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The Brookings Cafeteria

Updated 7 days ago

Rank #93 in Politics category

Business
Non-Profit
News
Politics
Read more

Host Fred Dews interviews experts from the Brookings Institution, a nonprofit public policy organization (think tank) based in Washington, D.C., about their research and ideas on solutions to the most pressing public policy challenges facing the nation and the world.

Read more

Host Fred Dews interviews experts from the Brookings Institution, a nonprofit public policy organization (think tank) based in Washington, D.C., about their research and ideas on solutions to the most pressing public policy challenges facing the nation and the world.

iTunes Ratings

370 Ratings
Average Ratings
294
65
7
1
3

Stop mindlessly reading reports

By Carolina Tola - Jul 19 2019
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I like the podcast and find the discussions interesting, but mindlessly reading reports to us is monotonous and lifeless. Stick to the engaging conversations. Otherwise, it’s too easy to tune it out.

Fred Dews is the man

By Bill Nowicki - Aug 19 2014
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I regular guy with a special ability to reach scholars.

iTunes Ratings

370 Ratings
Average Ratings
294
65
7
1
3

Stop mindlessly reading reports

By Carolina Tola - Jul 19 2019
Read more
I like the podcast and find the discussions interesting, but mindlessly reading reports to us is monotonous and lifeless. Stick to the engaging conversations. Otherwise, it’s too easy to tune it out.

Fred Dews is the man

By Bill Nowicki - Aug 19 2014
Read more
I regular guy with a special ability to reach scholars.
Cover image of The Brookings Cafeteria

The Brookings Cafeteria

Updated 7 days ago

Rank #93 in Politics category

Read more

Host Fred Dews interviews experts from the Brookings Institution, a nonprofit public policy organization (think tank) based in Washington, D.C., about their research and ideas on solutions to the most pressing public policy challenges facing the nation and the world.

Rank #1: After Election 2016

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Brookings experts discuss Election 2016 and the transition ahead. David Wessel, senior fellow in Economic Studies and director of the Hutchins Center on Fiscal and Monetary Policy, moderates a conversation with Stuart Butler, senior fellow in Economic Studies, John Hudak, senior fellow in Governance Studies and deputy director of the Center for Effective Public Management, Elaine Kamarck, senior fellow in Governance Studies and founding director of the Center for Effective Public Management, and Bruce Riedel, senior fellow in Foreign Policy and director of the Intelligence Project, on the results of the 2016 U.S. presidential election and what to expect from President-elect Donald Trump. Special thanks to the event moderator, David Wessel, and the events team, Eric Bull, Adrianna Pita, and Camilo Ramirez. Additional thanks to audio producer Gaston Reboredo and producer Vanessa Sauter, and also thanks for additional support from Eric Abalahin, Jessica Pavone, Nawal Atallah, Basseem Maleki, and Rebecca Viser. Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen in all the usual places, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. BCP is part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Nov 10 2016
52 mins
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Rank #2: The rise of the alt-right

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Baruch College professor Thomas J. Main discusses his new book, “The Rise of the Alt-Right,” with Bill Finan, director of the Brookings Institution Press. In the interview and his book, Main describes the alt-right’s ideological roots, how it became a factor in American politics, and why it poses the greatest challenge to democratic liberalism today. Also in this episode, David Wessel explains the current and potential consequences of President Trump’s tariffs in the latest edition of his Economic Update. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter.  The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Aug 10 2018
35 mins
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Rank #3: Is Russia a threat?

