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Arts
Literature

London Review Bookshop Podcasts

Updated 12 days ago

Arts
Literature
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Twice a week or so, the London Review Bookshop becomes a miniature auditorium in which authors talk about and read from their work, meet their readers and engage in lively debate about the burning topics of the day. Fortunately, for those of you who weren't able to make it to one of our talks, were able to make it but couldn't get a ticket, or did in fact make it but weren't paying attention and want to listen again, we make a recording of everything that happens. So now you can hear Alan Bennett, Hilary Mantel, Iain Sinclair, Jarvis Cocker, Jenny Diski, Patti Smith (yes, she sings) and many, many more, wherever, and whenever you like.

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Twice a week or so, the London Review Bookshop becomes a miniature auditorium in which authors talk about and read from their work, meet their readers and engage in lively debate about the burning topics of the day. Fortunately, for those of you who weren't able to make it to one of our talks, were able to make it but couldn't get a ticket, or did in fact make it but weren't paying attention and want to listen again, we make a recording of everything that happens. So now you can hear Alan Bennett, Hilary Mantel, Iain Sinclair, Jarvis Cocker, Jenny Diski, Patti Smith (yes, she sings) and many, many more, wherever, and whenever you like.

iTunes Ratings

30 Ratings
Average Ratings
16
8
1
1
4

iTunes Ratings

30 Ratings
Average Ratings
16
8
1
1
4
Cover image of London Review Bookshop Podcasts

London Review Bookshop Podcasts

Updated 12 days ago

Read more

Twice a week or so, the London Review Bookshop becomes a miniature auditorium in which authors talk about and read from their work, meet their readers and engage in lively debate about the burning topics of the day. Fortunately, for those of you who weren't able to make it to one of our talks, were able to make it but couldn't get a ticket, or did in fact make it but weren't paying attention and want to listen again, we make a recording of everything that happens. So now you can hear Alan Bennett, Hilary Mantel, Iain Sinclair, Jarvis Cocker, Jenny Diski, Patti Smith (yes, she sings) and many, many more, wherever, and whenever you like.

Rank #1: Motherhood: Sheila Heti and Sally Rooney

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Sheila Heti’s latest novel Motherhood (Harvill Secker) confronts, in the characteristic fiction cum essay style which she pioneered in How Should a Person Be? one of the fundamental dilemmas of early womanhood – to have children or not. She read from her work and discussed it with Sally Rooney, bestselling author of Conversations with Friends (Faber).
Jun 11 2018
48 mins
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Rank #2: Richard Powers and Benjamin Markovits: The Overstory

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Richard Powers, one of America’s greatest novelists, often compared to Pynchon and Roth, read from and talked about his twelfth novel ‘The Overstory’ (Heinemann). Powers has always been remarkable for the seriousness with which he takes science and nature and their intersections with literature, and in ‘The Overstory’, which stretches in time and place from antebellum New York to the Pacific North West timber wars in the late 20th century, he provides us with an arboreal equivalent to Moby Dick, and a book that will permanently change – and for the better – the way you view the world around you. Powers was in conversation with the novelist Benjamin Markovits.
Oct 09 2018
52 mins
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Rank #3: After Kathy Acker: Chris Kraus and Juliet Jacques

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Twenty years after Kathy Acker's untimely death, Chris Kraus has provided the first full biography of the avant-garde artist, writer and counter-cultural heroine. Sheila Heti writes of After Kathy Acker (Allen Lane) 'This is a gossipy, anti-mythic artist biography which feels like it's being told in one long rush of a monologue over late-night drinks by someone who was there.' On the 25th September, Chris Kraus, the author of amongst many other books I Love Dick ('the most important book about men and women written in the last century.' according to Emily Gould in the Guardian) was joined in conversation about Acker by writer Juliet Jacques, the author of Trans: A Memoir (Verso).
Oct 31 2017
1 hour 6 mins
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Rank #4: Mathias Enard and Elif Shafak: Tell Them of Battles, Kings and Elephants

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Man Booker International-shortlisted novelist Mathias Enard, 'the most brazenly lapel-grabbing French author since Michel Houellebecq', returns with Tell Them of Battles, Kings and Elephants (tr. Charlotte Mandell), his fourth novel to appear in English after Zone, Street of Thieves and Compass. In 1506, Michelangelo – a young but already renowned sculptor – is invited by the sultan of Constantinople to design a bridge over the Golden Horn. Michelangelo, after some hesitation, flees Rome and an irritated Pope Julius II – whose commission he leaves unfinished – and arrives in Constantinople. Constructed from real historical fragments, Tell Them of Battles, Kings, and Elephants is a thrilling novella about why stories are told, why bridges are built, and how seemingly unmatched pieces, seen from the opposite sides of civilization, can mirror one another. Enard was in conversation with Elif Shafak.
Jan 09 2019
56 mins
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Rank #5: For the Good Times: David Keenan and Bill Drummond

