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LSE Review of Books

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A podcast series from the LSE Review of Books blog lsereviewofbooks.com - the podcasts give listeners the opportunity to hear prolific authors and academics discuss the ideas behind their latest books.

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A podcast series from the LSE Review of Books blog lsereviewofbooks.com - the podcasts give listeners the opportunity to hear prolific authors and academics discuss the ideas behind their latest books.

iTunes Ratings

4 Ratings
Average Ratings
1
2
0
0
1

iTunes Ratings

4 Ratings
Average Ratings
1
2
0
0
1
Cover image of LSE Review of Books

LSE Review of Books

Updated 3 days ago

Read more

A podcast series from the LSE Review of Books blog lsereviewofbooks.com - the podcasts give listeners the opportunity to hear prolific authors and academics discuss the ideas behind their latest books.

Rank #1: Episode 3: Marxism and the Left [Audio]

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Contributor(s): Eli Zaretsky, Alex Callinicos, Amy Mollett, Cheryl Brumley | In this special episode we visit the Marxism 2012 Festival in London's Bloomsbury to hear the latest from Marxist thinkers and activists. Professor of European Studies at King's College London, Alex Callinicos, speaks about austerity and how Karl Marx's theories have found increasing relevance in today's recession-weary world. We then take a look at the leftist movements across the Atlantic with Eli Zaretsky, Professor of History at The New School for Social Research in New York. He talks to us about his latest book Why America Needs a Left, the rise of the Tea Party and how President Obama failed his left-leaning supporters. Presented by Amy Mollett and Cheryl Brumley. Produced by Cheryl Brumley. Music courtesy of Harri at freesound.org for his song Hypno5 as well as Thee Faction for their song "Ready".

Jul 19 2012

12mins

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Rank #2: Episode 5: Democracy and its Discontents [Audio]

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Contributor(s): Matthew Flinders, Armine Ishkanian, Elisa de Denaro Vieira, George Lawson, Cheryl Brumley, Amy Mollett | Professor of Politics at Sheffield University, Matthew Flinders, talks about his new book Defending Politics: Why Democracy Matters in the 21st Century, and argues that the problem with politics is not politicians themselves but the public’s understanding of the processes involved. LSE’s Armine Ishkanian speaks about her book Democracy Building and Civil Society in Post-Soviet Armenia and how civil society and democratisation projects need a firm grounding in a country’s grassroots in order to successfully aid its transition to democracy. George Lawson, Professor of International Relations at the LSE and an expert in democratisation and revolutions, tells us about books and the role the anti-apartheid movement had in sparking his early interest in international relations. We also catch-up with LSE Bees to talk about the wonders of hive behaviour. Produced by Cheryl Brumley. Presented by Amy Mollett. Other Contributors: Cheryl Brumley, Matthew Flinders, Armine Ishkanian, Elisa de Denaro Vieira, George Lawson, LSE Bees. Music and sound came courtesy of the following users at freesound.org: bebeto (Intro music); Harri (Hypno1 and Hypno5); and Harp (Pryght-one). Published 26th September 2012.

Sep 26 2012

30mins

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Rank #3: Episode 8: Architecture and Design: Framing the urban experience [Audio]

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Contributor(s): Amy Mollett, David Kohn, Fran Tonkiss, Hyun Bang Shin | In this podcast we set out to explore how design and architecture can enhance and manipulate our everyday experiences. Architect David Kohn, co-designer of A Room for London, discusses how design can influence the way we experience everything from time to the urban experience. Fran Tonkiss, LSE Reader in Sociology and Director of the LSE Cities Programme, talks about her latest book on the social life of urban form and why ‘the devil gets all the best designs’. Hyun Bang Shin, LSE Associate Professor in Geography and Urban Studies, talks about reading Marx under South Korea’s strict national security laws and how this has influenced his own work on urban displacement. Presented by Amy Mollett. Produced by Cheryl Brumley. Other Contributors: David Kohn, Fran Tonkiss, Hyun Bang Shin. Music and sound came courtesy of the following users at freesound.org: Corsica_S (Argon Sky Multisample), Klankbeeld (Riverside and (traffic horns city nervous busy); inchadney (seagulls); Synth pad (ambient pad); The Working Bamboo (Piano ambient); Bosk 1 (wind houling); Stomachache (New Year 2012); Leady (War Noise REV); Fonogeno (police sirens); Suonho (crystal airlines). From The FreeMusicArchive.org: Dumbo Gets Mad (Radical Leap), Podington Bear (Sneaker Chase); Sunsearcher (Latin Rhythm); and Telegraphy (Grey Matter). Photo collage: matt_e from Flickr.com.