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Steven Pifer, senior fellow and director of the Arms Control and Non-Proliferation Initiative, examines the relationship between the U.S. and Russia in terms of nuclear policy, arms control, and the conflict with Ukraine. Also in this episode, Molly Reynolds, fellow in Governance Studies, discusses recent congressional town hall meetings and the likelihood that members of Congress will change their actions when they return to Washington. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on iTunes, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter.
Feb 24 2017
44 mins
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Rank #4: Grand strategy in the age of Trump

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Hal Brands, a professor at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies, discusses his new book, “American Grand Strategy in the Age of Trump,” and what an “America First” foreign policy framework looks like. Also in this episode, Joe Parilla explains the economic development incentives that state and local governments offer to get corporations, such as Amazon, to locate there. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Apr 17 2018
28 mins
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Rank #5: Open government and Trump's transition ethics

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Ambassador Norman Eisen, visiting fellow in Governance Studies and former U.S. ambassador to the Czech Republic, discusses the controversies surrounding President-elect Trump’s transition to the White House and his new report on open government. Also in this episode, Rebecca Winthrop, director of the Center for Universal Education and senior fellow in Global Economy and Development, analyzes the ways in which education systems should evolve in the digital age. Finally, Bill Finan and Greg Clark, nonresident senior fellow at the Metropolitan Policy Program, continue their conversation on Clark’s new book “Global Cities: A Short History.” The first part of this interview can be found in our “Election 2016: It’s almost over” episode. Thanks to audio producer Gaston Reboredo and producer Vanessa Sauter, and also thanks for additional support from Eric Abalahin, Jessica Pavone, Nawal Atallah, Basseem Maleki, and Rebecca Viser. Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen in all the usual places, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. BCP is part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Dec 09 2016
46 mins
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Rank #6: A progress report on Betsy DeVos’ education agenda

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Elizabeth Mann Levesque, a fellow in Governance Studies and the Brown Center on Education Policy, discusses some of the policies being pursued by the United States Department of Education under current Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos. Also in this episode, Joseph Parilla introduces his research on cluster-based economic development in the latest edition of our Metro Lens segment. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Aug 24 2018
34 mins
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Rank #7: Trump's national security and defense team

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Donald Trump’s inauguration as 45th president of the United States is right around the corner, and so the nation's (and world's) focus turns to the end of his transition to the White House and the start of his administration. Senior Fellow Michael O’Hanlon--director of research for Foreign Policy, co-director of the Center on 21st Century Security and Intelligence, and the Sydney Stein, Jr., Chair--came on the show to talk about the president-elect’s incoming national security team and the most salient foreign policy, national security, and defense issues for the new administration.  Also in this episode, Senior Fellow David Wessel, director of the Hutchins Center on Fiscal and Monetary Policy, talks about investing in human capital in his regular Wessel's Economic Update. And, Visiting Fellow Philippe Le Corre talks about China's global rise and how the U.S. and European Union can meet the challenge Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen in all the usual places, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. BCP is part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Jan 06 2017
48 mins
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Rank #8: On ISIS, Syria, Iran, and President Obama’s Middle East Strategy

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ISIS establishes a jihadist caliphate across Syria and Iraq. Iran pursues its nuclear ambitions. Syria remains mired in a terrible civil war, exacting a toll on the civilian population and region. In this podcast, Senior Fellow Mike Doran (@doranimated) offers his views on these and related developments, the Obama administration’s response to them, and what he believes is the “great white whale” of President Obama’s Middle East strategy. Although he says that Obama’s initiatives in the region have failed, he explains what the president can do to put together a coalition of like-minded powers to act as a counterweight to the ISIS threat.
Doran also offers candid thoughts on why “academia is a profoundly conformist place,” how he made the transition from that world to government and then to a think tank, and why he wanted to be a Middle East scholar in the first place.
Plus, highlights from a recent Brookings expert panel on Russia and Ukraine, and what Russia's foreign policy moves indicate about Vladimir Putin's view on the global order. 
Show Notes:
• "Somebody Else's Civil War" (Doran's article in Foreign Affairs, January/February 2002)•  The Arc of Crisis: Beirut to Baghdad (Brookings event in which Doran made the Sarah Palin reference)• "Iran Surprises Itself and the World" (Brookings Essay by Suzanne Maloney)• "Is Obama Like Eisenhower?" (article by Doran)• "Pursue Regime Change in Syria" (Big Bets/Black Swans memo by Doran)• "Reconciliation with Iran Helps Fuel Middle East Mayhem" (for Doran's Captain Ahab reference)• "Going the Distance: On and off the road with Barack Obama" (David Remnick's interview with the president)
Send feedback or questions for podcast guests to BCP@brookings.edu.
Sep 05 2014
41 mins
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Rank #9: The Intersection of Politics and Policy Is a Lonely Place

