Cover image of Software Engineering Daily
(355)

Rank #194 in News category

News
Tech News

Software Engineering Daily

Updated 7 days ago

Rank #194 in News category

News
Tech News
Read more

Technical interviews about software topics.

Read more

Technical interviews about software topics.

iTunes Ratings

355 Ratings
Average Ratings
313
23
7
6
6

Fantastic Range of Content

By Rob Colburn - Sep 28 2018
Read more
Wide range of topics from cloud, server-less, crypto currency to web assembly and front end.

Jeff is the best !

By SaumiRa - Jul 07 2018
Read more
This is the BEST podcast for software developers, sales , start ups and so many others !

iTunes Ratings

355 Ratings
Average Ratings
313
23
7
6
6

Fantastic Range of Content

By Rob Colburn - Sep 28 2018
Read more
Wide range of topics from cloud, server-less, crypto currency to web assembly and front end.

Jeff is the best !

By SaumiRa - Jul 07 2018
Read more
This is the BEST podcast for software developers, sales , start ups and so many others !
Cover image of Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

Updated 7 days ago

Rank #194 in News category

Read more

Technical interviews about software topics.

Rank #1: Facebook GraphQL with Lee Byron

Podcast cover
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In 2011, Facebook had begun to focus its efforts on mobile development. Mobile phones did not have access to reliable, high bandwidth connections, and the Facebook engineering team needed to find a solution to improve the request latency between mobile clients and the backend Facebook infrastructure.

One source of latency was recursive data fetching. If a mobile application client made a request to the backend for newsfeed, the backend API would return the newsfeed, but some components of that feed would require additional requests to the backend. In practice, this might result in a newsfeed loading partially on a phone, but having a delayed loading time for the comments of a newsfeed item.

GraphQL is a solution that came out of this problem of recursive data fetching. A GraphQL server provides middleware to aggregate all of the necessary information to serve a complete request. GraphQL connects to backend data sources and federates the frontend request across these different data sources.

GraphQL was open sourced in 2015, and has found many use cases in addition to simplifying backend data fetching for mobile clients. Today, GraphQL is used by PayPal, Shopify, Twitter, and hundreds of other companies.

Lee Byron is the co-creator of GraphQL and he joins the show to tell the story of GraphQL, and how it fit into Facebook’s shift to mobile.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

  • New SEDaily app for iOS and for Android. It includes all 1000 of our old episodes, as well as related links, greatest hits, and topics. You can comment on episodes and have discussions with other members of the community. I’ll be commenting on each episode, so if you hear an episode that you have some commentary on, jump onto the app, or on SoftwareDaily.com to share your thoughts. And you can become a paid subscriber for ad free episodes at softwareengineeringdaily.com/subscribe. Altalogy is the company who has been developing much of the software for the newest app, and if you are looking for a company to help you with your mobile and web development, I recommend checking them out.    
  • FindCollabs is a place to find collaborators and build projects. FindCollabs is the company I am building, and we are having an online hackathon with $2500 in prizes. If you are working on a project, or you are looking for other programmers to build a project or start a company with, check out FindCollabs. I’ve been interviewing people from some of these projects on the FindCollabs podcast, so if you want to learn more about the community you can hear that podcast.
  • Upcoming conferences I’m attending: Datadog Dash July 16th and 17th in NYC, Open Core Summit September 19th and 20th in San Francisco.
  • We are hiring two interns for software engineering and business development! If you are interested in either position, send an email with your resume to jeff@softwareengineeringdaily.com with “Internship” in the subject line.

The post Facebook GraphQL with Lee Byron appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Jul 19 2019
57 mins
Play

Rank #2: Facebook React with Dan Abramov

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React is a set of open source tools for building user interfaces. React was open sourced by Facebook, and includes libraries for creating interfaces on the web (ReactJS) and on mobile devices (React Native).

React was released during a time when there was not a dominant frontend JavaScript library. Backbone, Angular, and other JavaScript frameworks were all popular, but there was not any consolidation across the frontend web development community. Before React came out, frontend developers were fractured into different communities for the different JavaScript frameworks.

After Facebook open sourced React, web developers began to gravitate towards the framework for its one-way data flow and its unconventional style of putting JavaScript and HTML together in a format called JSX. As React has grown in popularity, the React ecosystem has developed network effects. In many cases, the easiest way to build a web application frontend is to compose together open source React components.

After seeing the initial traction, Facebook invested heavily into React, creating entire teams within the company whose goal was to improve React. Dan Abramov works on the React team at Facebook and joins the show to talk about how the React project is managed and his vision for the project.

RECENT UPDATES:

The FindCollabs Open has started. It is our second FindCollabs hackathon, and we are giving away $2500 in prizes. The prizes will be awarded in categories such as machine learning, business plan, music, visual art, and JavaScript. If one of those areas sounds interesting to you, check out findcollabs.com/open!

The FindCollabs Podcast is out!

We are booking sponsorships for Q3, find more details at https://softwareengineeringdaily.com/sponsor/

The post Facebook React with Dan Abramov appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

May 16 2019
53 mins
Play

Rank #3: Data-As-A-Service with Auren Hoffman

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Data-as-a-service businesses offer paid access to data sets. These data sets can be useful for building products or training machine learning models. 

