Haus
— Phallogocentrism & Helene Cixous

Recordings are from Peter Eisenman’s Lecture ‘Architecture in the Age of Electronic Media’ (1993) (AA archive)[https://www.aaschool.ac.uk//VIDEO/lecture.php?ID=737]

Music —
Lee Rosevere ‘Quizitive’
Lee Rosevere ‘Curiosity’
Lee Rosevere ‘Thoughtful’ all from (Free Music Archive)[freemusicarchive.org]

Clips of —  Awesome 3 ‘Don’t Go’ (1992)
Liquid ‘Sweet Harmony’ (1992)
2 Bad Mice ‘Bombscare’ (1992)
M.A.N.I.C ‘I’m Coming Hardcore’ (Original Mix) (1991)

*Support the show on Patreon to receive bonus content for every show. *

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We’re on the web at aboutbuildingsandcities.org

This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

Jul 17 2018
1 hour 31 mins
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Rank #5: 18 – Junkspace – Rem Koolhaas & the End of Architecture

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A fuzzy empire of blur, a low grade purgatory, a perpetual Jacuzzi with millions of your best friends…

We're discussing Junkspace (2001), Rem Koolhaas's notoriously elliptical wander through the dystopian and formless morass of early 21st retail architecture that seems gradually to be devouring the city, and the world.

In keeping with the essay, the episode is radically unstructured, only barely makes sense, and is held together largely by hyperbole.

We discussed –
– Rem Koolhaas and OMA
– The books SMLXL and Delirious New York
Exodus: The Voluntary Prisoners of Architecture
– Frederic Jameson's review of Junkspace in NLR 21 (2003)
– Jameson's Postmodernism, Or the Cultural Logic of Late Capitalism (1991)
– Walter Benajmin's Passagenwerk or Arcades Project

Music –
'Ruca' and 'Agnes' from the album 'Teal' by Rod Hamilton
and 'Curiosity', 'Quisitive' and 'Biking in the Park' from the album 'Music for Podcasts' by Lee Rosevere; both from the Free Music Archive
Blue Gas 'Shadows From Nowhere' (1984)

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Apr 17 2017
1 hour 3 mins
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Rank #6: 42 — John Ruskin — Rock Lover

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John Ruskin’s ‘Stones of Venice’ is one of the monuments of architectural theory in the 19th century. But it’s a hard book to get through, or to get inside. It’s incredibly long, and animated by a kind of moralistic passion that feels a little alien, at best quaint, or childish. Part of the reason is that Ruskin was a Victorian — indeed, one of the great formers of Victorian taste.

We were planning to talk about the first part of the book, but in the end we just spent the whole episode trying to get to grips with what that means. Why was he like this?

We’ll read the first two parts in the next episode. Thanks for being patient!

As usual we got a couple of things wrong — Little Nell is actually in ‘The Old Curiosity Shop’. Also the number of volumes of ‘modern painters’ isn’t five — there are 7, actually — though often sold as five volumes.

Music — 
Tita Ruffo ‘Visione Veneziana’

Audio includes — the following site recordings from the Radio Aporee project on archive.org
Ksamil, Albanie - Midnight waves / by François-Emmanuel Fodéré (link)[https://archive.org/details/aporee2534929390]
17590 Ars-en-Ré, France - Waves wheeling / by Vincent Duseigne (link)[https://archive.org/details/aporee4030746036]
river Drava, Loka - dry grass, river flow, stones / by OR poiesis (link)[https://archive.org/details/aporee2505729057]
larnichtsberg, swallows, crows and insects / by Frank Schulte (link)[https://archive.org/details/aporee1154413596]
Venice, Italy - fish market / by Carlos Santos (link)[https://archive.org/details/aporee1646119081]
12230 Nant, France - Nant bells / by Vincent Duseigne (link)[https://archive.org/details/aporee3222937026]
Ksamil, Ksamil island, District de Sarandë, Albanie - Waves and waves / by François-Emmanuel Fodéré (link)[https://archive.org/details/aporee3014034668]
Bruges, Belgique - Brugge bells / by Vincent Duseigne (link)[https://archive.org/details/aporee3179836523]

Support the show on Patreon to receive bonus content for every show.

