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The Brookings Cafeteria

Updated 14 days ago

Government & Organizations
News & Politics
Non-Profit
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Host Fred Dews interviews experts from the Brookings Institution, a nonprofit public policy organization (think tank) based in Washington, D.C., about their research and ideas on solutions to the most pressing public policy challenges facing the nation and the world.

Read more

Host Fred Dews interviews experts from the Brookings Institution, a nonprofit public policy organization (think tank) based in Washington, D.C., about their research and ideas on solutions to the most pressing public policy challenges facing the nation and the world.

iTunes Ratings

366 Ratings
Average Ratings
290
65
7
1
3

Stop mindlessly reading reports

By Carolina Tola - Jul 19 2019
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I like the podcast and find the discussions interesting, but mindlessly reading reports to us is monotonous and lifeless. Stick to the engaging conversations. Otherwise, it’s too easy to tune it out.

Fred Dews is the man

By Bill Nowicki - Aug 19 2014
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I regular guy with a special ability to reach scholars.

iTunes Ratings

366 Ratings
Average Ratings
290
65
7
1
3

Stop mindlessly reading reports

By Carolina Tola - Jul 19 2019
Read more
I like the podcast and find the discussions interesting, but mindlessly reading reports to us is monotonous and lifeless. Stick to the engaging conversations. Otherwise, it’s too easy to tune it out.

Fred Dews is the man

By Bill Nowicki - Aug 19 2014
Read more
I regular guy with a special ability to reach scholars.
Cover image of The Brookings Cafeteria

The Brookings Cafeteria

Updated 14 days ago

Read more

Host Fred Dews interviews experts from the Brookings Institution, a nonprofit public policy organization (think tank) based in Washington, D.C., about their research and ideas on solutions to the most pressing public policy challenges facing the nation and the world.

Rank #1: On racism and white supremacy

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The language of racism and white supremacy is all around us; people are getting hurt, and also killed. But racism also pervades our public policies. To address these issues and how to move forward, this episode features a discussion with two Brookings experts: Andre Perry, David M. Rubenstein Fellow in the Metropolitan Policy Program, and Vanessa Williamson, senior fellow in the Governance Studies Program and also in the Urban-Brookings Tax Policy Center. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on iTunes, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Aug 09 2019
34 mins
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Rank #2: Who is Kim Jong-un?

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Jung Pak, senior fellow in Foreign Policy and the SK-Korea Foundation Chair in Korea Studies, discusses North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un’s rise to power, his objectives, and the United States’ military and diplomatic options for the Korean peninsula. In a new Brookings Essay, “The education of Kim Jong-un,” Pak further explains Kim’s upbringing and makes recommendations for thwarting Kim’s ambitions. Also in this episode, David Wessel discusses his views on the recent volatility of the stock market and what relationship, if any, it has to the economy. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Feb 09 2018
30 mins
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Rank #3: How Pittsburgh went from steel town to innovation city

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Brookings expert Scott Andes discusses the findings of a new report from the Centennial Scholar Initiative, “Capturing the next economy: Pittsburgh’s rise as a global innovation city,” which examines how Pittsburgh was able to transform itself from a manufacturing economy to leader in global innovation and technology. Also in this episode, Adie Tomer and Ranjitha Shivaram discuss broadband subscription rates in American neighborhoods in a new Metro Lens segment, and Ryan Nunn, policy director for the Hamilton Project, answers a question from one of our listeners. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Sep 29 2017
40 mins
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Rank #4: Peace, security, and the United Nations General Assembly

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In a special edition of the Brookings Cafeteria podcast, Foreign Policy Vice President and Director Bruce Jones discusses his new report on the peace and security landscape around the world and previews the United Nations General Assembly in New York City. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Sep 19 2018
34 mins
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Rank #5: Norm Eisen, the Petschek Palace, and Europe’s turbulent century

