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All Angular Podcasts by Devchat.tv

Updated 10 days ago

Technology
Software How-To
Tech News
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All Angular podcasts produced by Devchat.tv: - Adventures in Angular - My Angular Story - Angular Rants

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All Angular podcasts produced by Devchat.tv: - Adventures in Angular - My Angular Story - Angular Rants

iTunes Ratings

29 Ratings
Average Ratings
24
3
2
0
0

The best source for Angular knowledge

By The Best Gabe on the Planet - Jun 12 2016
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One of the best tech podcasts I've listened to, and I listen to a lot. On this podcast, the masters of angular and programming meet. Not only do I learn a lot about upcoming technologies and approaches to development, I also learn about how to think about programming. And, they're entertaining. I look forward to each episode with excitement and deep anticiptation.

Stacked Panel - 10/10 Resources of Angular Folks

By tg18509 - Feb 08 2016
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This podcast is the best! If you’re trying to stay up on the latest in Angular then you’re going to absolutely love AiA. I’ve been listening to them as much as possible for the past year and a half or so, and they continue to put out the best content out there. It’s useful time and time again.

iTunes Ratings

29 Ratings
Average Ratings
24
3
2
0
0

The best source for Angular knowledge

By The Best Gabe on the Planet - Jun 12 2016
Read more
One of the best tech podcasts I've listened to, and I listen to a lot. On this podcast, the masters of angular and programming meet. Not only do I learn a lot about upcoming technologies and approaches to development, I also learn about how to think about programming. And, they're entertaining. I look forward to each episode with excitement and deep anticiptation.

Stacked Panel - 10/10 Resources of Angular Folks

By tg18509 - Feb 08 2016
Read more
This podcast is the best! If you’re trying to stay up on the latest in Angular then you’re going to absolutely love AiA. I’ve been listening to them as much as possible for the past year and a half or so, and they continue to put out the best content out there. It’s useful time and time again.
Cover image of All Angular Podcasts by Devchat.tv

All Angular Podcasts by Devchat.tv

Updated 10 days ago

Read more

All Angular podcasts produced by Devchat.tv: - Adventures in Angular - My Angular Story - Angular Rants

Rank #1: MAS 089: Craig Spence

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Sponsors

  • Sentry– use the code “devchat” for two months free on Sentry’s small plan

  • CacheFly

Host: Aaron Frost

Joined By Special Guest: Craig Spence

Episode Summary

Craig Spence joins Aaron Frost at Angular Denver to share his journey as an Angular developer. After switching majors from Music to Multimedia Systems Engineering in university, Craig interned for Weta Digital and there he realized how powerful the web was. He then started working for Trade Me, an eBay like website in New Zealand where people buy and sell all kinds of things . There he worked in a team migrating the website from AngularJS to Angular. Craig shares his experiences and many crises they faced during this transition and explains how they resolved them. He currently works as a Senior Engineer at Spotify in Sweden.

Links

Aug 06 2019
40 mins
Play

Rank #2: AiA 157: Building Angular

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Panel: 

Ward

Alyssa

Joe

Charles

In this episode of Adventures in Angular the panel tackles the topic of build systems for Angular. Since the building process is subjective to experience and options. The panel talks about different ways to build based on their own qualification and prior knowledge of things like web pack, system JS, and many more.

Joe, Ward, Alyssa, and Charles discuss how Web Pack is used, and individual problems they encounter in areas of the CLI and other areas. Ward and the team discuss guides to the CLI and deployments. Also, some talks about working backward to figure issues out. Also the key four lines of code.

In particular, we dive pretty deep on:

  • Issues with Web pack
  • Using Node Server
  • Encounter problems with the CLI
  • Manually making sure production line of code do not change
  • and many more

Links

Picks:

Ward

The Annual Procrastination Conference 

Angular in Memory Web API

Fences 

Alyssa

Joe

  • Plural Sight Course  - Migrating from Angular JS to Angular
  • Sara Cooper 

Charles

Sep 26 2017
54 mins
Play

Rank #3: AiA 199: RxJS with Ben Lesh, Tracy Lee, and Jay Phelps

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Panel:

  • Shai Reznik
  • Joe Eames
  • Alyssa Nicoll
  • Ward Bell

Special Guests:

In this episode, the Adventures in Angular panel talks to Ben Lesh, Tracy Lee, and Jay Phelps about RxJS. Tracey is the co-founder of This Dot Labs, which does a lot for the JavaScript community and does JavaScript consulting, as well as is on the RxJS core team. Jay is also a co-founder of This Dot Labs and used to be on the RxJS core team. Finally, Ben is an engineer at Google, is the RxJS project lead there, and is on the Angular team. They talk about the changes to RxJS from the past year, the API changes for version 6, and more!

In particular, we dive pretty deep on:

  • Ben, Tracey, and Jay intros
  • What happened in the last year with RxJS?
  • No longer a test scheduler
  • Using real timers
  • Version 5 VS version 6
  • TestScheduler.Run method
  • Won’t have to write code with injecting a scheduler
  • What’s the best way to get started?
  • Look at the docs
  • Understanding Marble diagrams
  • Many blog articles on Marble syntax out there
  • Wasn’t originally designed for public consumption
  • Using the test Scheduler is not a requirement for testing RxJS code
  • Jasmine testing framework
  • Jest
  • Marbles diagrams are a bit more declarative and specific to RxJS
  • Is it a part of RxJS proper?
  • API changes for version 6
  • Backwards compatibility package
  • TSLint rules
  • rxjs-tslint
  • TypeScript
  • And much, much more!

