Cover image of The Permaculture Podcast
(139)
Science & Medicine
Natural Sciences

The Permaculture Podcast

Updated 14 days ago

Science & Medicine
Natural Sciences
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with Scott Mann

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with Scott Mann

iTunes Ratings

139 Ratings
Average Ratings
113
10
13
1
2

Great podcast

By Andrewralph11122211111 - Oct 17 2018
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As a Marriage and Family Therapy student I view people within the relational systems they are a part of. It is encouraging to hear from people who are focused on a systems perspective in different domains. I find a lot of encouragement from this podcast, it is one of my favorites. Scott Is a great podcast host.

Fair and Enlightening

By MidshipmenVoyage - Mar 08 2016
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Very good dialogue and reviews.

iTunes Ratings

139 Ratings
Average Ratings
113
10
13
1
2

Great podcast

By Andrewralph11122211111 - Oct 17 2018
Read more
As a Marriage and Family Therapy student I view people within the relational systems they are a part of. It is encouraging to hear from people who are focused on a systems perspective in different domains. I find a lot of encouragement from this podcast, it is one of my favorites. Scott Is a great podcast host.

Fair and Enlightening

By MidshipmenVoyage - Mar 08 2016
Read more
Very good dialogue and reviews.
Cover image of The Permaculture Podcast

The Permaculture Podcast

Updated 14 days ago

Read more

with Scott Mann

Rank #1: 1725 – Joel Salatin on Farming, Experience, and Mastery.

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The author, speaker, and farmer of Polyface Farms Joel Salatin joins me to talk about farming, the importance of experience, and the role of mastery over ourselves and our chosen discipline.

http://www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Episode1725.mp3

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These topics lay out the major themes of the conversation that follows but touch only on the barest of the depth you’ll hear. Together Joel and I explore land access for new farmers, living frugally, agriculture based on skilled people, mentoring and apprenticeship, the nature of wisdom, and what it means to be well read and with it well rounded: to be an interesting conversationalist with something to say and a provocative way to say it, so others find us and our message appealing.

I left this conversation thinking about the personal changes we can make now to become experts in our chosen field and how that serves as a model for others that continues the change that already began. Eventually, that daily change becomes the future we cannot imagine for generations to come.

Once you’ve given this interview a listen, leave a comment below and let me know your thoughts. Or, you can also get in touch with me directly by the usual ways.

Call: 717-827-6266
Email: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com

Write:

The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

Summer to Fall Fundraiser
Donate today!
Become a Patreon supporter.
Enter to win a Permaculture Design Course at VerdEnergia Pacifica in Costa Rica.
More information about this campaign: Returning to The Gift

Resources
Polyface Farms
Eager Farmer

Sep 10 2017
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Rank #2: 1820 – The Soil Food Web with Dr. Elaine Ingham

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Today’s guest, in an interview recorded by co-host David Bilbrey, is the microbiologist and soil researcher Dr. Elaine Ingham.

http://www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Episode1820.mp3

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During this conversation, David and Elaine explore the microbiology of the soil, the impact of this life on the health of our plants and agricultural system, how we can be citizen scientists, and the power of a microscope to bring all these ideas together, right in front of our eyes. Underneath it all is the importance of healthy, living soil for human well being, as individuals, participants in a community, and citizens of the world.

Find out more about her work on soil microbiology at soilfoodweb.com and on her classes and other work with Environment Celebration Institute at environmentcelebration.com.

David and I have partnered with Dr. Ingham and Environment Celebration Institute to make her courses more accessible to permaculture practitioners. If you’d like to take one of her online classes, use the promo code permaculturepodcast at checkout to save up to 50%. By doing so, you also help to support the podcast.

Stepping away from this conversation, I’m reminded of several past interviews that focused on citizen science and nutrient-dense foods, with Dr. Ingham’s talk with David adding the importance of soil microbiology and what we can do to support a healthy soil biome. As permaculture practitioners we can blend scientific research – both our own and that of others – with our Earth care practices.

To continue these conversations and the exploration of these ideas, you’ll find links to the related interviews, including those mentioned above, below.

What do you think of what Dr. Ingham is doing? Do you use a microscope in your exploration of the world? Have you taken one of her courses?

Let me know. Leave a comment in the show notes, call: 717-827-6266, send me an email: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com or contact David: david@thepermaculturepodcast.com or drop a letter in the post.

The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

From here, there is another shorter episode coming out in a few days, which is a conversation with Leslie Crawford about her new children’s book Sprig the Rescue Pig. After that is Sarah Bir at the end of the month, to talk about her book The Fruit Forager’s Companion.

Until then, spend each day exploring your soil while taking care of Earth, yourself and each other.

Resources
Dr. Ingham’s CV
Soil Food Web
Environment Celebration Institute
Dr. Ingham’s Online Classes
Ecological Monograph (1985 – PDF)
EcoThinkIt

Additional Interviews
Nutrient Dense Foods with Dan Kittredge
The Citizen Scientist with Stephen Harrod Buhner
GoBotany! and Citizen Science with Elizabeth Farnsworth

Jun 20 2018
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Rank #3: Broad Impact Permaculture

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“What have you seen through your lived experience and via your increasing network that gives you not only aspirational hope, but also “perspirational” perspective & confidence of moving past demonstration projects and moving toward broader-scale impact?”

Posted by Christopher Kopka during the May Ask Me Anything on Patreon.

https://www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/Impact.mp3

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I don’t see the land and agriculture-based permaculture movement pushing past the point of small or demonstration projects in the near future because of the expense and labor required to create, manage, and harvest from fully integrated systems. Compared to modern agriculture, the tools currently do not exist to scale-up without a large investment in human labor, which drives the price of on-farm production. Farm labor is skilled labor and we must not only train those people but also pay the costs up-front. Compare this to spreading the expense over years with leased machines or purchasing farm equipment on credit.

I do find hope in the projects that exist, however, in showing us a way forward as we answer the question of labor costs compared to mechanized production. All the farms I’ve visited created an abundance of food, and importantly financial income, on a small scale. The two most integrated, Island Creek (pictured above) and Salamander Springs, focused growing on around 1 acre (.4 hectare), required three people working 35-45 hours per week to operate from sowing seeds in Spring to the Fall harvest, while training the interns and assistant in integrated farming practices.

Island Creek grew a large market garden of foods including annuals of corn and greens, while growing perennials and strong self seeding plants such as figs, leeks, garlic, and Egyptian onions. Salamander Springs focused largely on a Three Sisters garden, with different varieties or corns, beans, and squash, supplemented with Spring ephemerals foraged and tended on the property, and a small garden full of onions, brassicas, and greens to extend and supplement the season long income.

