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Science & Medicine

Science Magazine Podcast

Updated 12 days ago

Science & Medicine
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Weekly podcasts from Science Magazine, the world's leading journal of original scientific research, global news, and commentary.

Read more

Weekly podcasts from Science Magazine, the world's leading journal of original scientific research, global news, and commentary.

iTunes Ratings

402 Ratings
Average Ratings
255
63
36
30
18

The Best

By gilledfreak - Mar 08 2018
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Sarah is amazing. Love this podcast

great program

By Margot Brinn - Oct 09 2017
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I love the interviewers excellent questions and the interviewees well researched answers.

iTunes Ratings

402 Ratings
Average Ratings
255
63
36
30
18

The Best

By gilledfreak - Mar 08 2018
Read more
Sarah is amazing. Love this podcast

great program

By Margot Brinn - Oct 09 2017
Read more
I love the interviewers excellent questions and the interviewees well researched answers.
Cover image of Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast

Updated 12 days ago

Read more

Weekly podcasts from Science Magazine, the world's leading journal of original scientific research, global news, and commentary.

Rank #1: Next-generation cellphone signals could interfere with weather forecasts, and monitoring smoke from wildfires to model nuclear winter

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In recent months, telecommunications companies in the United States have purchased a new part of the spectrum for use in 5G cellphone networks. Weather forecasters are concerned that these powerful signals could swamp out weaker signals from water vapor—which are in a nearby band and important for weather prediction. Freelance science writer Gabriel Popkin joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about the possible impact of cellphone signals on weather forecasting and some suggested regulations.

In other weather news this week, Sarah talks with Pengfei Yu, a professor at Jinan University in Guangzhou, China, about his group’s work using a huge smoke plume from the 2017 wildfires in western Canada as a model for smoke from nuclear bombs. They found the wildfire smoke lofted itself 23 kilometers into the stratosphere, spread across the Northern Hemisphere, and took 8 months to dissipate, which line up with models of nuclear winter and suggests these fires can help predict the results of a nuclear war.

This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.

Ads on this week’s show: KiwiCo.com

Download the transcript (PDF) 

Listen to previous podcasts.

About the Science Podcast
Aug 08 2019
23 mins
Play

Rank #2: Podcast: Recognizing the monkey in the mirror, giving people malaria parasites as a vaccine strategy, and keeping coastal waters clean with seagrass

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This week, we chat about what it means if a monkey can learn to recognize itself in a mirror, injecting people with live malaria parasites as a vaccine strategy, and insect-inspired wind turbines with Online News Editor David Grimm. And Joleah Lamb joins Alexa Billow to discuss how seagrass can greatly reduce harmful microbes in the ocean—protecting people and corals from disease. Read the research.   Listen to previous podcasts.   [Image: peters99/iStock; Music: Jeffrey Cook]
Feb 16 2017
20 mins
Play

Rank #3: Podcast: The archaeology of democracy, new additions to the uncanny valley, and the discovery of ant-ibiotics

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This week, what bear-mounted cameras can tell us about their caribou-hunting habits, ants that mix up their own medicine, and feeling alienated by emotional robots with Online News Editor David Grimm. And Lizzie Wade joins Sarah Crespi to discuss new thinking on the origins of democracy outside of Europe, based on archeological sites in Mexico.

Listen to previous podcasts.

Download the show transcript.

Transcripts courtesy of Scribie.com.

[Image: rpbirdman/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook]
Mar 16 2017
24 mins
Play

Rank #4: Earthquakes caused by too much water extraction, and a dog cancer that has lived for millennia

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After two mysterious earthquake swarms occurred under the Sea of Galilee, researchers found a relationship between these small quakes and the excessive extraction of groundwater. Science journalist Michael Price talks with host Sarah Crespi about making this connection and what it means for water-deprived fault areas like the Sea of Galilee and the state of California.

Also this week, Sarah talks with graduate student Adrian Baez-Ortega from the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom’s Transmissible Cancer Group about the genome of a canine venereal cancer that has been leaping from dog to dog for about 8000 years. By comparing the genomes of this cancer from dogs around the globe, the researchers were able to learn more about its origins and spread around the world. They also discuss how such a long-lived cancer might help them better understand and treat human cancers.

This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.

Ads on this week’s show: Science Sessions podcast from the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Download the transcript (PDF)

Listen to previous podcasts.

