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Rank #68 in Science category

Science

Science Magazine Podcast

Updated 4 days ago

Rank #68 in Science category

Science
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Weekly podcasts from Science Magazine, the world's leading journal of original scientific research, global news, and commentary.

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Weekly podcasts from Science Magazine, the world's leading journal of original scientific research, global news, and commentary.

iTunes Ratings

443 Ratings
Average Ratings
275
71
39
35
23

The Best

By gilledfreak - Mar 08 2018
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Sarah is amazing. Love this podcast

great program

By Margot Brinn - Oct 09 2017
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I love the interviewers excellent questions and the interviewees well researched answers.

iTunes Ratings

443 Ratings
Average Ratings
275
71
39
35
23

The Best

By gilledfreak - Mar 08 2018
Read more
Sarah is amazing. Love this podcast

great program

By Margot Brinn - Oct 09 2017
Read more
I love the interviewers excellent questions and the interviewees well researched answers.
Cover image of Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast

Updated 4 days ago

Read more

Weekly podcasts from Science Magazine, the world's leading journal of original scientific research, global news, and commentary.

Rank #1: How whales got so big, sperm in space, and a first look at Jupiter’s poles

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This week we have stories on strange dimming at a not-so-distant star, sending sperm to the International Space Station, and what the fossil record tells us about how baleen whales got so ginormous with Online News Editor David Grimm.

Julia Rosen talks to Scott Bolton about surprises in the first data from the Juno mission, including what Jupiter’s poles look like and a peak under its outer cloud layers.

Listen to previous podcasts. 

[Music: Jeffrey Cook]

May 25 2017

27mins

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Rank #2: Podcast: Where dog breeds come from, bots that build buildings, and gathering ancient human DNA from cave sediments

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This week, a new family tree of dog breeds, advances in artificial wombs, and an autonomous robot that can print a building with Online News Editor David Grimm.  

Viviane Slon joins Sarah Crespi to discuss a new way to seek out ancient humans—without finding fossils or bones—by screening sediments for ancient DNA.  

Jen Golbeck interviews Andrew Shtulman, author of Scienceblind: Why Our Intuitive Theories About the World Are So Often Wrong for this month’s book segment.   

Listen to previous podcasts.  

See more book segments.    

Download the show transcript.

Transcripts courtesy of Scribie.com.

[Image: nimis69/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Apr 27 2017

24mins

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Rank #3: How to weigh a star—with a little help from Einstein, toxic ‘selfish genes,’ and the world’s oldest Homo sapiens fossils

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This week we have stories on what body cams reveal about interactions between black drivers and U.S. police officers, the world’s oldest Homo sapiens fossils, and how modern astronomers measured the mass of a star—thanks to an old tip from Einstein—with Online News Intern Ryan Cross.

Sarah Crespi talks to Eyal Ben-David about a pair of selfish genes—one toxin and one antidote—that have been masquerading as essential developmental genes in a nematode worm. She asks how many more so-called “essential genes” are really just self-perpetuating freeloaders?

Science Careers Editor Rachel Bernstein is also here to talk about stress and work-life balance for researchers and science students.

Listen to previous podcasts.

[Image: Chris Burns/Science; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Jun 08 2017

31mins

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Rank #4: Still-living dinosaurs, the world’s first enzymes, and thwarting early adopters in tech

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This week, we have stories on how ultraviolet rays may have jump-started the first enzymes on Earth, a new fossil find that helps date how quickly birds diversified after the extinction of all the other dinosaurs, and a drug that may help reverse the effects of traumatic brain injury on memory with Online News Editor Catherine Matacic and special guest Carolyn Gramling.

Sarah Crespi talks to Christian Catalini about an experiment in which some early adopters were denied access to new technology and what it means for the dissemination of that tech.

Listen to previous podcasts.

[Image: Michael Wuensch/Creative Commons Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Jul 13 2017

25mins

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Rank #5: Mathematicians and the NSA and a news roundup

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John Bohannon discusses the growing rift between mathematicians and the National Security Agency following Edward Snowden's 2013 revelations of massive eavesdropping on U.S. citizens. David Grimm discusses daily news stories. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Img: Amos Frumkin/Hebrew University Cave Research Center]

Jan 29 2015

24mins

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Rank #6: Podcast: Scoliosis development, antiracing stripes, and the dawn of the hobbits

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Listen to stories on lizard stripes that trick predators, what a tiny jaw bone reveals about ancient “hobbit” people, and the risks of psychology’s dependence on online subjects drawn from Mechanical Turk, with online news intern Patrick Monahan.   Brian Ciruna talks about a potential mechanism for the most common type of scoliosis that involves the improper flow of cerebral spinal fluid during adolescence with host Sarah Crespi.   [Image: irin717/iStock/Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Jun 09 2016

22mins

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Rank #7: A jump in rates of knee arthritis, a brief history of eclipse science, and bands and beats in the atmosphere of brown dwarfs

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This week we hear stories on a big jump in U.S. rates of knee arthritis, some science hits and misses from past eclipses, and the link between a recently discovered thousand-year-old Viking fortress and your Bluetooth earbuds with Online News Editor David Grimm.