Dec 03 2013

29mins

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Rank #4: Episode 7: Behind Economics and Finance: Prisoners’ Dilemmas and Payday Lenders [Audio]

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Contributor(s): Mary Morgan, Carl Packman, John van Reenen, Amy Mollett, Cheryl Brumley, Joel Suss | Mary Morgan, LSE Professor of History and Philosophy of Economics, speaks to us about her book: The World in the Model: How Economists Work and Think and how the once prose-heavy discipline founded by Adam Smith has been transformed by maths. Carl Packman, author of Loan Sharks: The Rise and Rise of Payday Lending, discusses the exponential growth of the payday lending industry in the UK. Director of LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance, Professor John van Reenen, thinks back to his early career and identifies the books shaped his thinking about the economic world. Presented by Amy Mollett. Produced by Cheryl Brumley. Music and sound came courtesy of the following users at freesound.org: wim (London underground train arriving 6 and 13), Foop (Edithouse); and The FreeMusicArchive.org: Dumbo Gets Mad (Radical Leap), Podington Bear (Dark Matter, Light in Branches, Pink Blossoms, Light Touch), Deltason (Groundloop). Published 17th July 2013.

Jul 17 2013

31mins

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Rank #5: Episode 6: China - Home and Away [Audio]

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Contributor(s): Rosemary Sales, Xia Lin, Perry Fung, John Gitting,Ting Xu, Amy Mollett | We take a walk through London’s Chinatown with Rosemary Sales and Xia Lin, Researchers at Middlesex University, to discuss the complex of identities in the area and meanings of home for Chinese immigrants. John Gittings, Research Associate at the School of Oriental and African, talks about China’s early peace philosophers and the importance of engaging the country in diplomacy. Ting Xu, Research Fellow at LSE’s economic history department, speaks about growing up in China in the wake of the Cultural Revolution and how her parent’s boundless passion for books was a source of inspiration. Presented by Amy Mollett. Produced by Cheryl Brumley. Other Contributors: Rosemary Sales, Xia Lin, Perry Fung, John Gitting,Ting Xu. Music and sound came courtesy of the following users at freesound.org: bebeto (Intro music); Harri (Hypno1 and Hypno5); and Harp (Pryght-one); and the following user from the FreeMusicArchive.org: Jiony (Not Found_Invisible).

Jan 03 2013

29mins

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Rank #6: The Women’s Library @ LSE [Audio]

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Contributor(s): David Doughan, Asiya Islam, Amy Mollett | This special joint podcast from the LSE Review of Books and LSE Equality and Diversity, examines the history of the newly acquired Women’s Library at the LSE through the eyes of a long-term librarian. David Doughan MBE, who has been at the Women's Library for 23 years, speaks to Asiya Islam about the continued significance of the library and its role in the late 20th century feminist movement. Presented by Amy Mollett. Contributors: Asiya Islam, David Doughan. Produced by Cheryl Brumley. Music courtesy of Duke Hugh (Sweet and Lowdown) from the Freemusicarchive.org.

Jun 14 2013

8mins

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Rank #7: LSE Literary Festival - Academic Inspiration: Favourite works of fiction II [Audio]

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Contributor(s): Odd Arne Westad, John Van Reenen, Fatima El Issawi, Simon Glendinning, Dominic Muir | In this special LSE Literary Festival series, the LSE Review of Books blog asked prominent LSE professors to read from their favourite works of fiction, building on the Academic Inspiration series on their blog, LSEReviewofbooks.com. In the second part of this series, we hear from Director of LSE IDEAS, Professor Odd Arne Westad, reading from Hunger, Director of the Centre for Economic Performance, Professor John Van Reenen, reading from the non-fiction essay The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte, Research Fellow at POLIS Dr Fatima El Issawi, reading from the poem The Messenger With Her Hair Long to the Springs, and Reader in European Philosophy and Director of the Forum for European Philosophy, Dr Simon Glendinning, from Before the Law. Presented by Amy Mollett. Produced by Cheryl Brumley. Contributors: Odd Arne Westad, John Van Reenen, Fatima El Issawi, Simon Glendinning, Dominic Muir, Cheryl Brumley. Music and sound came courtesy of the following contributors at the FreeMusicArchive.org: Phopha (Macabre City – CC-BY-NC-ND); Machines in Heaven (bordersbreakdown – CC-BY-NC-SA); Dexter Britain (After The Week I’ve Had (CC-BY-NC-SA); and Alfred Bizarro To Be Exactly (Pineambient – CC-BY-NC-ND).