About the Science Podcast
Aug 01 2019
26 mins
Play

Rank #5: Science Podcast - Monstrous stone monuments of old and a rundown of stories from our daily news site (3 Jan 2014)

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Britain's prehistoric stone monuments; stories from our daily news site.
Jan 03 2014
19 mins
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Rank #6: Podcast: Dancing dinosaurs, naked black holes, and more

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What stripped an unusual black hole of its stars? Can a bipolar drug change ant behavior? And did dinosaurs dance to woo mates? Science's Online News Editor David Grimm chats about these stories and more with Science's Multimedia Producer Sarah Crespi. Plus,Science's Emily Underwood wades into the muddled world of migraine research, and Jessica Metcalf talks about using modern microbial means to track mammalian decomposition.
Jan 08 2016
31 mins
Play

Rank #7: Podcast: Where dog breeds come from, bots that build buildings, and gathering ancient human DNA from cave sediments

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This week, a new family tree of dog breeds, advances in artificial wombs, and an autonomous robot that can print a building with Online News Editor David Grimm.  

Viviane Slon joins Sarah Crespi to discuss a new way to seek out ancient humans—without finding fossils or bones—by screening sediments for ancient DNA.  

Jen Golbeck interviews Andrew Shtulman, author of Scienceblind: Why Our Intuitive Theories About the World Are So Often Wrong for this month’s book segment.   

Listen to previous podcasts.  

See more book segments.    

Download the show transcript.

Transcripts courtesy of Scribie.com.

[Image: nimis69/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook]
Apr 27 2017
24 mins
Play

Rank #8: Podcast: A planet beyond Pluto, the bugs in your home, and the link between marijuana and IQ

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Online News Editor David Grimm shares stories on studying marijuana use in teenage twins, building a better maze for psychological experiments, and a close inspection of the bugs in our homes. Science News Writer Eric Hand joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss the potential for a ninth planet in the solar system that circles the sun just once every 15,000 years.  [Image: Gilles San Martin/CC BY-SA 2.0]
Jan 21 2016
17 mins
Play

Rank #9: Genes that turn off after death, and debunking the sugar conspiracy

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Some of our genes come alive after we die. David Grimm—online news editor for Science—talks with Sarah Crespi about which genes are active after death and what we can learn about time of death by looking at patterns of postmortem gene expression.

Sarah also interviews David Merritt Johns of Columbia University about the so-called sugar conspiracy. Historical evidence suggests, despite recent media reports, it is unlikely that “big sugar” influenced U.S. nutrition policy and led to the low-fat diet fad of the ’80s and ’90s.

Listen to previous podcasts.

[Image: Lauri Andler (Phantom); Music: Jeffrey Cook]
Feb 15 2018
13 mins
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Rank #10: Testosterone, women, and elite sports and a news roundup

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Katrina Karkazis discusses the controversial use of testosterone testing by elite sports organizations to determine who can compete as a woman, and David Grimm discusses daily news stories. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Img: Alexander Hassenstein/Getty Images]
May 21 2015
29 mins
Play

Rank #11: Drug use in the ancient world, and what will happen to plants as carbon dioxide levels increase

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Armed with new data, archaeologists are revealing that mind-altering drugs were present at the dawn of the first complex societies some 5000 years ago in the ancient Middle East. Contributing writer Andrew Lawler joins Sarah Crespi to discuss the evidence for these drugs and how they might have impacted early societies and beliefs.

Sarah also interviews Sarah Hobbie of the University of Minnesota about the fate of plants under climate change. Will all that extra carbon dioxide in the air be good for certain types of flora? A 20-year long study published this week in Science suggests theoretical predictions have been off the mark.

This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.

Listen to previous podcasts.

[Image: Public domain Music: Jeffrey Cook]
Apr 19 2018
23 mins
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Rank #12: How whales got so big, sperm in space, and a first look at Jupiter’s poles

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This week we have stories on strange dimming at a not-so-distant star, sending sperm to the International Space Station, and what the fossil record tells us about how baleen whales got so ginormous with Online News Editor David Grimm.

Julia Rosen talks to Scott Bolton about surprises in the first data from the Juno mission, including what Jupiter’s poles look like and a peak under its outer cloud layers.

Listen to previous podcasts. 

[Music: Jeffrey Cook]
May 25 2017
27 mins
Play

Rank #13: A new dark matter signal from the early universe, massive family trees, and how we might respond to alien contact

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For some time after the big bang there were no stars. Researchers are now looking at cosmic dawn—the time when stars first popped into being—and are seeing hints of dark matter’s influence on supercold hydrogen clouds. News Writer Adrian Cho talks with Sarah Crespi about how this observation was made and what it means for our understanding of dark matter.

Sarah also interviews Joanna Kaplanis of the Wellcome Sanger Institute in Hinxton, U.K., about constructing enormous family trees based on an online social genealogy platform. What can we learn from the biggest family tree ever built—with 13 million members spanning 11 generations?