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Senior Fellow Norman Eisen discusses his new book, “The Last Palace: Europe’s Turbulent Century in Five Lives and One Legendary House,” with Thomas Wright, director of the Center on the United States and Europe. Eisen describes the Petschek house in Prague where he lived as the U.S. ambassador to the Czech Republic, and how the lives of its former occupants tell the story of 100 transformative years of European history.   Also in this episode, Dany Bahar explains what led him to become a scholar and what he’s researching now in the latest edition of our Coffee Break segment.   Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Aug 31 2018
28 mins
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Rank #6: Fixing America's broken marijuana policies

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Senior Fellow John Hudak discusses recent changes in public policy toward medical and recreational marijuana in the United States. Also in this episode, nuclear strategy and arms control expert Frank A. Rose makes his Brookings podcast debut in our regular Coffee Break segment, and Jung H. Pak answers a question on tensions in the Korean peninsula from one of our listeners. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Apr 20 2018
44 mins
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Rank #7: 2018 midterms: Myths about the upcoming elections

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In the first episode of a special series on the 2018 midterm elections, Senior Fellow John Hudak describes some of the issues shaping the upcoming midterm elections and which common narratives around the elections are not supported by data.   Also in this episode, David Wessel explains the Federal Reserve’s recent decision to raise interest rates and the inherent difficulties in forecasting the economy.  Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Oct 12 2018
33 mins
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Rank #8: Protecting American elections from foreign interference

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In June, FBI Director Christopher Wray testified to the Senate Judiciary Committee that “the Russians are absolutely intent on trying to interfere with our elections,” and just recently the Senate Intelligence Committee issued a bipartisan report finding that governments at all levels are unprepared to combat a Russian attack on U.S. election infrastructure. Meanwhile, Senate Majority leader Mitch McConnell has refused to allow a vote on House-passed election security measures, calling such efforts partisan and pointing to steps the Trump administration has taken to bolster election security. On this episode, Darrell West, the vice president and director of Governance Studies and Founding Director of the Center for Technology Innovation at Brookings, addresses these issues.  Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on iTunes, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Aug 02 2019
23 mins
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Rank #9: The 1967 Arab-Israeli War

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Between June 5 and June 10, 1967, Israel and an Arab coalition of Egypt, Syria, and Jordan fought a war that Israelis call the Six Day War, and that Arabs generally call the June War. By war’s end, Israel had captured territories on all three fronts: the Sinai Peninsula and Gaza Strip from Egypt; the Golan Heights from Syria; and the West Bank and East Jerusalem from Jordan. And with those territories hundreds of thousands of people, primarily Palestinians (today numbering millions), came under Israeli control. In this episode, five Brookings scholars share their insights and expertise on a range of current policy issues that have roots in the conflict. These include how the war changed both Israel and its Arab neighbors; the transformation of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict; the rise of political Islam as an alternative to Arab secular nationalism, particularly in Egypt; regional repercussions and peace deals; and the role of US diplomacy. On the 50th anniversary of the 1967 War, our experts look back as they look forward to grapple with these issues and how the conflict’s legacies continue to resonate today. This episode is part of a larger effort by the Center for Middle East Policy at Brookings to offer perspectives on the war’s anniversary, to ask what can be learned from it, and how these lessons inform our understanding about the current turmoil in the region.
Jun 02 2017
56 mins
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Rank #10: The rise of Chinese President Xi Jinping

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Cheng Li, senior fellow in Foreign Policy and director of the John L. Thornton China Center, talks about the rise of Chinese President Xi Jinping through the Chinese communist party leadership, which is the focus of his new book, “Chinese Politics in the Xi Jinping Era: Reassessing Collective Leadership.” Also in this episode, Laurence Chandy, fellow in Global Economy and Development, examines how technology and globalization affect inequality. Finally, Harsha Singh, executive director of the Brookings India Center, discusses his career, Brookings India, and current events in India. Thanks to audio producer Gaston Reboredo and producer Vanessa Sauter, and also thanks for additional support from Eric Abalahin, Jessica Pavone, Nawal Atallah, Basseem Maleki, and Rebecca Viser. Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen in all the usual places, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. BCP is part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Nov 18 2016
44 mins
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Rank #11: After Election 2016