Sarah Crespi talks to Daniel Apai about a long-term study of brown dwarfs and what patterns in the atmospheres of these not-quite-stars, not-quite-planets can tell us.

Listen to previous podcasts.

[Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Aug 17 2017

18mins

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Rank #8: Podcast: When good lions go bad, listening to meteor crashes, and how humans learn to change the world

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This week, meteors’ hiss may come from radio waves, pigeons that build on the wings of those that came before, and a potential answer to the century-old mystery of what turned two lions into people eaters with Online News Editor David Grimm.

Elise Amel joins Julia Rosen to discuss the role of evolution and psychology in humans’ ability to overcome norms and change the world, as part of a special issue on conservation this week in Science.

Listen to previous podcasts.

Download the show transcript 

Transcripts courtesy Scribie.com 

[Image: bjdlzx/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Apr 20 2017

26mins

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Rank #9: Drug use in the ancient world, and what will happen to plants as carbon dioxide levels increase

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Armed with new data, archaeologists are revealing that mind-altering drugs were present at the dawn of the first complex societies some 5000 years ago in the ancient Middle East. Contributing writer Andrew Lawler joins Sarah Crespi to discuss the evidence for these drugs and how they might have impacted early societies and beliefs.

Sarah also interviews Sarah Hobbie of the University of Minnesota about the fate of plants under climate change. Will all that extra carbon dioxide in the air be good for certain types of flora? A 20-year long study published this week in Science suggests theoretical predictions have been off the mark.

This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.

Listen to previous podcasts.

[Image: Public domain Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Apr 19 2018

23mins

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Rank #10: Podcast: A planet beyond Pluto, the bugs in your home, and the link between marijuana and IQ

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Online News Editor David Grimm shares stories on studying marijuana use in teenage twins, building a better maze for psychological experiments, and a close inspection of the bugs in our homes. Science News Writer Eric Hand joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss the potential for a ninth planet in the solar system that circles the sun just once every 15,000 years.  [Image: Gilles San Martin/CC BY-SA 2.0]

Jan 21 2016

17mins

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Rank #11: Podcast: The archaeology of democracy, new additions to the uncanny valley, and the discovery of ant-ibiotics

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This week, what bear-mounted cameras can tell us about their caribou-hunting habits, ants that mix up their own medicine, and feeling alienated by emotional robots with Online News Editor David Grimm. And Lizzie Wade joins Sarah Crespi to discuss new thinking on the origins of democracy outside of Europe, based on archeological sites in Mexico.

Listen to previous podcasts.

Download the show transcript.

Transcripts courtesy of Scribie.com.

[Image: rpbirdman/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Mar 16 2017

24mins

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Rank #12: Podcast: Dancing dinosaurs, naked black holes, and more

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What stripped an unusual black hole of its stars? Can a bipolar drug change ant behavior? And did dinosaurs dance to woo mates? Science's Online News Editor David Grimm chats about these stories and more with Science's Multimedia Producer Sarah Crespi. Plus,Science's Emily Underwood wades into the muddled world of migraine research, and Jessica Metcalf talks about using modern microbial means to track mammalian decomposition.

Jan 08 2016

31mins

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Rank #13: The spread of an ancient technology and a daily news roundup (26 September 2014)

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New evidence reveals the complicated history of stone tool use 400,000 - 200,000 years ago.

Sep 26 2014

20mins

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Rank #14: Fossilized dinosaur proteins, and making a fridge from rubber bands

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Have you ever tried to scrub off the dark, tarlike residue on a grill? That tough stuff is made up of polymers—basically just byproducts of cooking—and it is so persistent that researchers have found similar molecules that have survived hundreds of millions of years. And these aren’t from cook fires. They are actually the byproducts of death and fossilization. Host Sarah Crespi talks with Contributing Correspondent Gretchen Vogel about how these molecules can be found on the surface of certain fossils and used as fingerprints for the proteins that once dwelled in dinos.

And Sarah talks with Zunfeng Liu, a professor at Nankai University in Tianjin, China, about a new cooling technology based on a 100-year-old observation that a stretched rubber band is warm and a relaxed one is cool. It’s going to be hard to beat the 60% efficiency of compression-based refrigerators and air conditioning units, but Zunfeng and colleagues aim to try, with twists and coils that can cool water by 7°C when relaxed.

This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.

Ads on this week’s show: The Tangled Tree: A Radical New History of Life by David Quammen

Download a transcript (PDF)

Listen to previous podcasts.