The largest I visited, Radical Roots Farm in Virginia, operated on five acres. Even though they used a small walk-behind tractor, this farm, run by Dave and Lee O’Neill, included multiple on-farm interns throughout the year. It’s been several years since our interview and my tour, but at the time it took around 7 people with light mechanization to operate the farm from seed to harvest. The O’Neills also enhanced their regular farm income with a nursery business.

From what I’ve encountered at these farms and in other conversations, the successful farms were in the right place while receiving financial support and growing slowly. Holly at Island Creek received the land she farms on as a wedding present and her husband operates a prosperous roofing business. Susana Lein at Salamander Springs purchased an inexpensive piece of hard Kentucky hilltop for not a lot of money and built up over many years. Though I do not know the intricacies of the O’Neill’s origin story, they were successful business people who found ways to grow the nourishing foods they wanted to by supplementing their on-farm vegetable income and living frugally with what they had, again building up over the years.

I mention these examples as they sit in a place of—and as I’m reminded by Taj Scicluna’s thought for a 4th ethic for permaculture—transition. I’ve said before, on the podcast and elsewhere, that I don’t think permaculture will be the system that directly changes the world, but I do see this system of ecological design as a model of how far we can go and what will get us to the next steps. We now are the pioneers who push the envelope and help existing groups and those who follow us to create the new world we imagine, with systems yet to be discovered or named.

These edges are where I find inspiration as permaculture practices influence larger projects. Some examples of those include Dickinson College and Farmers on the Square; Hilltop Urban Farm; and City Repair Project.

Years ago I lectured about permaculture at Dickinson College, which also runs a large organic farm. At that time I had engaging conversations with the professors, and in the times since, the farm staff continue to integrate more regenerative practices. Those often focus on intentional design and positive ecological impacts. I continue to visit the farm which encourages local agriculture through a CSA, but also on-site energy production and waste recycling through the production of biochar, biogas, and effluent fertilizer. The farm also participates in a weekly farmers market, Farmers on the Square, in downtown Carlisle, PA.

The first time I went to the market, there were only a dozen or so vendors selling vegetables and a few value-added products such as jams and jellies. Now the market spreads across the square in Carlisle and is filled with vendors selling fresh produce and vegetables, as expected, but also bakeries with fresh breads; meaderies; wineries; cheese makers and dairy purveyors. A wander through the market over the years moved from a few fresh food stuffs to a whole diet available for sale without going to a grocery store.

Another example is the 501(c)3 non-profit Hilltop Urban Farm, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The director, Sarah Bexendell, is a permaculture practitioner and brings her knowledge of permaculture and experience in city and urban planning to the work of the farm. Through these actions, Hilltop Urban Farm helps to create youth farms, incubator farm projects, and also reach farmers markets throughout Pittsburgh.

Or, there is City Repair Project, founded by permaculture practitioner and teacher Mark Lakeman (Interview 1, Interview 2). Using the elements of permaculture design CR helps communities reclaim local culture, power, and joy in a way that influences street art and engagement.

These groups, using business funds, governmental money, and institutional  influence, have a broader reach for those of us interested in creating greater regenerative approaches with wider cultural impact. Partnering with groups such as these in our own area, serving on boards, and participating in the local community allow us to bring our ethics and principles to the forefront of the conversation.

Jul 31 2019
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Rank #4: 1810 – The Suburban Micro-Farm: Designing for Neighbors and Small Spaces

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My guest today is Amy Stross, blogger at TenthAcreFarm.com and author of The Suburban-Microfarm. I wanted Amy to join me for an interview to hear her perspective on creating integrated spaces where people are and will continue to live for the foreseeable future: in cities and suburbs.

http://www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/Episode1810.mp3

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Drawing on her years of experience in the landscape and her neighborhood, Amy shares what we can do to grow in small yards and gardens by considering our edges, looks at the difference we can make in our pantry if we grow for ourselves or in our wallet if we grow for market, and also shares her thoughts on what the future of permaculture holds as the ethics and principles are put into practice by people adapt these ideas to where they are and through their interests.

You can find out more about her and all she spoke about at tenthacrefarm.com/permaculturepodcast.

What do you think of what Amy shared with us today? How are you building a longer table instead of a higher fence?

Let me know. Leave a comment in the show notes or get in touch.

Email: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com
Call: 717-827-6266
Write:

The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

From here the next conversation is Oliver Goshey. He and I settle in to talk about natural building and designing for disasters.

Until then, take care of Earth, yourself, and each other.

Spring Fundraiser
As we enter Spring, I’m running a small fundraiser, known as The Car Drive as I need to replace my 14-year-old minivan with 218,000+ miles. If you love this show, whether you’re new or been with me a long time, I’m asking you to donate $1 for every show you’ve listened to. It will really help.

For anyone who donates during this campaign, the artist Lindsay Wilson has created a series of nature-inspired one-of-a-kind mixed-media prints, which I’ll be giving away to some donors.

Click here to learn more about the fundraiser

Give online by going to paypal.me/permaculturepodcast

Or send something in the mail.

The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

See more of Lindsay Wilson’s art at curvedcanvas.com

ReGen18
Now that David Bilbrey officially joined me as a co-host instead of his occasional role as a guest host, we’re working on getting him to some events to network and interview people who coincide with his interest in the intersection of business and permaculture.

The first of those trips is to travel to ReGen18 from May 1 – 4, 2018, in San Francisco, California, to connect with speakers dedicated to his interest: weaving together business and permaculture to transition to the world we want to see.

Will you be at ReGen18? If so, email david@thepermaculturepodcast.com and let him know.

Would you like to go? Use the following link to register and save 30%.

Register for ReGen18 as a Permaculture Podcast Listener

Resources
Tenth Acre Farm – Page for Permaculture Podcast listeners
Cincinnati Permaculture Institute

Apr 10 2018
Play

Rank #5: 1905 – So You Want To Be A Modern Homesteader with Kirsten Lie-Nielsen

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In this episode, Kirsten Lie-Nielsen, author of So You Want to be a Modern Homesteader, joins me to share her journey in becoming a modern homesteader and the advice she has for anyone interested in pursuing a similar path. Residing in Maine, I like her story because of how she and her partner had this dream and began on the land they were on. Continuing to develop their skills, in a space that was definitely not a farm, they spent this time seeking out the right piece of property for their goals.

https://www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/Episode1905.mp3

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Through our chat together Kirsten shares what and why she and her husband focused on when moving to the land. That she earns an income off the farm, and what they are developing to make one on it. The value of a partner who shares your dream, which she has in her husband. The relationship we have with our animals, including what develops from bottle feeding a baby goat, when your geese imprint on you and having a guardian dog as part of your family. Engaging your local community, while also leveraging social media to stay connected, learn new skills, and promote your farm and farm business.