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"The intersection of politics and policy is a lonely place," writes Senior Fellow Elaine Kamarck in her new book How Change Happens—Or Doesn't: The Politics of U.S. Public Policy. In this podcast, Kamarck, founding director of the Center for Effective Public Management, touches on the ideas and examples in her book to explain why politics and policy have to come together for us to understand success and failure in U.S. politics.
She talks about "surveying the policy battlefield" in trying to understand the complexity of change. For example, why did unpopular President Harry Truman manage to get the Marshall Plan passed "with a hostile Republican Congress," while Barack Obama, who "came into office on the heels of a robust political victory" with majorities in both houses of Congress, failed to enact climate change legislation?
The conversation ranged from how FDR's social policies reflected American values, to whether the Affordable Care Act does, to the complexity and length of modern legislation, to whether or not elections matter and if mandates exist outside politician's own minds.
Show notes:
• Lessons from the Shutdown: Management Matters, Even for Presidents, by Elaine Kamarck• FixGov blog• The Semi-Sovereign People: A Realist's View of Democracy in America, by E.E. Schattschneider• Myth of the Presidential Mandate, by Robert Dahl
Dec 20 2013
27 mins
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Rank #10: The 1967 Arab-Israeli War

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Between June 5 and June 10, 1967, Israel and an Arab coalition of Egypt, Syria, and Jordan fought a war that Israelis call the Six Day War, and that Arabs generally call the June War. By war’s end, Israel had captured territories on all three fronts: the Sinai Peninsula and Gaza Strip from Egypt; the Golan Heights from Syria; and the West Bank and East Jerusalem from Jordan. And with those territories hundreds of thousands of people, primarily Palestinians (today numbering millions), came under Israeli control. In this episode, five Brookings scholars share their insights and expertise on a range of current policy issues that have roots in the conflict. These include how the war changed both Israel and its Arab neighbors; the transformation of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict; the rise of political Islam as an alternative to Arab secular nationalism, particularly in Egypt; regional repercussions and peace deals; and the role of US diplomacy. On the 50th anniversary of the 1967 War, our experts look back as they look forward to grapple with these issues and how the conflict’s legacies continue to resonate today. This episode is part of a larger effort by the Center for Middle East Policy at Brookings to offer perspectives on the war’s anniversary, to ask what can be learned from it, and how these lessons inform our understanding about the current turmoil in the region.
Jun 02 2017
56 mins
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Rank #11: The top economic issues in 2017

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Ted Gayer, vice president and director of Economic Studies and the Joseph A. Pechman Senior Fellow, looks at the top economic issues in the upcoming year. Tune in to hear his views on the performance of the U.S. economy and job markets, as well as the trends he sees with the new administration. Also in this podcast: Joseph Kane, senior research analyst and associate fellow at the Metropolitan Policy Program, discusses the increasing water infrastructure challenges we face today, and what action cities need to take to tackle their water challenges in our regular "Metro Lens" segment. Finally, Fred Dews reviews the highlights of what experts have said in the previous week regarding the Trump administration in our new "First 100 Days" segment. This week: withdrawing from the Trans-Pacific Partnership, security relations with China, and our possible transition into a new world order. Thanks to audio producer Gaston Reboredo and producer Vanessa Sauter, and also thanks for additional support from Eric Abalahin, Jessica Pavone, Nawal Atallah, Kelly Russo, and Rebecca Viser. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on iTunes, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. BCP is part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Jan 27 2017
40 mins
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Rank #12: Fixing America's broken marijuana policies

