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Homebrewed Christianity Podcast

Updated 9 days ago

Education
Religion & Spirituality
Society & Culture
Christianity
Philosophy
Read more

The #1 Theology podcast on planet earth with Dr. Tripp Fuller. Each episode features an extended interview with a different scholar from a variety of perspectives. Enjoy.

Read more

The #1 Theology podcast on planet earth with Dr. Tripp Fuller. Each episode features an extended interview with a different scholar from a variety of perspectives. Enjoy.

iTunes Ratings

240 Ratings
Average Ratings
192
20
7
6
15

The intros aren’t long enough

By TheeDivineMagician - Jul 30 2019
Read more
The intros aren’t long enough

Ear Blessings

By mama T. - Jul 15 2019
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This podcast is a blessing for your ears. Your brain will tingle with theological wonderment.

iTunes Ratings

240 Ratings
Average Ratings
192
20
7
6
15

The intros aren’t long enough

By TheeDivineMagician - Jul 30 2019
Read more
The intros aren’t long enough

Ear Blessings

By mama T. - Jul 15 2019
Read more
This podcast is a blessing for your ears. Your brain will tingle with theological wonderment.
Cover image of Homebrewed Christianity Podcast

Homebrewed Christianity Podcast

Updated 9 days ago

Read more

The #1 Theology podcast on planet earth with Dr. Tripp Fuller. Each episode features an extended interview with a different scholar from a variety of perspectives. Enjoy.

Rank #1: SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT!

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Guess what theology nerds?

This is a special announcement.

I have just accepted a position as Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Edinburgh. There I will be part of a John Templeton Foundation project, God and the Book of Nature: Building a Science-Engaged Theology of Nature. It is hard to exaggerate how excited I am about this position and the opportunity to work in theological education. On top of that I will be able to interact and connect with a host of new voices for the podcast, across the pond.

It really is a dream come true for this theology nerd.

Here’s where I would absolutely love your help.

Taking an entry level academic position at a prestigious university will open doors in the long run, so we want to take the venture as a family. The transition over seas will have a pretty significant hit in our monthly income, but being frugal isn’t the biggest concern, it is the rather daunting costs of moving over seas. That’s why we setup a GoFundMe where you can make a tax-deductible donation to the process.

For over 11 years Homebrewed Christianity has been bringing you online theological resources. With 70k regular listeners and having crossed over 3 million downloads already this year, I know many of you enjoy it almost as much as I do. Your support not only makes the podcast possible, but has enabled me to continue to pursue my dream.

I am asking for those who are able to help out. Here’s two ways you can.

Donate to the GoFundMe to help us cover the moving costs. This donation is tax-deductible because of our partnership with ReWilder.

Join the Homebrewed Community and support the podcast with a monthly donation. You will also get access to a bunch of goodies including a year-long introduction to contemporary theology.

If you’re strapped for funds, don’t worry about it. Please, keep enjoying the podcast! But if you’re able to help out, either one-time via GoFundMe or recurring via the Homebrewed Community, it would mean alot to me.

Either way, I look forward to bringing you all-new zestiness from across the pond.

Thanks for considering!

Tripp

Aug 09 2019
25 mins
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Rank #2: #HBC10: Why Go Derrida with John D. Caputo

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Today is the day! HBC turns 10! To celebrate, we are selling tickets to Theology Beer Camp at the cheapest price for 48 hours.

Jack Caputo is back and gives us 5 reasons to go Derrida:

1. Derrida give you the best argument against fundamentalism
2. It also is the best argument against modernism, including the new atheists, and reductionism
3. The undeconstructable, or unconditional, which is not a Platonic ideal, but a hope, an expectation.
4. Binary oppositions are deconstructable
5. The pervasive presence of biblical motifs in Derrida’s work

Jack also explains his relationship to Derrida and his work, how Derrida’s atheism was not the end of theology but the beginning of a new, more interesting post-theistic theology, whether Derrida is to blame for post-modernism, why absolutists are much scarier than relativists, and why post-modernism is neither absolutism nor relativism,

Plus, he tackles fundamentalism, the new atheists, Trump, and the distinction between beliefs and a deeper faith. Books mentioned:

Hoping Against Hope, The Folly of God, On Religion, Deconstruction in a Nutshell

The Westar Giveaway includes foundational classics as well as recent new works from some of our most beloved Westar members and scholars including Jack Caputo, Catherine Keller, John Dominic Crossan, and more! Click here to win over $500 of zesty books.

