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Rank #192 in Books category

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Books

London Review Bookshop Podcasts

Updated 2 days ago

Rank #192 in Books category

Arts
Books
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Twice a week or so, the London Review Bookshop becomes a miniature auditorium in which authors talk about and read from their work, meet their readers and engage in lively debate about the burning topics of the day. Fortunately, for those of you who weren't able to make it to one of our talks, were able to make it but couldn't get a ticket, or did in fact make it but weren't paying attention and want to listen again, we make a recording of everything that happens. So now you can hear Alan Bennett, Hilary Mantel, Iain Sinclair, Jarvis Cocker, Jenny Diski, Patti Smith (yes, she sings) and many, many more, wherever, and whenever you like.

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Twice a week or so, the London Review Bookshop becomes a miniature auditorium in which authors talk about and read from their work, meet their readers and engage in lively debate about the burning topics of the day. Fortunately, for those of you who weren't able to make it to one of our talks, were able to make it but couldn't get a ticket, or did in fact make it but weren't paying attention and want to listen again, we make a recording of everything that happens. So now you can hear Alan Bennett, Hilary Mantel, Iain Sinclair, Jarvis Cocker, Jenny Diski, Patti Smith (yes, she sings) and many, many more, wherever, and whenever you like.

iTunes Ratings

37 Ratings
Average Ratings
20
9
1
1
6

Hit hit miss

By colineverest - Oct 26 2019
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This is pretty great but when it’s bad woah!

iTunes Ratings

37 Ratings
Average Ratings
20
9
1
1
6

Hit hit miss

By colineverest - Oct 26 2019
Read more
This is pretty great but when it’s bad woah!
Cover image of London Review Bookshop Podcasts

London Review Bookshop Podcasts

Updated 2 days ago

Read more

Twice a week or so, the London Review Bookshop becomes a miniature auditorium in which authors talk about and read from their work, meet their readers and engage in lively debate about the burning topics of the day. Fortunately, for those of you who weren't able to make it to one of our talks, were able to make it but couldn't get a ticket, or did in fact make it but weren't paying attention and want to listen again, we make a recording of everything that happens. So now you can hear Alan Bennett, Hilary Mantel, Iain Sinclair, Jarvis Cocker, Jenny Diski, Patti Smith (yes, she sings) and many, many more, wherever, and whenever you like.

Rank #1: Motherhood: Sheila Heti and Sally Rooney

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Sheila Heti’s latest novel Motherhood (Harvill Secker) confronts, in the characteristic fiction cum essay style which she pioneered in How Should a Person Be? one of the fundamental dilemmas of early womanhood – to have children or not. She read from her work and discussed it with Sally Rooney, bestselling author of Conversations with Friends (Faber).

Jun 11 2018

48mins

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Rank #2: James Wood: The Fun Stuff

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James Wood visited the Bookshop to talk about his new collection of pieces, The Fun Stuff, and to discuss life, literature, and the role of the critic.

Mar 19 2013

1hr 4mins

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Rank #3: Seymour Hersh with Adam Shatz: The Killing of Osama Bin Laden

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Seymour Hersh has been a towering presence in American journalism for nearly 50 years. In 1970 he won the Pulitzer Prize for his articles exposing the My Lai massacre in Vietnam. In 2015 his 10,000 word article 'The Killing of Osama Bin Laden' proved so popular that it crashed the London Review of Books's website. In between, he has written articles on Iraq, Iran, Lebanon, Israel and countless other topics, their common thread being their refusal to take government explanations and denials at face value. Hersh talked about his work with LRB contributing editor Adam Shatz, and in particular about his new book The Killing of Osama Bin Laden (Verso).

Apr 21 2016

1hr 11mins

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Rank #4: On Elizabeth Bishop: Colm Tóibín and Ruth Padel

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In On Elizabeth Bishop novelist and essayist Colm Tóibín provides a deeply personal meditation on one of the greatest poets of the 20th century, and one who has had a powerful influence on his own work. ‘Above all,’ writes Saskia Hamilton, ‘he honours Bishop’s exact ways with language, and his sifting of what is said from what is unsaid in her poetry illuminates his own watchful and patient art as a novelist.’ Tóibín joined us at the shop to talk about Elizabeth Bishop with the poet and critic Ruth Padel whose most recent collection, Learning to Make an Oud in Nazareth, was published by Chatto in 2014.

May 19 2015

1hr 1min

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Rank #5: China Miéville in conversation with The White Review

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China Miéville read from his work, and discussed some of the issues raised by it with Ben Eastham, co-founder and editor of The White Review.

