Cover image of LD Podcast
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Education
Kids & Family

LD Podcast

Updated 8 months ago

Education
Kids & Family
Read more

A podcast for parents by parents of children with learning disabilities

Read more

A podcast for parents by parents of children with learning disabilities

iTunes Ratings

25 Ratings
Average Ratings
21
2
0
1
1

iTunes Ratings

25 Ratings
Average Ratings
21
2
0
1
1
Cover image of LD Podcast

LD Podcast

Updated 8 months ago

Read more

A podcast for parents by parents of children with learning disabilities

Rank #1: Kevin Carroll- Rules of the Red Rubber Ball Part 2- Fail Better

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In the second part of our conversation with Kevin Carroll, we talk about the concept of "fail better". Part of the important aspect of play is that it lets you experiment and riff in a safe environment, where failing and retrying, tinkering, and treating things as your lab is well tolerated. In contrast, work environments tend to be much more high risk, and making mistakes are something full of shame- it's what makes people try to cover up errors, rather than own them, understand them, and do something different next time. Great companies that focus on design and innovation like IDEO (known for the ipod, swiffer, and other great products) they start with Understanding the problem or situation at hand, followed by detailed Observation, Brainstorming and prototyping solutions. We have to remember this same process can work for organizing our kitchens; talking to our kids about getting a homework center that works with them rather than against them, or any other problem at hand. Innovation comes from creativity and being willing to take risks and as Kevin states, being willing to Fail Better than ever before. Click here to listen or download Show 110- Kevin Carroll, Katalyst- Fail Better

May 23 2009
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Rank #2: Show #108 Dr. Stuart Brown Part II- Success, Practice, and Grandparents

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In today's show, I talk a little bit about the importance of working memory, and then we hear the second part of the interview with Dr. Stuart Brown, as we finish our discussion about the importance of play and imagination in developing critical thinking and social skills. I've also recently reworked my Guide for getting Good Grades into a PDF, available here for download. The picture to the right is from our recent trip to the newly renovated Smithsonian Museum of American History, where they have a fantastic exhibit on science, invention and play. We have to remember that so much of an adult's later success can depend on what interests they developed in childhood. Our children, even if they struggle in some aspect of school, have many talents and areas where they are special. We need to find these, but moreover, give our children the opportunity to find these things on their own- to try, to experiment, to fail and to try again on their own. That's what we can all learn from play, aside from the true joy it brings to our lives. Click here to listen to Show #108- Dr. Stuart Brown- The Importance of Play

Mar 24 2009
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Rank #3: Show #107- Dr. Stuart Brown- National Institute for Play

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Dr. Stuart Brown is a physician and psychiatrist who has been studying the importance of play for many years, and is the founder of The National Institute for Play. He's written a wonderful new book, entitled "Play: How it Shapes The Brain, opens the Imagination, and Invigorates the Soul" which should be on every parent and teacher's book shelf. Over the course of his clinical career, he interviewed thousands of people to capture their play profiles. His cataloging of their profiles demonstrated the active presence of play in the accomplishments of the very successful and also identified negative consequences that inevitably accumulate in a play-deprived life. The National Institute for Play includes a catalog of information and research on play in humans and animals; play profiles, and more. You can find out more by going to the website by clicking here. Dr. Brown and his work has been featured in articles in the New York Times (The 3 R's, a Fourth is Crucial too- Recess) and numerous other publications. Dr. Brown founded the Institute back in 1989, and was surprised that much of the play-related research he reviewed was fragmented and lacked quantitative confirmation of factors readily observed clinically. A science and evidence-based way of understanding and suggesting how to improve play hygeine was and still is lacking. He turned to animal play research to gain insights into human play. With the support of the National Geographic Society and Jane Goodall, he observed animal play in the wild. He became acquainted with the premier animal play experts in the world, and began to see play as a long evolved behavior important for the well being and survival of animals. He subsequently came to understand that humans are uniquely designed by nature to enjoy and participate in play throughout life. Many of our kids, even in affluent homes, are often deprived of the free play and free time they need to develop skills in critical thinking they will need later in life. Play is fun, but it's also a very serious subject for good emotional and social development in kids, and I think it's one of the things we can often forget about when we try to help improve our kids who struggle in school. We may think extra work is the answer, but extra play might help even more. In the first part of our interview, we talk about how play is important for kid's development; in the second part, we discuss how Grandparents and play; how important hands on learning is for kids, and how this seemingly "wasteful" activity may be where most of their most important learning comes from. I know you'll really enjoy Dr. Stuart Brown- his new book helped me think about play and how we incorporate it in our lives in a whole new way. Click here to listen to Show #107- Dr. Stuart Brown- The Importance of Play