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Senior Fellow John Hudak discusses recent changes in public policy toward medical and recreational marijuana in the United States. Also in this episode, nuclear strategy and arms control expert Frank A. Rose makes his Brookings podcast debut in our regular Coffee Break segment, and Jung H. Pak answers a question on tensions in the Korean peninsula from one of our listeners. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Apr 20 2018
44 mins
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Rank #13: The ISIS attack on Paris

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Daniel Byman, an expert on counterterrorism and Middle East Security, and research director for the Center for Middle East Policy at Brookings, explains what we know and don’t know about the ISIS terrorist attack in Paris and whether he thinks ISIS will strike the U.S.
Also, part two of our Paris climate talk series on new technology from Mark Muro, senior fellow and policy director of the Metropolitan Policy Program.
“The real danger to me is not taking care of the refugee problem,” argues Byman, “If these refugees are trapped in the Middle East, if they’re in these huge camps where there are no opportunities, if they’re not integrated into host societies, over time we’re going to see the development of a terrorism and radicalization problem among large numbers of refugees.”
Also in this podcast: “What’s Happening in Congress” with special guest Molly Reynolds, a fellow in Governance Studies.

Show Notes:
What do the Paris attacks tell us about foreign fighters?
Five things to know about the Paris attack
A look at the policy options in war torn Syria (video)
Do Syrian refugees pose a terrorism threat?
The believer: How an introvert became the leader of the Islamic State
Five ways to make innovation 'sticky'
Green banking goes local

Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.

Nov 19 2015
22 mins
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Rank #14: Iran’s 1979 revolution and its legacies today

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In a special episode of the Brookings Cafeteria podcast, five Brookings experts—Suzanne Maloney, Bruce Riedel, Jeffrey Feltman, Daniel L. Byman, and Elaine Kamarck—describe how the consequences of Iran’s 1979 revolution affected Iran and the region and continue to shape a range of international dynamics today. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on iTunes, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Jan 25 2019
1 hour 7 mins
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Rank #15: Five Rising Democracies

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Ted Piccone, a senior fellow in the Project on International Order and Strategy discusses the five rising democracies; Brazil, South Africa, India, Indonesia, and Turkey and their role in the international liberal order.
“These countries show that you can have democratization and improvements in political freedom and at the same time grow your economies and improve in terms of human development,” Piccone says. In the podcast, Piccone provides an overview of each of the five nations highlighted in his new book, “Five Rising Democracies and the Fate of the International Liberal Order,” and how their economic, social, and political development allows them greater access in global politics.
Also in this episode, “Steve Hess Stories” with Senior Fellow Emeritus Stephen Hess.
Show Notes
Five Rising Democracies and the Fate of the International Liberal Order
More Steve Hess Stories on SoundCloud
Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Feb 12 2016
30 mins
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Rank #16: America's War on Poverty Moves to the Suburbs

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Poverty in the United States looks different now than it did when President Lyndon Johnson declared an "unconditional war on poverty" 50 years ago. With the publication of their book, Confronting Suburban Poverty in America, Elizabeth Kneebone and Alan Berube brought to the fore of the national conversation the experience of the 16.5 million people living in poverty in the suburbs. In a new podcast, Kneebone, a fellow in the Metropolitan Policy Program, says that the landscape of poverty is "dramatically different" than it was a half century ago. A third of the poor population lives in the suburbs, and during the 2000s, the poor population there grew larger and faster than in cities.
While many programs from the war on poverty have been effective in keeping millions of people out of poverty, Kneebone says in this podcast that the shifting geography of poverty to suburbs means that we need to "reassess what's working" and "better adapt our policies to a new reality of suburban poverty."
Learn more about the book, get case studies about communities facing suburban poverty, and download an Action Toolkit at Confronting Suburban Poverty in America.
Also read "Does the Suburbanization of Poverty Mean the War on Poverty Failed?" by Kneebone and Berube.
Jan 22 2014
29 mins
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Rank #17: On racism and white supremacy

