Cover image of Dakota Datebook
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Education
Society & Culture
History

Dakota Datebook

Updated about 1 month ago

Education
Society & Culture
History
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Stories of things that happened in North Dakota and vicinity. Sitting Bull to Phil Jackson, cattle to prairie dogs, knoefla to lefse. In partnership with the Historical Society of North Dakota, and funded by the North Dakota Humanities Council, a nonprofit, independent state partner of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in the program do not necessarily reflect those of the North Dakota Humanities Council or the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Read more

Stories of things that happened in North Dakota and vicinity. Sitting Bull to Phil Jackson, cattle to prairie dogs, knoefla to lefse. In partnership with the Historical Society of North Dakota, and funded by the North Dakota Humanities Council, a nonprofit, independent state partner of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in the program do not necessarily reflect those of the North Dakota Humanities Council or the National Endowment for the Humanities.

iTunes Ratings

3 Ratings
Average Ratings
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iTunes Ratings

3 Ratings
Average Ratings
3
0
0
0
0
Cover image of Dakota Datebook

Dakota Datebook

Updated about 1 month ago

Read more

Stories of things that happened in North Dakota and vicinity. Sitting Bull to Phil Jackson, cattle to prairie dogs, knoefla to lefse. In partnership with the Historical Society of North Dakota, and funded by the North Dakota Humanities Council, a nonprofit, independent state partner of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in the program do not necessarily reflect those of the North Dakota Humanities Council or the National Endowment for the Humanities.

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Rank #1: The Song of the Meadowlark, as Theodore Roosevelt Heard it

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You don’t need a calendar to tell you when Dakota’s summertime has arrived, you can hear it when a meadowlark’s flute-like song reaches your ears. No one has written more beautifully of the delightful-nature of meadowlarks than Theodore Roosevelt. Here is what Roosevelt wrote in 1885: “In the spring, when the thickets are green ... One of our sweetest, loudest songsters is the [Western] meadowlark; this I could hardly get used to at first, for it looks exactly like the Eastern meadowlark which utters nothing but a harsh disagreeable chatter. But the plains air seems to give it a voice, and it will perch on top of a bush or tree and sing for hours in rich, bubbling tones.”
Jul 16 2019
2 mins
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Rank #2: Not Guilty!

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Sunday is often viewed as a day of rest, and blue laws even restricted Sunday activities and business. The origin of the term is murky. It is often said that the original morality laws in Puritan settlements were printed on blue paper, but there is no evidence to confirm that. Under blue laws, most businesses, including grocery stores, were closed on Sundays. There were generally some exceptions for hospitals, hotels, and restaurants. The Supreme Court ruled that blue laws were constitutional on secular, not religious grounds. The court said the purpose of the laws was to protect workers and families by “securing a day of rest.”
Jul 15 2019
2 mins
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Rank #3: Vencel Shorma and Stalin

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Today’s story is about Vencel James Shorma, who was born in Rovno, Poland, in 1889. He was still a child when his family moved to Russia, and in 1904 they moved again emigrating to America. Vencel was 15 years old when they arrived in Richland County, becoming farmers on land near Wyndmere, west of Wahpeton.
Jul 12 2019
2 mins
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Rank #4: Ways to Fight Mosquitoes

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The most despised insect in North Dakota has been the mosquito. Always humming in your ear, with bites so itchy and painful, you slap yourself to kill one. One tale suggested that Dakota mosquitoes were especially unbearable because they had been cross-bred with wasps . How did North Dakota fight mosquitoes in the past? There were four ways: a person could use a [head]-net, a smudge, stay inside, or – get used to it!”
Jul 11 2019
3 mins
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Rank #5: Grounded

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On this date in 1919, a barnstorming pilot was leaving Hope, North Dakota, but not by air as he had planned. Lieutenant Omlee was one of the many daredevil pilots making a living by taking brave passengers for rides in the newfangled airships. While airplane manufacturers had exhibition flying teams almost as soon as planes took to the air, the entertainment didn’t become wildly popular until after World War I, when the government sold surplus military planes for pennies on the dollar. Many former fighter pilots purchased the planes and took to the skies. They gave daring exhibitions that thrilled the crowds. They also gave rides for a fee.
Jul 10 2019
2 mins
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Rank #6: Congressman Johnson's "Mosquito Tall Tale"

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The very best tall tale about North Dakota’s gigantic mosquitoes came from Martin N. Johnson, a Congressman and storyteller. Johnson often repeated his ‘Mosquito Tall Tale’ – a perfect example of exaggeration and unabashed overstatement.
Jul 09 2019
2 mins
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Rank #7: A Stunning Announcement

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On this date in 1909, a stunning announcement by North Dakota’s Secretary of State hit the newspapers. Alfred Blaisdell and his wife had just returned from a trip to England. At the time, Great Britain was in the midst of massive demonstrations demanding the right to vote for women. Blaisdell was impressed. On returning to the United States he announced, “I am more in favor of woman suffrage than ever before.”
Jul 08 2019
2 mins
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Rank #8: A Number One Horse Thief

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Horse thieves have long been a staple in western movies and are notorious in Western lore. Stealing a horse on the western frontier very possibly doomed the owner to die, stranded in the wilderness. Consequently, the theft was a hanging offense. The hanging was often an impromptu affair, carried out without the benefit of a trial. The horse thief could count on justice that was swift and final.
Jul 05 2019
2 mins
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Rank #9: The Dickinson Dakota Territory Speech

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Theodore Roosevelt’s first opportunity to personally express much of his passion for our nation, as well as Dakota Territory’s gift of healing grace, was in 1886. TR was the featured speaker at Dickinson’s first full-on Independence Day celebration.
Jul 04 2019
2 mins
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Rank #10: Tall Tales About Dakota Mosquitoes

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Mosquitoes are pesky, pestiferous, and pestilential, besides being prolific. One of the most-plentiful mosquito species in North Dakota has a scientific name of: “aedes vexans.” “Aedes” meaning “unpleasant” or “odious;” and “vexans” meaning “vexing.” You get the picture. Both elements of its name mean “extremely nasty.”
Jul 03 2019
3 mins
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