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History At Our House: Ancient History

Updated 4 days ago

Education
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The History At Our House blog, providing samples of Mr Powell's unique approach to teaching history.

Read more

The History At Our House blog, providing samples of Mr Powell's unique approach to teaching history.

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Cover image of History At Our House: Ancient History

History At Our House: Ancient History

Updated 4 days ago

Read more

The History At Our House blog, providing samples of Mr Powell's unique approach to teaching history.

Rank #1: The destructive tensions in a society of slaveholders

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Here's episode 20 of the podcast, where we let you peek your head round our classroom doors here at History At Our House!

As anyone from the United States well knows, slavery can cause massive tensions and rifts in any state. Particularly when that state is establishing itself as a "free" state, and trying to figure out what that word means. Greece had its own trouble with this (something students will see repeated in the Roman empire!). Although the slaves were "self-made" in a certain sense (they forfeited their and their family's freedom when they went bankrupt), it was still a cruel system, creating a lot of resentment - with tensions that came close to exploding!

Don't forget, if you're streaming via podbean, you can also subscribe via iTunes here and not miss any new episodes: http://itunes.apple.com/gb/podcast/history-at-our-house-ancient/id457257170

Aug 21 2012

6mins

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Rank #2: Athens: A terrible place to build a monarchy

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Here's episode 19 of the podcast, where we let you peek your head round our classroom doors here at History At Our House!

One of the things we're hot on here is the significance of events. It's not enough to know that such-and-such a people believed this or that such-and-such an event happened. We want to make sure students understand why it all matters. The Athenians had what is in many ways a strange form of government (one that went through many changes in its lifetime). In the period looked at here, we look at the significance of a certain aspect of their form of government: namely that there existed "monarchs", but these were very different creatures from the Kings we know of Europe. Indeed, because of the limits placed on this monarch it was very difficult to build any lasting legacy as a monarch, to have an enduring thing which could be called "The Monarchy", as we'll see!

Don't forget, if you're streaming via podbean, you can also subscribe via iTunes here and not miss any new episodes: http://itunes.apple.com/gb/podcast/history-at-our-house-ancient/id457257170

Aug 15 2012

7mins

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Rank #3: The Ancient and Spartan ideology of Communism

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Here's episode 18 of the podcast, where we let you peek your head round our classroom doors here at History At Our House!

This week we're with the High School class, where students grapple a lot more with the ideas being bandied about in each period. They work to understand what these ideas are and how they influenced events. In this particular class the students studied why the Spartans were one of history's earliest examples of a Communist culture, and how understanding this is important in integrating ancient events with modern events. Students gain a better grasping the nature of various forms of governments as well as forming an enduring picture of humans as having a certain nature, as reacting in characteristic ways to similar conditions.

Don't forget, if you're streaming via podbean, you can also subscribe via iTunes here and not miss any new episodes: http://itunes.apple.com/gb/podcast/history-at-our-house-ancient/id457257170

Aug 06 2012

7mins

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Rank #4: The Peculiarly Greek Olympics

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Here's episode 17 of the podcast, where we let you peek your head round our classroom doors here at History At Our House!

Well, the Olympics are in full swing now, so why don't we learn a little bit about their origins? This clip comes from a class late last year, but it's especially relevant now. Nowadays, the Olympics is a pretty standard event. It's a tribute to great mastery, tenacity, and passion no less, but it meant something even more back in its founding...

Don't forget, you can subscribe via iTunes here: http://itunes.apple.com/gb/podcast/history-at-our-house-ancient/id457257170

Jul 31 2012

7mins

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Rank #5: The Limits of the Persian Empire

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Here's episode 16 of the podcast, where we let you peek your head round one of our classroom doors, here at History At Our House!

And so we reach the edges of the Persian Empire, its borders and its capabilities. As the class looked at last time, there's a reason we're so interested in Mesopotamia: it's because of the Persians! And in particular, we care about why they came into conflict with another ancient peoples, and what led to that ancient battle we hear so much clamouring about (particularly in recent years, after a certain film). What was it that bounded their Westward expansion - geographically and, more importantly, ideologically?

Don't forget, you can subscribe via iTunes here: http://itunes.apple.com/gb/podcast/history-at-our-house-ancient/id457257170

Jul 23 2012

6mins

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Rank #6: The Persians as the Pyramids of Mesopotamia

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Here's episode 15 of the podcast, where we let you peek your head round one of our classroom doors, here at History At Our House!

Why do we care about Mesopatamia? What's this thing out that's driving us to learn about them? In any culture or period, there's something interesting and mysterious which drives us into wanting to know more - the American Revolution makes us want to know about the European struggles that gave birth to it, the philosophy and plays left behind make us want to know more about how Greece was able to produce these works, the Pyramids make us wonder who on earth those Egyptians were and why they built them. And for Mesopotamia: it's the Persians, and in particular because when studying Greek history they seemingly come out of nowhere and decide to start smashing up the Greeks - but why? Who were they?

Don't forget, you can subscribe via iTunes here: http://itunes.apple.com/gb/podcast/history-at-our-house-ancient/id457257170

Jul 16 2012

5mins

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Rank #7: Socrates vs the Mob

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Episode 11 of the podcast, where we let you peak your head round one of the classroom doors, here at History At Our House!

We carry on with the high school class from last week, who were reading about Socrates trial in Plato's 'Apology'. This week they look at the wider issues involved, about democracy and the rule of law versus the wishes of the people. How does one balance the freedom and rights of the individual with the fact that a government is formed of (or by representatives of) the people, and by extension their wishes and desires? This was a question the founders of the United States grappled with, being all too aware of this moment in history themselves...

Jun 18 2012

8mins

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Rank #8: Justice and the Trial of Socrates

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Episode 10 of the podcast, where we let you peak your head round one of the classroom doors, here at History At Our House!

This week it's something a little different: some Ancient Greek Philosophy! As part of our emphasis on giving a more integrated and rich history education, high school students in the program don't just learn that certain great thinkers existed - they hear what those people had to say for themselves too. One of the defining features of ancient Athens was the tension between the will of the people and the rule of law, between the mob and the individual. The founding fathers were all too aware of this, concretised in one epic moment: the trial of Socrates. Here's a sample of the students examining Socrates not-all-that-apologetic 'Apology'.
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Find out more about History At Our House at http://historyatourhouse.com/?page_id=318

Jun 11 2012

7mins

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Rank #9: The Code of Hammurabi

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Episode 9 of our sneak peek inside the History At Our House classroom!

This week we learn a little bit about the source of the old saying "An eye for an eye", and how it was actually a pretty radical principle at the time. It marked a shift from arbitrary rule, towards an equal, codified system of law, one which measured out objectively just what punishment should be meted out to each crime.

Find out more about History At Our House at  http://historyatourhouse.com/?page_id=318

Jun 05 2012

6mins

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Rank #10: Nobody expects the Macedonian Expedition

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Here's episode 25 of the podcast, where we let you peek your head around our classroom doors here at History At Our House!

Athens and the rest of Greece has risen, high on its defeat of Persia. And now it has fallen into internal wars and bickering, disunited and collapsing in on itself. Much of this can be blamed on Athen's avarice, wanting to rule the other city-states. Thebes then looked to imitate Athens, by conquering surrounding lands, but it was not only met with mixed success, but also created some unintended consequences: educating and providing opportunity for a father and son from Macedonia to rise to power over the Greek and Persian worlds...

Don't forget, if you're streaming via podbean, you can also subscribe via iTunes here and not miss any new episodes: http://itunes.apple.com/gb/podcast/history-at-our-house-ancient/id457257170

Oct 16 2012

5mins

Play