Links:

Sponsors

Picks:

Shai

Joe

Ward

Tracey

Ben

Jay

Jul 24 2018
1 hour 26 mins
Play

Rank #4: AiA 214: NgRx Tips & Tricks with Adrian Fâciu

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Panel:

  • Charles Max Wood
  • John Papa

Special Guest: Adrian Faciu

In this episode, Chuck talks with Adrian Faciu who is a developer for Visma and is a blogger. The panel talks to Adrian about his blog titled, “NgRx Tips & Tricks.” They ask Adrian in-depth questions about NgRx, among many other topics. Listen to today’s episode for more details!

Show Topics:

0:00 – Advertisement: AngularBootCamp.Com

0:55 – Chuck: Hi! Our guest is Adrian Faciu.

1:10 – Guest: Hello! I am Adrian and I am a developer who works for a Norwegian company, but I live in Romania!

1:35 – Chuck.

1:36 – Guest.

1:47 – Chuck: The market is so global. I have talked with many different guests from different parts of the world – it’s really neat! It’s this global phenomenon.

2:12 – Guest: It’s a great thing!

2:23 – Chuck: They have an office where you live?

2:31 – Yes.

2:37 – Chuck: How are you guys using Angular over there?

2:47 – Guest: We have several different products. We customize using them with internalized tools.

3:04 – Chuck: Real quick let’s talk about your blog post. I will admit I am not that familiar with NgRx, so I will ask newbie questions. Now do you want to explain what this is?

3:41 – Guest: Sure! The short story of the article is I saw people doing things the hard way. And after I figured out some things, people encouraged me to write about my experience.

4:37 – Chuck: John Papa just signed-in!

4:53 – Guest: Yes NgRx is...

5:02 – Chuck: You used classes for all actions what do you mean by that?

5:05 – Guest answers the question into detail.

6:31 – Chuck: Let’s say we have a class that uses a log error...

6:42 – Guest: For example you have actions that...

7:02 – Chuck: When you use the reducer...

7:10 – Guest: There are other tricks we can use like keeping all of them in the same file...

8:00 – Guest talks about the union type.

8:24 – Chuck: You learned this by doing things wrong – what happens when you do these things wrong?

8:30 – Guest: If you don’t put all of your classes in the right file then you end up with a lot of files. If you don’t create hero types then you’d have to...

10:02 – Chuck: If you import user actions then does it import all of the other types?

10:08 – Guest: Import everything from that file.

10:17 – Chuck: If you have any questions, John, feel free to chime-in!

10:29 – John: Yeah I am scanning through this.

The negative I hear a lot of through actions, it’s cause we create constants – the action class creators, it seems to cause an undue amount of stress. How much actual code do you actually have to write – how do you feel about that?

11:12 – Guest: I didn’t want to write all of this code! That’s what I wanted to avoid.

11:44 – John: I wrote them, didn’t like them, I went back to them...

It wasn’t just that I created a new action I had to create the constant and other things – also the place you do the union type, I’d forget to do the union type at the end! If you don’t have all of those things then it won’t work. Even on a simple project I’d have 120 lines of code for a simple task.

12:49 – Guest: Yes. Sometimes I would forget this or that. I’d have to figure out what I did wrong. I went back and created classes for a lot of things. I like the benefits.

13:19 – John: I like your ideas and your tips in your blog.

How do you feel about the NAMES of those actions?

13:55 – Guest.

14:51 – John: Important part is the naming of the string inside of it – that’s the value...

So you can see the actions that are being displayed.

15:25 – Guest: If you didn’t do it right that’s where the problem would be.

15:38 – John: To me it’s a love/hate relationship b/c there is so much code to it. I usually copy and paste which means that I usually forget to change something. I agree, but I don’t’ like creating it.

16:05 – Guest: I’ve been trying to figure out a solution for it eventually I gave up.

16:23 – John: Moving onto effects – inside that happens inside of the Redux cycle – if you want to do something outside of it that’s when you do effects right?

16:40 – Guest.

16:49 – John: Using the effects is good or do it a different way?

17: 20 – Guest: It makes my components cleaner. I have seen projects that DON’T use it and it’s not the best.

17:36 – John: Like getting a list of customers...

(I am using my hands and nobody can see me!)

It’s weird to me to NOT use the effects!

18:52 – Guest: If you implement some type of caching then it’s everything to put everything in the state.

19:07 – Chuck: I haven’t used it as much as I would like, but I haven’t do much with it.

19:23 – John: I am curious from somebody hasn’t dove into it – does effects make sense to you, Chuck?

19:39 – Chuck: It seems like effects is a side effect? Like calling out an external API...

20:10 – John: Yeah even multiple effects.

John asks a question.

20:23 – Guest answers the question.

20:29 – Chuck: I like that you can make constrained assumptions and all of the complicated...

21:10 – Guest: I am using my effects like functions.

21:26 – John’s question.

21:31 – Chuck: Doing everything!

You said implement the 2-payload method – that doesn’t make sense?

21:43 – Guest: Not 100% convinced you need it. What people are doing on these actions...

22:43 – Chuck: How much magic you want?

22:50 – Guest.

22:59 – John: I am confused about ERROR HANDLING. What do you advise for people to do?

23:21 – Guest: Basically, when you deal with that effect you deal with the actions, and the actions...

If you get an error on it it’s done. I was trying to explain there that...do it on another stream. Try it on another stream and handle it. What happened to me – I did it on the action state and I got an error and then everything will stop.

24:27 – John: That’s not good!

24:32 – Chuck.

24:35 – John: Good tip!

24:40 – Chuck: Angular has gotten better at that. I still find, though...

25:06 – John.

25:16 – John: Hey I appreciate these blog posts that don’t always show the happy path. To show the unhappy path is a good idea.

25:32 – Chuck.

26:00 – Going down your list, Adrian, let’s talk about effects are services. I agree, but not that we have...

26:24 – Guest: I have seen cases where people forget that. They say I want to call a service, how do I do that? They forget...

26:50 – John: You have to provide your services somewhere. The old way was you could go into the...