We get into quite a bit in our time together, which also reminded me of how technology is not always the most reliable at the end of a rural lane. You’ll hear a few places where we have less than perfect audio, but those are minor compared to the wealth of information Kirsten shares with us in this conversation.

You can read Kirsten’s blog and learn more about her journey at HostileValleyLiving.com, and you’ll find her book at newsociety.com.

In cooperation with New Society Publishers, I’m giving away a copy of her book to a listener on Patreon. For those of you who support the podcast there, you’ll find this in your feed beginning February 18th.

Not a Patreon supporter? That’s okay, this drawing is open to everyone. All you need to do is register with Patreon and leave a comment in the link below. This giveaway only runs through February 28th, so head over there today.

Book Giveaway: So You Want To Be A Modern Homesteader

While lauding Kirsten’s book, I mention that I like the questions she asks to help you perform a self-assessment and decide whether or not this really is the path you want to pursue, something we don’t talk about enough within the permaculture community. Those questions can help you with preparing for rural life, understanding the seasonality of living on a farm, the reality of raising children on the homestead, and more.

A few of those questions, from the chapter on Skills and Resources for Rural Living, include:

What is your plan for keeping food fresh or preserved?
How will you bathe and get fresh drinking water?
How will you keep your animals warm in winter?

As you read each chapter and answer those questions, if you want to learn more and dig deeper, Kirsten provides a relatively comprehensive list of books for each topic. From the same chapter, some of the books she recommends:

The Encyclopedia of Country Living by Carla Emery
Raising Goats Naturally by Deborah Niemann

I’m a fan of her suggested reading because many of the books are ones I would personally recommend from my own library, or have been suggested by guests at one point or another.

Overall, if you are called to the land, you can learn a lot from Kirsten, her blog, and her books.

I missed her at Mother Earth News Fair in PA this past year, as I was hanging out with Jereme Zimmerman at the time talking mead, but look forward to meeting her this September and sitting through some of her presentations. If you can make it to that or any of the other events, she’ll be at, seek out the opportunity. If not, read her work.

After listening to this episode, what do you think about making a move to a homestead? Have Kirsten’s insights changed your views? Will you need to take some time to build your skills?

Let me know.

Call: 717-827-6266
Email: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com

Or if you still like to seal an envelope and mail a letter, that address is:

The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

From here, the next episode is a conversation with Zev Friedman of Co-operate WNC as we sit down to talk about mutual aid and the scale of cooperation. That’s out on February 27 for Patreon supporters and regular release on February 28.

To go with that episode is a giveaway for copies of Peter Kropotkin’s Mutual Aid and The Conquest of Bread.

Until the next time, consider whether or not a homestead is right for you and your plans, while taking care of Earth, yourself, and each other.

Feb 20 2019
Play

Rank #6: 1801 – Wilson Alvarez on Biomimicry, Landcare, and The Reintegration Project

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How did animals and people influence the landscape for hundreds of thousands, and even millions of years, before the rise of civilization?

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That question provides the framework for Wilson Alvarez and his current work, The Reintegration Project, which examines the prehistoric ecosystem engineers of the Eastern United States as a way to understand how permaculture practitioners and rewilders can use biomimicry to replicate those influences and restore the landscape.

To dig into this question and the solutions he’s found, Wilson shares his thoughts on harmonic disturbance; functional extinction; taxon vs. mechanical substitution as two different approaches to land management for conversation rewilding; and how to bolster the ecosystem by planning for correct disturbances of the correct size at the correct time.

As one of my teachers, colleagues, and friends this interview with Wilson has less structure as we didn’t need an introduction to get started so we just started talking, with the interview beginning with an explanation of the idea of niche construction.

To find out more about Wilson and his work as a permaculture practitioner and rewilder, listen to our earlier interviews:

1347 – Restoring Eden with Wilson Alvarez and Ben Weiss
1405 – Listener Questions on Zone 4 Permaculture with Wilson Alvarez and Ben Weiss
1411 – Rewilding with Wilson Alvarez and Ben Weiss

I’d also like to say that for anyone in the Mid-Atlantic the Horn Farm Center is an incredible resource for anyone interested in Agriculture, Permaculture, and Rewilding. Jon Darby, who appeared in the first group discussion of the podcast many years ago (Part 1) (Part 2), is the education director there and focuses on offering classes in these areas, often with Wilson as a lead instructor. Check out the events page and see if there is anything might be of interest to you.

My conversations with Wilson always restore some of my hope that we can achieve a number of our ecological, landscape, and management goals because of the way he provides practical, replicable advice on how to tackle the hard issues facing us.  He continually develops ways to face the difficult tasks of working on the edges to manage the landscape and to do so with simple tools.

Though there are some ethical and legal issues we’ll probably need to discuss at some point before taking these practices to the required landscape scale, right now you can use the four ecosystems engineers that Wilson shared today — the beaver, wolf, elephant, and wild human — and look for similar prehistoric landscape changers in your area and how they impacted the land and begin applying the mechanical disturbances they did, now, where you are.

If, after listening to this episode you dive into the research of your local ecological engineers, I’d love to hear what you find and the ways they created disturbances.

Call: 717-827-6266
Email: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com
Write:

The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

From here the next interview is my conversation with Michael Judd on Natural Burials.

Support the Podcast
Make a One-time Donation
Become a Patreon member

The Fifth World
Learn more at TheFifthWorld.com/rpg
Download the Rules (Direct Link – PDF)

The Possibility Handbook
See updates on this project and my other work on Instagram
Learn more about the project and becoming an agent of change

Patreon Exclusives
Wilson Alvarez – Practicing Permaculture On The Edge
The Permaculture Earthworks Giveaway (Closes January 11, 2018)
The Forest Garden Greenhouse Giveaway (Closes January 18, 2018)

Resources
1411 – Rewilding with Wilson Alvarez and Ben Weiss
1405 – Listener Questions on Zone 4 Permaculture with Wilson Alvarez and Ben Weiss
1347 – Restoring Eden with Wilson Alvarez and Ben Weiss

Horn Farm Center
Donate to Horn Farm Center and support The Reintegration Project
The Forest Man of India (YouTube)
Jadav Payeng (The Forest Man of India – Wikipedia)
The Biggest Estate on Earth by Bill Gammage
Bringing Nature Home by Doug Tallamy
Last Child in the Woods by Richard Louv
1535 – Beyond the War on Invasive Species (Tao Orion)
1718 – Nomad Seed Project (Zach Elfers)

Jan 10 2018
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Rank #7: 1733 – Drawing Down Carbon: Eric Toensmeier on Agroforestry and Climate Change

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How do we limit the damage of the greatest terrestrial environmental disaster ever, climate change?

