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Science & Medicine
Sports & Recreation
Natural Sciences
Outdoor

The Eyes on Conservation Podcast

Updated 12 days ago

Science & Medicine
Sports & Recreation
Natural Sciences
Outdoor
Read more

The Eyes on Conservation Podcast is a weekly interview series featuring conservations with top experts in the fields of conservation, wildlife and environmental justice.

Read more

The Eyes on Conservation Podcast is a weekly interview series featuring conservations with top experts in the fields of conservation, wildlife and environmental justice.

iTunes Ratings

37 Ratings
Average Ratings
33
3
0
1
0

One of the good ones!

By Frog_Lady - Dec 14 2016
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Long-time listener here, keep it up! The episode on Standing Rock has been my favorite so far.

Great podcast

By Fthuuh - Aug 24 2015
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This is exactly what I was looking for! Absolutely love it

iTunes Ratings

37 Ratings
Average Ratings
33
3
0
1
0

One of the good ones!

By Frog_Lady - Dec 14 2016
Read more
Long-time listener here, keep it up! The episode on Standing Rock has been my favorite so far.

Great podcast

By Fthuuh - Aug 24 2015
Read more
This is exactly what I was looking for! Absolutely love it
Cover image of The Eyes on Conservation Podcast

The Eyes on Conservation Podcast

Updated 12 days ago

Read more

The Eyes on Conservation Podcast is a weekly interview series featuring conservations with top experts in the fields of conservation, wildlife and environmental justice.

Rank #1: EOC 161: Mr. Trash Wheel Saves the Day!

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Today on the show we are going to learn about how one city is taking responsibility for the trash that it produces, and setting a global example for how to stop plastic waste from entering our oceans. That city is Baltimore, and I was lucky enough to have the opportunity to chat with one of the key figures behind Baltimore’s campaign to clean up their waterways - Adam Lindquist.  Adam works for the Waterfront Partnership of Baltimore where he serves as the director of the Healthy Harbor Initiative.  Listen in to the episode to learn how Adam and others are using Mr. Trash Wheel, and a variety of other initiatives to clean up Baltimore's harbor and improve the lives of those who live in the city.
Aug 29 2018
34 mins
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Rank #2: EOC 157: Discussing Drones and Wildlife with the founders of Oceans Unmanned

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Today’s episode is about drones.  I spoke with the founders of an organization called Oceans Unmanned about how they are using drones to assist in conducting biological research, as well as how they are working to reduce wildlife disturbance from drones.
Jul 04 2018
37 mins
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Rank #3: EOC 169: Livin' On a Prairie!

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Most endangered species are easy to see in peril. There simply aren’t very many of them, and we struggle to see them in the areas where they’re from. Others aren’t so clear. Take, for example, the black-tailed prairie dog. It seems like they’re everywhere, and yet, their numbers are some of the lowest they’ve every been. This isn’t just bad news for the prairie dog. It’s bad news for animals like the black footed ferret, and a whole host of other animals who either feed on prairie dogs or rely on their burrows for shelter. Meet Deanna Meyer, the Executive Director of Prairie Protection Colorado, the group working to relocate prairie dogs from certain eradication in places like the City of Castle Rock’s Promenade Shopping Mall in Colorado. While only a fraction of these animals were able to be saved by Deanna and her team, the ones that did make it to the relocation area just outside of Sedalia have no idea how lucky they are. And maybe we don't either. Find out more about Deanna and the whole team of Prairie Protection Colorado at prairieprotectioncolorado.org and prairieprotectioncolorado@gmail.com. Show music by The Humidors. Additional music by Blue Dot Sessions via Creative Commons Licensing.
Dec 19 2018
56 mins
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Rank #4: EOC 158: The future of ocean conservation with Callum Roberts

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For her feature-length film, Sea of Life, the ever-talented Julia Barnes interviewed scientists and activists working to save the ocean and shared an interview with Callum Roberts with Eyes on Conservation. Callum is a marine conservationist, oceanographer, author and researcher based at York University. Julia spoke with Callum about human impacts on the ocean, going back through the history of fishing and looking towards the future of ocean conservation.
Jul 18 2018
19 mins
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Rank #5: EOC 150: A Conversation with Peter Seligmann

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When he launched Conservation International in 1987, Peter Seligmann recognized that the conservation movement had yet to genuinely consider people as an integral part of ecosystems. Along with his team their thinking was on jobs and health and the health of a family, the health of the community and how these are all impacted by the conservation of nature. This seemingly intuitive approach was novel, innovative. They went further to generate science and ideas that were pragmatic, applicable and inclusive and utilizing this to guide decision making. Through hard work, passion, compassion and an openness to learning from mistakes, a strong, highly accomplished organization flourished and continues to today. After 30 years as the CEO, he recently stepped down from that role and handed the reins to a new generation of leaders, remaining on as chairman and exploring new endeavors. Producer Matt Podolsky spoke with Peter about his story, the challenges of being an innovative leader and the phenomenal work of CI during his tenure and moving forward.
Apr 25 2018
1 hour 24 mins
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Rank #6: EOC 148: The Challenges Facing the Ocean