What do you do?

27:28 – Guest: Most of the applications...

28:17 – John.

28:25 – Chuck: I love deleting code!

28:32 – John: You end up in a spaghetti pool, though, if you needed that deleted code. Nooooo!!!

29:00 – Chuck.

29:01 – Guest.

29:10 – Advertisement: Get A Coder Job!

29:49 – John: Let’s talk about reducers – the smallest part of your tip sections. You say, “keep them simple” – how do you keep them simple?

30:07 – Guest: I have received this observation from several people. This is the biggest problem I had.

How to keep them simple...

31:08 – John: When someone makes that type of code – where would you want them to put it?

31:23 – Guest: It depends on different types of actions. Maybe I have some sort of matter that I added to the data – an action from my application we can catch it into an effect and...

Not all of the actions have to go to the reducer.

32:04 – John: I say, “Hmm...” when I see reducers like this...they are running a synchronized code inside of a reducer. And I see that a lot.

32:24 – Chuck.

32:28 – John: You go call a reaction, and...sometimes they are doing HTP there, but it’s hard to explain.

33:11 – John: What are some of the things that they can do to step-into, when they are using these?

33:16 – Guest: That’s why I only have these things about the reducers.

33:48 – Chuck: I am wondering what is the life cycle look like? What do you call a reducer from an effect from an action or vice versa?

34:09 – Guest answers the question.

34:37 – John: It can be confusing with all of these different terms. Where does it end? Your component you have to say: call this action. Perform this action and then the action says get customers – the NgRx library listens for that and helps connect to the reducer for you. Look into the action and then return that to a stream to whatever...

35:29 – Guest: Yes, it sends it to reducers.

Guest goes into more detail.

36:09 – John: You never talk to the reducer directly?

36:17 – Chuck: ...is that something I should have done before – or does it call effects and the effects load the information into the state and the reducer pulls it out for the action?

36:46 – Guest.

36:58 – Chuck.

37:03 – Guest.

37:53 – John: It really depends on what you want to do, Chuck.

John will give a hypothetical scenario.

38:58 – Chuck: In your scenario, let’s say...

39:14 – John: Everything is right up until the end there.

It’s a little magical, honestly. I just know here is my selector and here is my data!

40:17 – Chuck: Selector is essentially I am interested in THIS state or THIS state change.

40:40 – Guest.

40:50 – Chuck: So when that changes...

40:56 – Guest.

40:59 – John.

41:05 – Chuck: A little piece of the overall store.

41:18 – Guest: My tip there was a bout the selectors...

42:30 – Chuck: So I can hand off my selector to multiple places?

42:36 – Guest: Yep. You don’t need to know anything else.

42:44 – Guest: Combine it as needed. Another benefit here is memorization. It says that each time you select pure functions it wont call the function again.

43:42 – I am seeing a trend in your tips, too. I am seeing easier way to code. You are always saying selector technique. There are a lot of terms in NgRx module. Dispatchers and states and stores...it’s nice to have a way to create the code easier.

44:21 – Guest: It does take a lot of time for someone to grasp.

44:30 – Chuck.

44:35 – John: Don’t use the store all over the place – that’s what Adrian says!

44:54 – Guest: I think it’s more like dumb components. I have a container of all of these dumb components. The container is the one that KNOWS.

46:22 – Chuck: It’s just a button.

46:28 – Guest: You click the button and it triggers. Whenever you want to use that component then you...

46:48 – Chuck: Any types of data that you wouldn’t want to use in your NgRx store?

47:07 – Guest: It depends – I am not holding any logging information there, though.

47:51 – John: I like to ask WHY. Property initialization. You are saying...

48:11 – Guest: It’s less code and it’s reasonable. If I can have less code then I’d love to have it. I think it’s cleaner b/c it’s not that much code. Most people might think blah, blah, blah, but I think it looks okay.

48:46 – John: I can see why it would be less code.

48:57 – Guest.

49:07 – John: I haven’t seen this: looking at your property initializer...

Looking at your code here, Adrian...

The store object itself is a reference to the NgRx store. That means you have to...

To me I don’t want my app to know that NgRx is involved. I started to do this...I was creating an Angular service, which...

Have you done this before?

50:33 – Guest:  I have seen this function but I haven’t played with it. It makes sense. This takes it a step further. Like you say it’s perfect b/c nobody knows anything about that store, but it’s a new level. I think you have some benefits with that way of doing it, too.

51:23 – John: The one thing that sticks out is company name is your observable, then your...

52:10 – Guest: Yeah that’s good b/c it might be better! They might not even know what NgRx is, and you have a service so just use them. Yeah it’s just an observable.

52:33 – Chuck: You don’t want to see my garage.

52:44 – Guest: Some services are underrated. Like you suggested we could use them for much more.

53:01 – Guest: It was nice writing these tips.

53:19 – Chuck: What are working on now?

53:23 – Guest: Writing a new blog.

53:41 – Chuck: We will keep an eye out for it. Where do you post?

53:55 – Guest: Usually Medium, and Twitter.

Search for my name and you will find me, b/c I have the same handler on all the places.

54:15 – Chuck & John: Let’s go to picks!

54:30 – Chuck is talking about future episodes and potential topics.

You can vote stuff up on Trello on NgRx so we can go deeper on this topic.

55:40 – Advertisement – Fresh Books!

1:02:00 – Advertisement – Cache Fly!

Links:

Sponsors:

Picks:

John

  • NgRx Data
  • Conferences  - Don’t feel mofo

Charles

Adrain

Nov 06 2018
1 hour 2 mins
Play

Rank #5: AiA 164: TypeScript with Amanda Silver

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Charles Max Wood

Special Guests: 

Amanda Silver

In this episode, Charles is at Microsoft Connect 2017 in NYC. Charles speaks with Amanda Silver. Amanda is deemed the  TypeScript and future of JavaScript guru, and this year's speakers at Microsoft Connect with Visual Studio Live Share. Amanda shares what is new with TypeScript and how that is a kind of subscript to JavaScript. Amanda explains the big picture of TypeScript’s inception and where she believes the language will be most efficient and effective for JavaScript and TypeScript developers.