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Brookings experts discuss Election 2016 and the transition ahead. David Wessel, senior fellow in Economic Studies and director of the Hutchins Center on Fiscal and Monetary Policy, moderates a conversation with Stuart Butler, senior fellow in Economic Studies, John Hudak, senior fellow in Governance Studies and deputy director of the Center for Effective Public Management, Elaine Kamarck, senior fellow in Governance Studies and founding director of the Center for Effective Public Management, and Bruce Riedel, senior fellow in Foreign Policy and director of the Intelligence Project, on the results of the 2016 U.S. presidential election and what to expect from President-elect Donald Trump. Special thanks to the event moderator, David Wessel, and the events team, Eric Bull, Adrianna Pita, and Camilo Ramirez. Additional thanks to audio producer Gaston Reboredo and producer Vanessa Sauter, and also thanks for additional support from Eric Abalahin, Jessica Pavone, Nawal Atallah, Basseem Maleki, and Rebecca Viser. Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen in all the usual places, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. BCP is part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Nov 10 2016
52 mins
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Rank #12: Foreign policy in the Obama era

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Martin Indyk, executive vice president of the Brookings Institution, offers his take on a broad spectrum of foreign policy issues, including peace in the Middle East, the liberal international order, and his own journey in foreign affairs leadership and policymaking. He also discusses the contours of an "Obama doctrine" in foreign policy, and whether the next president will bring continuity or change. Also in this podcast: an economic update from David Wessel, director of the Hutchins Center on Fiscal and Monetary Policy. Also hear Philippe Le Corre, visiting fellow in the Center on the United States and Europe, discuss his upcoming book “China’s Offensive in Europe.”   Show Notes Obama's article in "Atlantic Monthly" Order from Chaos blog   Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen in all the usual places, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu. Thanks to audio engineer and producer Zack Kulzer, with editing help from Mark Hoelscher, plus thanks to Carissa Nietsche, Bill Finan, Jessica Pavone, Eric Abalahin, Rebecca Viser, Brionne Smith, and our intern Sarah AbdelRahim.
May 13 2016
44 mins
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Rank #13: America’s data privacy problem

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Cameron Kerry, who currently serves as the Ann R. and the Andrew H. Tisch Distinguished Visiting Fellow at Brookings and was formerly general counsel and acting secretary of the United States Department of Commerce, describes the state of online consumer data protections in the United States and introduces a framework for data privacy legislation. Also in this episode, Jenny Schuetz discusses her research on how housing affordability varies across the country and the consequences of unusually high or low housing prices in communities.   Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Jul 27 2018
29 mins
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Rank #14: The ISIS attack on Paris

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Daniel Byman, an expert on counterterrorism and Middle East Security, and research director for the Center for Middle East Policy at Brookings, explains what we know and don’t know about the ISIS terrorist attack in Paris and whether he thinks ISIS will strike the U.S.
Also, part two of our Paris climate talk series on new technology from Mark Muro, senior fellow and policy director of the Metropolitan Policy Program.
“The real danger to me is not taking care of the refugee problem,” argues Byman, “If these refugees are trapped in the Middle East, if they’re in these huge camps where there are no opportunities, if they’re not integrated into host societies, over time we’re going to see the development of a terrorism and radicalization problem among large numbers of refugees.”
Also in this podcast: “What’s Happening in Congress” with special guest Molly Reynolds, a fellow in Governance Studies.

Show Notes:
What do the Paris attacks tell us about foreign fighters?
Five things to know about the Paris attack
A look at the policy options in war torn Syria (video)
Do Syrian refugees pose a terrorism threat?
The believer: How an introvert became the leader of the Islamic State
Five ways to make innovation 'sticky'
Green banking goes local

Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.

