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Rank #146 in Music category

Music

Afropop Worldwide

Updated 12 days ago

Rank #146 in Music category

Music
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Afropop Worldwide is an internationally syndicated weekly radio series, online guide to African and world music, and an international music archive, that has introduced American listeners to the music cultures of Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean since 1988. Our radio program is hosted by Georges Collinet from Cameroon, the radio series is distributed by Public Radio International to 110 stations in the U.S., via XM satellite radio, in Africa via and Europe via Radio Multikulti.

Read more

Afropop Worldwide is an internationally syndicated weekly radio series, online guide to African and world music, and an international music archive, that has introduced American listeners to the music cultures of Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean since 1988. Our radio program is hosted by Georges Collinet from Cameroon, the radio series is distributed by Public Radio International to 110 stations in the U.S., via XM satellite radio, in Africa via and Europe via Radio Multikulti.

iTunes Ratings

135 Ratings
Average Ratings
119
4
4
5
3

Love this show!

By Nebbish in the Negative Zone - Jul 25 2018
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Great introduction to so many artists and styles! Keep up the great work!

Excellent

By Sallenicar - Oct 09 2017
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I came here because of influence of Afro in Latin America. Bamba Mejicana.

iTunes Ratings

135 Ratings
Average Ratings
119
4
4
5
3

Love this show!

By Nebbish in the Negative Zone - Jul 25 2018
Read more
Great introduction to so many artists and styles! Keep up the great work!

Excellent

By Sallenicar - Oct 09 2017
Read more
I came here because of influence of Afro in Latin America. Bamba Mejicana.
Cover image of Afropop Worldwide

Afropop Worldwide

Updated 12 days ago

Rank #146 in Music category

Read more

Afropop Worldwide is an internationally syndicated weekly radio series, online guide to African and world music, and an international music archive, that has introduced American listeners to the music cultures of Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean since 1988. Our radio program is hosted by Georges Collinet from Cameroon, the radio series is distributed by Public Radio International to 110 stations in the U.S., via XM satellite radio, in Africa via and Europe via Radio Multikulti.

Rank #1: Barrio Colón to Brooklyn

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The clave cuts the air, the drums triangulate in endless conversation, the singers push their voices over the rhythm, competing with daring improvisations, while a pair of dancers tease and provoke, shifting across the small space between singers and drummers: This is an Afro-Cuban rumba, a communal form of Afro-Cuban folkloric music that continues to be a crucial part of the musical life of New York City. From the inclusive to the exclusive, we also experience an original group interpreting Afro-Cuban sacred music through jazz explorations. In this podcast, we hear from two Cuban musicians, Anier Alonso and Melvis Santa, who are adding their unique voices to the New York Afro-Cuban music scene, pushing things forward with tireless creative energy.

Produced by Ricardo Luiggi and Morgan Greenstreet.
Photo by Carla A. Tomassini Quijano www.carlaojo.com

Hear full interviews, in Spanish with Anier and Melvis:
https://soundcloud.com/zonalibredjs/anier-alonso-entrevista https://soundcloud.com/zonalibredjs/melvis-santa-entrevista
Aug 06 2019
18 mins
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Rank #2: The Invisible Line - Haiti and the Dominican Republic

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The island of Hispaniola, located in the western Caribbean, is divided in two by an invisible line that snakes down its central mountain range. On one side is Haiti, the other the Dominican Republic: one colonized by the French, the other by Spain. The island was the first place in the Americas colonized by Europeans, and was the place where trans-Atlantic slavery was first implemented. It was also home to the first--and only--successful slave revolt when Haiti rebelled against France in 1791. Yet there has frequently been a tremendous amount of tension between the two countries. For decades, Eurocentric elites in the Dominican Republic have painted Haitians as inferior and threatening. Today, there is an uproar around the issues of Haitian immigration to the D.R., and politicians who are lobbying to build a wall between the two countries.

Despite the conflicts, Dominicans and Haitians are linked by deeply interwoven histories, economies and cultures. In this episode of Afropop Worldwide, we tell the story of the relationship between Haiti and the Dominican Republic through music, from the Haitian Revolution to the 1937 massacre perpetrated by Dominican dictator Rafael Trujillo. We also visit a batey community in the sugarcane fields, where residents play Haitian-Dominican gagá music, explore the relationship between race and music on the island, and meet young people using music to bring the people of Hispaniola closer together.

Produced by Marlon Bishop

APWW #760
Feb 14 2019
59 mins
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Rank #3: A Brief History of Funk

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Funk is a perennial favorite. In this panoramic history of the grooviest of genres, we hear track after track of absolute boogie-down classics. Everything from Sly and the Family Stone to James Brown, with a few stops to hear legends like the Meters, Kool and the Gang, and Parliament. We’ll also hear the great Bobby Byrd explain the rhythmic motor behind the JB’s, and Georges Clinton talk about the roots of his funk.