There has been steady growth in the tools and practices around processing and storing data. But access to data sets remains a bottleneck for widespread development of machine learning applications in a large set of domains. 

SafeGraph is a company focused on the problem of data-as-a-service. Today, SafeGraph’s primary product is reliable, up-to-date location information on places. The data for these points-of-interest needs be acquired, verified, cleaned, made accessible through an API, and intelligently priced. 

In previous episodes with SafeGraph, we have explored the basic premise of data businesses and why they are important platforms for building futuristic data products that are impossible for entrepreneurs to build today. SafeGraph CEO Auren Hoffman returns to the show to discuss the data as a service business model.

Software-as-a-service has existed as a category for more than a decade. Infrastructure-as-a-service has existed for just as long. Data-as-a-service is much more undeveloped. Auren recently published the “Data-As-A-Service Bible: Everything You Wanted To Know About Running A DaaS Business”. This was a very useful article, as it breaks down a category of software that is almost entirely unexplored.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

ANNOUNCEMENTS

  • FindCollabs is a place to find collaborators and build projects. We recently launched GitHub integrations. It’s easier than ever to find collaborators for your open source projects. And if you are looking for some people to start a project with, FindCollabs we have topic rooms that allow you to find other people who are interested in a particular technology, so that you can find people who are curious about React, or cryptocurrencies, or Kubernetes, or whatever you want to build with.
  • Podsheets is an open source podcast hosting platform that we recently launched. We are building Podsheets with the learnings from Software Engineering Daily, and our goal is to be the best place to host and monetize your podcast. If you have been thinking about starting a podcast, check out podsheets.com.
  • New SEDaily app for iOS and for Android. It includes all 1000 of our old episodes, as well as related links, greatest hits, and topics. You can comment on episodes and have discussions with other members of the community. I’ll be commenting on each episode, so if you hear an episode that you have some commentary on, jump onto the app, or on SoftwareDaily.com to share your thoughts. And you can become a paid subscriber for ad free episodes at softwareengineeringdaily.com/subscribe. Altalogy is the company who has been developing much of the software for the newest app, and if you are looking for a company to help you with your mobile and web development, I recommend checking them out. 

The post Data-As-A-Service with Auren Hoffman appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Aug 08 2019
1 hour 2 mins
Play

Rank #4: Edge Storage with Steve Klabnik

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Edge computing allows for faster data access and computation.

When your client application makes a request, that request might be routed to the edge. Edge servers are more numerous and more widely distributed than normal data centers, but an edge server might not have all of the data or the complete application logic for the backend to serve your request.

Edge servers have historically been used for content delivery networks (CDN). CDNs are useful for hosting and serving media files that might otherwise be slow to access over a network. More recently, applications are also using edge servers for computation, as well as storage of resources which are smaller than the movies, music, and images that have traditionally been stored on an edge server.

Steve Klabnik is an engineer with Cloudflare, and he returns to the show to discuss storage at the edge. In Steve’s previous appearances we have explored Rust and WebAssembly, and we also touch on those topics in today’s episode.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

  • FindCollabs is a place to find collaborators and build projects. FindCollabs is the company I am building, and we are having an online hackathon with $2500 in prizes. If you are working on a project, or you are looking for other programmers to build a project or start a company with, check out FindCollabs. I’ve been interviewing people from some of these projects on the FindCollabs podcast, so if you want to learn more about the community you can hear that podcast.
  • New Software Daily app for iOS. It includes all 1000 of our old episodes, as well as related links, greatest hits, and topics. You can comment on episodes and have discussions with other members of the community. And you can become a paid subscriber for ad free episodes at softwareengineeringdaily.com/subscribe. Altalogy is the company who has been developing much of the software for the newest app, and if you are looking for a company to help you with your mobile and web development, I recommend checking them out.
  • Upcoming conferences I’m attending: Datadog Dash July 16th and 17th in NYC, Open Core Summit September 19th and 20th in San Francisco.
  • We are hiring two interns for software engineering and business development! If you are interested in either position, send an email with your resume to jeff@softwareengineeringdaily.com with “Internship” in the subject line.

The post Edge Storage with Steve Klabnik appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Jul 08 2019
55 mins
Play

Rank #5: Netflix Early Days with Greg Burrell

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Netflix started with a DVD-by-mail product. The software infrastructure and operations practices needed for the DVD business were very different from those needed by a streaming video company.

Since the early days of Netflix, CEO Reed Hastings knew that the company would evolve to becoming a streaming video platform. But he did not know when the technology would be advanced enough to support video streaming, and he did not know how users would consume it.

Greg Burrell has worked at Netflix for 14 years. Greg was one of the first engineers to start working on video streaming, which Netflix first attempted to implement with a set top box that downloaded movies and played them on your television. After evolving this strategy, Netflix arrived at the current model of video streaming through apps on browsers and mobile devices.

As the company pivoted from DVD-by-mail to video streaming, Netflix encountered multiple challenges across engineering, operations, and communications across the company. At the time, there was no “DevOps” movement. There were not established continuous delivery practices. The available cloud technologies were immature and low level.