In particular, we dive pretty deep on:

  • What is new in TypeScript?
  • Keep JavaScript and TypeScript aligned
  • TypeScript is implemented to create larger scaled applications
  • Integration with VS Code, etc.
  • Building better tools for JavaScript Developers
  • When would this be taken on by users
  • Defaults in Visual Studio
  • TypeScript replacing JavaScript type service
  • TypeScript is written in TypeScript
  • Chakra runtime
  • Diaspora
  • The different faces of JavaScript
  • Optimized JavaScript runtime
  • Languages should be created with tooling
  • A satisfying tooling experience
  • Foot Guns
  • New Tokens
  • Eco-systems and metadata
  • Multi-phase
  • Minimum common denominator constantly changing
  • Collaborating on the same code
  • Open Source and the impact
  • How to move to open source
  • Contributing
  • The next thing for TypeScript
  • The future of JavaScript
  • And much more!

Links:

  • @amandaksilver

Picks:

Amanda

Charles

Charles Max Wood

Special Guests: 

Amanda Silver

In this episode, Charles is at Microsoft Connect 2017 in NYC. Charles speaks with Amanda Silver. Amanda is deemed the  TypeScript and future of JavaScript guru, and this year's speakers at Microsoft Connect with Visual Studio Live Share. Amanda shares what is new with TypeScript and how that is a kind of subscript to JavaScript. Amanda explains the big picture of TypeScript’s inception and where she believes the language will be most efficient and effective for JavaScript and TypeScript developers.

In particular, we dive pretty deep on:

  • What is new in TypeScript?
  • Keep JavaScript and TypeScript aligned
  • TypeScript is implemented to create larger scaled applications
  • Integration with VS Code, etc.
  • Building better tools for JavaScript Developers
  • When would this be taken on by users
  • Defaults in Visual Studio
  • TypeScript replacing JavaScript type service
  • TypeScript is written in TypeScript
  • Chakra runtime
  • Diaspora
  • The different faces of JavaScript
  • Optimized JavaScript runtime
  • Languages should be created with tooling
  • A satisfying tooling experience
  • Foot Guns
  • New Tokens
  • Eco-systems and metadata
  • Multi-phase
  • Minimum common denominator constantly changing
  • Collaborating on the same code
  • Open Source and the impact
  • How to move to open source
  • Contributing
  • The next thing for TypeScript
  • The future of JavaScript
  • And much more!

Links:

  • @amandaksilver

Picks:

Amanda

Charles

Nov 22 2017
1 hour 4 mins
Play

Rank #6: AiA 162: Change detection in Angular with Maxim Koretskyi

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Panel: 

Joe Eames

Alyssa Nicoll

Shai Reznik

Special Guest:

Maxim Koretskyi

In the episode of Adventures in Angular the panel welcome Maxim Koretskyi to talk about Change Detection in Angular. Maxim explains that he enjoys reverse engineering and working with Angular. Maxim talks about working with Angular and React to figure out how the Change Detection works on both platforms. Furthermore,  Maxim mentions that all his findings and on his blog on Medium.

In particular, we dive pretty deep on:

  • Why Change Detection and what is most interesting about it?
  • Debugging
  • Reversing engineering in React and how Change Detection works
  • The difference in how Change Detection work in Angular and React
  • Diving into the source code for Angular 2.
  • The component is angular?
  • Directives
  • Life Cycle hooks
  • Change detection runs for each view notes
  • View notes are a directive
  • Loops and subsequences
  • Example View at 24:00
  • Intercepting the mouse click
  • Microtasks
  • How does Angular know that something has changed?
  • Compliers
  • Dynamic components

•and much more!

Links: 

Picks:

 Shay Reznik

Alyssa

  • Warld Domination

Joe

Maxim

Nov 08 2017
58 mins
Play

Rank #7: AiA 203: "Where To Store Angular Configurations" with Dave Bush

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Panel:

  • Charles Max Wood
  • John Papa
  • Alyssa Nicholl
  • Joe Eames

Special Guests: Dave Bush

In this episode, the Adventures in Angular panel talks to Dave Bush about his blog post Where To Store Angular Configurations. Dave has been programming for 30 years both in the .net and JavaScript spaces, and has been working with Angular since it first came out. They talk about the inspiration for writing this post, config.json, and APP_INITIALIZER. They also touch on optimizing, if he ever worked with Angular.js, and more!

In particular, we dive pretty deep on:

  • Chuck’s Get a Coder Job Course
  • Dave intro
  • JavaScript and Angular
  • What was the inspiration for this blog post?
  • Blog posts born out of frustration
  • Static config files
  • Config.json
  • Downsides to config.json
  • Replicating on dev servers
  • Local hosts
  • What is APP_INITIALIZER?
  • The cost of APP_INITIALIZER
  • Optimizing
  • Making an environment-agnostic
  • Did you ever work with Angular.js?
  • Pros to the APP_INITIALIZER
  • jQuery
  • Great tips from his article
  • Making one build that works in any environment
  • Moving towards optimization
  • Source maps
  • And much, much more!

Links:

Sponsors

Picks:

Charles

John

Joe

Dave

Aug 21 2018
1 hour
Play

Rank #8: AiA 204: "Real Ward Angular"

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Panel:

  • Charles Max Wood
  • John Papa
  • Alyssa Nicholl
  • Joe Eames
  • Shai Reznik
  • Ward Bell

In this episode, the Adventures in Angular panel talks about what Ward is doing currently, which is working on a large, complex, and involved application that they are using Angular for. They are using this episode to discuss a real-world Angular project or real “Ward” Angular project. They talk a little about what the project is, challenges he has had to overcome, and the differences that come with writing apps in reactivity. They also touch on the idea that “the mystery is part of the pattern,” reactive forms, and more!