Please rate and review the show on your podcast store to help other people find us!

Follow us on twitter // instagram // facebook

We’re on the web at aboutbuildingsandcities.org

This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

Sep 30 2018
1 hour 20 mins
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Rank #7: 46 — Robert Venturi's 'Complexity & Contradiction' — Valid Banalities

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For the first AB+C of 2019 we’re tackling one of the seminal texts of the 1960s, and an iconic moment in the stylistic overthrow of the postwar modernist order — Robert Venturi’s ‘Complexity and Contradiction in Architecture’ (1966). It’s a slim, lavishly illustrated volume, which seems lucid and straightforward, but upon closer reading turns out to be much more elusive. What are complexity and contradiction, where are they found, and what are architects supposed to do with them?

On the bonus we’ll be discussing the early projects of Venturi and Rauch.

This episode is sponsored by The Great Courses Plus — a streaming learning service with video lectures by experts in all sorts of fields. Go to thegreatcoursesplus.com/BUILDINGS to get a month of free access to thousands of courses.

Edited by Matthew Lloyd Roberts.

Support the show on Patreon to receive bonus content for every show.

Please rate and review the show on your podcast store to help other people find us!

Follow us on twitter // instagram // facebook

We’re on the web at aboutbuildingsandcities.org

This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

Jan 14 2019
1 hour 55 mins
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Rank #8: 06 – Tate Modern – Herzog & de Meuron Before and After

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Luke & George visit and discuss Switch House, the new extension to Tate Modern – and the architects of both it, and the original museum, Herzog & de Meuron. Plus – thoughts on the machine tool utopia also known as Switerland, design process, and the centrality of the spreadsheet in modern architecture.

Music:
‘Holy Roller’ from the album ‘Shangri-La (Instrumentals)’ by YACHT. From the Free Music Archive at freemusicarchive.org

Look at pictures on our Google+ page:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/104384327113725304822

Sep 19 2016
1 hour 14 mins
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Rank #9: 04 – Barbican Estate – Establishment Brutalism

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Exploring the history and architecture of the inimitable Barbican Estate, the joys of brutalism, concrete, late modernist planning, concealed historical references, getting lost, etc. Includes a couple of short forays into the imagined lives of inhabitants and visitors...

Music includes:
‘Β6’ from the album ‘ΝΕΑ ΕΛΛΗΝΙΚΑ ΚΟΚΚΑΛΑ’ by Kοκκαλα and ‘Heavy Traffic’ from the album ‘The Happiest Days Of Our Lives’ by Three Chain Links. Both from the Free Music Archive at freemusicarchive.org

Look at pictures on our Google+ page:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/104384327113725304822

Aug 29 2016
1 hour 2 mins
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Rank #10: 13 – Ayn Rand's 'The Fountainhead' – 1 of 2

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This isn't one of those book reviews where you're expected to read the book first – we did it so you don't have to.

Ayn Rand's 'The Fountainhead' is a 750 page long novel which at times is physically painful to read. It's a supposedly 'philosophical' book in which none of the motivations and actions of the characters make any sense. People have long conversations which are nearly impossible to follow. Rand maunders on about apparently random bits of mise-en-scene for pages. Even if you were going to live for a thousand years, it would still be an outrageous misuse of your time.

In spite of this, it's probably the most successful and influential depiction of an architect in fiction – the indominatable will of one (orange haired) man, Howard Roark, pitted against the entire resources of a corrupt and servile society, determined to try and make him care about other people's well-being.

Millions of people have read (and claimed to enjoy!) it.

We've had a moderately good time making fun of it.

Expect bad language and worse politics throughout.