May 15 2013

1hr 13mins

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Rank #6: The Dream of Enlightenment: Anthony Gottlieb and Julian Baggini

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'Never has the story been told so well,' said the New York Review of Books of Anthony Gottlieb's The Dream of Reason, a history of Western philosophy from the Ancient Greeks to the Renaissance. In The Dream of Enlightenment he continues the story with the great thinkers of the Enlightenment. Gottlieb was in conversation with Julian Baggini, author of numerous works on philosophy, including The Pig that Wants to be Eaten and 99 Other Thought Experiments and his most recent, Freedom Regained: The Possibility of Free Will (Granta), for an evening of conversation about the history of philosophy, and how to write about it for a popular audience.

Feb 07 2017

52mins

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Rank #7: Mathias Enard and Elif Shafak: Tell Them of Battles, Kings and Elephants

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Man Booker International-shortlisted novelist Mathias Enard, 'the most brazenly lapel-grabbing French author since Michel Houellebecq', returns with Tell Them of Battles, Kings and Elephants (tr. Charlotte Mandell), his fourth novel to appear in English after Zone, Street of Thieves and Compass. In 1506, Michelangelo – a young but already renowned sculptor – is invited by the sultan of Constantinople to design a bridge over the Golden Horn. Michelangelo, after some hesitation, flees Rome and an irritated Pope Julius II – whose commission he leaves unfinished – and arrives in Constantinople. Constructed from real historical fragments, Tell Them of Battles, Kings, and Elephants is a thrilling novella about why stories are told, why bridges are built, and how seemingly unmatched pieces, seen from the opposite sides of civilization, can mirror one another. Enard was in conversation with Elif Shafak.

Jan 09 2019

56mins

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Rank #8: Olga Tokarczuk and Deborah Levy

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One of the most acclaimed Polish writers of her generation, Olga Tokarczuk has won multiple prizes, most recently the Man Booker International for her novel Flights, translated by Jennifer Croft, and published, for the first time in English, by Fitzcarraldo Editions. Tokarczuk was in conversation with Man Booker shortlisted novelist Deborah Levy. This event was part of the Poland Market Focus programme at the London Book Fair, supported by the British Council.

Jun 04 2018

54mins

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Rank #9: 'Beethoven for a Later Age': Edward Dusinberre and James Jolly

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When asked about the meaning of the late string quartets Beethoven famously remarked 'Oh those are not for you, they are for a later age.' Has that later age arrived? In a talk illustrated by musical excerpts both recorded and live, the leader of the Takács Quartet Edward Dusinberre discusses the significance and challenge of these extraordinary pieces of music with editor-in-chief of Gramophone James Jolly. Presented in association with Gramophone and EFG International.

Feb 02 2016

25mins

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Rank #10: Jarvis Cocker

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To mark the publication of the paperback edition of Mother, Brother, Lover, Jarvis Cocker joined us at the shop for a conversation with the novelist Jon McGregor – ‘Cocker’s lyrics were what made me want to tell stories’, McGregor wrote in the Guardian’s ‘My Hero’ column.

Oct 22 2012

1hr 1min

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Rank #11: Nell Zink and Alex Clark: Doxology

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Nell Zink, born in Virginia in 1964 and now resident in Germany, is one of the most remarkable novelists of her, and indeed any generation. Her exuberant creations, always inflected with political, social and ecological concern, have won worldwide acclaim for their recklessness, their inventiveness and their sheer stylistic brilliance. She read from the latest of them, *[Doxology][1]* (4th Estate), a tale that begins with the iconic tragedy of 11 September 2001 and spins out from it into America’s past and potential futures, she discussed it with Alex Clark of the Guardian. [1]: /on-our-shelves/book/9780008323486/doxology

Sep 17 2019

58mins

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Rank #12: Mothers: Jacqueline Rose and Devorah Baum

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‘I think to be a mother for five minutes is to know that the world is unjust, and that our hearts are impure.’ In her latest book Mothers: An Essay on Love and Cruelty (Faber) Jacqueline Rose, co-director of the Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities, regular LRB contributor and prominent cultural and literary theorist, investigates the question of what we ask of mothers, and what we hold them responsible for, often against all sense of reason. Drawing on literature, newspaper reports and psychoanalysis, Rose uncovers how our expectations of what mothers can and should do are damaging both to women, and the world. She was in conversation about her ideas with Devorah Baum, lecturer in English Literature and Critical Theory at the University of Southampton and author of Feeling Jewish and The Jewish Joke.

May 07 2018

58mins

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Rank #13: Out of the Woods: Luke Turner and Olivia Laing

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After the disintegration of the most significant relationship of his life, the demons Luke Turner has been battling since childhood are quick to return - depression and guilt surrounding his identity as a bisexual man, experiences of sexual abuse, and the religious upbringing that was the cause of so much confusion. It is among the trees of London's Epping Forest where he seeks refuge. But once a place of comfort, it now seems full of unexpected, elusive threats that trigger twisted reactions. Turner was in conversation with Olivia Laing (*Crudo*; *The Lonely City*).