Mar 13 2018
1 hour 24 mins
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Rank #3: Crucifixion of the Warrior God with Greg Boyd

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Get ready for a theology nerd fiesta with Greg Boyd. Greg is the co-founder of Woodland Hills Church, where he currently serves as senior pastor, and the founder of Re|Knew. Greg is on talking about his new, two-volume book, The Crucifixion of the Warrior God. Over two volumes, Gregory A. Boyd argues that we must take seriously the full range of Scripture as inspired, including its violent depictions of God. At the same time, he affirms the absolute centrality of the crucified and risen Christ as the supreme revelation of God.

In this episode, Tripp and Greg talk about:

  • how to understand the “violent God” of the Old Testament
  • the revelation of God and the role the cross plays in it
  • the role the warrior God passages played in the Roman empire
  • the cosmic conflict narrative, where the cross is the final battle between God and cosmic powers
  • plus, how we fit the demonic into our worldview today.

We’ve teamed up with our friends at Fortress Press to giveaway a signed copy of Greg Boyd’s two volume work The Crucifixion of the Warrior God. PLUS, the winner will also get 10 signed copies of the condensed version, Cross Vision, perfect for a small group discussion. And make sure to join Greg, Rachel Held Evans, and Tripp for the ReKnew Conference, September 21-23 in St. Paul.

And if you just can’t wait until September, then head on over to theologybeercamp.com and get your tickets for Denver (Aug. 18-19) and Oklahoma City (Aug. 25-26) and join Peter Rollins and Tripp for two days of theological nerdiness, craft beer, and all the karaoke you can handle.

Jul 19 2017
1 hour 31 mins
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Rank #4: Christian Women in the Patristic World

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On the podcast is Amy Brown Hughes, assistant professor of theology at Gordon College, and co-author withLynn Cohick, professor of New Testament at Wheaton College, of the book Christian Women in the Patristic World.

Amy wanted to understand what influence the women of this period had on the development of Christianity, and, more importantly, how can women in the church own that tradition.

  • why don’t we know more about these stories?
  • how the role and power of women shift in relation to the church’s relation to empire?
  • what are the biggest misconceptions about this period in the church and the academy?
  • how do the martyr narratives continue to shape discipleship when we’re out of that context?

Plus, theology as responsible remembrance, negotiating the history of the church in today’s context, dealing with the uncomfortable parts of the past while still receiving the tradition responsibly, and Gregory of Nyssa of the submission of Christ and 1 Corinthians 15:20-28.

You can get a copy of Athanasius’ On the Incarnation here.

Make sure to follow Amy on twitter @amybrownhughes

Thanks to all of the new Homebrewed members that have signed up to donate monthly to help support the podcast and be a part of the community. You can help support the podcast by going to homebrewedcommunity.com and join today!

Don’t miss Tripp speaking in Atlanta on February 12th at Mani’s Tavern. Did we mention it’s free? Check out the event page for more details…

Some people give something up for Lent (most of us fail at it). But why not take something on instead? How about (gasp!) actually reading the Bible?

Sure, we all know Bible verses and may have even tried to read the “whole Bible,” maybe even more than once. But it can be confusing, contradictory and – if we’re being honest – really freaking boring in places. But there’s another way to approach scripture that can actually make sense, and might even be enjoyable.

Join Homebrewed CultureCast’s Amy and Christian Piatt, and Tripp in figuring out how to “Survive the Bible” together this Lent.

Jan 30 2018
1 hour 25 mins
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Rank #5: The Christian Idea of God with Keith Ward

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British philosopher, theologian, priest, scholar, fellow of the British Academy, former professor at Oxford, Keith Ward is back on the podcast talking about his new book, The Christian Idea of God

Hear how Keith ended up writing theology, why he thinks philosophy of religion and theology end up being the same thing, and what exactly theology is anyway.