About the Science Podcast

Oct 10 2019

21mins

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Rank #15: Podcast: An ethics conundrum from the Nazi era, baby dinosaur development, and a new test for mad cow disease

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This week, we chat about how long dinosaur eggs take—or took—to hatch, a new survey that confirms the world’s hot spots for lightning, and replenishing endangered species with feral pets with Online News Editor Catherine Matacic. Plus, Science’s Alexa Billow talks to Megan Gannon about the dilemma presented by tissue samples collected during the Nazi era. And Sarah Crespi discusses a new test for mad cow disease with Kelly Servick.   Listen to previous podcasts.   [Image: NASA/flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Jan 05 2017

29mins

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Rank #16: A new dark matter signal from the early universe, massive family trees, and how we might respond to alien contact

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For some time after the big bang there were no stars. Researchers are now looking at cosmic dawn—the time when stars first popped into being—and are seeing hints of dark matter’s influence on supercold hydrogen clouds. News Writer Adrian Cho talks with Sarah Crespi about how this observation was made and what it means for our understanding of dark matter.

Sarah also interviews Joanna Kaplanis of the Wellcome Sanger Institute in Hinxton, U.K., about constructing enormous family trees based on an online social genealogy platform. What can we learn from the biggest family tree ever built—with 13 million members spanning 11 generations?

In a bonus segment recording during a live podcasting event at the AAAS Annual Meeting in Austin, Sarah talks with Michael Varnum of Arizona State University in Tempe about what people think they will do if humanity comes into contact with aliens that just happen to be microbes. Live recordings sessions at the AAAS meeting were supported by funds from the European Commission.

This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.

Listen to previous podcasts.

[Image: Kilo-Degree Survey Collaboration/H. Hildebrandt & B. Giblin/ESO; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Mar 01 2018

34mins

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Rank #17: Genes that turn off after death, and debunking the sugar conspiracy

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Some of our genes come alive after we die. David Grimm—online news editor for Science—talks with Sarah Crespi about which genes are active after death and what we can learn about time of death by looking at patterns of postmortem gene expression.

Sarah also interviews David Merritt Johns of Columbia University about the so-called sugar conspiracy. Historical evidence suggests, despite recent media reports, it is unlikely that “big sugar” influenced U.S. nutrition policy and led to the low-fat diet fad of the ’80s and ’90s.

Listen to previous podcasts.

[Image: Lauri Andler (Phantom); Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Feb 15 2018

13mins

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Rank #18: Pollution from pot plants, and how our bodies perceive processed foods

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The “dank” smelling terpenes emitted by growing marijuana can combine with chemicals in car emissions to form ozone, a health-damaging compound. This is especially problematic in Denver, where ozone levels are dangerously high and pot farms have sprung up along two highways in the city. Host Sarah Crespi talks with reporter Jason Plautz about researchers’ efforts to measure terpene emissions from pot plants and how federal restrictions have hampered them.

Next, host Meagan Cantwell talks with Dana Small, a professor of psychiatry and psychology at Yale University, about how processed foods are perceived by the body. In a doughnut-rich world, what’s a body to think about calories, nutrition, and satiety?

And in the first book segment of the year, books editor Valerie Thompson is joined by Erika Malim, a history professor at Princeton University, to talk about her book Creatures of Cain: The Hunt for Human Nature in Cold War America, which follows the rise and fall of the “killer ape hypothesis”—the idea that our capacity for killing each other is what makes us human.

This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.

Download the transcript (PDF)

Listen to previous podcasts.

About the Science Podcast

[Image: Wornden LY/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Jan 24 2019

32mins

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Rank #19: Podcast: Cracking the smell code, why dinosaurs had wings before they could fly, and detecting guilty feelings in altruistic gestures

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This week, we chat about why people are nice to each other—does it feel good or are we just avoiding feeling bad—approaches to keeping arsenic out of the food supply, and using artificial intelligence to figure out what a chemical smells like to a human nose with Online News Editor David Grimm. And Stephen Brusatte joins Alexa Billow to discuss why dinosaurs evolved wings and feathers before they ever flew. And in the latest installment of our monthly books segment, Jen Golbeck talks with Bill Schutt, author of Cannibalism: A Perfectly Natural History.  

Listen to previous podcasts.

[Image: Todd Marshall; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Feb 23 2017

31mins

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Rank #20: How DNA is revealing Latin America’s lost histories, and how to make a molecule from just two atoms

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Geneticists and anthropologists studying historical records and modern-day genomes are finding traces of previously unknown migrants to Latin America in the 16th and 17th centuries, when Asians, Africans, and Europeans first met indigenous Latin Americans. Sarah Crespi talks with contributing correspondent Lizzie Wade about what she learned on the topic at the American Association of Physical Anthropologists’s annual meeting in Austin.

Sarah also interviews Kang-Keun Ni about her research using optical tweezers to bring two atoms—one cesium and one sodium—together into a single molecule. Such precise control of molecule formation is allowing new observations of these basic processes and is opening the door to creating new molecules for quantum computing.

This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.

Listen to previous podcasts.

[Image: Juan Fernando Ibarra; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

Apr 12 2018

20mins

Play