In particular, we dive pretty deep on:

  • Get a Coder Job course
  • Angular
  • Ward’s project intro
  • Ward runs a business that builds applications for people
  • Taking lead on a new project
  • ngRx data
  • Redux and RxJS
  • His company makes Breeze
  • Needed an enrollment app
  • Didn’t want to use Breeze, they wanted him to use reactive programming
  • Needed the application to be as simple as possible
  • Why he decided to give reactivity programming a chance
  • Challenges he’s faced
  • Writing enterprise apps in reactivity
  • Immutability
  • Forms over data apps
  • Reactive forms
  • The mystery is part of the pattern
  • Effects
  • Debugging tools
  • Reactive pattern
  • Discovering new ways to code
  • Reactive programming brings in a different set of problems, but it’s not that it’s right or wrong
  • React State Museum
  • And much, much more!

Links:

Sponsors

Picks:

Charles

John

Joe

Shai

Ward

Aug 28 2018
1 hour 10 mins
Play

Rank #9: AiA 251: AngularJS to Angular Migration with Craig Spence

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Sponsors

Panel

  • Aaron Frost

  • Alyssa Nicoll

  • Shai Reznik

Joined By Special Guest: Craig Spence

Episode Summary

Craig Spence was a developer at Trade Me in New Zealand before he moved to Sweden to join Spotify. Trade Me is New Zealand's biggest website and it is similar to eBay where people buy and sell lots of different items. Craig talks about his experiences migrating Trade Me from AngularJS to Angular and the challenges they faced. One of the tips Craig has for the audience is when faced with a problem it is better to ask for help from those who have been in similar situations before, rather that attempting to solve it alone. The panel also agrees that developers should stop writing in AngularJS and make the decision to move forward. Craig recently started working at Spotify in Sweden and is dealing with a challenging bug that has lasted for over 13 days.

Links

Picks

Aaron Frost:

Alyssa Nicoll:

Shai Reznik:

Craig Spence:

Aug 06 2019
42 mins
Play

Rank #10: AiA 216: Building a Complete Web Application from Scratch Alone with Amir Tugendhaft

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Panel:

  • Aaron Frost
  • Brian Love

Special Guest: Amir Tugendhaft

In this episode, Aaron and Brian talk with Amir Tugendhaft who is a web developer who is located in Israel. He finds much gratification developing and building things from scratch. Check out today’s episode where Aaron, Brian, and Amir talk about just that. Other topics include UI Design, Flexbox, UX design, PrimeNG, and ag-Grid.

Show Topics:

0:00 – Advertisement: AngularBootCamp.Com

0:52 – Host: Welcome! Today’s panel is myself, Brian, and our guest is Amir Tugendhaft!

1:13 – Guest: I am a developer and experience with Angular and React.

1:56 – Host: You spend your days/nights there?

2:03 – Panel: He is committed.

2:08 – Host: I am going to back up a second, and Brian could you please introduce yourself, please?

2:26 – Brian: I am the CETO at an Angular consulting firm (Denver, CO). We have the pleasure with working with Aaron from time-to-time. My Twitter handle is @brian_love – check it out!

2:52 – Host: What is CETO stand for?

2:59 – Brian answers the question.

Brian: I oversee the crew among other things.

3:31 – Host: What do you want to talk about today, Amir? You are the guest of honor today!

3:40 – Guest.

4:00 – Host: That is a lot of information – that might be more than 1 episode. We have to stay focused!

4:14 – Host: I read one of your recent blogs about Cross Filled Violators. I met you through your blog before we did the

Host: Give us your own ideas about starting your own app.

4:50 – Guest answers the question.

6:17 – Host: I am biased. But here is a fact. I used to work on a large team (60 people) and everyone committing to the same page app. We were using Angular.js 1.5, which I think they are still using that. I know that it worked but it wasn’t the easiest or fastest one to maintain, but it worked.

7:05 – Brian.

7:10 – Host: What are you trying to do? React doesn’t fulfill that need. I think you are being hyperballic and using extreme cases as the norm. Let’s be honest: we do cool stuff with jQuery plugins when we didn’t have a framework. When they say that the framework is stopping them then I say: I agree to disagree.

8:00 – Host: What do you think, Amir?

8:04 – Guest: I don’t have preferences. I try to build applications through the technologies and create components and simple applications.

8:30 – Brian.

8:33 – Guest: You create the component, and then...

9:21 – Brian: You don’t have to have a template file and another file – right?

9:35 – Guest.

9:48 – Host: I do in-line styles and in-line templates. One thing I learned from React is that I like my HTML, style and code. I like it being the same file as my component. I like that about that: I like single file components. This promotes getting frustrated if it gets too big. Yeah if it’s more than 500 lines than you have to simplify. That’s one of the things that l like.

10:47 – Brian: Modules versus...

10:55 – Guest.

11:07 – Host: I think in React and Vue you have the word module but in JavaScript you have a file that exports...

11:26 – Host: I have my opinion here and talking with Joe. He made a good point: at a certain level the frontend frameworks are the same. You could be doing different things but they basically do the same thing.

13:57 – Guest: Basically what that means is that the technology used it will do the same thing. Your patterns and practices are huge.

14:17 – Brian: If you are talking about the 3 popular frameworks out there – they are basically doing the same thing. I like Angular a little big more, though. Like you said, Aaron, people tend to pick the same one. I like the opinionated things about Angular. You get properties, components or called props or inputs you are getting a lot of the same features. It comes down to your personal preference.