In a bonus segment recording during a live podcasting event at the AAAS Annual Meeting in Austin, Sarah talks with Michael Varnum of Arizona State University in Tempe about what people think they will do if humanity comes into contact with aliens that just happen to be microbes. Live recordings sessions at the AAAS meeting were supported by funds from the European Commission.

This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.

Listen to previous podcasts.

[Image: Kilo-Degree Survey Collaboration/H. Hildebrandt & B. Giblin/ESO; Music: Jeffrey Cook]
Mar 01 2018
34 mins
Play

Rank #14: Paying cash for carbon, making dogs friendly, and destroying all life on Earth

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This week we have stories on the genes that may make dogs friendly, why midsized animals are the fastest, and what it would take to destroy all the life on our planet with Online News Editor David Grimm.

Sarah Crespi talks to Seema Jayachandran about paying cash to Ugandan farmers to not cut down trees—does it reduce deforestation in the long term?

Listen to previous podcasts.

[Image: Kerrick/iStockphoto; Music: Jeffrey Cook]
Jul 20 2017
28 mins
Play

Rank #15: Breeding better bees, and training artificial intelligence on emotional imagery

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Imagine having a rat clinging to your back, sucking out your fat stores. That’s similar to what infested bees endure when the Varroa destructor mite comes calling. Some bees fight back, wiggling, scratching, and biting until the mites depart for friendlier backs. Now, researchers, professional beekeepers, and hobbyists are working on ways to breed into bees these mite-defeating behaviors to rid them of these damaging pests. Host Sarah Crespi and Staff Writer Erik Stokstad discuss the tactics of, and the hurdles to, pesticide-free mite control.

Also this week, Sarah talks to Philip Kragel of the Institute of Cognitive Science at the University of Colorado in Boulder about training an artificial intelligence on emotionally charged images. The ultimate aim of this research: to understand how the human visual system is involved in processing emotion.

And in books, Kate Eichorn, author of The End of Forgetting: Growing Up with Social Media, joins books host Kiki Sanford to talk about how the monetization of digital information has led to the ease of social media sharing and posting for kids and adults.

This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.

Download a transcript (PDF) 

Listen to previous podcasts.

About the Science Podcast

[Image: Steve Baker/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]
Jul 25 2019
39 mins
Play

Rank #16: The bond between people and dogs and a news roundup

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Evan MacLean discusses the role of oxytocin in mediating the relationship between dogs and people, and David Grimm discusses daily news stories. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Img: Teresa Alexander-Arab/flickr/Creative Commons BY-ND 2.0]
Apr 16 2015
23 mins
Play

Rank #17: The biology of color, a database of industrial espionage, and a link between prions and diabetes

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This week we hear stories on diagnosing Alzheimer’s disease in chimps, a potential new pathway to diabetes—through prions—and what a database of industrial espionage says about the economics of spying with Online News Editors David Grimm and Catherine Matacic.

Sarah Crespi talks to Innes Cuthill about how the biology of color intersects with behavior, development, and vision. And Mary Soon Lee joins to share some of her chemistry haiku—one poem for each element in the periodic table.

Listen to previous podcasts.

[Image: Zoltan Tasi/Unsplash; Music: Jeffrey Cook]
Aug 03 2017
27 mins
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Rank #18: A jump in rates of knee arthritis, a brief history of eclipse science, and bands and beats in the atmosphere of brown dwarfs

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This week we hear stories on a big jump in U.S. rates of knee arthritis, some science hits and misses from past eclipses, and the link between a recently discovered thousand-year-old Viking fortress and your Bluetooth earbuds with Online News Editor David Grimm.

Sarah Crespi talks to Daniel Apai about a long-term study of brown dwarfs and what patterns in the atmospheres of these not-quite-stars, not-quite-planets can tell us.

Listen to previous podcasts.

[Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech; Music: Jeffrey Cook]
Aug 17 2017
18 mins
Play

Rank #19: How the measles virus disables immunity to other diseases and a news roundup

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Michael Mina discusses how measles destroys immunity to other infectious diseases and why the measles vaccine has led to disproportionate reductions in childhood mortality since its introduction 50 years ago, and David Grimm discusses daily news stories. Hosted by Susanne Bard. [Img: UNICEF Ethiopia/Creative Commons License BY-NC-ND 2.0, via flickr]
May 07 2015
25 mins
Play

Rank #20: Podcast: Babylonian astronomers, doubly domesticated cats, and outrunning a T. Rex

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Online news editor David Grimm shares stories on 66-million-year-old Tyrannosaurus rex tracks, a signature of human consciousness, and a second try at domesticating cats. Mathieu Ossendrijver joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss newly translated Babylonian tablets that extend the roots of calculus all the way back to between 350 B.C.E. to 50 B.C.E. Read the related research in Science.
Jan 28 2016
24 mins
Play

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