By drawing down carbon.

http://www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/Episode1733.mp3

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How we do that, and the most effective ways possible, form the base of this conversation with Eric Toensmeier, as he shares his ongoing research about the impacts of agriculture and how we can use agroforestry to increase productivity and sequester carbon.

As an overview of the global state of carbon farming, Eric also discusses the reality of what we can do, through dietary practices and engaging in our own food production, to create change. For those of you inclined towards policy and top-down approaches, you’ll hear plenty of possibilities of how you can move the conversation in your community and with your legislators.

Find out more about him at perennialsolutions.org, and The Carbon Farming Solution at ChelseaGreen.com.

Visit our partner: Food Forest Card Game

Given the range of topics touched on regarding climate change, the resources below include not only those that Eric mentioned, but also a number of previous interviews with Dr. Laura Jackson, Keefe Keeley of The Savanna Institute, small-scale farmers Lee and Dave O’Neill at Radical Roots, and the market farmer Jean-Martin Fortier, as well as Jerome Osentowski of Central Rocky Mountain Permaculture. In the conversation with Jerome, he even touches on the impacts he’s seeing of climate change after his many years in the high altitude environment of Colorado where CRMPI calls home, and the focus of his decades of work on greenhouses.

As I put together the notes for this show, I’m left thinking about how to move forward in a meat-reduced world and have questions I need to answer. How viable is meat on leftovers? What systems do we need to implement to capture food waste so it gets to animals instead of the refuse bin?

I should have expected to be left with more questions after speaking with Eric, so am going to keep digging into this and will share more as I find it.

I would like to have Eric back sometime to continue the conversation about permaculture and food production on marginal land. If you have questions about this or anything else we covered in today’s conversation, leave a comment in the show notes below, or get in touch.

Email: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com
Call: 717-827-6266

Or you can send me a letter if you prefer something analog:

The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

From here, the next conversation is from guest host David Bilbrey, who sat down with John Seed to talk about Saving the Los Cedros Biological Reserve.

Until then, spend each day creating the world you want to live in by taking care of Earth, yourself, and your community by capturing carbon wherever you can.

Resources
The Carbon Farming Solution
Project Drawdown
Perennial Solutions

The Center for Agroforestry at the University of Missouri
Agroforestry at Virginia Tech
IPCC – Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change

Trees on Farms by RJ Zomer, et al. (PDF)
Savanna Institute
Steve SolomonGardening When It Counts
John Jeavons – Grow Biointensive
Legal Pathways to Carbon_Neutral Agriculture by Peter Lehner and Nathan Rosenberg (PDF)
Diet for a Small Planet

Interviews for More Information
Modern Agricultural Systems with Dr. Laura Jackson
The Savanna Institute with Keefe Keeley
The Market Gardener with Jean-Martin Fortier
Radical Roots Farm with Dave and Lee O’Neill
The Forest Garden Greenhouse (Jerome Osentowski)

Nov 30 2017
Play

Rank #8: Caring for Bees

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2018 was terrible for beekeepers, with up to 40 percent of hives across the United States dying off, one of the worst losses since we started tracking honey bee health. Recently, the USDA suspending the Honey Bee Tracking Survey indefinitely. Earlier this year, the bee-harming pesticide sulfoxaflor, sold under the trade names Closer and Transform, which has been banned since 2015, was approved for emergency use across 14 million acres in the United States.

With these multiple threats for honey bees, and indeed all our insect pollinators, what can we do?

https://www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/CaringForBees.mp3

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Searching for answers and to understand colony collapse disorder and what was killing our bees, in 2013 I reached out to Dr. Dennis vanEngelsdorp a research scientist with the University of Maryland and former Chief apiarist for Pennsylvania.

In this re-mastered release of that conversation, Dennis shares what he’s learned investigated bee dies off ever since Dave Hackenberg, a beekeeper with hives in Pennsylvania, first reported large colony losses and coined the term colony collapse disorder in 2006. Dennis shares more about the ongoing loss of bee colonies in the United States and elsewhere, which continues even now, years after this conversation, as well as the role of bees as pollinators in our food supply, and what we can do to support honeybees and native pollinators.

Find out more about Dr. vanEnglesdorp’s work by watching the TED Talk “A Plea for Bees“.

Stepping away from this conversation, years later, I still enjoy how precise and technical the conversation became regarding the research and issues surrounding bees, while still remaining accessible. For all of his work and research, I never felt like Dennis spoke over our heads. Part of that, I imagine, come from his love and passion for bees. Listening to him describe the co-evolution of flowers and pollinators reminded me of the beauty of nature, why I love this work, and why each of us should care for a little space of our own so we can build a better world that includes habitat for pollinators and the other species that also call this world home.

If you have any thoughts on this episode, please leave a comment, or drop something in the post:

The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

Until the next time, spend each day making the world a better place while taking care of Earth, your self, and each other.

Resources:
Dennis vanEnglesdorp, PhD
Dennis vanEnglesdorp: A Plea for Bees (TED Talk Video)
Bee Informed Partnership
Crop Pollination Exposes Honey Bees to Pesticides Which Alters Their Susceptibility to the Gut Pathogen Nosema ceranae (Research Article)

Jul 13 2019
Play

Rank #9: 1908 – Trees of Power with Akiva Silver

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My guest today is Akiva Silver of Twisted Tree Farm in Spencer, New York. He joins me to talk about his life and the experiences that lead to his new book Trees of Power from Chelsea Green Publishing.

https://www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/Episode1908.mp3

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Starting with his beginning as a tracker and forager, we move into his work on getting his farm started, and some of his favorite trees. Among those, we dig in deep about chestnuts and hickories. We also touch on what we mean by the word farm. Creating his families on-farm income on three-quarters of an acre. How foraging and tending the land extends the space we might consider our farm. How we can harvest more food than we can imagine by going to those places and spaces where others might not consider looking for food.