This is a very comprehensive interview. Tripp and Keith cover just about every Christian doctrine you can think of. You’ll also hear Keith discuss the reasons we have problems talking about God today, why he argues for personal idealism and what exactly that means, the problem of consciousness, issues around value, morality, and where they come from, the relationship of God and the world, how God is present and acting in the cosmos, and much, much more.

Plus, Tripp talks about his top 5 Keith Ward books (Christ and the Cosmos; Rethinking Christianity; God and the Philosophers; The Case for Religion; Why There is Almost Certainly a God).

It’s the 500th Birthday of the Protestant Reformation and we are gonna have a podcast party!
The Homebrewed Christianity Podcast is partnering with friends at Christ the King Lutheran Church in Cary to put on a live podcast to celebrate the 500th Birthday for the Reformation. We will get nerdy with a couple religion Professors from Campbell University, be inspired by some Lutheran Ministers, and get hydrated with local craft beer. After talking it up we will sing it out with some old school hymns. Nothing says “Happy Birthday” in the style of Luther like getting nerdy, having a beer, and singing with friends. Click here for tickets!

And don’t miss a special screen and post-screening Q&A about the new Morgan Freeman show on National Geographic, The Story of Us. We will be at Meyers Park Baptist Church in Charlotte, NC on November 10th.

Oct 17 2017
1 hour 21 mins
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Rank #6: Michael Reiss: Evolutionary Ethics and the role of Religion

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Michael Reiss is a British bioethicist, educator, and journalist. He is also an Anglican priest. Reiss is professor of science education at the Institute of Education, University College London, where he is assistant director, research and development. We had a fun conversation about his recent Boyle lecture (you can watch it here). We discuss a number of topics:

  • how is ethics framed and formed by our evolutionary heritage?
  • Dawkins and the genes eye view
  • the role of language and rituals in the formation of the self reflection
  • how human fictions shape our living
  • the emergence of religion within humanity and the social brain
  • how religious practice preceded ethics and belief
  • how ethics evolved among our species
  • the nature of humanity’s expanding in-group
  • a shout out to Peter Singer

You can find out more about the Religion and the Social Brian project here.

He also has a number of articles available for download here.

Jul 31 2019
47 mins
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Rank #7: Open and Relational Theology Throwdown with Thomas Jay Oord

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I am super excited to share this conversation with my dear friend and brilliant scholar Tom Oord. In this episode we discuss a couple different topics from an Open and Relational perspective in the hope it lures you to join our Open and Relational Theology reading group!! That’s right. Tom and I are gonna facilitate an exploration of ORT and we would love for you to join the fun.

Did you know Tom just released a new book? It’s called “God Can’t: How to Believe in God and Love after Tragedy, Abuse, and Other Evils.” It is the single best introduction to the open and relational perspective on evil for the non-specialist. I have already recommended it to a bunch of people, so if you are asking questions about God’s power, presence, and relationship to suffering – read this book.

Thomas Jay Oord is a theologian, philosopher, and scholar of multi-disciplinary studies. Oord is an award-winning author, and he has written or edited more than twenty books. A twelve-time Faculty Award winning professor, Oord teaches at institutions around the globe. A gifted speaker, Oord is known for his contributions to research on love, open and relational theology, science and religion, and the implications of freedom and relationships for transformation.

Join us for a nerdy online learning party!

Here’s Tom’s 3 Open and Relational Theology 101 books

Here’s my additional 3 texts

My 3 Favorite Tom Oord Books!

Tom’s Selections for an Open and Relational Theology 101 Reading List

Previous Visits of Tom to the Podcast

Open and Relational Q&A with Thomas Jay Oord
Why Go Wesleyan? with Thomas Jay Oord
Evil, Providence and the Love of God with Tom Oord
Thomas Jay Oord really loves talking about Love [Barrel Aged]
Jan 18 2019
1 hour
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Rank #8: Thomas Jay Oord wants you to know “God Can’t”

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I love Tom Oord. It is rare someone as intelligent as Tom is simultaneously committed to the life of the church, sensitive to people’s lived experience, and advancing the intellectual quest in multiple areas. In this episode I talk with Tom about his newest book, God Can’t: how to believe in God and Love after Tragedy, Abuse, and other Evils.

During this conversation we both share a number of personal stories. Some of them may be a bit intense if you are listening with kids or the expectation of just nerdiness. For more academic conversations with Tom check out the previous episodes below.