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Making a documentary involves learning a lot of information and then condensing it into a very short format. For Sea of Life Julia Barnes, filmmaker and ocean activist, interviewed over 50 experts and only about 20 of them were featured in the movie; sometimes only for a few minutes. With a depth of information sitting on her hard drives, today she shares with listeners some never before heard clips from an interview with Tom Campbell. Tom Campbell is an underwater filmmaker who has witnessed big changes in the ocean over his lifetime.
Apr 11 2018
25 mins
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Rank #7: EOC 165: Keeping the Fire

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Today, we're taking you to a remote island off the coast of Alaska, just above the Aleutian Islands and not too far from Russia. Among the bellows of the fur seals and windswept sea cliffs of St. Paul Island, Aquilina Lestenkof, an indigenous Unangan woman and pioneer for her community in revitalizing the Unangan language, is teaching a new generation of youth about where their people have come from, and how far they still have to go in order to protect what she calls the "ingredients" that make up her community and culture.
Oct 24 2018
51 mins
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Rank #8: EOC 152: Carbon offset programs make a positive difference: an example from Kenya

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Over the past decade, carbon offsetting has become increasingly popular, but it has also become increasingly controversial. While some argue that carbon offset programs allow people to feel absolved of their carbon consuming sins without genuinely changing behaviors, which may very well be true in some instances, we here at the Eyes on Conservation Podcast as part of the larger Wild Lens crew all work to be active participants in a sustainable future. As all of us at Wild Lens prepare to gather from all across the country to discuss the future direction of the organization, we will be participating in a carbon offset program to make this a more sustainable venture. But, as we began researching the options, it was difficult to figure out which programs were genuinely effective. That is, until we discovered ECO2. ECO2 works in Kenya and offers carbon offsets that pay for several programs, including locally produced efficient stoves that reduce wood consumption and help to preserve the unique vegetation and biodiversity of the Kakamega rainforest. These stoves have a cleaner burning process, decreasing indoor air pollution and associated acute respiratory infections in women and children. Moreover, savings in burning unsustainably harvested fuel wood cuts down CO2 emissions. Matt Podolsky spoke with Anton Espira, a founder and principle of ECO2 and Solibrium, that has been overseeing this inspiring project that Wild Lens is excited to contribute to.
May 09 2018
38 mins
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Rank #9: EOC 149: Plight of the Puerto Rican Sharp-shinned Hawk

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Hurricane Maria was the worst storm to hit Puerto Rico in over 80 years, arriving only two weeks after Hurricane Irma passed just north of the island. The effects of these storms on Puerto Rican families — and the island’s infrastructure — will take many years to heal. The effect on the wildlife inhabiting this island was also, not surprisingly, equally devastated. When the Peregrine Fund’s team of biologists surveyed the population of Puerto Rican Sharp-shinned Hawks in 2017, they found 75 birds comprising 16 breeding pairs in four locations on the island. Following hurricanes Irma and Maria, the population was down to just 19 individual birds. Nearly 75 percent of the subspecies was lost. Matt Podolsky sat down with Russel Thurstrom at the Peregrine Fund to learn more about this discovery and the actions being taken to prevent this species from blinking out.
Apr 18 2018
32 mins
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Rank #10: EOC Rebroadcast: The New Era of Outdoor Adventure Storytelling with Fitz Cahall

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If you’re like me, you are a total sucker for story. The kind that make me lean-in, as if my ears closer to the speaker could possibly offer more, is my favorite. I’ve come to learn that this is, in fact, a nearly universal human trait, emerging spontaneously in childhood, and existing in all cultures studied thus far. Humans have been telling stories for thousands of years, sharing them orally even before the invention of writing. They allow people to see patterns where there is chaos, meaning where there is randomness. Humans are inclined to see narratives where there are none because it can afford meaning to our lives—taking on a form of existential problem-solving. As Spring begins to hint of Summer and outdoor adventures start filling up my calendar, it feels like the season of storytelling; shared on the trail, around the campfire, over beers after some epic Type II fun. Amid all of it, I ache for ways to take more people with me to these places, to engage them in these experiences, to awaken a passion in them for the preservation and protection of nature. When Matt Podolsky interviewed Fitz Cahall, well-known outdoor adventure storyteller, I left the show filled with inspiration on doing just this. In honor of this seasonal transition, I wanted to re-broadcast this show on the off-chance it may prove equally inspirational for others.
May 16 2018
44 mins
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Rank #11: EOC 162: Saving the Nautilus