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David Keenan’s For the Good Times (Faber), set in Belfast during The Troubles, pursues four friends battling for an identity in a neighbourhood harangued by violence and religious intensity. The book highlights the complexity of believing in a cause whilst indulging in the spoils of amoral days. Keenan’s second novel is an urgent and experimental follow up to This is Memorial Device (Faber). Keenan was in conversation with artist and musician, Bill Drummond.
Jul 23 2019
1 hour 14 mins
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Rank #6: On Fairy Tales: Carol Mavor and Marina Warner

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Carol Mavor, Professor of Art History and Visual Culture at the University of Manchester, reflects in her latest book Aurelia (Reaktion) on the very particular place that fairy tales hold in our culture and in the popular imagination. 'Aurelia is as strange, enigmatic, and full of magic as its subjects' writes the essayist Maggie Nelson. Mavor was in conversation with cultural critic, mythographer and historian of the folk tale Marina Warner.
Jan 30 2018
58 mins
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Rank #7: Seven Types of Atheism: John Gray and Adam Phillips

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For a generation now, public debate has been corroded by a narrow derision of religion in the name of an often very vaguely understood 'science'. In *Seven Types of Atheism* (Allen Lane) John Gray describes the rich, complex world of the atheist tradition, a tradition which he sees as in many ways as rich as that of religion itself, as well as being deeply intertwined with what is so often crudely viewed as its 'opposite'. Gray was in conversation with author and essayist Adam Phillips.
Sep 17 2018
1 hour 5 mins
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Rank #8: Winter: Ali Smith and Olivia Laing

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Following her Man Booker shortlisted Autumn, Ali Smith was at the shop to present its sequel Winter, (Hamish Hamilton), the second in a quartet of novels reflecting and embedded in the shifting seasons. A book full of truths for the post-truth era, Winter confronts and contrasts this bleakest of seasons with the evergreen qualities of love, memory, art and laughter. Smith was in conversation with Olivia Laing, writer and critic, and author of, most recently, The Lonely City (Canongate).
Nov 13 2017
49 mins
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Rank #9: Mothers: Jacqueline Rose and Devorah Baum

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‘I think to be a mother for five minutes is to know that the world is unjust, and that our hearts are impure.’ In her latest book Mothers: An Essay on Love and Cruelty (Faber) Jacqueline Rose, co-director of the Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities, regular LRB contributor and prominent cultural and literary theorist, investigates the question of what we ask of mothers, and what we hold them responsible for, often against all sense of reason. Drawing on literature, newspaper reports and psychoanalysis, Rose uncovers how our expectations of what mothers can and should do are damaging both to women, and the world. She was in conversation about her ideas with Devorah Baum, lecturer in English Literature and Critical Theory at the University of Southampton and author of Feeling Jewish and The Jewish Joke.
May 07 2018
58 mins
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Rank #10: Peter Carey on ‘A Long Way from Home’

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To celebrate the publication of the London Review Bookshop's beautiful limited edition of Peter Carey’s new novel 'A Long Way From Home', LRB publisher Nicholas Spice spoke to Carey about his deep family connections with cars, maps and stories, the question of race in Australia, and how all these things come together in the new work.
Jan 19 2018
28 mins
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Rank #11: Notes to Self: Emilie Pine and Katherine Angel

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First published by Irish independent Tramp Press, Emilie Pine’s Notes to Self became a phenomenal word-of-mouth bestseller. Now picked up on this side of the water by Hamish Hamilton, Pine’s debut collection of autobiographical essays is a poignant, radically honest and fiercely intelligent account of the pains and joys of living as a woman in the 21st Century. She was in conversation with Katherine Angel, author of Unmastered: A Book on Desire, Most Difficult to Tell.
Feb 06 2019
1 hour 3 mins
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Rank #12: TJ Clark and Jeremy Harding: Heaven on Earth

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What is it about the particularities of painting that has allowed artists to explore, in a variety of ways and with a sometimes surprising degree of freedom, the vexed relations between the mundane and the celestial? In his latest book Heaven on Earth (Thames and Hudson) art historian T.J. Clark draws on examples from Giotto to Picasso to provide an exciting new history of the depiction of the divine. Professor Clark will be in conversation with LRB contributing editor Jeremy Harding.
Nov 21 2018
1 hour 6 mins
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Rank #13: On Exile: Richard Sennett and Sewell Chan

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Professor Richard Sennett has spent an intellectual lifetime exploring how humans live in cities. In this pair of essays Richard Sennett explores displacement in the metropolis through two vibrant historical moments: mid-nineteenth-century Paris, with its community of political exiles, a place where ‘you look in the mirror and see someone who is not yourself’; and Renaissance Venice, where state-imposed restrictions on ‘outsider’ groups – including prostitutes as well as Jews – had some surprising cultural consequences. Richard Sennett discussed these ideas with Sewell Chan, international news editor at the New York Times.
Dec 26 2017
1 hour 7 mins
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Rank #14: Writers on Recordings: Nicola Barker on T.S. Eliot