Nov 19 2015
22 mins
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Rank #15: The Supreme Court after Scalia

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Russell Wheeler, a visiting fellow in Governance Studies and an expert on federal courts, discusses the process and politics of replacing Associate Justice Antonin Scalia on the U.S. Supreme Court given the current political climate. 
“This polarization our politics has affected the polarization of the confirmation and nomination process and I don’t see how it gets ratcheted down,” Wheeler says. “It gets ratcheted up but I don’t see what happens to get us back to the day in which the Senate basically fulfilled its duty, which was to advise and consent to confirmation of qualified nominees and we’re moving away from that basic obligation of the Senate.”
In the podcast, Wheeler gives an overview of the president's and the Senate's constitutional duties for replacing a Supreme Court justice. He also discusses the implications of appointing a Supreme Court justice now, or waiting until the next president is sworn in.
Also in this episode: another segment of “Steve Hess Stories” with Senior Fellow Emeritus Stephen Hess; and Lincoln Mitchell discusses his new book, “The Democracy Promotion Paradox.”
Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Mar 11 2016
31 mins
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Rank #16: Why the poorest kids quit high school

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Melissa Kearney, a nonresident senior fellow in Economic Studies, explains her new research (with Phillip Levine for the Brookings Papers on Economic Activity) on high school students who are growing up in places with high income inequality and their decision to stay in high school or not.
“Kids at the bottom of the income distribution are discouraged by higher levels of income inequality as opposed to being driven by it,” Kearney says. “Low income kids are more likely to drop out of high school than high income kids. But conditional to being low income, kids who are growing up in states or cities characterized by high levels of lower tail income inequality—a greater gap between the bottom and the middle—are more likely to drop out of high school.”
Also in this episode: Our regular economic update with David Wessel, senior fellow and director of the Hutchins Center on Fiscal and Monetary Policy. Also stay tuned to hear our new Metro Lens segment with Amy Liu, vice president and director of the Metropolitan Policy Program.
Show Notes:
Generation Unbound
Income Inequality, Social Mobility, and the Decision to Drop Out Of High School
Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Mar 18 2016
26 mins
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Rank #17: Intro to Southeast Asia: Diversity, security, and politics

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Senior Fellow Jonathan Stromseth discusses the economic and security tensions in Southeast Asia, and relations among its nations with the United States and China. Also in this episode, Jon Valant previews his research on racial disparities in school discipline. A full interview with Jon will air later in May. And finally, David Wessel puts talk of the federal debt and deficits into context. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Apr 06 2018
35 mins
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Rank #18: The true costs of Trump's border wall (part 2)

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In the second of two parts of a conversation about the U.S.-Mexico border wall that President Trump has pledged to build, Brookings Senior Fellow Vanda Felbab-Brown discusses the costs of a wall for the U.S. economy and the environment, and whether it would have any effect on crime and violence. Also in this episode, meet Jay Shambaugh, new director of the Hamilton Project at Brookings. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Sep 08 2017
32 mins
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Rank #19: Iran’s 1979 revolution and its legacies today

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In a special episode of the Brookings Cafeteria podcast, five Brookings experts—Suzanne Maloney, Bruce Riedel, Jeffrey Feltman, Daniel L. Byman, and Elaine Kamarck—describe how the consequences of Iran’s 1979 revolution affected Iran and the region and continue to shape a range of international dynamics today. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on iTunes, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Jan 25 2019
1 hour 7 mins
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Rank #20: America's Diversity Explosion Is Coming Just in Time

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"I am convinced that the United States is in the midst of a pivotal period ushering in extraordinary shifts in the nation's racial demographic makeup," writes William Frey in his new book, Diversity Explosion: How New Racial Demographics are Remaking America. In this podcast, Frey, a senior fellow in the Metropolitan Policy Program and an internationally regarded demographer, explains what he means by "diversity explosion"; why growing minority populations are so important for America; and what public officials, community leaders, and decision-makers need to understand about the importance of educating and training a new generation of workers.
Frey also discusses how he got into the field of demography, and what it means when people say "demography is destiny." 
Also in the podcast, David Wessel, director of the Hutchins Center on Fiscal & Monetary Policy, offers his regular economic update, noting that "something weird is going on" when broad measures of the labor market are looking better yet two-thirds of the voters say the economy is getting worse.

Show notes:
• Diversity Explosion: How New Racial Demographics Are Remaking America• Immigrants Continue to Disperse, with Fastest Growth in the Suburbs• Social Mobility Memos• "The Great American Melting Pot" (music/lyrics by Lynn Ahrens, performed by Lori Lieberman, Schoolhouse Rock, 1977)

Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Nov 14 2014
35 mins
Play

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