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The chambered nautilus is the only living descendant of a group of ocean creatures that thrived in the seas 500 million years ago when the earth’s continents were still forming. Older than the dinosaurs, these deep sea dwellers are often referred to as the oldest living fossils. But, after withstanding countless challenges, they are being sought after for their beauty and dwindling toward extinction. A young activist and several curious scientists traveled to Fiji recently on an expedition to learn more about this ancient animal and how to save it. Gianna Savoie traveled with them to capture some of the story of this threatened ancient animal and the work being done to rescue it. I spoke with this filmmaker and founder of Ocean Media Institute, a non-profit conservation organization based in Bozeman, MT, to learn more about their adventure and her work as a science storyteller on behalf of the ocean.
Sep 12 2018
26 mins
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Rank #12: EOC 010: Greater Sage-Grouse Conservation and Research with Jen Forbey

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Episode Summary: We have dedicated the month of January here at the Eyes on Conservation podcast to Greater Sage-grouse conservation.  We are releasing a brand new short documentary today, Greater... Read more » The post EOC 010: Greater Sage-Grouse Conservation and Research with Jen Forbey appeared first on Wild Lens.
Jan 07 2015
55 mins
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Rank #13: EOC 132: Praying (in a strictly secular way) for the Vaquita

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So I’m guessing that folks have started to notice that we’ve been lagging behind on our typical weekly release schedule with the show.  We are going through a bit of a transition period with the show, and with Wild Lens as a whole - in fact one facet of this transition will be discussed in detail on today’s episode.  But regarding the podcast - I just want to assure you that we aren’t going anywhere - we are planning lots of exciting interviews for the coming months and will be back to our weekly schedule very soon. Now we had to make the vaquita the focus of this episode because I am about to embark upon what could be the most dramatic shoot of my career.  In less than 2 weeks the vaquita capture effort will begin, and our Wild Lens crew will be there to capture whatever happens. As if the capture effort itself wasn’t exciting enough, we also have an exciting update to share about our film project itself.  This will be discussed in detail on today's episode of the show - but just to give you a teaser - we have partnered with several other large production companies to produce the feature length version of our film.  We’re super excited about this collaboration and everything that it means for both vaquita awareness generally and Wild Lens.
Oct 04 2017
56 mins
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Rank #14: EOC 155: Nate Dappen: We Are the Stories that We Tell About Ourselves

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Today we are welcoming back our guest from episode 92 of the show - Nate Dappen.  Nate is a filmmaker focused on telling stories about science and conservation, and he has a new film, just released this week, called “the Passage”. The Passage is a bit of a departure from Nate’s typical storytelling style - it’s a deeply personal story focused on the importance of family and explores what it’s like for him to watch his parents age.
Jun 13 2018
45 mins
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Rank #15: EOC 156: When life happens, make a podcast

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To have or not to have children, that is a most vexing question and one I wrestled with personally during my 30s. A career in conservation and, in particular, being steeped in issues of climate change, firmly planted me on the fence on the issue. After all, how could I bring a life into this doomed world? At the same time, I witnessed nature’s resilience first-hand, opening the possibility of hope for the future, so maybe a new life could thrive and contribute to making the world an even better place. Then I hit 40 and was quietly relieved that nature had made the decision for me and that answer was: “No.” That is until it wasn’t anymore. I have no idea what changed, but suddenly my husband and I were expecting. And my world flipped. Matt Podolsky and I chatted about this flip and the curious business of having and raising a conscientious child that makes a positive contribution to the world and how finding answers to these questions lead to the idea for a new podcast.
Jun 20 2018
35 mins
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Rank #16: EOC 170: The Unsettling Link Between Violence Against Women and Climate Change

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Kristy Oriol and Paul Bancroft recently co-authored an article on the surprising and unsettling link between climate change and violence against women and their words serve as some of the earliest discussions surrounding this important topic. Oriol and Bancroft work to provide victims of domestic and sexual violence and child abuse with safety, advocacy, support and education services through the non-profit, the Tahoe Safe Alliance.  Learn how increasing knowledge of these connections could simultaneously work to dismantle rape culture and remedy the climate crisis.
Jan 02 2019
41 mins
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Rank #17: EOC 166: Fracked Politics