Akiva also shares the joy of propagation and the many ways we can do this from cuttings to grafting to layering, and how we can significantly diversify our plant genetics by growing out our selection from seeds.

Whether you are growing, planting, or just enjoy trees, there is a lot to learn from this interview.

Trees of Power Giveaway

You can find Akiva, his farm, and work at twisted-tree.net and you can find his book, Trees of Power, at chelseagreen.com. You’ll find links to those and many of the resources Akiva mentioned, such as Empire Chestnut Company, in the Resources section of the show notes.

Though Akiva runs a farm that propagates thousands and thousands of trees each year, what stands out for me is the passion that comes through in his voice from his connection to Earth that he developed that through foraging and tracking. His experience shows that we can use these skills as a way to foster and deepen that connection.

I feel that doing this is essential because we need to love something to care for it. If we can have that experience at a younger age, it can lead to a lifetime of meaningful action on our part to take responsibility for our choice and the impact on Earth, other people, and our ability to return the surplus.

Foraging is one of the best skills for this that we can learn, and also share with others, especially children. Time and time again I see this in my own kids, as my daughter seeks out violets and my son the brambles, to harvest flower and berries from the yard or when we go for a hike. It instilled a curiosity to wonder what this mushroom is, and can they eat it? To borrow my camera to take a picture so we can find out more about that little bush we’ve never seen before. This started when they were pre-school age and continues now as they prepare for their pre-teen years.

Anyone can benefit from learning to forage. As a hobby, it is simple and low-cost that can reap incredible rewards and is worth taking your time to, even if it’s only for a few hours on a couple of weekends a year.

If you’d like to learn more about foraging, though I know some great foragers locally, the best person working in our broader region of the United States and writing about their experiences is Sam Thayer. As Akiva mentioned, Sam wrote the forward to Trees of Power and has appeared on The Permaculture Podcast in the past. His books are just incredible and take you through many of the different ways you can make use of a wide selection of plants, beyond only the edible parts. Even if you don’t live in areas where the particular plants he details grow, his thoughts on foraging ethics and what to consider while walking the land make each book worth much more than the cover price.

Sam Thayer is at foragersharvest.com, and you can find a link to our interview below.

Donate online to the Winter to Spring Fundraiser

Along the way on this or any of your journeys, if I can ever help, please let me know.

Call: 717-827-6266
Email: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com

Write:
The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

From here the next interview is a conversation with Tim Krahn about the essentials of Rammed Earth construction.

Until then, spend each day creating the world you want to live in by foraging, propagating trees, and taking care of Earth, your self, and each other.

Resources
Twisted Tree Farm
Trees of Power (Chelsea Green)

Tom Brown Jr. Tracking School
The Graves Tree – Arthur Graves Chestnuts
Empire Chestnut Company (Route 9 Cooperative)

Interview: Foraging with Sam Thayer

Mar 20 2019
Play

Rank #10: 1838 – Mushrooms and Mycology with Lindsey Bender

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My guest today is Lindsey Bender, the chief mycologist for Field and Forest Products, Inc., a mushroom spawn and supply company located in Wisconsin.

https://www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/Episode1838.mp3

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I met Lindsey at the Pennsylvania Mother Earth News Fair in 2018 when I stopped to check in with Laura of Field and Forest, who I’ve gotten to know over the years through phone calls asking questions about mushrooms and other products and meeting one another at the fair several years ago. This time Lindsey was along for the trip. Once we started talking about all things fungi, she started answering some of my questions in very technical ways that lead us to talk about her background. Through that I learned she became a mycologist after many years studying biology at the undergraduate and graduate levels, which we get into in more depth during her introduction.

In this interview, you’ll hear about her work on keeping the genetic lines of the fungi used for spawn production healthy and experiments related to the interactions between fungi, plants and soil microbiology. She also shares why some mushrooms are commercially viable, and others are not, including some of our favorites like morels and why those cannot reliably be grown from spawn, and different ways to shock fungi to force fruiting and induce mushroom production.

Whether you are new to mushroom cultivation or been growing for years, there’s something here for everyone to learn more about fungi and mycology.

Find out more about Lindsey and Field and Forest Products, Inc. at fieldforest.net.

What did you think about this conversation with Lindsey? Does it change your view of mushrooms, mushroom growing, and what is possible?

Let me know. Leave a comment in the show notes,

Call: 717-827-6266
Email: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com
Write:

The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

From here the next conversation is my interview with Fred Provenza as we talk about his book Nourishment: What Animals Can Teach Us About Rediscovering Our Nutritional Wisdom.

Until the next time, spend each day learning more a fungi and taking care of Earth, yourself, and each other.

Resources
Field and Forest Products, Inc.
Three-Season Mushroom Gardens (Video)

Nov 30 2018
Play

Rank #11: 1735 – Permaculture in Perspective: Fertile Edges with Maddy Harland

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To know where we are headed, it’s important to know where we are and where we come from. As Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. wrote in his book Strength to Love, “We are not makers of history; we are made by history.”

http://www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/Episode1735.mp3

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With that in mind, in the conversation that follows Maddy Harland provides a 25 year retrospective on permaculture as viewed through her role as the longtime editor of Permaculture Magazine, which has been encapsulated in her new book Fertile Edges.

Find out more about Maddy Harland and the magazine at permaculturemagazine.co.uk. You can order a copy of her book, Fertile Edges, from PermanentPublications.co.uk if you are in the United Kingdom, or ChelseaGreen.com if you are in the United States.

For more on the people and organizations mentioned during our conversation, look to the resource section below.

Visit our Partner: North Spore Mushroom Company for all of your mushroom needs. Use the code PERMACULTURE at checkout to save 10% on your entire order.

Also be sure to follow them on Instagram @northsporemushrooms for great mushroom growing tips and advice.

I enjoyed my time with Maddy because of her long history in the permaculture movement and getting to hear, directly, about her role as a curator of so much useful information for our community. Permaculture continues to exist and grow because of her efforts and the team at Permaculture Magazine. Generations of permaculture practitioners came to the movement by picking up a copy at the newsstand.

That includes me. Though I found permaculture in the 90s when I started exploring sustainability, primitive skills, and rewilding in the mid-2000s an issue of Permaculture Magazine was in a stack of periodicals gifted to me so that I could see what was happening in the world. That inspired me to continue my search for a Permaculture Design Course, and lead me to Susquehanna Permaculture, Ben Weiss, and Dillon Cruz. At the end of that class, I started this show.