Greg joins the show to describe the evolutionary arc of Netflix’s engineering process. Greg also presents a model for software development that he describes as “Full Cycle Development”. At Netflix, engineering teams of full cycle developers work without dedicated operations or testing teams. It is a sophisticated approach to engineering management.

I spoke to Greg at the Fullstack Tech Radar Day, a software conference in Tel-Aviv put on by Tikal, an engineering community based out of Israel and San Francisco. This was a great conference, and we’ll be airing some additional content from it in the coming weeks.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

We are hiring two interns for software engineering and business development! If you are interested in either position, send an email with your resume to jeff@softwareengineeringdaily.com with “Internship” in the subject line.

The post Netflix Early Days with Greg Burrell appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

May 29 2019
1 hour 5 mins
Play

Rank #6: Repl.it: Browser Coding with Amjad Masad

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The browser has become the central application of the consumer operating system. Every piece of client software, from email to document management, has become usable through the browser. Even modern desktop software such as Slack is built using Electron, a tool for building client applications that essentially run inside of a browser without an address bar.

One activity that still takes place largely outside of the browser is the process of writing and deploying code. A developer often uses an IDE such as Eclipse to write their code, then switches over to a terminal where they can build and deploy their code to a remote server running in the cloud.

For a developer who has been writing code for a long time, this process feels completely intuitive. But for a new developer, it can be totally disorienting. New developers sometimes have trouble understanding the difference between a local and remote environment, or how to use repository management software like Git. This is in addition to all the other problems a new developer might be dealing with, such as language installation, syntax, and package management.

Repl.it is a browser-based coding environment, compute engine, and collaborative workspace. Repl.it has found significant traction among new programmers who begin their programming journey within Repl.it and then stay in the environment, even as their applications become more richly featured and complicated.

Repl.it is an amazing piece of software, and the story behind it is remarkable. Amjad Masad had the idea for Repl.it many years before he started the company for it, but he needed to first build up the money and confidence in order to go after the business with full force. Amjad joins the show to talk about his long journey towards building Repl.it, and to discuss the thriving Repl.it platform in its current form.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

Check out our active companies and projects:

  • FindCollabs is a place to find collaborators and build projects. Find a project to work on
  • Podsheets is an open source podcast hosting platform built with the learnings from Software Engineering Daily. Our goal is to be the best place to host and monetize your podcast. If you have been thinking about starting a podcast, check out podsheets.com.
  • The SEDaily app for iOS and Android includes all 1000 of our old episodes, as well as related links, greatest hits, and topics. Subscribe for ad-free episodes.

The post Repl.it: Browser Coding with Amjad Masad appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Sep 06 2019
56 mins
Play

Rank #7: Facebook Engineering Culture with Raylene Yung

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Facebook moves fast because of vision, collaboration, and trust. The fast pace of development is enabled by constantly improving infrastructure and a sense of unity throughout the company. 

In Facebook’s early days, there was an emphasis on rapidly deploying new code to drive constant improvement and experimentation. 

Product quality was maintained by engineers closely checking each other’s code reviews, rather than writing detailed unit testing suites. Facebook engineers had a sense for how the product should operate, and they were able to evaluate whether a new feature was working properly by testing a live version of that feature.

At Facebook, the vision of the company is clearly communicated to the employees. Every employee within Facebook can articulate the vision for the company, and will use similar language in describing that vision. 

Since the employees are aligned on strategy, they can also align in their implementation of product features. This reduces conflicts across roles and between teams. 

Facebook has also shown a willingness to trust its engineers. Trust was exemplified by Facebook’s tolerance for failures in the early days. When an engineer broke a build, or shipped a feature that failed to gain traction, that engineer was usually not punished. They may have even been rewarded, if the company could learn significantly from such an error.

Raylene Yung was an engineer at Facebook from 2009 to 2015. As she moved from individual contributor to manager to engineering director, Raylene worked on products including News Feed, Timeline, Privacy, and Sharing. 

Raylene joins the show to give her reflections on the Facebook product and engineering environment. She explained how Facebook’s culture of collaboration, vision, and trust drive fast product development and minimizes conflict.

Raylene left Facebook and joined Stripe, where she worked on payments systems and international expansion for almost four years.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

  • New SEDaily app for iOS and for Android. It includes all 1000 of our old episodes, as well as related links, greatest hits, and topics. You can comment on episodes and have discussions with other members of the community. I’ll be commenting on each episode, so if you hear an episode that you have some commentary on, jump onto the app, or on SoftwareDaily.com to share your thoughts. And you can become a paid subscriber for ad free episodes at softwareengineeringdaily.com/subscribe. Altalogy is the company who has been developing much of the software for the newest app, and if you are looking for a company to help you with your mobile and web development, I recommend checking them out.    
  • FindCollabs is a place to find collaborators and build projects. FindCollabs is the company I am building, and we are having an online hackathon with $2500 in prizes. If you are working on a project, or you are looking for other programmers to build a project or start a company with, check out FindCollabs. I’ve been interviewing people from some of these projects on the FindCollabs podcast, so if you want to learn more about the community you can hear that podcast.
  • Upcoming conferences I’m attending: Datadog Dash July 16th and 17th in NYC, Open Core Summit September 19th and 20th in San Francisco.
  • We are hiring two interns for software engineering and business development! If you are interested in either position, send an email with your resume to jeff@softwareengineeringdaily.com with “Internship” in the subject line.