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Nicola Barker discusses T.S. Eliot, with reference to his appearances at New York’s 92nd Street Y, with the 92Y’s Reading Series producer Bernard Schwartz. The 92Y has been a home to the voices of literature for 80 years, hosting in its famed Reading Series the greatest literary artists of the 20th century and recording for posterity their appearances as part of its vast audio archive. The ‘Writers on Recordings’ event series invites contemporary authors to discuss the legendary voices that have meant the most to them. Each conversation features rare archival recordings and is led by Bernard Schwartz, who produces 92Y's Reading Series as director of its Unterberg Poetry Center. The series is produced in collaboration with the 92nd Street Y and Queen Mary University of London.
Jun 26 2019
1 hour 19 mins
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Rank #15: In Therapy: Susie Orbach and Lisa Appignanesi

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To celebrate the publication of In Therapy: The Unfolding Story (Profile/Wellcome Collection), Susie Orbach was in conversation with Lisa Appignanesi. In this new updated edition, Orbach, who The New York Times called the 'most famous psychotherapist to have set up couch in Britain since Sigmund Freud' explores what goes on in the process of therapy through a series of dramatized case studies.
Feb 13 2018
50 mins
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Rank #16: Crudo: Olivia Laing and Ali Smith

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From a Tuscan hotel for the super-rich to a Brexit-paralysed UK, Kathy spends the first summer of her 40s trying to adjust to making a lifelong commitment just as Trump is tweeting the world into nuclear war. But it’s not only Kathy who’s changing. Political, social and natural landscapes are all in peril. Fascism is on the rise, truth is dead, the planet is hotting up. Is it really worth learning to love when the end of the world is nigh? And how do you make art, let alone a life, when one rogue tweet could end it all? Crudo, the first novel from Olivia Laing, author of three critically acclaimed works of non-fiction, charts in real time what it was like to live and love in the horrifying summer of 2017, from the perspective of a commitment-phobic peripatetic artist who may or may not be Kathy Acker. Laing was in conversation with Ali Smith.
Jul 02 2018
51 mins
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Rank #17: Dreams of Leaving and Remaining: James Meek and Chris Bickerton

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In Dreams of Leaving and Remaining (Verso), novelist, journalist, essayist and contributing editor to the LRB James Meek anatomises the fractured body of our nation as it approaches one of the most momentous junctures in its post-war history. In a series of frontline reports and interviews from every corner of the island, he talks to remainers, leavers, undecideds and don’t-cares. He was in conversation about his discoveries with Chris Bickerton, Reader in Modern European Politics at the University of Cambridge.
Mar 13 2019
1 hour 11 mins
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Rank #18: Late in the Day: Tessa Hadley and Alex Clark

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Tessa Hadley's new novel Late in the Day (Jonathan Cape) addresses loss, friendship and lives unmoored. Hilary Mantel says, ‘The lives of two close-knit couples are irrevocably changed by an untimely death in the latest novel from Tessa Hadley, the acclaimed novelist and short story master who ‘recruits admirers with every book’.' Hadley was in conversation with Alex Clark of the Guardian.
Mar 20 2019
1 hour 4 mins
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Rank #19: Promise of a Dream: Sheila Rowbotham and Lynne Segal

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Sheila Rowbotham’s many books, in history, politics, feminist theory and biography, have established her firmly at the forefront of both the women’s movement and of libertarian socialism. Perhaps the most personal of them though is Promise of a Dream, first published by Penguin in 2000 and now available again in a new edition from Verso. Frank, beautifully written, funny and moving, it is a coming of age story that takes us from Leeds to Oxford via the Sorbonne, and a stirring account of awakening political consciousness during the 1960s. Professor Rowbotham read from her work, and was in conversation with Lynne Segal, Professor of Psychology and Gender Studies at Birkbeck College and author, most recently, of Radical Happiness and Making Trouble.
Aug 06 2019
1 hour 7 mins
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Rank #20: An Evening with James Wood

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Over six winter days in upstate New York the Querry family, its members variously afflicted by painful divorce, bereavement and depression, wrestle with life’s fundamental questions. Why do some people find living so much harder than others? Is happiness a skill that can be learned, or a lucky accident of birth? Is reflection helpful to happiness or an obstacle to it? Profoundly moving and quietly humorous, Wood’s second novel is, as Rebecca Adams wrote in the Financial Times, ‘stubbornly true to life.’ Wood read from Upstate (Cape), and discussed it with the audience.
Jul 23 2018
54 mins
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