Mar 06 2009
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Rank #4: Show #106- Dr. Russell Barkley :Understanding ADHD

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This show features the second half of my conversation with Dr. Russell Barkley. We talk about many critical things parents and educators need to know about ADHD, but the most critical is this: Kids with ADHD tend to be 30-40% delayed in developing executive functions, and if we can adjust our expectations of our children, setting expectations based not on their age but their developmental stage. By adjusting our expectations to what the child can actually do takes lots of stress, pain and unhappiness out of the often tense situation caused by ADHD and its performance problems. Dr. Barkley is one of the most respected, internationally recognized experts in ADHD and is well known as the primary investigator in on of the longest continuous studies about ADHD known as the Milwaukee Study, following kids from childhood through age 28 (and the study continues to follow this cohort today.) Dr. Barkley's full credentials can be found on his informative website -you can find it at www.russellbarkley.org. I've excerpted part of his credentials here for you: After serving in the United States Air Force Dr. Barkley obtained his Bachelor's Degree with Honors in Psychology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1973. He then attended Bowling Green State University in Ohio where he received his Masters Degree in 1975 and his Ph.D. in 1977 in Clinical Psychology, receiving the Distinguished Dissertation Award for his research on the effects of medication on children with ADHD. He then attended the Oregon Health Sciences University for internship training in developmental, learning, and behavioral disorders of children. Thereafter, in 1977, he joined the Department of Neurology at the Medical College of Wisconsin (MCOW) and Milwaukee Children's Hospital where he worked in the Child Neurology Division and eventually founded the Neuropsychology Service at MCOW. He served as its Chief and as Associate Professor of Neurology until 1985. Dr. Barkley then relocated to the University of Massachusetts Medical School, where he served as the Director of Psychology and as a Professor of Psychiatry and Neurology (1985-2002). While there, he established the research clinics for both child and adult Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorders. In 2003, Dr. Barkley relocated to the Charleston, SC area where he became a Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the Medical University of South Carolina. In 2005, he joined the faculty of the Department of Psychiatry at the SUNY Upstate Medical University in Syracuse, NY. Dr. Barkley has been awarded a Diplomate (board certification) in three specialties, these being Clinical Psychology (ABPP), Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, and Clinical Neuropsychology (ABCN, ABPP). He is a clinical scientist, educator, and practitioner who has authored, co-authored, or co-edited 20 books and clinical manuals. He has published more than 200 scientific articles and book chapters related to the nature, assessment, and treatment of ADHD and related disorders (see Publications). In 1993, he founded a bimonthly newsletter for clinical professionals, The ADHD Report (Guilford Publications). He has created seven professional videotapes on ADHD and defiant children, three of which have won national awards, including the 1992 and 1994 Golden Apple Award for educational videos from the National Education Association. Dr. Barkley has served on the editorial boards of 11 scientific journals and as a reviewer for numerous others. He was the President of the Section of Clinical Child Psychology, Division 12, of the American Psychological Association (1988), and was President of the International Society for Research in Child and Adolescent Psychopathology (1991). Also in today's show: Please check out the dysTalk website, a UK based website dealing with dyslexia and other learning disabilities. Donna, a listener

Feb 20 2009
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Rank #5: Dr. Russell Barkley- ADHD Insights, Part 1 Show #105