The post Facebook Engineering Culture with Raylene Yung appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Jul 16 2019
46 mins
Play

Rank #8: Facebook Engineering Process with Kent Beck

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Kent Beck is a legendary figure in the world of software engineering. 

Kent was an early advocate of Test-Driven Development (TDD), and popularized the idea of writing unit tests before writing code that would satisfy those unit tests. A unit test isolates and tests a small piece of functionality within a large piece of software. Practitioners of Test-Driven Development write tens or hundreds of tests in order to cover a large variety of cases that could potentially occur within their software.

When Kent Beck joined Facebook in 2011, he was 50 years old and thought he had seen everything in the software industry. During Facebook Boot Camp, Kent started to realize that Facebook was very different than any other company he had seen. Facebook Boot Camp is the six-week onboarding process that every new hire learns about the software practices of the company.

After graduating Facebook Boot Camp, Kent began to explore Facebook’s codebase and culture. He found himself rethinking many of the tenets of software engineering that he had previously thought were immutable.

Kent joins the show to discuss his time at Facebook, and how the company’s approach to building and scaling products thoroughly reshaped his beliefs about software engineering.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Check out our active companies and projects:

  • FindCollabs is a place to find collaborators and build projects. Find a project to work on
  • Podsheets is an open source podcast hosting platform built with the learnings from Software Engineering Daily. Our goal is to be the best place to host and monetize your podcast. If you have been thinking about starting a podcast, check out podsheets.com.
  • The SEDaily app for iOS and Android includes all 1000 of our old episodes, as well as related links, greatest hits, and topics. Subscribe for ad-free episodes.

The post Facebook Engineering Process with Kent Beck appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Aug 28 2019
56 mins
Play

Rank #9: Facebook Engineering with Pete Hunt

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Facebook engineering is commonly described by two words: move fast.

Building products quickly has been a differentiating characteristic of the company since its inception. From the longtime engineers to the summer interns, Facebook instills a sense of immediacy and opportunity in all of its employees.

The goal of Facebook is to make the world more open and transparent, with the intention of creating greater understanding and connection through Internet services. More than any other company in history, Facebook has enabled people to communicate with each other via simple user interfaces and real, authenticated human identity.

Facebook must move fast, because the vision for Facebook is without precedent. It may feel like the Facebook mission is already finished, because you can already use Facebook to connect with anyone across the world with an Internet connection.

But once you are connected to somebody on Facebook, there are only a small number of interactions you can take: sending a message, sharing a photo, broadcasting a video stream. There are so many more parts of our lives waiting to be digitized, and many of these require a real identity system to work properly.

More than any other company, Facebook is positioned to expand our system of real-world human trust onto the Internet. The depth and breadth of the engineering problems required to accomplish this demands that Facebook move fast. To move slower would cause all of us to pay the opportunity cost of having to wait longer to interconnect our global society.

Pete Hunt worked as an engineer at Facebook for three and a half years. At Facebook, he helped build React, a set of technologies that have significantly improved frontend application interface development. After the Instagram acquisition, Pete was the first engineer from Facebook to join the Instagram team to help bring the two companies together.

Pete left Facebook in 2014 to start Smyte, a company that made trust and safety tools for marketplaces and social networks. Smyte was acquired by Twitter, where Pete now works on engineering problems relating to trust, safety, health, and infrastructure.

Pete joins the show for the first of several episodes with Facebook engineers. In these episodes, we will explore the engineering practices of Facebook–from scaling Facebook’s PHP monolith to open sourcing React and GraphQL. Other topics will include management, onboarding, and product strategy.

Our goal is to present a holistic picture of how Facebook engineering works, so that other organizations can learn to adopt practices that will allow them to move faster. We hope you enjoy this series on Facebook engineering.

RECENT UPDATES:

The FindCollabs Open has started. It is our second FindCollabs hackathon, and we are giving away $2500 in prizes. The prizes will be awarded in categories such as machine learning, business plan, music, visual art, and JavaScript. If one of those areas sounds interesting to you, check out findcollabs.com/open!

The FindCollabs Podcast is out!

We are booking sponsorships for Q3, find more details at https://softwareengineeringdaily.com/sponsor/

The post Facebook Engineering with Pete Hunt appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

May 13 2019
1 hour
Play

Rank #10: Project Management with Kurt Schrader

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Software projects are organized and planned using project management software. Examples of project management software include JIRA, Trello, and Asana. There are hundreds of tools for managing a software project because there are infinite ways that a project could be managed.

Google Docs changed project management by allowing documents to be easier to share and collaborate on. Newer SaaS tools such as Slack, Dropbox, and Notion have taken the design lessons from social networking apps to make enterprise software more engaging.

As the tools improve, our project management strategies change, and new software tools emerge to fit those new management strategies.