Thomas Jay Oord is a theologian, philosopher, and scholar of multi-disciplinary studies. Oord is an award-winning author, and he has written or edited more than twenty books. A twelve-time Faculty Award winning professor, Oord teaches at institutions around the globe. A gifted speaker, Oord is known for his contributions to research on love, open and relational theology, science and religion, and the implications of freedom and relationships for transformation.

Previous Visits of Tom to the Podcast

Open and Relational Q&A with Thomas Jay Oord
Why Go Wesleyan? with Thomas Jay Oord
Evil, Providence and the Love of God with Tom Oord
Thomas Jay Oord really loves talking about Love [Barrel Aged]
Feb 07 2019
1 hour 6 mins
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Rank #9: Our God Loves Justice with W. Travis McMaken

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Travis McMaken, Associate Professor of Religion at Lindenwood University, is on the podcast not just to talk about Theology Beer Camp, but also his new book, Our God Loves Justice.

It’s a book he wish he would have read when he was an MDiv student, and wants to show people that the current connection between Protestant theology and politics in North America is not the only possible connection. The book is also an introduction to the theology of Helmut Gollwitzer, his fight for justice, his relationship to Karl Barth, and his democratic socialism.

  • why does our current political and theological context in North America need another option?
  • what are the questions we should be taking seriously?
  • should the church be involved in politics?
  • how should we understand instances of violence in politics?
  • what is the role of confessional communities?

Tripp and Travis talk about the connection between conservative Protestant theology and political outcomes, the spirituality of the church as America’s original heresy, the myth of non-political religion, the regulation of speech about God, and the tension between the church being pragmatically and revolutionarily engaged in politics.

Plus, Tripp answers some common questions about Theology Beer Camp… speaking of which, if you haven’t gotten your tickets for Theology Beer Camp this August in Asheville, you better act fast before they are gone! Just go to theologybeercamp.com to score your tickets before the price goes up. And if you want to donate monthly to help support the podcast (and get loads of nerdy, bonus material) then go to homebrewedcommunity.com to sign up now.

Don’t forget to follow Travis on Twitter and check out his most zesty theology blog.

Apr 17 2018
1 hour 15 mins
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Rank #10: Can a process theologian be an Evangelical & other questions with Philip Clayton

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Get ready for a super nerdy, no holds barred podcast with Philip Clayton, Ingraham Professor of Theology at the Claremont School of Theology. This is the first time that Philip has been on since Tripp finished his PhD (Philip was his adviser), and now that the power dynamic has shifted, they can tell each other what they really think.

You’ll get to hear a little unfiltered conversation about Tripp’s dissertation, the historical, existential, and metaphysical registers of Christ and God, the things about Tripp’s dissertation that surprised himself, our cultural phobia surrounding saying the word God, Pannenberg’s existential approach to Christianity, and what verse in the bible Philip knew couldn’t be true. Plus:

  • Tillich, language, and symbols
  • the presence (or lack) of a tradition to draw upon
  • and the intersection of Whiteheadian aesthetics, embodiment, and ethics.

Can a process theologian be an Evangelical with a high christology? Does God win in the end? Do you need to have a complete eschatology to have a persuasive Christianity? Is it possible take both historical criticism and special revelation seriously? Is God personal and does God have a personality?

All of these topics are fair game in this Q&A session.

If you are in North Carolina, you better get ready for two back-to-back live podcasts in December. On December 7th Tripp will be at Wake Forest University School of Divinity talking with Bill Leonard (author of the Homebrewed Guide to Church History) and on December 8th he will be in Cary, NC.

If you really want to make your advent great, join Tripp, Diana Butler Bass, and the folks from Crackers and Grape Juice in Washington DC on December 16th. You can get tickets and learn more here.

Dec 04 2017
1 hour 17 mins
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Rank #11: Keith Ward talks about the Bible

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Keith Ward is back on the podcast to talk a little about his new book, Love Is His Meaning: Understanding The Teaching Of Jesus. In the book, Keith wrestles with the teachings of Jesus in a non-literal way, and looks to interpret the teachings of Jesus consistently throughout.

