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(12638)

Rank #3 in Government category

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Government

Radiolab Presents: More Perfect

Updated 4 days ago

Rank #3 in Government category

News
Government
Read more

From the producers of Radiolab, a series about how the Supreme Court got so supreme.

Read more

From the producers of Radiolab, a series about how the Supreme Court got so supreme.

iTunes Ratings

12638 Ratings
Average Ratings
11389
550
286
170
243

Important

By SelahJT - Nov 13 2019
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This podcast should be heard by all of us! Well done!

More of more?

By law nerd88 - Nov 05 2019
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Please continue these episodes, especially during this important time in USSC history!

iTunes Ratings

12638 Ratings
Average Ratings
11389
550
286
170
243

Important

By SelahJT - Nov 13 2019
Read more
This podcast should be heard by all of us! Well done!

More of more?

By law nerd88 - Nov 05 2019
Read more
Please continue these episodes, especially during this important time in USSC history!
Cover image of Radiolab Presents: More Perfect

Radiolab Presents: More Perfect

Updated 4 days ago

Read more

From the producers of Radiolab, a series about how the Supreme Court got so supreme.

Rank #1: Kittens Kick The Giggly Blue Robot All Summer

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We think of the Supreme Court justices as all-powerful beings, issuing momentous rulings from on high. But they haven’t always been so, you know, supreme. On this episode, we go all the way back to the case that, in a lot of ways, started it all. 

Jul 01 2016

36mins

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Rank #2: More Perfect presents: Adoptive Couple v. Baby Girl

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On this episode, a three-year-old girl and the highest court in the land. From the Radiolab archives, Adoptive Couple v. Baby Girl is the story that inspired More Perfect's creation.

Jun 17 2016

42mins

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Rank #3: Object Anyway

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At the trial of James Batson in 1983, the prosecution eliminated all the black jurors from the jury pool. Batson objected, setting off a complicated discussion about jury selection that would make its way all the way up to the Supreme Court. On this episode of More Perfect, the Supreme Court ruling that was supposed to prevent race-based jury selection, but may have only made the problem worse.

Jul 16 2016

48mins

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Rank #4: The Imperfect Plaintiffs

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On this episode, we visit Edward Blum, a 64-year-old “legal entrepreneur” and former stockbroker who has become something of a Supreme Court matchmaker. He’s had remarkable success, with 6 cases heard before the Supreme Court, including that of Abigail Fisher. We also head to Houston, Texas, where in 1998, an unusual 911 call led to one of the most important LGBTQ rights decisions in the Supreme Court’s history.

Jun 28 2016

1hr 4mins

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Rank #5: One Nation, Under Money

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An unassuming string of 16 words tucked into the Constitution grants Congress extensive power to make laws that impact the entire nation. The Commerce Clause has allowed Congress to intervene in all kinds of situations — from penalizing one man for growing too much wheat on his farm, to enforcing the end of racial segregation nationwide. That is, if the federal government can make an economic case for it. This seemingly all-powerful tool has the potential to unite the 50 states into one nation and protect the civil liberties of all. But it also challenges us to consider: when we make everything about money, what does it cost us?

Jan 30 2018

52mins

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Rank #6: Sex Appeal

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“Equal protection of the laws” was granted to all persons by the 14th Amendment in 1868. But for nearly a century after that, women had a hard time convincing the courts that they should be allowed to be jurors, lawyers, and bartenders, just the same as men. A then-lawyer at the ACLU named Ruth Bader Ginsburg set out to convince an all-male Supreme Court to take sex discrimination seriously with an unconventional strategy. She didn’t just bring cases where women were the victims of discrimination; she also brought cases where men were the victims. In this episode, we look at how a key battle for gender equality was won with frat boys and beer.

Nov 23 2017

55mins

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Rank #7: Justice, Interrupted

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The rules of oral argument at the Supreme Court are strict: when a justice speaks, the advocate has to shut up.  But a law student noticed that the rules were getting broken again and again — by men.  He and his professor set out to chart an epidemic of interruptions.  If women can’t catch a break in the boardroom or the legislature (or at the MTV VMA’s), what’s it going to take to let them speak from the bench of the highest court in the land?

Dec 19 2017

24mins

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Rank #8: Mr. Graham and the Reasonable Man

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On a fall afternoon in 1984, Dethorne Graham ran into a convenience store for a bottle of orange juice. Minutes later he was unconscious, injured, and in police handcuffs. In this episode, we explore a case that sent two Charlotte lawyers on a quest for true objectivity, and changed the face of policing in the US.

Nov 30 2017

1hr 8mins

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Rank #9: The Gun Show

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For nearly 200 years of our nation’s history, the Second Amendment was an all-but-forgotten rule about the importance of militias. But in the 1960s and 70s, a movement emerged — led by Black Panthers and a recently-repositioned NRA — that insisted owning a firearm was the right of each and every American. So began a constitutional debate that only the Supreme Court could solve. That didn’t happen until 2008, when a Washington, D.C. security guard named Dick Heller made a compelling case.

Oct 12 2017

1hr 9mins

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Rank #10: Citizens United

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Citizens United vs. Federal Election Commission is one of the most polarizing Supreme Court cases of all time. So what is it actually about, and why did the Justices decide the way they did? Justice Anthony Kennedy, often called the “most powerful man in America,” wrote the majority opinion in the case. In this episode, we examine Kennedy’s singular devotion to the First Amendment and look at how it may have influenced his decision in the case. 

Nov 02 2017

1hr

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