Kurt Schrader is the CEO of Clubhouse, a project management tool for software engineers. Kurt joins the show to talk about the history and future of project management tools. He also discusses the engineering challenges of improving performance on a complicated webapp. Project management tools often have to load hundreds of small objects on a page, which required performance optimizations in the Clubhouse frontend JavaScript library.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

The post Project Management with Kurt Schrader appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Jun 24 2019
1 hour 2 mins
Play

Rank #11: Kubernetes Development with Tim Hockin

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Kubernetes has evolved from a nascent project within Google to a thriving ecosystem of cloud providers, open source projects, and engineers.

Tim Hockin is a principal software engineer who has been with Google for 15 years. Tim joins the show to talk about the early days of the Kubernetes projects, and the engineering efforts that are under way five years into the project.

At KubeCon EU 2019, two of the prevalent subjects of discussion were service mesh and serverless–particularly the Knative project. Tim gave his perspective for how projects that are adjacent to Kubernetes are developed within the community.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

The post Kubernetes Development with Tim Hockin appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Jun 04 2019
50 mins
Play

Rank #12: Facebook Strategy with Mike Vernal

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Facebook’s strategy is shaped by long term goals, short term requirements, and the available resources of the company.

Long term goals are necessary for thinking through big decisions such as acquisitions, hardware product investments, and open source software ecosystems. To implement long term goals, Facebook needs to communicate the vision of the company and foster an internal culture that supports that vision.

Short term requirements can affect how the company is thinking on a more immediate time horizon.

When Facebook realized the importance of mobile computing, the mentality in the company quickly shifted from looking at mobile as a tax on engineering resources to a long-term source of business value. When Google started to work on Google+, Facebook engineers focused their resources on the potential competitive threat.

Facebook’s strategy is implemented by the engineers, product managers, and other employees of the company. Facebook is unique in its ability to allow those employees to self-assemble into work that is meaningful to the individuals as well as to the company.

As the long term goals and short term requirements of Facebook change over time, company resources are shifted to focus the company on the correct set of priorities. Some of those priorities might be speculative investments in new technologies. Other priorities might include doubling down on areas of the company that are showing promise.

Mike Vernal worked as a VP of product and engineering at Facebook for 8 years. He left the company in 2016 and joined Sequoia Capital, where he now works as a partner. In his time at Facebook, he helped architect and implement strategies relating to product direction and engineering.

Mike joins the show for a discussion about his time at Facebook and the strategic lessons that he learned from his time at the company.

RECENT UPDATES:

The FindCollabs Open has started. It is our second FindCollabs hackathon, and we are giving away $2500 in prizes. The prizes will be awarded in categories such as machine learning, business plan, music, visual art, and JavaScript. If one of those areas sounds interesting to you, check out findcollabs.com/open!

The FindCollabs Podcast is out!

We are booking sponsorships for Q3, find more details at https://softwareengineeringdaily.com/sponsor/

The post Facebook Strategy with Mike Vernal appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

May 17 2019
1 hour
Play

Rank #13: Jaeger: Distributed Tracing at Uber with Yuri Shkuro

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During 2015, Uber was going through rapid scalability. The internal engineering systems were constantly tested by the growing user base. Over the next two years, the number of internal services at Uber would grow from 500 to 2000, and standardizing the monitoring of all these different services became a priority.

After working with a variety of available tools, Uber’s engineering team decided that something new needed to be built internally. Jaeger is an open source distributed tracing tool that provides observability features throughout Uber’s microservices architecture.

Yuri Shkuro is an engineer at Uber, where he works on Jaeger and other infrastructure projects. He joins the show to discuss the history of engineering at Uber, the architecture of Jaeger, and the requirements for building and scaling a distributed tracing tool.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

Show Notes

Mastering Distributed Tracing

ANNOUNCEMENTS

  • FindCollabs is a place to find collaborators and build projects. We recently launched GitHub integrations. It’s easier than ever to find collaborators for your open source projects. And if you are looking for some people to start a project with, FindCollabs we have topic rooms that allow you to find other people who are interested in a particular technology, so that you can find people who are curious about React, or cryptocurrencies, or Kubernetes, or whatever you want to build with.
  • Podsheets is an open source podcast hosting platform that we recently launched. We are building Podsheets with the learnings from Software Engineering Daily, and our goal is to be the best place to host and monetize your podcast. If you have been thinking about starting a podcast, check out podsheets.com.
  • New SEDaily app for iOS and for Android. It includes all 1000 of our old episodes, as well as related links, greatest hits, and topics. You can comment on episodes and have discussions with other members of the community. I’ll be commenting on each episode, so if you hear an episode that you have some commentary on, jump onto the app, or on SoftwareDaily.com to share your thoughts. And you can become a paid subscriber for ad free episodes at softwareengineeringdaily.com/subscribe. Altalogy is the company who has been developing much of the software for the newest app, and if you are looking for a company to help you with your mobile and web development, I recommend checking them out.   

The post Jaeger: Distributed Tracing at Uber with Yuri Shkuro appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Aug 06 2019
57 mins
Play

Rank #14: Stripe Machine Learning Infrastructure with Rob Story and Kelley Rivoire

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Machine learning allows software to improve as that software consumes more data.

Machine learning is a tool that every software engineer wants to be able to use. Because machine learning is so broadly applicable, software companies want to make the tools more accessible to the developers across the organization.

There are many steps that an engineer must go through to use machine learning, and each additional step inhibits the chances that the engineer will actually get their model into production.