Features music by Chris Zabriskie –
'Heliograph' from the album 'Divider', 'The Dark Glow of the Mountains', 'I need to start writing things down' and 'We always thought the future would be kind of fun' from the album 'The Dark Glow of Mountains' and 'Cylinder 3' from the album 'Cylinders'. All at the Free Music Archive

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Jan 30 2017
56 mins
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Rank #11: 40 — '2001 – A Space Odyssey' 1/2 — Pink Upholstery in Cartesian Space

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Stanley Kubrick’s 1968 film 2001 a space odyssey is the iconic depiction of space travel, channeling the optimism and excitement of radical advances in space exploration and technology. It’s an uncompromising, utterly singular film, whose vision of a possible future is carried through comprehensively. Its scope and ambition are still basically unequalled. Kubrick is famous for the obsessiveness of his research — in this case bringing in expertise from leading scientists, cutting edge digital pioneers, animators, makers of special effects. As a result, 2001 seems to capture the imagination of a very particular era of technological optimism in the mid 1960s in America and worldwide.

We talk about the film, its amazing worlds and interiors, the Worlds Fairs in Seattle and New York which were a proving ground for many of those involved, as well as passing references to — Chris Marker’s La Jetee
— Charles and Ray Eames
— Xerox PARC
— Superstudio

Support the show on Patreon to receive bonus content for every show. On this episode's bonus — we're talking Osaka Expo and Space habitats.

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We’re on the web at aboutbuildingsandcities.org

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Aug 02 2018
1 hour 8 mins
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Rank #12: 49 — 19th c. Machine Utopias 1/2 — Darwin Among the Machines

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We start a two-part discussion of the utopias and dystopias of the late 19th century 'machine age,' when new technology seemed to be remaking the world, and society along with it.

What sort of world would the machines bring? In this episode we discuss Samuel Butler's novel 'Erewhon' and the extraordinary speculation on machine life that it contains. We also talk about Edward Bulwer-Lytton's 'Vril' — to which it was initally (erroneously) thought to be a sequel — and Nikolai Chernyshevsky's 'What is to be done'.

Music — Chris Zabriskie 'Is that you or are you you?' from the Free Music Archive.

Edited by Matthew Lloyd Roberts.

Support the show on Patreon to receive bonus content for every show.

Please rate and review the show on your podcast store to help other people find us!

Follow us on twitter // instagram // facebook

We’re on the web at aboutbuildingsandcities.org

This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

Feb 26 2019
1 hour 12 mins
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Rank #13: 47 — Venturi Scott-Brown & Learning From Las Vegas

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We continue our discussion of the theoretical works of Robert Venturi with this episode on ‘Learning from Las Vegas — The Forgotten Symbolism of Architectural Form’ — researched and written with Denise Scott-Brown and Steven Izenour, and published in 1972.

The book, which examines the architecture of the Vegas strip, is the origin of the famous ‘Duck vs Decorated Shed’ comparison, and contains a lot else besides, including denunciations of the cult of Space, praise for the ‘ugly and ordinary,’ a certain amount of ostentatiously-wielded erudition, and so on.

Music:
Al Smith 'Road House' https://archive.org/details/78road-houseal-smith-a-smith-c-carter_gbia0054635a

This episode is sponsored by The Great Courses Plus — a streaming learning service with video lectures by experts in all sorts of fields. Go to thegreatcoursesplus.com/BUILDINGS to get a month of free access to thousands of courses.

Edited by Matthew Lloyd Roberts.

Support the show on Patreon to receive bonus content for every show.

Please rate and review the show on your podcast store to help other people find us!

Follow us on twitter // instagram // facebook

We’re on the web at aboutbuildingsandcities.org

This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

Jan 28 2019
1 hour 30 mins
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Rank #14: 07 – The Glass Paradise – 1 of 3 – Coloured Glass Destroys Hatred!

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We begin a three-part exploration of the Glass Paradise – an early 20th vision of a better world – starting off with Bruno Taut’s extraordinary Glashaus (1914), and the even stranger text which inspired it, Paul Scheerbart’s ‘Glassarchitektur’. Conceived as a model for a new and more beautiful way of living – the Glashaus is a glimpse at a future that never came to pass, filled with jewel-like cites and kaleidoscopic colour. Also, vacuum cleaners as insect exterminators, spinning crystal globes at every door, gold-leafed factories, glass fibre soft furnishings, and the ever-present threat of zeppelin attack.

Much of our material is drawn from the excellent ’Glass! Love!! Perpetual Motion!!! A Paul Scheerbart Reader’ by Josiah McElheny & Christine Burgin (eds) (University of Chicago, 2015) – highly recommended.