15:31 – Host: What else Amir?

15:35 – Guest: Let’s talk about the UI.

16:05 – Brian.

16:08 – Guest asks a question.

16:25 – Brian: How have you tackled this problem?

16:34 – Guest: I kind of ran with it. If there wasn’t something that I liked I started from scratch, because it really didn’t feel right.

16:51 – Brian: I am an enemy of starting over type of thing. You have a lot of engineers who START projects, and they can say that they start this piece, but the experts and choice team members have what it takes to ship a feature. I mean fully ship it, not just 80%, but also the final 20%. I think it takes a lot of pose decision making to say I want to rewrite it but not right now. I still need to ship this code. I have always been a bigger fan as not rewriting as much as possible; however, if you started with good patterns then that’s true, but if you are starting off with bad patterns then maybe yes. I like that opinion b/c you have to start right.

Brian: How do you do your CSS?

19:05 – Guest.

19:52 – Advertisement: Get A Coder Job!

20:30 – Brian: How do you make those decisions, Amir?

20:39 – Guest: I see something that I like and ask myself how do I apply this to my design and I start scaling things.

21:50 – Host: Are you using a tool like Sketch for your initial UI design?

22:05 – Guest.

22:54 – Host: I worked on a project where the client had a designer (UX).

24:00 – Host and Guest go back-and-forth.

24:51 – Host: I am sure it’s all about the quality from your designer, too. Hopefully it works well for you and it’s quality.

25:18 – Host: There is a lot to building an app from scratch. I am not a good designer. I am not a designer – I mean straight-up. I got nothing. I appreciate team members that can do that.

26:06 – Guest: Do you write...?

26:35 – Host: Only on the most recent project. The designer didn’t own the HTML CSS but he initially wrote it and then gave it to me and now I own it, and it’s in components. If he wants updates then I have to go and make changes b/c he doesn’t know Angular. If it’s a sketch or a PNG you have to make it look like that. That’s what most of my career has been.

Host: HTML and CSS got me 762x easier once Flexbox came around! I know there is a decimal there!

28:23 – Host talks about Flexbox some more.

28:42 – Guest asks a question.

28:50 – Host: I suppose if I really had heavy needs for a table then I would try CSS grid could solve some problems. I might just use a styled table.

29:12 – Brian: ag-Grid or something else.

29:21 – Host: On this recent project...I’ve used in-house design and other things. If I ever needed a table it was there. I don’t rebuild components b/c that can get expensive for me.

30:50 – Brian: Accessibility.

31:00 – Host: Your upgrade just got 10x harder b/c you own the component loop. I really don’t build tables or drop-downs. Only way is if I really need to build it for a specific request.

31:30 – Brian.

31:58 – Host: Let me give you an example. You can think I am crazy, but a designer gave me a drop-down but he told me to use PrimeNG. I had the chose of building my own drop-down or the designer has to accept whatever they gave him. I made the UI make what he wanted and I made the drop-down zero capacity and then...

Host: When you click on what you see you are clicking on the...

Host: Does that make sense?

33:35 – Guest.

33:50 – Host.

34:25 – Brian: That is interesting; remember when...

34:58 – Host: We will send this episode to Jeremy – come on Jeremy! Any last ideas? Let’s move onto picks!

35:20 – Advertisement – Fresh Books! 30-day free trial!

END – Advertisement – Cache Fly!

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Aaron

Amir

Brian

Nov 20 2018
42 mins
Play

Rank #11: AiA 231: Why Angular Developers Should Learn RxJS

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Panel

  • Charles Max Wood
  • Aaron Frost
  • Joe Eames

Joined by Special Guest: Michael Hartington

Episode Summary

Aaron Frost introduces a RxJS as a trend that is also a fundamental for angular. Aaron Frost  shares his experience at ng-conf where the community was polled, and the topic most people wanted to learn was RxJS. Charles Max Wood brings up a previous podcast where Ward Bell predicts this trend, sharing the opinion that angular developers must know RxJS to be successful. The panels discusses the need to be reactive in Angular and the need to react to this trend by learning RxJS. Michael Hartington and Aaron Frost share an examples to show how RxJS simplifies the work.The panel discusses the switch from NgRx or RxJS, and a few things that might help someone looking to switch. Panelists share how they learned RxJS and how it helped them, even if they were reluctant to learn it. They finish by sharing resources they found helpful in learning RxJS.

Links

Picks 

Michael Hartington

  • Harmonquest

Joe Eames

  • Gravity Falls
  • Dungeons and Dragons

Charles Max Wood

  • Podfest
  • Go out and meet awesome people in the angular community

Aaron Frost

  • Captain Crunch - Crunch Berries
Mar 19 2019
45 mins
Play

Rank #12: AiA 219: Testing Angular Applications with Michael Giambalvo

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Panel:

  • Charles Max Wood
  • Joe Eames
  • John Papa
  • Alyssa Nicoll

Special Guest:  Michael Giambalvo

In this episode, Chuck talks with special guest Michael Giambalvo who is an author of the book titled, “Testing Angular Applications.” This book can be purchased through Amazon, Manning Publications, among other sites, too. The panelists and the guest talk about different types of tests, such as end-to-end testing and unit testing. They also talk about Angular, Java, Mocha, Test Café, and much more! Check it out!

Show Topics:

0:00 – Advertisement: AngularBootCamp.Com

0:53 – Chuck: Our panel is John Papa, Joe Eames, Alyssa Nicoll, and myself. My new show is the DevRev – check it out, please!

1:26 – Guest: I am a contributing author to our new book, which is about Angular.

1:56 – Chuck: How is it like to write with multiple people?

2:04 – Guest: Yep it’s hard b/c we are in different areas. Back in the 2.0 days, Jesse was writing a book. He was talking about typescript and components. Craig made friends with Jesse and they were talking about the book he was writing. Then we all jumped in to get in finished. We all had areas that we were specialists in!