Simply put, this podcast exists because of Maddy’s work with the magazine; editing so many great books, like the ones from Patrick Whitefield; and co-founding Permanent Publications that made those books available to the world.

Her work provides me and other permaculture podcasters, video producers, bloggers, and authors — those members of our community who were often not part of those first or second waves of permaculture education and outreach — with a foundation to search out the voices, farms, designers, and scientists to expand and push the edges of permaculture.

Maddy continues that legacy of curation and inspiration with Fertile Edges, a collection of her wisdom that provides a view into the past, present, and future of Permaculture. If you are new to movement or were one of Bill Mollison’s first students,  this is something well worth having. Pick up a copy today.


After listening to this interview, where do you see the permaculture movement right now? Where do you see our future heading?

Let me know. Leave a comment below or get in touch.

717-827-6266
show@thepermaculturepodcast.com

Or drop something in the post:

The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

Also be sure to follow the show on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

From here, the next episode wraps up the end of the year with a look back over 2017 and my plans for 2018. After that, the first interview of the new year is with Wilson Alvarez to discuss Biomimicry and Landcare: The Reintegration Project.

As this is the last interview of the year I want to wish you a Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays.

Until we meet again, spend each day by taking care of Earth, yourself, and celebrating with your community.

Support the Podcast:
Become a Patreon Member
Make a one-time donation

Resources
Maddy Harland
Permaculture Magazine
Permanent Publications

Fertile Edges
Permanent Publications (U.K.)
Chelsea Green (U.S.)
Permaculture in a Nutshell
Permanent Publications (U.K.)
Chelsea Green (U.S.)
Earth Care Manual
Permanent Publications (U.K.)
Chelsea Green (U.S.)
People and Permaculture
Permanent Publications (U.K.)
Chelsea Green (U.S)

UK Permaculture Association
Patrick Whitefield (Wiki)
Graham Bell
Chris Dixon (UK Permaculture Association)
Chris Marsh (UK Permaculture Association)
Max LindeggerCrystal Waters
Looby Macnamara
Aranya (Permanent Publications)
Charles Dowding
Stephanie Hafferty
Albert Bates (Peaksurfer)
Mayan Mountain Research Farm / Christopher Nesbitt
Polly Higgins / Eradicating Ecocide

Dec 20 2017
Play

Rank #12: 1829 – People & Permaculture: Trauma Informed and Radical Self Care with Jessi Bloom

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Nearly every episode of the podcast, including this one, ends with the final statement, “Until the next time, spend each day creating the world you want to live in by taking care of Earth, yourself, and each other.” What does it mean, however, to take care of ourselves, or one another, in a meaningful way?

https://www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/Episode1829.mp3

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That question forms the central point of this interview with ecological landscape designer, speaker, and author Jessi Bloom. She shares her personal story of becoming Trauma Informed, ways we can work on healing ourselves through mental and physical health routines, how we can help others by taking a Mental Health First Aid training, and what we can do to create sacred spaces and use plants, plant-based medicine, and daily acts for our overall happiness and wellbeing.

This work isn’t about a day at a spa or a simple vacation to recuperate, but how you can heal yourself and create a life that supports and nurtures you.

Find out more about Jessi and work at jessibloom.com and her books, including Creating Sanctuary, at TimberPress.com. You’ll find those and links to trauma awareness training and mental health first aid in the resource section below.

What do you think of this conversation with Jessi?
What do you do to take care of yourself?
Have you attended a course in Mental Health First Aid or to become Trauma Informed?

Let me know. Leave a comment below or get in touch:

Call: 717-827-6266
Email: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com
Write:

The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

From here the next episode is out on September 10th, which is also my 39th birthday, and is a conversation with Jereme Zimmerman about his new book Brew Beer Like a Yeti: Traditional Techniques and Recipes for Unconventional Ales, Gruits, and Other Ferments Using Minimal Hops.

Until the next time, spend each day creating the world you want to live in by taking care of Earth, yourself, and each other.

Support the Podcast:
Donate Online.
Become an ongoing Patreon Member.

Resources
Jessi Bloom
NW Bloom Ecological Services
Timber Press
Trauma Informed Care Project (Offers Trainings)
Mental Health First Aid

Dave Boehnlein
Bullock’s Permaculture Homestead
Tilth Alliance

Aug 30 2018
Play

Rank #13: 1826 – Essential Earthbag Construction with Kelly Hart

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Our guest for this episode is the carpenter, architect, and builder Kelly Hart. He joins me today to talk about Earthbag Construction, the subject of his recently published book Essential Earthbag Construction from New Society Publishers.

https://www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/Episode1826.mp3

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Learn more about my Moment of Need

In this interview, Kelly walks us through many of the steps required for building with earthbags, including the practical needs of what bags to use, what you can fill the bags with for thermal mass or insulation, some of the tools and equipment you’ll need, establishing a foundation, laying the courses, tying each layer together, and also how to secure your doors and windows.

After you’ve listened to this interview, you’ll have a basic understanding of how to use earthbags for construction. With a copy of Kelly’s book you can learn the rest.

Find out more about Kelly and his work, including his DVD A Sampler of Alternative Homes, at naturalbuildingblog.com, and his book at NewSociety.com.

I like this interview because Kelly invites us to try our hand at building with earthbags. I find that invitation in, to try, to make mistakes, and to learn, incredibly powerful and empowering.

We can start with simple structures, like an above-ground root cellar or domed storage shed, to get comfortable with the necessary techniques before proceeding to something more complicated. With the way earthbags go together we can stack, pull down, and try again, with our first structure serving as an in-depth learning experience.

This is also an inexpensive technique, making it affordable and accessible in ways other methods, where mistakes can be costly, are not. Looking at the cost of supplies and some sample projects, 1,000 of the polypropylene bags that Kelly mentioned, are less than $400. Another $80 for a 440-yard roll of 4-point barbed wire.

From there you’ll need rebar, lumber, windows, doors, and your tools, but over and over again I found many owner-built earthbag homes, all over the world, for under $10,000, in all shapes and sizes.

Multi-story. Rectilinear. Rounded. Any combination you can imagine. As a lover of cob and the feel of Earthships, there is something about the earthbag as a base that appeals to me.

Its natural building meets LEGO.

Earth risen into walls and offering us security, in a structure we can build with our own hands.

I can think of few things more comfortable than that.

What do you think of this conversation? Has this changed your thoughts on building with earthbags? Is this a method you’ve used?

Let me know.

Leave a comment in the show notes, or get in touch.