Produced by Ned Sublette.

Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww.

Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/

APWW #124
Nov 23 2017
59 mins
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Rank #4: Hip Deep Ghana: 21st Century Accra From Gospel To Hiplife

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[APWW PGM #669] [Originally aired in 2014]

Hiplife, a fusion of hip-hop and highlife, has come of age, spawning subgenres tilting to roots culture, international rap, and boldly humorous satire, not to mention azonto, a dance craze that has rocketed to global renown in just over a year. But for all that, the biggest-selling music in the country, by far, is gospel. On this whirlwind Hip Deep tour of Accra, we meet stars like Reggie Rockstone, M.anifiest, Efya, Soul Winners, and the genre-bending FOKN Bois. Jesse Weaver Shipley, anthropologist and author of the book Living the Hiplife: Celebrity and Entrepreneurship in Ghanaian Popular Music, helps untangle the complex world of award ceremonies, corporate endorsements, live music in church, and the emergence of women in Ghana’s male-dominated pop world.
Aug 20 2015
59 mins
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Rank #5: Tropical Soul Of Jorge Ben Jor

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Jorge Ben Jor first began to experiment with fusions of samba, bossa nova, rhythm ‘n’ blues and soul in the early 1960s. Together with Caetano Veloso and Gilberto Gil, he participated in the watershed cultural movement, Tropicália, in the late 1960s. In the 1970s, he further explored Afro-Brazilian history and culture in a series of popular albums that have since become key points of reference for a contemporary neo-soul movement. Jorge Benjor continues to be an active presence in Brazilian popular music. He grants us a rare interview to tell his story. The program is produced by Sean Barlow and co-produced with Christopher Dunn, author of Brutality Garden: Tropicália and the Emergence of a Brazilian Counterculture (University of North Carolina Press, 2001) as part of Afropop Worldwide’s “Hip Deep” series
Aug 11 2016
58 mins
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Rank #6: Bamako Sounds

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Airdate: 7/21/2016
Producer: Banning Eyre
Show # 735

Our recent Hip Deep in Mali series explored fascinating stories of art and life in post-crisis Mali. On this program, it's just the music. We hear new sounds from veteran maestros Djelimady Tounkara and Cheikh Tidiane Seck, Wassoulou music star Nahawa Doumbia, mesmerizing Songhai songs from Baba Salah and Samba Toure, and balafon pyrotechnics from Bassidi Kone. We also meet some new ensembles: the Afrojazz of Mamadou Barry, and the bracing roots-pop of Bamba Wassoulou Groove, and sample the latest in Malian rap.
Jul 21 2016
59 mins
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Rank #7: An Atlantic Journey: From Cape Town to Cape Verde

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[APWW #710] [Originally aired 6/11/2015]

Join us on a freewheeling musical excursion. We start in Cape Town, South Africa listening to jazz, rock, and even classical music inspired by the city’s signature sound: goema. Veteran rocker and now-composer Mac McKenzie is our charismatic guide. Then on to Namibia where we meet one of the country’s most innovative and soulful singer/songwriter/bandleaders, Elemotho Galelekwe. We end in Cape Verde to hear old and new sounds from the first Portuguese settlement in Africa—from the vintage crooning of Ze Luis to the new sounds of cola-zouk.
Dec 31 2015
59 mins
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Rank #8: Roots and Future: A History of U.K. Dance

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Look around today’s musical mainstream, and you’ll quickly realized that dance styles are everywhere, filling stadiums, topping charts, and gathering tens of thousands in festivals around the country. Yet few know their full history. “Roots and Future” explores how a community of (primarily) black British musicians, fans, D.J.s, and radio pirates recreated dance music in the United Kingdom during the 1990s and 2000s.

Connected to the musical mainstream during 1989’s drug and rave fueled “second summer of love,” these musicians learned to combine American hip-hop, dancehall toasting, dub bass, and techno euphoria to create style after chart-topping style, from drum-twisting jungle to the slick sounds of garage, the ferocious rhythms of grime, and the all-encompassing low-end of dubstep. We’ll speak to legendary pirate radio D.J.s, underground label owners, and groundbreaking producers. We’ll check young M.C.s spitting their bars on illegal frequencies, and hear veterans playing to their beloved audiences. And most importantly? We’ll rave. See you on the dance floor.