Mar 01 2013

15mins

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Rank #8: LSE Literary Festival 2013: Special Edition Preview Podcast [Audio]

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Contributor(s): Anne Applebaum, Nigel Warburton, Louise Gaskell | From 26th of February to 2nd March 2013, the London School of Economics will hold its 5th Annual Literary Festival under the theme ‘Branching Out’. The LSE Review of Books team been out on the road to meet some of this year’s Literary Festival speakers, and in this special edition podcast you’ll hear a taster of some of the events to come. Anne Applebaum, Pulitzer Prize winner and LSE’s current Philippe Roman Chair in History and International Affairs, talks to us about her Literary Festival event ‘Narrative Memory and the Mind’, taking place on Wednesday 27th February. Anne speaks about how personal histories have played a role in her books on the Soviet Union. Nigel Warburton, Senior Philosophy Lecturer at the Open University and host of the extremely popular Philosophy Bites podcast, talks about his event taking place 26th February, ‘Philosophy by Podcast‘. Nigel speaks about philosophy in the 21st century and why the podcast may help rejuvenate the Socratic method. We also hear from LSE Literary Festival organiser, Louise Gaskell, about the host of events available to attend. Presented by Amy Mollett. Produced by Cheryl Brumley. Contributors: Anne Applebaum, Nigel Warburton, Louise Gaskell, Music came courtesy of the following contributor at the FreeMusicArchive.org: Dumbo Gets Mad (“Radical Leap” – CC-BY-NC-SA).

Feb 21 2013

10mins

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Rank #9: LSE Literary Festival - Academic Inspiration: Favourite works of fiction [Audio]

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Contributor(s): Conor Gearty, Mary Evans, Sonia Livingstone | In this special LSE Literary Festival series, the LSE Review of Books blog asked prominent LSE professors to read from their favourite works of fiction, building on the Academic Inspiration series on their blog, LSEReviewofbooks.com. Professor of Human Rights Law Conor Gearty reads from The Trial, Centennial Professor at Gender Institute Mary Evans from Little Women, and Sonia Livingstone, Professor of Social Psychology, Department of Media and Communications from The Warden. Presented by Amy Mollett. Produced by Cheryl Brumley. Contributors: Conor Gearty, Mary Evans, Sonia Livingstone. Music and sound came courtesy of the following contributors at the FreeMusicArchive.org: Silent Strangers (In the Elysian Field – CC-BY-NC-ND); Lee Maddeford with Les Gauchers Orchestra (Le petit jardin – CC-BY-NC-SA); and Clinic Archives Mix (Melting Clouds – Defoliation – CC-BY-NC-ND).

Feb 15 2013

8mins

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Rank #10: LSE Review of Books in Brazil: Rio in transition [Audio]

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Contributor(s): Cheryl Brumley | In the first episode of a three-part series on Brazil, the LSE Review of Books Podcast takes a closer look at the city of Rio de Janiero to uncover wider issues that face the world’s fastest growing cities. Before talking to LSE and Brazilian authors about their books on Brazil, LSERB podcast producer, Cheryl Brumley, made her first stop at the annual Urban Age Conference to hear how politicians, academics and planners from cities around the globe grapple with city transformations. The conference, put on by LSE Cities and the Alfred Herrhausen Society, is a globetrotting event which invites 70 experts to participate in a two-day investigation of cities. The conference took place in Rio amidst unprecedented urban transformation and ambitious redevelopment projects, spurred on by the impending World Cup and Olympic Games. This podcast features Ricky Burdett, Director of LSE Cities, and architectural adviser to the London 2012 Olympics; Washington Farjado, Adviser on Urban Affairs to the Mayor of Rio de Janeiro; Dame Tessa Jowell, MP and former UK Minister for the Olympics; Enrique Peñalosa, former Mayor of Bogota; Amanda Burden, Director of the New York City Department of Planning; and many others. Presented and produced by Cheryl Brumley. Other Contributors in order of appearance: Ricky Burdett, Antoni Vives, Washington Farjado, Jurgen Bruns-Berentelg, Dame Tessa Jowell, Anthony Williams, Andy Altman, Jailson de Sousa e Silva, Suketu Mehta, Alejandro Echeverri, Edgar Pieterse, Amanda Burden, Silvio Torres, Maria Olivia Rocart, Enrique Penalosa, Adam Greenfield. Music and sound came courtesy of: DJ Sunho from the album DJ Sunho in Brasil with special permission; The Prelinger Archives: Brazil: South American Medley (National Geographic, 1948).

Feb 07 2014

21mins

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