In this episode he talks about his relationship with scripture and how it’s changed over the years, his unusual route from philosophy to Christianity, which teachings of Jesus we should take seriously but not literally, the relationship between the bible as a historical text and as a sacred text, and the canonized diversity of Christianity. He also tackles:

  • * What does a reductive, materialistic, scientific account miss when talking about creation?
  • * How did the biblical prophets change biblical religion?
  • * How are we supposed to understand the Kingdom of God that Jesus teaches?
  • * What would it mean to be priests of the earth?
  • * What is scripture’s role when discussing contemporary issues of ethics and morality?
  • * How much are we bound by Jesus’ teachings and life?

Plus, the problem of evil and suffering and how science can help Christians with this, the centrality of God’s unlimited divine love and why it’s essential to the New Testament’s testimony to God.

On March 13th Homebrewed Christianity turns 10 years old! On our birthday there will be 48 hours you can score the cheapest tickets to Theology Beer Camp 2018 August 16-18 in Asheville NC. But there’s only 99 seats so signup at theologybeercamp.com to get early access to the tickets.

Mar 06 2018
1 hour 1 min
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Rank #12: Resurrecting Easter with John Dominic Crossan

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John Dominic Crossan – the fifth guest ever on the podcast – is back for his sixth visit to talk about his new book Resurrecting Easter

Hear about the genesis of a book about the resurrection, or rather, how a curiosity about an image of Jesus turned into this book, and how Eastern Christianity’s image of Easter differs radically from the Western tradition of Easter.

Individual Resurrection vs. Universal Resurrection:

  • which of these images is in greater continuity with the New Testament?
  • and what is the meaning of it?
  • how does a universal resurrection impact understandings of God’s relationship to the person of Jesus and the world?

Hear how his approach to questions about the resurrection has changed over time – whether the resurrection was literal or metaphorical – and how that blocked questions of meaning, the difference between ascension and resurrection in Judaism, Paul’s re-reading of the resurrection of the dead, the political implications of resurrection, and why Christians should take evolution seriously.

Make sure you enter the Westar Institute Foundational Classics giveaway for your chance to win over $500 worth of books by John Dominic Crossan, Catherine Keller, Jack Caputo, and more!

Feb 27 2018
56 mins
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Rank #13: Faith Formation in a Secular Age with Andrew Root

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Andrew Root, Associate Professor and Carrie Olson Baalson Chair of Youth and Family Ministry at Luther Seminary, is back on the podcast to talk about his new book, Faith Formation in a Secular Age. This is the first of three books engaging Charles Taylor’s work.; church’s obsession with Youthfulness

Andrew and Tripp talk about their mutual love for Charles Taylor, Andrew’s work expanding it into a new way of understanding God’s presence, ministry, and divine action, the origins of youth ministry in America, and the church’s obsession with youthfulness.

Andrew also explains the origins of the book, how Taylor’s work offers a great way to interpret what young people are going through, explains what Taylor means by the Age of Authenticity, and the politics of recognition.

Plus, they discuss Bonhoeffer and the youth movement, the church’s desire for recognition by today’s youth, secularism and the reduction of faith, the burden of belief, divine action, mystical experiences and church membership, and Andrew gives a little taste of what the second book in the series will be about…

If you want to hang out with Tripp, Andrew, and many others in Minneapolis for the Science for Youth Ministry Conference: Jesus Rode a Dinosaur: Faithful Youth Ministry in a Scientific Age, click here to get tickets and more info.

If you don’t want to wait that long and are in North Carolina, you won’t want to miss the Theology Nerd Bootcamp and Live Podast Why God Loves Science on March 2nd in Chapel Hill. Get tickets and more information here.

Feb 13 2018
1 hour 17 mins
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Rank #14: Karl Barth for Evangelicals with Mark Galli

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Mark Galli, author of Karl Barth: An Introductory Biography for Evangelicals, and editor-in-chief for Christianity Today, is on the podcast to talk about Karl Barth, Evangelicalism in America, and homebrewing.

You’ll hear him discuss how he became editor-in-chief of Christianity Today, the role of Christianity Today in American religion, and the cultural, political, and religious levels of meaning for the term “Evangelical.”