An engineer who wants to build machine learning into their application needs access to data sets. They need to join those data sets, and load them into a machine (or multiple machines) where their model can be trained. Once the model is trained, the model needs to test on additional data to ensure quality. If the initial model quality is insufficient, the engineer might need to tweak the training parameters.

Once a model is accurate enough, the engineer needs to deploy that model. After deployment, the model might need to be updated with new data later on. If the model is processing sensitive or financially relevant data, a provenance process might be necessary to allow for an audit trail of decisions that have been made by the model.

Rob Story and Kelley Rivoire are engineers working on machine learning infrastructure at Stripe. After recognizing the difficulties that engineers faced in creating and deploying machine learning models, Stripe engineers built out Railyard, an API for machine learning workloads within the company.

Rob and Kelley join the show to discuss data engineering and machine learning at Stripe, and their work on Railyard.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

The post Stripe Machine Learning Infrastructure with Rob Story and Kelley Rivoire appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Jun 13 2019
1 hour 11 mins
Play

Rank #15: Monolithic Repositories with Ciera Jaspan

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Google’s codebase is managed in a single monolithic repository. An engineer at Google can explore almost any area of the codebase within the entire company. In order to enable this, Google has built tooling to support the monolithic repo, including a virtual file system and a set of build tools.

A monolithic repository is not to be confused with a monolithic deployment. Google’s infrastructure consists of thousands of small services interacting over a network, and scaling individually. But all of the code for each of these different independent modules is in the same version control system.

Ciera Jaspan is a staff software engineer at Google working on developer infrastructure. She worked on an internal research project within Google to find out how engineers felt about the monolithic repository system and how it compared to a large number of small repositories.

Ciera joins the show to discuss repository management, internal tooling, and Google’s approach to researching developer productivity within the company.

RECENT UPDATES:

The FindCollabs Open has started. It is our second FindCollabs hackathon, and we are giving away $2500 in prizes. The prizes will be awarded in categories such as machine learning, business plan, music, visual art, and JavaScript. If one of those areas sounds interesting to you, check out findcollabs.com/open!

The FindCollabs Podcast is out!

We are booking sponsorships for Q3, find more details at https://softwareengineeringdaily.com/sponsor/

The post Monolithic Repositories with Ciera Jaspan appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

May 22 2019
59 mins
Play

Rank #16: JavaScript Jabber with Jeff Meyerson

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Host: Charles Max Wood of JavaScript Jabber

Joined by Special Guest: Jeffrey Meyerson

Jeffrey Meyerson, founder of FindCollabs and host at Software Engineering Daily joins Charles Max Wood for a discussion about latest trends in the developer world, ways of monetizing podcasts, and finding ads for podcasts. Jeffrey shares how he started to host podcasts and how he became a developer.

Jeffrey’s journey as a developer started out with his interests in music and poker. Jeff and Charles compare advertising through sponsoring a booth in a conference versus advertising through a podcast. Tune in for a fun chat that covers everything from Keto dieting to software buzz words.

Show Notes

The post JavaScript Jabber with Jeff Meyerson appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Sep 08 2019
45 mins
Play

Rank #17: Kubernetes Operators with Rob Szumski

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Kubernetes has made distributed systems easier to deploy and manage. As Kubernetes has become reliable, engineers have started to look for higher level abstractions we can define on top of Kubernetes.

An operator is a method of packaging, deploying, and managing a Kubernetes application.

Operators are useful for spinning up distributed systems such as Kafka, Redis, or MongoDB. These data systems are complicated, stateful applications with lots of failure domains. The operator framework enables a developer to deploy one of these complicated applications with less fear of the system crashing, or entering an erroneous state.

Rob Szumski is an engineer at Red Hat. He joins the show to discuss Kubernetes, the operator pattern, and his time at CoreOS, which was acquired by Red Hat.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

The post Kubernetes Operators with Rob Szumski appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Jun 18 2019
1 hour 9 mins
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Rank #18: PlayStation Engineering with Tony Godar

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The PlayStation is a line of game consoles created by Sony. PlayStation devices include the PS2, PS3, PS4, and the PSP mobile system. Tony Godar worked as an engineer in the PlayStation ecosystem for 15 years, and he joins the show to give a retrospective on his time in the console industry.

Developing hardware and software for game consoles differs significantly from the world of web development. Tony describes the culture of the game development world, and the challenges involved in the domains of software tooling, custom operating systems, and streaming media. In 2010, the PS3 was hacked by notorious tinkerer George Hotz, a previous guest on the show, an event which Tony also discusses.