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The language of racism and white supremacy is all around us; people are getting hurt, and also killed. But racism also pervades our public policies. To address these issues and how to move forward, this episode features a discussion with two Brookings experts: Andre Perry, David M. Rubenstein Fellow in the Metropolitan Policy Program, and Vanessa Williamson, senior fellow in the Governance Studies Program and also in the Urban-Brookings Tax Policy Center. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on iTunes, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Aug 09 2019
34 mins
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Rank #18: Foreign policy issues the candidates should be talking about

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“A lot of the issues that we focus on as crises on a daily basis—I think particularly of Syria—they are certainly crises in their own right,” says Jeremy Shapiro. “But to my mind the failure to deal with them does have a lot to do with the consequences of the breakdown in international order and the breakdown in the international capacity to create order.”
Jeremy Shapiro, fellow in the Project on International Order and Strategy and the Center on the United States and Europe at Brookings, gives his view on the top foreign policy issues of the day and in the 2016 presidential election.
“The interesting thing about terrorism is that it is never, at least for advanced societies, a direct threat in any existential way, despite what many of our politicians say,” argues Shapiro in this podcast, “What can threaten a nation like ours is that in the process of responding to an attack like in San Bernardino or in Paris that we destroy the things that are most precious to us, like our freedoms, like our civil liberties, that we engage in foreign policy adventures in order to try to make ourselves feel more secure and more safe that actually erode our power.”
Also in this podcast: The final installment of the Paris climate conference series by Bruce Jones, vice president and director of Foreign Policy at Brookings. And also stay tuned for our regular economic update with David Wessel, senior fellow and director of the Hutchins Center on Fiscal and Monetary Policy.

Show Notes:
Order from Chaos: Foreign policy in a troubled world
'What U.S. Foreign Policy Really Needs Is...'
Suzanne Maloney talks U.S.-Iran relations, the Iran nuclear deal, and the future of Iran 
How Russia and America make the same mistakes in Syria
How not to overreact to ISIS
The perils of "French Islam": France’s misguided response to the Paris attacks

Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.

Dec 18 2015
35 mins
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Rank #19: America’s 'insane' politics

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Jonathan Rauch, senior fellow in Governance Studies, expands on his widely popular new article in The Atlantic titled, “How American Politics Went Insane.” Also in this episode, Metropolitan Policy Program Associate Fellow Devashree Saha examines the impact of crashing oil prices on state and metro economies.   How American politics went insane The state of state parties, a neglected path to healthier politics Political Realism: How Hacks, Machines, Big Money, and Back-Room Deals Can Strengthen American Democracy Permanent trust funds: Funding economic change with fracking revenues Thanks to audio producer Mark Hoelscher, plus thanks to Carisa Nietsche, Bill Finan, Vanessa Sauter, Jessica Pavone, Eric Abalahin, and Rebecca Viser. Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen in all the usual places, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Aug 12 2016
23 mins
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Rank #20: The Facts on Inequality, Wealth, Income, and Working May Surprise You

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Economic issues are prolific in the public sphere, from taxes and inequality, to jobs and productivity and more. Even Thomas Piketty's book on wealth distribution is now a bestseller. How can a person make sense of the terms and of the discussion? One way is to talk to an economist, like Gary Burtless, a senior fellow in the Economic Studies Program at Brookings. In this podcast, he offers his expertise to explain issues such as middle-class income gains, wealth distribution and Piketty's book in ways that both surprise and enlighten.
Show notes:
• Income Growth and Income Inequality: The Facts May Surprise You• Big Payroll Gains and Anemic Labor Force Growth• Potential Effects of the Affordable Care Act on Income Inequality• Impact of the Great Recession on Retirement Trends in Industrialized Countries• Urban-Brookings Tax Policy Center
May 21 2014
39 mins
Play

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