Mark tells a story about his encounter with Barth in a coffee shop in Santa Cruz, and the origins of the book. Plus the themes and ideas in Barth’s work that are controversial for Evangelicals, and what Barth most has to offer Evangelicals.

This conversation goes way beyond the topics of the book and include:

  • Barth’s respect and friendship with theologians with whom he deeply disagreed
  • the polarization of American politics and religion
  • Barth’s reinterpretation of the reformed tradition and his view on the doctrine of election
  • Rob Bell and the task of preaching
  • the increased Evangelical support of Trump
  • the superiority of democratic socialism for bible believing Christians
  • whether we can (and should) separate the theology from the theologian, that is, their personal behavior and what they peach,
  • and boundary markers for Evangelicals

And don’t miss some nerdy homebrewing conversation at the end. You can learn more about Mark’s work by visiting: christianitytoday.com/gallireport

Are you ready to make Advent great again? Make Advent Great Again is a pop-up community for holiday resistance and renewal. We’ll give you daily reflections that plant potent seeds of hope to counter the weeds of that Grinch-ly other #MAGA. We’re offering a weeklycheck-in video that you can tune into live (or whenever you want) where we’ll cover:

  • Mother Mary and Us: Recovering a Radical Christmas of Renewal & Resistance
  • How to Go Home for the Holidays without Losing Your Soul
  • Grounding in the Ultimate Gift: The Advent of Us
  • We’re providing a private, safer-space discussion group where we can be totally honest about our struggles and breakthroughs. A ‘home base’ to truly Make Advent Great Again, one day at a time

The cost? Contribute whatever you can to help make this possible for everyone. The suggested donation is $20, but no one is turned down for lack of funds.

Click here to make your Advent great again and see the list of contributors.

If you are in North Carolina, you better get ready for a two back-to-back live podcasts in December. On December 7th Tripp will be in Winston-Salem talking with Bill Leonard (author of the Homebrewed Guide to Church History) and on December 8th he will be in Cary, NC.

If you really want to #MAGA, join Tripp with the folks from the Crackers and Grape Juice podcast in Washington DC on December 16th. You can get tickets and learn more here.

Nov 29 2017
1 hour 37 mins
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Rank #15: Raising the Intellectual Bar in the Church with Alexis Waggoner

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Alexis Waggoner, Director of Marketing and Digital Education at the Westar Institute, is on to talk about raising the intellectual bar in the church (while lowering it in the academy).

First, you’ll hear about how her academic interests impacted her coming back to Christianity, how growing up in a more conservative setting she was told what to believe rather than how to believe, the experience of growing up in a military family and how that affected her faith, being a chaplain in the military and how that shapes her understanding of herself and her faith, and the questions and thinkers the church needs to wrestle with.

Plus, Alexis shares some of the more annoying things her progressive friends say and believe about the military, and the questions and doubts about the faith she received.

The Westar Institute Foundational Classics Giveaway is almost over! Make sure you enter by the end of March 31st to get a chance to win an awesome stack of books by some very zesty authors, including Catherine Keller, Jack Caputo, John Dominic Crossan, Marcus Borg, and more! If you’ve already entered, make sure you keep sharing – the more you share, the better your chances of winning!

Mar 30 2018
59 mins
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Rank #16: Keep Christianity Weird w/ Michael Frost

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On this episode I am joined by Michael Frost and we talk about his newest book Keep Christianity Weird: Embracing the Discipline of Being Different.  Michael is an internationally recognized missiologist and one of the leading voices in the missional church movement. On top of that he’s is the Vice Principal of Morling College and the founding Director of the Tinsley Institute, a mission study centre located at Morling College in Sydney, Australia.

You can check out his website, follow him on twitter, and even on Facebook.

Dec 12 2018
1 hour 16 mins
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Rank #17: Disability, Time, and the Spiritual Dimension of Health with John Swinton

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To kick off the first Homebrewed interview of the new year, Tripp is talking with John Swinton about time, disability, and all things nerdy.

John is the Chair in Divinity and Religious Studies at the School of Divinity, History, and Philosophy at the University of Aberdeen and founder of the Centre for the Study of Spirituality, Health and Disability. Learn a little bit about how John become vocationally a scholar of religion and interested in religion and disability studies, how his work as a chaplain lead to his work as a practical theologian, and how issues surrounding the lives of people with disability shaped his research interests.