Jan 23 2019

52mins

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Rank #14: Crudo: Olivia Laing and Ali Smith

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From a Tuscan hotel for the super-rich to a Brexit-paralysed UK, Kathy spends the first summer of her 40s trying to adjust to making a lifelong commitment just as Trump is tweeting the world into nuclear war. But it’s not only Kathy who’s changing. Political, social and natural landscapes are all in peril. Fascism is on the rise, truth is dead, the planet is hotting up. Is it really worth learning to love when the end of the world is nigh? And how do you make art, let alone a life, when one rogue tweet could end it all? Crudo, the first novel from Olivia Laing, author of three critically acclaimed works of non-fiction, charts in real time what it was like to live and love in the horrifying summer of 2017, from the perspective of a commitment-phobic peripatetic artist who may or may not be Kathy Acker. Laing was in conversation with Ali Smith.

Jul 02 2018

51mins

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Rank #15: Notes to Self: Emilie Pine and Katherine Angel

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First published by Irish independent Tramp Press, Emilie Pine’s Notes to Self became a phenomenal word-of-mouth bestseller. Now picked up on this side of the water by Hamish Hamilton, Pine’s debut collection of autobiographical essays is a poignant, radically honest and fiercely intelligent account of the pains and joys of living as a woman in the 21st Century. She was in conversation with Katherine Angel, author of Unmastered: A Book on Desire, Most Difficult to Tell.

Feb 06 2019

1hr 3mins

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Rank #16: Danny Dorling and Sally Tomlinson: Brexit and the End of Empire

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Things fall apart when empires crumble. Rediscovery of past glories is attempted again and again, until eventually those living in what was once the heart of the empire become reconciled with their fate. Many of the British are not yet reconciled. A major cause of Brexit was a stoked-up fear of immigrants, but Rule Britannia: Brexit and the End of Empire (Biteback Publishing) argues that at its heart the rhetoric of Brexit was the playing out of older school curricula that had been dominated by empire. Brexit was led by people, almost all men, who mostly had fond memories of something that never was as great as they believed it to be. Co-authors Danny Dorling and Sally Tomlinson were in conversation. The conversation was chaired by writer and researcher Maya Goodfellow.

Feb 13 2019

59mins

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Rank #17: Writers on Recordings: Colm Tóibín on Elizabeth Bishop

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New York's 92nd Street Y has been a home to the voices of literature for 80 years, hosting in its famed Reading Series the greatest literary artists of the 20th century and recording for posterity their appearances as part of its vast audio archive. Featuring Colm Tóibín on Elizabeth Bishop and Rachel Cusk on Katherine Anne Porter, the Writers on Recordings series invites contemporary authors to discuss the legendary voices that have meant the most to them. Each conversation features rare archival recordings and is led by Bernard Schwartz, who produces 92Y's Reading Series as director of its Unterberg Poetry Center. Now in its third year, the series is produced in collaboration with the 92nd Street Y and Queen Mary University of London.

Aug 14 2019

1hr 20mins

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Rank #18: Kaveh Akbar and Richard Scott

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Iranian-American poet Kaveh Akbar’s debut collection Calling a Wolf a Wolf (Penguin) has been attracting ecstatic reviews and endorsements. The poet Fanny Howe writes ‘The struggle from late youth on, with and without God, agony, narcotics and love, is a torment rarely recorded with such sustained eloquence and passion as you will find in this collection’. Kaveh Akbar was joined in reading and conversation by Richard Scott, whose debut collection Soho (Faber) paints an uncompromising portrait of love and shame in contemporary London.

Apr 02 2018

1hr 6mins

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Rank #19: Radical Sacrifice: Terry Eagleton and Daniel Soar

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Professor Terry Eagleton’s more than 40 books have explored, in consistently invigorating ways, the many and surprising intersections and confluences of literature, culture, ideology and belief. His latest book Radical Sacrifice (Yale) draws on the Bible, the Aeneid, Hegel, Marx, Heidegger and Henry James in a brilliant meditation on the concept of sacrifice, fundamentally reconfiguring it as a radical force within modern life and thought. Professor Eagleton was in conversation about his latest work with Daniel Soar, senior editor at the London Review of Books.

Apr 24 2018

1hr 3mins

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Rank #20: For the Good Times: David Keenan and Bill Drummond

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David Keenan’s For the Good Times (Faber), set in Belfast during The Troubles, pursues four friends battling for an identity in a neighbourhood harangued by violence and religious intensity. The book highlights the complexity of believing in a cause whilst indulging in the spoils of amoral days. Keenan’s second novel is an urgent and experimental follow up to This is Memorial Device (Faber). Keenan was in conversation with artist and musician, Bill Drummond.

Jul 23 2019

1hr 14mins

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