Call: 717-827-6266
Email: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com

Write:

The Permaculture Podcast.
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

From here the next regular episode is a conversation with Ben Goldfarb to talk about his book Eager and the role of one of the world’s greatest ecosystem engineers, the beaver.

Until then, spend each day creating the world, and homes, you want to live in, while taking care of Earth, yourself, and each other.

Resources
Essential Earthbag Construction
Natural Building Blog (Kelly’s Website)
A Sampler of Alternative Homes (Kelly’s DVD)
Nader Khalili (1936 – 2008)
The $50 and Up Underground House Book (undergroundhousing.com)

Jul 30 2018
Play

Rank #14: 1904 – Rob Avis on the Essentials of Rainwater Harvesting

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Verge Permaculture 2016
Gavin Young Photography

In this episode of The Permaculture Podcast, Rob Avis, of Verge Permaculture, joins me to talk about rainwater harvesting.

https://www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/Episode1904.mp3

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This conversation is based on his new book from New Society Publishers, Essential Rainwater Harvesting. Rob wrote this book along with his wife and Verge Permaculture Partner, Michelle. Though they began their professional careers as engineers designing solutions in the oil fields, they now live on a productive permaculture homestead in Alberta, Canada, and use that experience to create and share all the formulas, calculations, and components needed to create a productive system for capturing clean, healthy water.

You can find more about Rob’s work at VergePermaculture.ca, and his book, Essential Rainwater Harvesting at NewSociety.com. You’ll, of course, find links to those and other resources, including his Rainwater Harvesting Toolkit, in the Resources section below.


To go with this conversation, In cooperation with New Society Publishers, I’m giving away a copy of Essential Rainwater Harvesting. That drawing runs from February 8th through at least the 18th. To enter, all you need to do is follow the link below and leave a comment in the post. I’ll then randomly select the recipient once this giveaway closes.

Book Giveaway: Essential Rainwater Harvesting

In the book, Rob and Michelle break down what we need in order to install a rainwater harvesting system, and they back that up with their professional experience and the sources, that lead them to their conclusions. They also hold the additional need to understand the liability and risks of such a system as engineers who put their stamp on a design. I mention this latter part as one of my earliest lessons in rainwater capture was just how heavy a rain barrel, even a 50 gallon one, can get—over 400lbs/180kils—and what we need to consider when placing them, such as a solid foundation, so they can be productive and not create any hazards for the user or surrounding neighbors.

One of the mystifying parts of rainwater harvesting for me, in the beginning, was calculating just how much water would fall on a given area and the necessary size for a storage container to hold it all. Once you start doing those calculations you quickly find that a lot of water, whether you count the volume in liters or gallons, comes off of a roof or parking lot with just a centimeter or half-inch of rain. Accounting for that, how your surfaces or gutters divide and divert those flows, and where they’ll go can help to understand how to use this resource around your home or in your landscape.

And with Essential Rainwater Harvesting, you’ll find all the details for that and so much more.

Which is a long way to say, I like this book and like the others in the Essential series from New Society Publishers, think you will too.

What did you think of this conversation with Rob? Do you have questions for him? Would you like to hear more about this work or his other projects at Verge Permaculture?

Get in touch:
show@thepermaculturepodcast.com
717-827-6266

And for those of you who still like to put a stamp on an envelope, I love finding your mail in my mailbox.

The Permaculture Podcast
PO Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

From here the next conversation is with Kirsten Lei-Nielsen to talk about whether or not you should become a homesteader.

Until then, spend each day making smart use of your resources while taking care of Earth, your self, and each other.

Resources
Verge Permaculture – Rob and Michelle Avis
Essential Rainwater Harvesting
Rainwater Harvesting Toolkit

Peter Coombes – Urban Water Cycle Solutions
Dr. Anthony Spinks PhD Thesis on Biofilms and Sludges

American Rainwater Catchment Systems Association (ARCSA)
North American Rainwater Harvesting Code

Feb 10 2019
Play

Rank #15: 1839 – Reclaiming our Nutritional Wisdom: Nourishment with Fred Provenza

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My guest today is the renowned animal behaviorist Fred Provenza, who joins me to talk about how we can reconnect with the foods that feed our bodies and reclaim our nutritional wisdom.

https://www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/Episode1839.mp3

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Visit Our Partner: Food Forest Card Game

Drawing on decades of research with animals, upon retirement from Utah State University he turned his lens towards human beings to pull together the best studies and his own personal journey to provide a way we can begin to eat well for ourselves by outlining where we’ve gone wrong and what we can do to make a positive change.

You can find Fred’s book, Nourishment, at chelseagreen.com.

What do you think of what Fred shares with us today? Can you see the relationships between flavor-feedback, culture, and alternative availability on our nutritional wisdom

Let me know.

Leave a comment in the show notes, call 717-827-6266, email: show@thepermacutlurepodcast.com, or write:

The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018.

Resources
Nourishment

Chemical Ecology (Wiki)
Dying To Be Me by Anita Moorjani
Edward R Murrow’s This I Believe (Wiki)

Dec 10 2018
Play

Rank #16: 1837 – Permaculture play, design considerations, and a casual conversation with Karl Treen

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My guest today is Karl Treen of Food Forest Card Game. He joins me to share where his life has gone since our interview last year.

https://www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/Episode1837.mp3

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Support the Podcast on Patreon

A longtime permaculture practitioner, Karl is one of the people whose work I follow off the air and I find quite a bit of inspiration from what he’s doing with his card game and working on implementing his designs in an urban environment where he lives in Rhode Island near the Atlantic Coast here in the United States. Though we’ve never met in person, knowing Karl as I do we wound talking as soon as we connected without a formal start to the interview. As a result what you’re about to hear drops directly into the conversation, but is not where we began nor ultimately where we ended when I turned off the recording.

Where we do pick up is a few moments after he shared that he made a move to a new house with a larger yard and how this change influences his permaculture work. Along the way, we talk about a variety of thoughts. Those include different uses for his game inside the permaculture or school classroom; accepting that we can’t know everything and with that what we can do to be better teachers and designers; and why Instagram is our favorite place to learn and share new ideas, and some folks he recommends following.

Find out more about Karl and his work at foodforestcardgame.com. While you are there consider picking up a couple of sets of cards as stocking stuffers for the holidays and introduce your friends and family to permaculture design.

I also recommend following Karl on Instagram. As we mentioned there at the end of the interview, you can find him at foodforestcardgame. In his feed, you can see images from his mushroom logs, which he inoculated a few days after recording this interview in early November. You’ll find links to his Instagram account, his mushroom project, and the people he mentioned worth following in the show notes.