#733 Roots and Future: A History of U.K. Dance
Producer: Sam Backer
Airdate: June 23rd 2016
Jun 23 2016
59 mins
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Rank #9: Hip Deep: Congo-Goma: Music, Conflict and NGOs

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[APWW PGM #720] [Originally broadcast in 2015] In the city of Goma, in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, far from the rumba-soaked nightlife of the capital, Kinshasa, an artistic renaissance is going on. After two decades of devastating factional wars, ongoing mineral profiteering, a volcanic eruption, and other extreme circumstances, internationally minded youth are expressing themselves through diverse, socio-politically engaged music, film and dance. Artists must also navigate the influence and patronage of international NGOs and humanitarian organizations that use local music and musicians as mouthpieces for their projects and campaigns. This Hip Deep edition examines how musicians approach topics of politics, peace and war, collaboration with NGOs and cultural centers, and artistic autonomy.
Jul 07 2016
59 mins
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Rank #10: The Cumbia Diaspora: From Colombia to the World

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Move over salsa and merengue–cumbia is the most popular music in Latin America. Today, cumbia is played from the borderlands of Texas down the spine of the Andes to the tip of Tierra del Fuego. In this Hip Deep edition, we find out how cumbia left Colombia in the ‘60s and ‘70s and traveled to other countries. Everywhere it went, it transformed itself, adapting to its new environment. In Peru, it mixed with psychedelic guitar effects and Andean sounds to become chicha. In Argentina, it became the expression of a new generation of restless youth in the burgeoning slums of Buenos Aires. And in Mexico, it became so instilled in the local culture that some have forgotten that it came from Colombia in the first place. Through extensive interviews with experts and musicians, we discover how cumbia and its many transformations tell us the story of Latin America in the late 20th century.

Produced by Marlon Bishop.

Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop and on Twitter @afropopww.

Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/

APWW PGM #606
11-10-2016
Nov 10 2016
59 mins
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Rank #11: Off the Beaten Track in Malawi and Burkina Faso

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[APWW #738] [Airs Sept. 22 2016]
This program ventures into corners of Africa we hear from rarely, guided by adventurous field recordists and crate diggers. The Zomba Prison Project is a set of recordings by inmates at a maximum security prison in Malawi, currently the poorest nation on earth. The project’s debut CD was nominated for a 2016 Grammy Award. Here, we speak with the producer, Ian Brennan, and hear tracks from a brand new volume of soulful, even heartbreaking, songs from the prison. Then, we go back to the 1970s in the city of Bobo-Dioulasso in Burkina Faso (then Upper Volta) to sample a gorgeous set of newly revealed recordings by Volta Jazz, Dafra Star, Les Imbattables Leopards and more. The program ends with wild cards from Mozambique and Ethiopia.
Produced by Banning Eyre
Sep 22 2016
59 mins
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Rank #12: African Sounds Of The Indian Subcontinent

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[APWW PGM #663] [Originally aired in 2013]
"African Sounds of the Indian Subcontinent"
In this Hip Deep program, Afropop explores musical connections between Africa and India. First up is the story of the Afro-Indian Sidi community. In the 13th century, Africans arrived in India as soldiers in the armies of Muslim conquerors. Some were able to rise through the ranks to become military leaders and even rulers. Their descendants continue to live in India today, performing African-influenced Sufi trance music at shrines to the Black Muslim saint named Baba Gor. Next, we dive into the swinging jazz era of 1930s Bombay, when African-American jazz musicians arrived by the dozen to perform at the glitzy Taj Mahal Hotel. They trained a generation of Indian jazz musicians who would become instrumental in the rise of India’s Hindi film music industry. Then we head south to the island of Sri Lanka, where Africans have had a presence for almost 500 years. We explore their history through the groovy Afro-Indo-Portuguese pop music style known as baila, popularized by 1960s star Wally Bastiansz and still performed at parties in Sri Lanka today. Finally, we speak with Deepak Ram, an Indian jazz flutist who recounts his experiences growing up Indian in apartheid South Africa. Throughout, we hear from leading experts, and of course, introduce fantastic and often-unexpected music.
Nov 12 2015
59 mins
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Rank #13: African Music at the Crossroads

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Afropop producer Banning Eyre takes us on a surprise-filled tour of his 30-some years of covering African music. Through conversations with Georges Collinet and producer/agent/DJ Rab Bakari, the program reflects on how the world, the music, the culture and the media have changed and keep on changing throughout Africa and the diaspora. Along the way we hear some of the tunes that have most inspired Banning and Georges, sample the latest Afrobeats and Naija pop, and speculate on where African music is heading next. Great music, provocative thinking!

Produced by Banning Eyre.

Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww.

Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/

[APWW #740]

Distributed 6/15/2017 [Originally aired in 2016]
Jun 15 2017
59 mins
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Rank #14: Shake It Fo Ya Hood New Orleans Bounce

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New Orleans, Louisiana is home to some of America's greatest musical traditions, and plays an outsized influence on the evolution of everything from jazz through to r&b, rock and funk. Today, the city is still legendary for its second line brass bands and brightly costumed Mardi Gras Indians. But if you've rolled through New Orleans on pretty much any night in the last 30 years, you've probably heard another sound—the clattering, booming, hip-shaking, chant-heavy roll of bounce, a form of hip-hop music, dance and culture unique to the Crescent City. Pulling from the national mainstream but remaking it the way that only New Orleans can, bounce has become a sonic touchstone for an entire generation of residents. For this Hip Deep edition, Afropop digs into the close-knit scene, talking to dancers, producers, MCs, and managers from over 30 years of bounce, all to explore the beat that drives New Orleans—and to find out what it means to the people who bring it to life. Produced by Sam Backer and Jessi Olsen.
Nov 01 2018
59 mins
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Rank #15: Africa in Matanzas, Cuba: El Almacen is Walking

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Africa in Matanzas, Cuba: El Almacén is Walking
Matanzas, Cuba has long been regarded as the source (la fuente) of many rich Afro-Cuban folkloric traditions. These ceremonial and secular Afro-Cuban musics are, for the most part, alive and well, and being documented for the first time by Matanceros themselves, rather than exclusively by Havana-based or non-Cuban imprints. The Matanzas record label and artist collective, Sendero Music/El Almacén, faces several challenges: oversight from the state, limited access to resources, curating which groups to record while paradoxically convincing the folkloric community of the value of their endeavors, and the conundrum of establishing meaningful connections outside of Cuba to disseminate the city’s music to the world. #726
Airdate: 10/13/2016
Producer: Harris Eisenstadt
Oct 13 2016
59 mins
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Rank #16: Congolese Rumba: Surviving the Pop Apocalypse

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All over the world, the music business as we know it is crumbling. But in the Democratic Republic of Congo, musicians have found a new (and very old) method of survival. Through a system of shout-outs called libanga, Congolese pop musicians call on rich people to sponsor their music. Singers use the metaphoric language of love to discuss power, politics and money in one of the world's poorest countries. Produced and hosted by Morgan Greenstreet in conversation with John Nimis, linguist and scholar of Congolese popular music.
Sep 27 2016
23 mins
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Rank #17: Afro-tech: Stories of Synths in African Music

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[APWW PGM #676] [Originally aired in 2013]
Technology is one of the great drivers of musical change, and often one of its least understood. In this episode, we will explore the synthesizer, looking closely at the history of this ubiquitous (and often debated) piece of musical technology, and investigating how and why it was first used in a variety African musics. Enabled by groundbreaking reissues of synth pioneers like William Onyeabor (Nigeria) and Hailu Mergia (Ethiopia), disco stars like Kris Okotie, and South African bubblegum superstars like Brenda Fassie, we will take you back to the ’70s and ’80s, listening to the birth of a distinctly African electronic sound.
Nov 05 2015
59 mins
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Rank #18: Hip Deep Rio #1: Samba at the Dawn of Modern Brazil

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In part one of our 2012 Hip Deep Brazil series, we travel back in time to Rio de Janeiro in the early 20th century to explore the birth of Brazil’s most iconic sound: samba. Beginning with the arrival of poor nordestinos in the city after the end of slavery in 1888, we follow the exploits of the early sambistas as they forged the genre that would come to represent the nation. Brazilian scholar Carlos Sandroni shows us how Afro-Brazilian religious music and popular styles like modinha transformed into the syncopated samba beat. Then, media scholar Bryan McCann guides us through the glamor and political intrigue of 1930s Rio as samba explodes as the popular music of choice throughout the country. We speak with samba greats from the old guard to the young bloods, including Dona Yvone Lara, Heitorzinho dos Prazeres, Paulão 7-Cordas and Luciana Rabelo. In closing, we find out how samba, an ambitious radio station and a populist dictatorship worked together to shape Brazilians’ ideas about race, society and the Brazilian nation itself
Aug 04 2016
59 mins
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Rank #19: Shake It Fo Ya Hood: Bounce, New Orleans Hip-Hop

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*Music in this show contains some explicit language*

New Orleans, Louisiana is home to some of America's greatest musical traditions, and plays an outsized influence on the evolution of everything from jazz through to r&b, rock and funk. Today, the city is still legendary for its second line brass bands and brightly costumed Mardi Gras Indians. But if you've rolled through New Orleans on pretty much any night in the last 30 years, you've probably heard another sound—the clattering, booming, hip-shaking, chant-heavy roll of bounce, a form of hip-hop music, dance and culture unique to the Crescent City. Pulling from the national mainstream but remaking it the way that only New Orleans can, bounce has become a sonic touchstone for an entire generation of residents. For this Hip Deep edition, Afropop digs into the close-knit scene, talking to dancers, producers, MCs, and managers from over 30 years of bounce, all to explore the beat that drives New Orleans—and to find out what it means to the people who bring it to life.

Produced by Jessi Olsen and Sam Backer.

Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww.

Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/

[APWW #761]

Distributed 8/31/2017
Aug 31 2017
59 mins
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