We also discuss the world of modern gaming and VR technology. Tony currently works as an engineer at MelodyVR, a company that makes virtual reality live music experiences.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

ANNOUNCEMENTS

  • FindCollabs is a place to find collaborators and build projects. We recently launched GitHub integrations. It’s easier than ever to find collaborators for your open source projects. And if you are looking for some people to start a project with, FindCollabs we have topic rooms that allow you to find other people who are interested in a particular technology, so that you can find people who are curious about React, or cryptocurrencies, or Kubernetes, or whatever you want to build with.
  • Podsheets is an open source podcast hosting platform that we recently launched. We are building Podsheets with the learnings from Software Engineering Daily, and our goal is to be the best place to host and monetize your podcast. If you have been thinking about starting a podcast, check out podsheets.com.
  • New SEDaily app for iOS and for Android. It includes all 1000 of our old episodes, as well as related links, greatest hits, and topics. You can comment on episodes and have discussions with other members of the community. I’ll be commenting on each episode, so if you hear an episode that you have some commentary on, jump onto the app, or on SoftwareDaily.com to share your thoughts. And you can become a paid subscriber for ad free episodes at softwareengineeringdaily.com/subscribe. Altalogy is the company who has been developing much of the software for the newest app, and if you are looking for a company to help you with your mobile and web development, I recommend checking them out.   

The post PlayStation Engineering with Tony Godar appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Aug 13 2019
58 mins
Play

Rank #19: Service Mesh Wars with William Morgan

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A service mesh is an abstraction that provides traffic routing, policy management, and telemetry for a distributed application.

A service mesh consists of a data plane and a control plane. In the data plane, a proxy runs alongside each service, with every request from a service being routed through the proxy. In the control plane, an application owner can control the behavior of the proxies distributed throughout the application.

As the Kubernetes ecosystem has developed, the service mesh abstraction has become an increasingly desirable component of a “cloud native” application stack.

As companies enthusiastically adopt Kubernetes, they eventually find themselves with a large distributed system that is difficult to operate. A service mesh simplifies some of these operational difficulties, as we have explored in numerous previous episodes.

The Kubernetes community has grown to include lots of enterprises, and those enterprises want to adopt service mesh. But today, many of them are afraid to adopt the technology because there are multiple competing products, and it is unclear which one the community will centralize around–or if the community will end up supporting multiple products.

Over the next few weeks, we will be airing interviews from KubeCon EU 2019 in Barcelona. These interviews are a window into the world of the Kubernetes and the cloud-native ecosystem, which is transforming the world of infrastructure software.

The most prominent theme across these shows was that of service mesh. Why was service mesh such an important topic? Because the battle for service mesh supremacy is a classic technology competition between a giant incumbent and a startup with far fewer resources.

The Kubernetes ecosystem is beautifully engineered to allow for a marketplace of warring ideas where the most worthy competitor wins out–but in some cases there is room for multiple products to occupy different subsections of the market.

Across these episodes, one theme we will explore is the governance and the diplomacy of these competing solutions, and how the Kubernetes ecosystem is structured to allow for harmonious resolution to technology battles.

It is tempting to look at this competition between service meshes as winner-take-all. But as of late May 2019, we do not yet know if it will be winner-take-all. In order to predict how the service mesh wars will play out, the best we can do is to look at historical examples.

Container orchestration wars was a winner-take-all market. Container orchestration was a problem of such depth, such technical complexity and integration, that there had to be a single winner for the ecosystem to marshall around.

During the container orchestration wars, as Mesos and Docker Swarm and HashiCorp Nomad and Kubernetes fought for supremacy, many large enterprises made bets on container orchestration systems that were not Kubernetes. When the dust settled, Kubernetes was the victor, and these large enterprises who had adopted orchestration systems other than Kubernetes begrudgingly began thinking about how to migrate to Kubernetes.

But during the orchestration wars, many more enterprises were sitting out altogether. They did not choose Kubernetes or Mesos or Swarm. They chose to wait.

Enterprise technologists are smart, and they can tell when a technology is immature. Although many enterprises wanted an orchestration system to manage their Docker containers, they did not want to insert a heavy abstraction that they would have to tear out later on.

Once Kubernetes won the orchestration wars, enterprise dollars piled into the space. The cloud native community has grown faster than anyone expected, because we solved the collective action problem of centralizing on a container orchestrator.

From enterprises to cloud providers to ISVs to podcasters, we share the same vision for Kubernetes: it is the Linux for distributed systems.

Within the Kubernetes ecosystem, the thought leadership tries not to pick winners. It is better for everyone if the winners are decided through competition. In order to foster competition, interfaces into Kubernetes can provide a layer of standardization along which different products can compete. Enterprises can buy into an interface without buying into any particular product.

Examples include the container networking interface (CNI) and the container storage interface (CSI). Every Kubernetes application wants storage and networking, but these Kubernetes applications do not want to be locked into a particular provider. Since there is a standardized interface for networking and storage, these applications can swap out one storage provider for another, or one networking provider for another.

How does this relate to service mesh?

In the service mesh market, Buoyant was first to market with its open source project Linkerd. Today’s guest William Morgan is the CEO of Buoyant. Over the last four years, Linkerd has slowly grown a following of dedicated users who run the open source service mesh in production.

Over the last four years, Linkerd has changed from its initial technology of the embedded JVM service proxy developed at Twitter to a Rust-based sidecar data plane and a Go-based control plane. Buoyant’s dedicated focus to the service mesh space has won over much of the community, as was evidenced by Linkerd becoming the predominant apparel brand at Kubecon EU 2019: Linkerd hats and t-shirts were everywhere at the conference.

Why did Linkerd become trendy? Ironically, because of a competing service mesh whose launch strategy was widely seen as an affront to the spirit of the cloud native community.