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Back in November, I had a chance to sit down with the very well known Dr. Russell Barkley, one of the true giants in the field of ADHD research. Dr. Barkley is one of the principal investigators in the longest term study on ADHD to date known as the Milwaukee Study, following kids diagnosed with ADHD from childhood now through early adulthood. In this first part of our two-part conversation, Dr. Barkley and I talk about: The History of ADHDWhy it's so hard for people to accept that ADHD is a biologically based behavioral disorder, not just a result of poor parenting or bad social environments.When we understand the origins of ADHD, there's a change from moral indignation at behaviors to compassion when we realize that the child can't help some of their behaviors- it's due to their brain function and neurological reasons, not a wilful choice to annoy you.Kids to change over development- so while we don't care that a three year old has no sense of time, this is something that becomes crucial as kids get older and certainly for adults. What was always a problem remains, even though we might have expected that they would simply "outgrow" the issue over time. This the contours and problems of ADHD change over time and over development, and the diagnostic criteria are still a bit behind in adapting to our understanding of how the face of ADHD changes over the course of development.Skills build on top of one another, so weak skills early on get exacerbated over time.Brighter people with ADHD often figure out different ways to get the job done and it may take them longer; less bright may simply give up or avoid the task all together. It's easier to give into your ADHD than try to constantly compensate for it.Impairments are situation specific, even if symptoms remain the same, like putting a ramp in front of a building; You can arrange the environment to allow people with ADHD to be more successful and remove the disability, by working around their style- shorter bursts of work, over longer period of time, for example.Kids should be allowed to have a quality of life, too, and that play and socialization should be reason enough to let kids play versus have large amounts of homework every night. And much more. I know you will find this conversation and content compelling. Dr. Barkley has given me much more insight into how ADHD changes over time, and I know I'm changing how I approach issues with my own children. Click here to listen to Show #105- Dr. Russell Barkley, Part 1

Feb 06 2009
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Rank #6: Show #103 Dr. Susan Johnson- Commonwealth Academy- Advisory and Organization

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One of the most amazing things I learned by visiting Commonwealth Academy is how everything in the school is student-centered. The advisory program is one piece of that puzzle, where kids are mentored and supervised on how to keep themselves organized and prepared for class, and where discipline is handled pro-actively and rarely interferes with the learning of the other students. This is possible because the faculty and staff really know the students, and can anticipate their needs, much like parents do. But like good parents, the goal is to make the kids independent over time and able to stand on their own. Another important part of this equation is developing a sense of trust with the students and with their parents, which can be a challenge after some rough previous school experiences. Dr. Johnson's years of experience in both public and private schools, and her candor about how important developing a sense of trust and community is to their success is palpable in every aspect of the school. I know you'll love hearing about the innovative and often simple approaches Commonwealth takes that empowers the students to find their voice and gives them the confidence to try new things, to risk and to succeed. In our next show, #104, we'll conclude our interview with Dr. Susan Johnson as we discuss IEP's, remediation and the future of education. Click here to download Show # 103, Dr. Susan Johnson- Commonwealth Academy- Advisory & Organization (For Students and Parents!)

Jan 17 2009
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Rank #7: Show #104- Dr. Susan Johnson, Commonwealth Academy- Remediation and the Future of Education

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In the third part of my conversation with Dr. Susan Johnson, head of Commonwealth Academy, we talk about the difference between teaching a child with accommodations versus remediating weaker skills and how to accomplish both; we also discuss what she would recommend as suggestions of how to change education. Ultimately, I think we have to look at education as an important part of raising an educated public, and as a vital part of our national infrastructure. We have to decide if education is important, and if so, then we have to make the changes necessary to do it well. But the one thing we will never be able to get rid of is the importance of students feeling mentored and cared about on a personal level by their teachers. If we want this to happen, we have to be prepared to help create smaller and more intimate classrooms, where students and teachers get to know each other- because without this, education can be little more than an assembly lime disguised as a school. I hope you enjoy today's show, and we'll be back to you next week! Click here to Download Show#104- Susan Johnson- Remediation and the Future of Education

Jan 17 2009
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Rank #8: Dr. Susan Johnson, Commonwealth Academy Show #102