Music by –
Albert Campbell & Irving Gillette ‘By the dear old River Rhine’ (1911) at https://archive.org/details/edba-2410
Arthur F. Collins, Byron G. Harlan ‘On the banks of the Rhine with a Stein’ (1905) https://archive.org/details/edgm-9124
‘Ice Chimes’ from the album ‘Disquiet Junto’ by Lee Rosevere at http://freemusicarchive.org/music/LeeRosevere/DisquietJunto
‘Tarnished Copper’ from the album ‘Marimba, Vibraphone, Chimes & Bells’ by Podington Bear at http://freemusicarchive.org/music/PodingtonBear/MarimbaVibraphoneChimes_Bells

Look at pictures on our Google+ page:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/104384327113725304822

Sep 27 2016
1 hour 4 mins
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Rank #15: 10 – Aldo Rossi's 'The Architecture of the City' – Interrupted Destiny

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A valiant attempt to understand Aldo Rossi's 1966 'L'Architettura della Citta', a book which both Luke & George have owned for years, but which neither have actually read until now (the pictures are nice, and the spine is an attractive orange colour).

Aldo Rossi's celebrity began with this book, and a certain mythic image of him – gloomy, nostalgic, perverse – is widely recognised within architectural history. But what does the book actually say? We explore monuments, urban artifacts, fragments of the city, the persistence of time and memory; and the promise of a new 'science' of urban analysis.

Music – 'Sleep Trance' and 'Ciro' both by Lee Rosevere from the albums 'Time-Lapse Volume 3: ASMR' and 'Farrago Zabriskie'...
at the Free Music Archive http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Lee_Rosevere/

Look at pictures on our Google+ page:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/104384327113725304822

Dec 06 2016
1 hour
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Rank #16: 30 – Franz Kafka's America

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Franz Kafka’s first, and least-finished, novel is an imaginary journey around the USA (a country he never visited). Written in 1912, it’s a fantasy of America at a time when seemed, to Europeans at least, to be the most futuristic (and mysterious) place on Earth.

Kafka’s fascination with machinery, technology and engineering is on display in ‘Amerika’, in which the young Karl Rossmann finds himself cut adrift in a land of glass elevators, miles-long traffic jams, endless hotels, filled with delirious extremes of luxury, poverty and inventiveness.

The edition we read is the current Penguin translation by Michael Hoffman.

We made brief reference to Joseph Roth, and to Neuromancer’s ‘Villa Straylight’.

Thanks for listening and Happy New Year!

Music:

  • David Rose and his Orchestra / Anton Dvorak ‘Humoresque’ (1946) archive.org
  • Felix Arndt / Anton Dvorak ‘Humoresque’ (1917) at archive.org
  • Dvorak, Casals, Szell, Czech Philharmonic Orchestra ‘Cello Concerto’ I / II (1937) archive.org
  • Dvorak, Szell, Cleveland Orchestra ’Slavonic Dances’ 2, 4 & 5 (1947) archive.org
  • Efrem Zimbalist; Sam Chotzinoff; Zimbalist ‘Hebrew Melody and Dance’ (1912) archive.org
  • Riccardo Martin; Dvorak; Victor Orchestra ‘Als die alte Mutter’ (1910) archive.org
  • Ukrainska Orchestra Pawla Humeniuka ‘Kozak-Trepak’ from the Free Music Archive
  • Jack Perry & the Light Crust Doughboys ‘Oklahoma Waltz’ (1947) youtube

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We’re on the web at aboutbuildingsandcities.org

This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

Jan 14 2018
1 hour 13 mins
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Rank #17: 22 – Chicago Tribune – 1 of 2 – World's Most Beautiful Office Building

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In 1922, to coincide with its 75th birthday, the Chicago Tribune set out to endow the city with ‘the world’s most beautiful office building’. The results of the design competition have been seen in retrospect less as ‘the ultimate in civic expression’ than as an expression of aesthetic and theoretical crisis within architecture. Hugely varied, bizarre, ingenious and occasionally grotesque, the entries provide a window into a discipline in transformation, as well as into the politics of a new American metropolis.

Apologies for some slight issues with the sound.