3:21 – Alyssa: If you break it up that makes sense.

3:31 – Guest.

3:40 – Panel: Pick different words and go around the room.

3:51 – Panel: You write the first ½ of a sentence and then you write the other ½ of the sentence!

4:10 – Guest: You have these big word documents and go back-and-forth.

4:36 – Alyssa: Editing and then pass it back-and-forth – how does that work?

4:46 – Guest: It’s like 8 pass backs-and-forth.

5:35 – Guest: The editing was the main issue – it took forever!

5:50 – Chuck: We were going to co-author a book and we didn’t.

Chuck: If you could break down the book in 4 core topics what would they be? Elevator pitch? What is the starting knowledge?

6:18 – Guest: We expect you to know Angular Intro and that’s it!

6:43 – Chuck: What are the principles?

6:50 – Guest: We talk about the testing component. We highlight the benefits of using Angular vs. Angular.js. That shows up in the book a lot. It’s very example driven.

7:28 – Chuck: We have been talking about testing quite a bit on the show lately.

8:22 – Chuck: Do you see people using the testing in regards to the pyramid?

8:33 – Guest: I am not a huge fan of the pyramid. Some questions I ask are: Does it run quickly? Is it reliable? To give you some background I work on Google Club Platform.

10:21 – The guest talks about “Page Level Integration Tests.”

11:31 – Alyssa.

11:50 – Chuck: After your explanation after writing your book I’m sure it’s a breeze now. Knowing these tests and having the confidence is great.

12:13 – Guest: Tools like Cypress is very helpful. Web Driver Testing, too.

12:43 – Chuck: Where do people start? What do you recommend? Do they start at Protractor or do they come down to unit tests?

13:02 – Guest: Finding the balance is important.

14:30 – Chuck: Check out a past episode that we’ve done.

14:40 – Panel asks a question about tools such as Test Café and Cypress.

14:50 – Guest: I really don’t know Test Café. There is a long story in how all of these fit together.

The guest talks about Selenium, Cypress, Safari, Edge, Chrome, Firefox, and Puppeteer!

19:24 – Chuck: Does it work in Electron as well, too?

19:26 – Guest: Good question but I don’t know the answer.

19:39 – Chuck: Maybe a listener could write a comment and tell us.

19:43 – Panel: I’ve used Protractor for many years. I like the explanation that you just gave. The great thing about Protractor is that you can...

20:29 – Guest: We wanted to explain the difficulty of Protractor in this book.

Guest: You have this test running in Node but then you have your app running in the browser. You have these 2 different run times. You might have to run them separately and there is tons of complexity.

21:15 – Panel: As I am coding you have this visual browser on one side, and then on the other side you have...

22:22 – Guest asks the panelists a question.

22:32 – Panel: I have only used it for a few months and a few several apps but haven’t had those issues, yet.

22:55 – Guest: I haven’t heard of Test Café at all.

23:05 – Alyssa: Is the book online?

23:13 – Guest: It’s available through Manning Publications and Amazon. I think we have some codes to giveaway!

23:34 – Chuck: Yeah, we are working on those codes and giveaways. We have mentioned about 5 or 6 tools – are you worried about your book going out of date?

24:05 – Guest: Sure that is something we are worried about. When editing took a long time to get through that was one of my thoughts.

The guest talks about Selenium, control flow, Protractor,

25:45 – Guest (continues): These new features were coming out while the book was coming out – so there’s that. What’s this thing about control flow and why this matters to you, etc. We were able to add that into the book, which is good. We were able to get those instructions out there. Books have a delay to them.

26:47 – Chuck: We talked about this in JavaScript Jabber. This guest talked about this and he is from Big Nerd Ranch. At what point do you have this breaking point: This isn’t a good fit for Test Café or Selenium BUT a good fit for Mocha or Jest?

27:27 – Advertisement: Get A Coder Job!

28:04 – Guest: Do you have a reason why you would switch testing tools?

28:12 – Chuck.

28:41 – Guest: That’s the tradeoff as you move down the ladder.

29:43 – Panel: If you want to trigger an action that isn’t triggerable?

29:50 – Guest answers the question.

30:07 – Panel.

30:20 – Chuck.

30:33 – Guest: You can access code. Usually something in a workflow will make it happen. You have to fall back on some type of UI sort of thing. It’s almost like doing Tetris! I’ve never had to directly call something. I am not the best one to answer that.

31:16 – Panel: It’s like a weird mix of tests.

31:29 – Panelist is talking about unit testing and other tests.

31:55 – Chuck asks a question.

32:02 – Guest: It depends on the scale of your project.

32:28 – Chuck: Do you guys use a test coverage tool or on the side of: everything should run and then test if there is a bug.

32:43 – Guest: Coverage isn’t the full story.

33:26 – Panel: You said you weren’t a fan of the testing pyramid – can you explain why?

33:43 – Guest: I think it turns too much prescriptive.

Guest: I think there are bigger concerns out there and the test pyramid is an over-simplification.

35:22 – Panel: What’s the difference between fast and slow testing?

35:28 – Guest: It really depends on your level of knowledge. If your test suite runs more than twenty minutes to an hour that is probably too slow!

36:03 – Alyssa.

36:09 – Chuck.

36:16 – Alyssa: There is no way that 20 minutes equals that!

36:26 – Guest: 20 minutes is the extreme limit. 

36:51 – Chuck.

37:11 – Panel: Any new Twitter news on Trump?

37:21 – Panelist talks about test suites!

37:40 – Panelists and guests go back-and-forth.

38:11 – Chuck: Do you have any recommendations for the unit testing? Keeping it small or not so much?

38:29 – Guest: Think: What is this test asking? Don’t write tests that won’t fail if some other tests could have caught them.