John gives a very helpful and simple definition of practical theology, talks about the rituals and practices in the life of the church and their impact on the lives of people with disabilities, disability and the shift from charity to discipleship, and the way our conception of time shapes our ideas of friendships and relationship from his newest book, Becoming Friends of Time: Disability, Timefullness, and Gentle Discipleship.

  • what does it mean for someone with advanced dementia to have forgotten, perhaps, who Jesus is, and yet still be a disciple with a vocation in the church?
  • is inclusion really the solution for people with disabilities within the church?
  • how does disability change our perception of what it means to be human?

Plus, Tripp and John talk about a theology of time, Saint Augustine’s discussion of time in Confessions, our obsession with time and how it has shaped our ideas of vocation in the modern world, memory and embodied spiritual practices, the need for honesty and lament and how all of this changes our understanding of Jesus’ healing narratives, and the spiritual dimension of health and how ideas of health in the bible are different from what Western medicine considers health.

John mentions this paper in the conversation, and you can find a great syndicate discussion about John’s book with his replies here.

Tripp will be in Atlanta on February 12th at Mani’s Tavern with friends from the McAfee School of Theology, more details coming soon.

You can pre-order your copy of the Homebrewed Guide To Being Human by Donna Bowman now!

A big thanks to all of our new Homebrewed Community members! You can join the community by going to homebrewedcommunity.com

Jan 17 2018
1 hour 14 mins
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Rank #18: An Oxford Philosopher’s Journey from Atheism to Idealism with Keith Ward

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This most zesty episode was part of the Cosmic Campfire reading group. I joined Science Mike, Mike Morrell, and a couple thousand nerds as we read through a new collection of spiritual memoirs – How I Found God in Everyone and Everywhere. Keith Ward was one of the contributors and he jumped on video chat to talk with Mike and I for the group.

It was an energetic and fun conversation that covered a number of topics from science, physics, materialism, idealism, the Cosmic Christ, spiritual experiences, religious pluralism, divine action, and more. Ohhh and you hear how this Oxford Philosopher went from being an atheist to an idealist and then converted to Christianity in India.

Keith Ward is a British philosopher, theologian, priest and scholar. He is a fellow of the British Academy and a priest of the Church of England. He was a canon of Christ Church, Oxford until 2003. Comparative theologyand the relationship between science and religion are two of his main topics of interest. He was Regius Professor of Divinity at the University of Oxford from 1991 to 2004.

Don’t forget to check out some amazing free lectures of Keith. Literally quality, zesty, nerdy, and free lectures.

Here’s his previous podcast visits:

<- we will be reading Keith during this upcoming group, so join up today.

Five Keith Ward Books To Enjoy

Recommendations From Keith

Jan 23 2019
1 hour 16 mins
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Rank #19: Christian Realism, Social Ethics, and Politics with Ronald Stone

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This episode was a real treat. Ronald Stone, from the Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, is on the podcast to talk about Christian identity and the renewal of Christian realism. Ronald studied with Niebuhr at Union Theological Seminary and was interested in politics and religion, social ethics, and social action from early on.

Tripp and Ronald talk about:

  • what it means to be a Christian realist today
  • the roots of realism, its critics, and its revival.
  • the religion and politics of the election
  • American exceptionalism, and the economy

Plus, make sure you stick around to the end of the interview to hear Ronald’s stories about his experience with Niebuhr and Tillich.

#TheologyBeerCamp Summer Edition is coming to Denver and Oklahoma City this August. Head over to theologybeercamp.com to get your tickets. You won’t want to miss Tripp and Peter Rollins dueling in the process vs. radical theology battle of the summer. Plus, we might convince Pete to sing karaoke…

We will be starting a new High Gravity class for the Homebrewed Community Members: The Theology Nerd’s Guide to Reading the Bible. Current members will have access to the class, and non-members will be able to purchase the class soon. But the best way to get the class is to become a monthly Homebrewed Community Member. You will get access to all of the past High Gravity courses, #EPICReads, exclusive bonus content, and a network of other theology nerds to help you brew your own faith. Just visit homebrewedcommunity.com to sign up.

Jul 11 2017
1 hour 37 mins
Play

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