A book showing all the competition entries has been uploaded to Monoskop — if you download it you will be able to see what we’re talking about…
https://monoskop.org/File:TribuneTowerCompetitionvol1_1980.pdf

We discuss the entries by John Mead Howells & Raymond Hood (plate 1)
Eliel Saarinen (13)
Holabird & Roche (20)
John Wynkoop (90)
Ross & Sloan (84)
Hornbostel & Wood (91)
Daniel Burnham (44)
Jarvis Hunt (118)
William Drummond (134)
Sjostrom & Eklund (190)

Music includes —
Arthur Fields ‘How Ya Gonna Keep Em Down on the Farm After They’ve Seen Paree?’
Jockers Dance Orchestra ‘The Royal Vagabond’
The Columbians ‘Just Like a Rainbow’
Victor Dance Orchestra ‘The Great One Step’
…all from the Free Music Archive and first heard on the excellent Antique Phonograph Music Program

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Aug 10 2017
1 hour 2 mins
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Rank #18: 15 – Michelangelo – 1 of 3 – David and the Sistene & Medici Chapels

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The first of a three-parter in which we try to understand the work, and myth, of Michelangelo Buonarroti, referred to by followers as ‘the Divine’, and genuinely described by his biographer as a messenger sent from God to stop people from doing bad art.

It’s a long recording and we may have spent a bit too long talking about the ‘New Sacristy’ in Florence. But the 15 minute, rhapsodic description of David’s perfect body?

We regret it Not At All.

Some slightly excessive chat about a particular part of David's body but otherwise extremely wholesome.

Music –
GF Handel’s ‘Unto us a son is born’
‘Kyrie Chant’ from Cantores in Ecclesia on archive.org https://archive.org/details/CantoresInEcclesia/05Track5.wma

Outro:
Kano ‘I Need Love’ (Full Time / Zig Zag, 1983)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7AypT-SaUJE

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Mar 06 2017
1 hour 26 mins
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Rank #19: 33 — Le Corbusier — 7 — Early Mass Housing

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In this episode we explore in two early schemes for mass housing, at Pessac and in Stuttgart.

Among many other things, we talked about —

  • Bourneville
  • New Lanark
    - Arnold circus
    - Bruno taut’s horseshoe estate
    - Pessac
    - Henri Frugès
    - The Weissenhofseidlung
    - Margarete Schutte-Lihotsky
    - Hannes Meyer’s essay ‘The New World’

Music & Interlude — - Harry Ross ‘Get Me an Apartment - Part 1’ from archive.org

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Mar 25 2018
1 hour
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Rank #20: 34 — Adolf Loos's 'Ornament and Crime' — Bathroom Kink

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Adolf Loos’s essay ‘Ornament and Crime’ (1910) is considered the classic modernist polemic against the frills and folderols of the established arts of the day.

We're in the city of Freud — and the neurotic subtext is very close to the surface.

We discuss a little of Loos’s career as an architectural iconoclast, jersey fanatic, and pervert :-/

Then we go on to a more freeform discussion of ornament in the contemporary, during which we massively contradict ourselves several times.

We discussed — 

  • Freud Nietzsche Hegel Darwin
  • Louis Sullivan
  • Mrs Beeton
  • English Free Building — Hermann Muthesius
  • Peter Behrens
  • Karl Friedrich Schinkel
  • Joseph Maria Olbrich
  • Henry van der Velde
  • Joseph Hoffmann
  • Josephine Baker’s 'Banana Dance'
  • The black granite bathroom at Villa Karma
  • (On the subject of reprehensible characters) Albert Speer

Contemporary ornamenters — 

  • Caruso St John
  • Farshid Moussavi & her book on facades

Music — 

  • Victor Sylvester and his Ballroom Orchestra ‘Vienna, City of my Dreams’
  • The Three Suns ‘Alt Wien’ (1949)
  • Philharmonic Orchestra Berlin ‘Von Wien durch die Welt'
  • Oldbrig's zither trio ‘Wien bliebt Wien’
    All from archive.org

Follow us on twitter // instagram // facebook

We’re on the web at aboutbuildingsandcities.org

This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

Apr 10 2018
1 hour 5 mins
Play

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