39:04 – Alyssa: That’s smart!

39:09 – Guest continues.

39:28 – Chuck: What else to jump on?

Chuck: Do you write your tests in typescript or in Java?

39:48 – Guest answers the question. He mentions Python, typescript, and more!

40:17 – Alyssa.

40:22 – Guest continues.

40:46 – Alyssa: How many people worked on that project?

40:50 – Guest: 2 or 3 framework engineers who did the tooling. About 20 people total for tooling to make sure everything worked.

41:18 – Panelist asks a question.

41:22 – Guest: About 20 minutes!

42:35 – Guest wants to talk about the topic: end-to-end testing!

44:59 – Chuck: Let’s do picks!

45:09 – Fresh Books!

END – CacheFly!

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Alyssa

Joe

Charles

Michael

Dec 11 2018
54 mins
Play

Rank #13: AiA 243: Lazy loading in Angular (with Angular Elements) with Juri Strumpflohner

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Panel

  • Aaron Frost
  • Joe Eames
  • Brian Love

Joined by Special Guest: Juri Strumpflohner

Episode Summary

A fun conversation about how to lazy load Angular modules with Juri Strumpflohner, a software developer with more 10 years of experience in technologies like Java, .Net and Node.js. Juri is also a  Google Developer Expert in Web Tech and an Egghead.io Instructor.

With lazy loading, it is possible to defer loading unused portions and load them on demand. The panel discusses what can be lazy loaded in an Angular application and how Aaron's for lazy loading in Angular helps with the process. 

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Aaron Frost:

Brian Love:

Joe Eames:

Juri Strumpflohner:

Jun 11 2019
1 hour 3 mins
Play

Rank #14: AiA 238: Angular State w/ NgRx with Mike Ryan

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Panel

  • Aaron Frost
  • Shai Reznik

Joined by Special Guest: Mike Ryan

Summary

In this fun episode, Mike Ryan introduces NgRX and gives the backstory of his getting involved with the NgRx Core Team. The panel discusses use cases where using NgRx is the best choice. Shai Reznik wonders where the cult-like loyalty to NgRx comes from. Mike talks about the future of NgRx and the future of state management in general. The panel discusses Ivy and what it means for state management.

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Aaron Frost:

Shai Reznik:

May 07 2019
56 mins
Play

Rank #15: 001 AiA The Birth of Angular

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In the inaugural episode of Adventures in Angular, the panelists talk to Miško Hevery about the birth of AngularJS.
Jul 31 2014
47 mins
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Rank #16: AiA 222: 10 Lessons Learned in Enterprise Angular Development with Chaz Gatian

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Sponsors

Panel

  • John Papa
  • Alyssa Nichol
  • Joe Eames
  • Charles Max Wood

Joined by Special Guest: Chaz Gatian

Summary

Chaz Gatian joins the show to discuss his blog post, “10 Lessons Learned in Enterprise Angular Development”. He starts by defining enterprise and the panel dives into the first point of his blog post about not making boneheaded mistakes. Next, the panel discusses utilizing view components and compare the ways they organize their code. Which touches on a couple more points, bubbling your components and packaging only if you are going to share. Alyssa Nichol asks Chaz about teams developing a fun application and breaking out of the research loop.

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John Papa

Alyssa Nichol

  • 8th anniversary today!
  • Blow up Christmas At-at

Joe Eames

Charles Max Wood

Chaz Gatian

Jan 15 2019
50 mins
Play

Rank #17: AiA 237: More on RxJS with Deborah Kurata

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Sponsors

Panel

  • Aaron Frost
  • Shai Reznik

Joined by Special Guest: Deborah Kurata

Summary

Deborah Kurata talks about the benefits of using a reactive approach to developing with RxJS. She explains how to use RxJS to program reactively and shares her vision of patterns everywhere to make reactive programming easier.  Shai Reznik asks a lot of great questions about switching to this approach and takes the stance of a new or student developer. Deborah and Aaron advocate for RxJS and debate the best ways to learn RxJs and implement reactive development.  

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Aaron Frost:

Shai Reznik:

Deborah Kurata:

Apr 30 2019
57 mins
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Rank #18: AiA 250: Adventures in 10x

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Sponsors

Panel

  • Aaron Frost
  • Joe Eames
  • Shai Reznik
  • Jennifer Wadella

Episode Summary

Much reaction has been received for the tweet about the 10x developers and this week the panel outlines the checklist a 10x developer has to meet in order to be considered a 10x developer (a developer that outputs 10 times more code than the rest of the company). From always having their screen background set to black to their generally toxic attitude that is disliked by the rest of the team, 10x developers are generally a reason for others to quit their job. The panel discusses why managers continue to keep these people on even though they affect the overall team production negatively and how they should be dealt with.

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Shai Reznik:

Jennifer Wadella:

Joe Eames:

  • Emotional IQ

Aaron Frost:

Jul 30 2019
50 mins
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Rank #19: 012 AiA Directives

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The crew talks about directives in AngularJS.
Oct 16 2014
32 mins
Play

Rank #20: AiA 240: RxJS and Observable Forms in Angular with Sander Elias

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Panel

  • Aaron Frost
  • Shai Reznik
  • Brian Love

Joined by Special Guest: Sander Elias

Episode Summary

In this episode of Adventures in Angular, the panel talks to Sander Elias, Senior Principal Engineer at HeroDevs from Netherlands. Sander is also an Angular Google GDE.

Sander created Observable forms, an alternative way to do forms in Angular which takes advantage of what the platform has to offer.

Aaron also talks about his speech at ng-conf 2019 and his follow up blog post about the speech and why he felt the need to write it.

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Sander Elias:

Aaron Frost:

Brian Love:

Shai Reznik:

May 21 2019
53 mins
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