Istio was created within Google, and launched with a set of brittle partnerships with IBM and other companies. Istio careened into the Kubernetes ecosystem with violent fanfare, trumpeting itself as the cloud native service mesh du jour through endless banner ads, marketing email campaigns, and KubeCon programming.

Any listener to this podcast knows I am as gullible as any technologist. I’m an idealist–and I wanted to believe that Istio represented the service mesh equivalent of Kubernetes. It’s from Google, it launched with a bunch of impressive logos, and it has an inspiring vision. Looks cloud native, smells cloud native, must be cloud native, right?

Unfortunately, Istio’s early marketing aggrandizements were disconnected from the nascent realities of the project. Istio was buggy and difficult to set up. Istio quickly developed a reputation as Google-manufactured vaporware: nice idea, not nearly ready for production.

For Linkerd, the timing could not have been better.

Istio’s romantic vision of an operating plane for routing traffic, managing security policy, and measuring network telemetry had seduced the enterprise masses. With their cravings unmet by Istio, these enterprises surveyed the market and quickly found their way to Linkerd, the humble service mesh next door, who had been waiting patiently all along.

The tide has turned against Istio, and towards Linkerd. But the service mesh wars have just begun. And as easy as it is to criticize Istio, the project is not only vaporware. Istio has a vision for a detailed operating plane that will evolve together with Envoy, a service proxy sidecar developed at Lyft.

Perhaps Istio’s early embers had too much marketing gasoline poured on them initially, but the project could still succeed. Google is the most sophisticated, well-resourced company in the world–and judging from Google’s adjacent strategic messaging around Anthos and other strategic initiatives, the company has already decided that Istio will be around for the long haul.

As a community, we should be grateful to witness the folly of Istio’s carpet-bomb marketing strategy. It is validation for the earnest resilience of the cloud native community, that even under the omnipresent duress of Google marketing, the community was able to collectively reject the Istio Kool Aid.

This should come as no surprise. The Cloud Native Computing Foundation resides within the Linux Foundation, and the Kubernetes ecosystem has been ordained with the ardent technical purity of Linus Torvalds.

The CNCF was formed under the looming shadow of AWS. The CNCF was seeded with the donation of Kubernetes by Google. Much like the Linux community was positioned as a rebellious movement in reaction to Microsoft’s dominance, the Kubernetes community represents a fervent desire to open up the market to cloud providers beyond the tight-lipped, proprietary dominion of Amazon.

With such a deep spirit of insubordination, it is no surprise that the community has rejected Istio like a set of loosely coupled organs rejecting a foreign skin attempting to layer itself across them. Even though the CNCF was founded by Google, the community was formed in spite of big centralized clouds, not as a marketing vessel for their products which may or may not be open source.

Microsoft seems to understand this fact better than Google, at least in the domain of service mesh.

The day after this interview with William, Microsoft announced the Service Mesh Interface (SMI), a project it partnered with Buoyant and other companies on to create a minimal spec for what a service mesh should offer to a Kubernetes deployment. The SMI presents a safe buy-in point for enterprises who want a service mesh, but do not want to get caught in the evangelistic crossfire of Istio and Linkerd.

It is in this environment that we begin our next series of shows on the current cloud native ecosystem.

Thanks to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation for putting together an amazing podcasting zone at KubeCon, and allowing me to conduct these interviews.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

We are hiring two interns for software engineering and business development! If you are interested in either position, send an email with your resume to jeff@softwareengineeringdaily.com with “Internship” in the subject line.

The post Service Mesh Wars with William Morgan appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

May 31 2019
1 hour 21 mins
Play

Rank #20: DevOps at Delta Air Lines with Jasmine James

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Airlines have always had an emphasis on new technology. Over the years, airlines have needed to develop more and more software. Digital transformation is causing every large company to adopt the tools and practices of software companies, and that includes Delta Airlines.

Delta Airlines has existed for more than 90 years. Over that period of time, the company has developed new systems in every generation of software, from the days of mainframe computers to a modern Java-based backend. When the DevOps movement started to take shape, Delta Airlines started to take a more focused approach on continuous integration, version control, and an organizational structure that removed silos between teams.

Jasmine James is a manager at Delta Airlines where she focuses on improving the software practices of the company. She joins the show to talk through the process of changing the developer culture within Delta, as well as what it is like to build software for an airline. Jasmine is speaking at GitLab Commit in Brooklyn on September 17, 2019, and GitLab is a sponsor of Software Engineering Daily, so if you are thinking about attending GitLab Commit, you can go to softwareengineeringdaily.com/commit and enter code COMMITSED to save 30% on your ticket, while also supporting Software Engineering Daily.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

Check out our active companies and projects:

  • FindCollabs is a place to find collaborators and build projects. Find a project to work on
  • Podsheets is an open source podcast hosting platform built with the learnings from Software Engineering Daily. Our goal is to be the best place to host and monetize your podcast. If you have been thinking about starting a podcast, check out podsheets.com.
  • The SEDaily app for iOS and Android includes all 1000 of our old episodes, as well as related links, greatest hits, and topics. Subscribe for ad-free episodes.

The post DevOps at Delta Air Lines with Jasmine James appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Sep 03 2019
43 mins
Play

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