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When it comes to fracking regulations on the ballot, there are likely fewer places more concerned than Weld county, Colorado, where I live. Weld county has a lot invested in the outcome, because nearly 12% of its workers are somehow either directly or indirectly tied to its production. Proposition 112 made it on the ballot because for many the debate over how safe this process actually is and how dangerous the wastewater byproduct can be has not been adequately dealt with. While the fight for Proposition 112 in 2018 ended in defeat for organizers, supporters treat the loss like another major milestone in the path to victory. So what would the legislation actually do? Proposed guidelines set by Proposition 112 would create a “setback” for all new oil and gas development a minimum of 2500 feet away from any “vulnerable” area such as homes, hospitals, schools, and highly trafficked or used areas by people. This would include public open spaces, water sources, or playgrounds. Any other areas deemed vulnerable by state or local governments would be added to the list. It would not affect any new oil and gas projects on federal land, and existing projects would be exempt. However, re-entering old wells would be considered new development and would therefore be subject to the new laws. Current restrictions demand wells be 1,000 feet away from high-occupancy buildings: schools, hospitals, and the like. 500 feet away from occupied buildings like homes, and only 350 feet away from playgrounds. I followed Anne Lee Foster, ballot initiative proponent and CO Rising volunteer, from the “yes” campaign’s office to election night to find out what this means for the future of oil and gas in Colorado. Show music by the Humidors. Additional music by Gillicuddy and Scott Holmes via the Free Music Archive through Creative Commons Licensing, and 112 through Fair Use. https://corising.org/ https://www.facebook.com/ColoradoRising/
Nov 07 2018
57 mins
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Rank #18: EOC 168: Resiliency and Opportunity in the Face of Climate Change

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On today’s episode of the show, we are taking you to Sun Valley Idaho where we’ll sit in on a panel discussion featuring the voices of both local and global innovators on the topic of resiliency, innovation and opportunity in the face of climate change. Aimee Christensen is the executive director of Sun Valley Institute for Resilience and lead’s today’s panel discussion. The theme of the discussion revolves around turning risks into opportunities and how economics, policy and natural resources fair in the face of climate change. With the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) recently releasing their special report on the effects of a 1.5 degree global temperature increase, and the very real and very urgent implications of those findings, these discussions on mitigating and adjusting our approaches to climate change in these dire times is more timely than ever. To learn more information about Sun Valley Institute or about the Sun Valley Forum on Resilience, visit: sunvalleyinstitute.org.
Dec 19 2018
1 hour 22 mins
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Rank #19: EOC 164: Purple Haze

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Earlier this year, I got an email from a listener that stood out.  It read, Listening to your podcast in college help me realize I wanted to get into filmmaking rather than field biology because I agree SO much with your viewpoints and the reasons you got into wildlife filmmaking. Holy shit!  I thought.  We had altered the course of someone’s life with this podcast! His name is Zach Steinhauser, and he had already begun working on his first film by the time he reached out with that email.  I responded right away to set up a conversation - there was a sense of responsibility that I had never felt before - I wanted to help ensure that Zach’s project was successful. Now I’ve fielded many calls like this from aspiring filmmakers, but this one was different, and not just because Zach was crediting this podcast as his inspiration.  Zach reached out at a time when we were re-assessing the strategic plan for our organization, Wild Lens.  You may have heard about this on the episode we released a few months back - episode 153. In a nutshell - we had decided to re-structure the organization as a collective, and to place a heavier focus on creating a network of collaboration and support for people working at the intersection of conservation and media arts.  Zach was exactly the type of person we wanted to help - so I asked if I could record our conversation for an episode of the show. Zach's film is about a topic if particular interest to me - purple martin conservation.  Purple martins are cavity nesters, like the subjects of my film Bluebird Man, but unlike bluebirds they are completely reliant on man made nesting boxes for their survival throughout most of their range.  Zach seeks to explore this relationship between humans and the purple martin in his new film, Purple Haze.
Oct 10 2018
1 hour 11 mins
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Rank #20: EOC 154: Science matters, especially when tackling issues of climate change

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Summer is often cited as a favorite season, what with long days and favorable weather for outdoor adventures. Living in Montana, however, Summer has gotten shortened by a new, worrisome season: Fire. Months of smoke-filled skies, waking up to a layer of particulate matter covering everything and a worry that seeps into every cell of my being makes it easily my least favorite time of the year. When the impacts of climate change are at my doorstep, the need to get nature on a better trajectory becomes urgent. Rather than utilizing great scientific minds to argue over whether what we all are experiencing in increasingly devastating examples is indeed reality, I have long been a proponent of developing solutions to strengthen ecosystems. This starts with scientists, land managers and advocates working together. I spoke with Jeff Burrell, the recently retired Northern Rockies Program Director for the Wildlife Conservation Society, about the role of science in the long-term preservation of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem in light of climate change. He beautifully articulates why using the best available science to choose how and where on-the-ground efforts are most effective has the greatest capacity to build climate change resilience at a landscape-scale.
Jun 06 2018
17 mins
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