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Before the holidays, I had the opportunity to spend the day at Commonwealth Academy, a college preparatory school for children with ADHD and learning disabilities, located in Alexandria, VA. Commonwealth Academy serves children from 6th grade through high school,and is a school that feels very much like a community the moment you walk through the doors. I got to sit down with Dr. Susan Johnson, the Director of the school, and we talked about everything from how they select their students, to how their curriculum and teaching methods differ from traditional schools. Dr. Johnson has been an educator and has worked with children in special education for over 30 years, and she sat on one of the initial panels that put together the IEP process for the State of New Jersey back in the 1970's. Her experience and perspective on children who struggle in traditional school settings is amazing, and it was an absolute privilege to be able to speak with her, the staff and the students at Commonwealth. I've split our interview into two parts; the first discusses how important it is to take a child-centered approach to education, and how that's the first step to helping struggling learners to begin to think of themselves as academic achievers. We also talk about how the environment of a school matters, and how it is integral to creating a community rather than just an institution of learning. We've given away our first handful of books, but we have some more available! Additionally, while you may have missed out on the Marcus Buckingham books here, my friend Carrie Runnals from the Words to Mouth podcast, has a few copies she would love to give away to our listeners! Just click the link and go to Carrie's website and you might win! The Words to Mouth podcast is a great place where readers can find out more about the authors and their work through insightful interviews, done by Carrie, another one of the fantastic ladies from the Divacast! Click here to listen to Show #102, Dr. Susan Johnson, Commonwealth Academy

Dec 30 2008
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Rank #9: Show # 101- Updates and Our Holiday Book Give-Away!

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Firstly, we have a new voicemail line- (206) 350-8626 Please call us- and remember we may answer your questions or use your comments on the show! Holiday Book Giveaway! Just like last year, we have books to give away this Holiday season! Marcus Buckingham and his publisher sent us 5 copies of his latest book, The Truth About You. I have a few copies of Marcus' "Go Put Your Strengths to Work" to give away as well. We also have books from Rick LaVoie, Dr. Edward Hallowell, Mel Levine and more- including a few cassette audio books for those that prefer audio books! In order to win, here's what you need to do: Step 1: Call our Voicemail line at (206) 350-8626 and leave us a comment or question, OR leave a review of the show in iTunes. Step 2: Send us an email at LDpodcast@gmail.com with your name and mailing address, so we can mail your book to you! I've mailed books all over the world last year, including South Africa, so everyone is eligible! The first 15 responders will receive a prize! In today's show, I talk a bit about the recent seminar I atteneded given by Russell Barkley, one of the leading authorities on ADHD. Much of what I heard made me rethink how I think about ADHD and its wide-spread affects on functioning. I got a chance to interview Dr. Barkley in person, and will share that in upcoming shows. I also included a clip from an interview I did a while back with Rick LaVoie, who even mentions Dr. Barkley, and how we sometimes forget how much of our frustrations daily with our kids may be, in part, the learning disability, not just them trying to drive us crazy- something I think we can all use the occasional reminder about- even me. Thank you so much for listening to the show and making everything we do to keep the show going worth while. Spread the word, and we'll keeping making the lives of kids struggling in school better, one child at a time. Click here to listen to Show #101- Annual Book Giveaway

Dec 03 2008
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Rank #10: Show #100 Sharon Martin, SLP on Response to Intervention (RTI) and Individualized Education Programs (IEP).

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In today's show, Sharon and I discuss how you might go about getting help for your child in school. Part of this is understanding the first steps, called Response to Intervention, or RTI. Teachers are supposed to try different, research-based interventions with the child in the classroom, to see if the child improves, before referring the child for possible testing and evaluation for special education services, that might require developing a special education program, commonly called an Individualized Education Plan or Program (IEP). As part of this show, I have put together a list of common modifications and accommodations that are typically made for kids in the classroom- think of this as a "menu" of sorts of possible, but not exclusive, changes that can be made to help your child. You can find this list and links to other resources under the link "Accommodations Guide". We have our big holiday book give away coming- and I hope you will are participate! Here are the rules: 1. The give away closes December 15, 2008. 2. We'll have a link at the top of our website for you to enter the drawing-you'll need to answer two questions and information so we can mail out the book to you. The only condition is that you let us know when it arrives! We'd love it if you'd leave us a review in iTunes as well, but that's optional, of course! We'll have copies of Marcus Buckingham's latest book, The Truth about You, a few audio books, books by Mel Levine, Rick LaVoie, Edward Hallowell, and more! Thank you so much, each and everyone of you, for making this one of the most rewarding things I've ever done. Click here to listen to show #100- Response to Intervention and IEP's

Nov 18 2008
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