To go with this interview, I’m giving away a deck of Food Forest Card Game cards and a copy of Mary Appelhof’s Worms Eat my Garbage.

I like sitting down with Karl to talk about his work because I find what he’s doing, even after his many years of practice, reflects the experiences of other permaculture folks who work a job, have a little bit of land and are doing the best they can. As with his conversation about composting and black soldier flies, we have many decisions to make on what works best for us, our design, and goals. Yes, he has the perfect start to growing the fly larva, but at this time there are other places to focus his time and energy.

Though he’s studied permaculture; created a design and education aid for the community, and remains connected with myself and others; he still finds inspiration from others. By focusing on a particular area for practice, he expands his knowledge, and direct experience becomes an in-depth resource for anyone who contacts him, while still absorbing what interests him from others.

Similarly, as I continue down my own path, my own role is influenced by sitting in the chair as the show host, to have conversations with guests, read the latest books and newest articles, and act as a curator of information about permaculture. To pull upon all these connections to help you find the people, books, organizations, and resources that help you meet your goals. As one of my teachers used to say, to be a guide on the side rather than a sage on the stage.

Continuing to stay in touch with Karl and others in our community, I’d like to have more casual conversations like this. We can learn so much from the informal understanding of the day to day lives of others putting the ideas of permaculture into practice.

If there’s someone who appeared on the show in the past that you thought I had a good conversation with and you’d like to hear back on the air for something less formal, let me know.

Call: 717-827-6266
Email: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com

Write:

The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

From here the next conversation should be my interview with mycologist Lindsay Bender of Field and Forest Products.

Until the next time, spend each day creating the world you want to live in my playing games, applying design to your life, and taking care of Earth, yourself, and each other.

Visit our Affiliates Page for a discount on the Women’s Permaculture Guild Permaculture Design Course, Classes with Heather Jo Flores of Food Not Laws, Herbal Medicine from Susquehanna Apothecary, and with Rebel Garden Tools, the best hand tools for gardening and forest farming.

Giveaway
Worms Eat my Garbage and a set of Food Forest Card Game Cards

Resources
Food Forest Card Game
Foodforestcardgame on Instagram
Haskap Edible Honeysuckle
Karl’s Mushroom Inoculation
Patrick Whitefield

Instagram Worth Following
The Permaculture Podcast
That Vinegar Guy
Greenwood Farm
Veggie Garden Vermont

Nov 20 2018
Play

Rank #17: 1811 – Designing for Disasters with Natural Building

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My guest today is Oliver Goshey, founder of the regenerative design and natural building company Abundant Edge, and host of the Abundant Edge podcast.

http://www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/Episode1811.mp3

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During this interview we talk about natural building and designing for disasters, including the nature of and increase in these problems; the role of our ecological impacts on what is occurring; what we can do to prepare ourselves for these eventualities; a better definition for what we should call a disaster; what we can do personally and systemically to bring about preventative change so we can be proactive rather than reactive; and why we need to abandon the concept of sustainability.

Quite a lot to cover, but all applicable to your daily permaculture practices.


Oliver and I did have another conversation not long after recording this one, in which he recorded me for an episode of the Abundant Edge Podcast on how we can live regeneratively without abandoning society.


For Patreon supporters, I’m giving away a copy of the book Oliver mentioned, The Hand-Sculpted House (Chelsea Green Publishing, 2002). Look for that in your feed on Wednesday, April 18, and I’ll draw the winner on Thursday, April 26.

Not a Patreon supporter but want to enter? Go to Patreon.com/permaculturepodcast, select the reward level that suits your needs, and sign up today.


Get in Touch with the Show
Call: 717-827-6266
Email: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com

Write:
The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018


Support the Podcast

Do you enjoy this podcast? If so, have you made a one-time donation?

I ask because for with all the episodes released since 2010, totaling millions of downloads, this show exists thanks to the generosity of around 500 people, total, who have donated in the last 7 years. That is an average of just 1 listener per episode giving their support.

Will you take today to make a difference for permaculture?

Make a one-time donation online by going to: paypal.me/permaculturepodcast

If you prefer to send something in the mail, that address is:

The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018


Resources
Abundant Edge
Abundant Edge Facebook Page (Company)
The Abundant Edge Facebook Page (Podcast)
Cob Cottage Company
Cob Cottage Company Apprenticeship
The Hand–Sculpted House (Chelsea Green Publishing, 2002)

How to live regeneratively without abandoning society with Scott Mann, – – where Oliver interviews me.

Why Cape Town is Running Out of Water, and Who’s Next (NatGeo)

Apr 20 2018
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Rank #18: 1825 – The Wildcrafting Brewer with Pascal Baudar

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Author, teacher, and forager Pascal Baudar joins me to discuss his exploration of primitive brews and fermentation, the basis for his latest book The Wildcrafting Brewer.

https://www.thepermaculturepodcast.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/Episode1825.mp3

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He shares with us the way we can combine local ingredients as flavor, with water, sugar, and yeast to create sodas, beer, wine, and mead with local flavor and sense of place. If you are familiar with his first book, The New Wildcrafted Cuisine, then you know his thoughts push the limits of what we might think of when considering what to toss into our brew pot. Taking these methods, he again takes us in an unexpected direction that goes from the social drinks we might expect, to discuss how we might consider making culinary, healing, or even psychotropic beverages.

Find out more about Pascal and his work as a forager and teacher at urbanoutdoorskills.com and his books, including The Wildcrafting Brewer at ChelseaGreen.com.

Visit our Partner: Acres U.S.A.

Stepping away from this conversation, though he and I spoke about brewing and making wild-flavored beverages, I’m thinking more generally about how easy it is to complicate and over-analyze our journey and arrive at a place where the results we wish to accomplish gets lost in a messy process requiring more work than needed.

Pascal shows us that with his primitive, or as he also says archaic, brews and how the modern steps, and commercial flavors, limit the range of experiences we create as we scrub and sanitize our pots and fermentation vessels, or leave our brews alone; watched but untouched as the liquid transforms from sugary concoction into alcoholic elixir.

How often do we do seek this same sterile approach in our other work, only to find the effort falls flat because of a singular direction and only considering one way?

What if we tried more simplicity and creativity in our work as permaculture designers, and in our relationships and initiatives for community building? Can we strip away the unnecessary and arrive and something more concise, clear, whole, productive, and enjoyable?

I think so, and the skills of creating wild foods and beverages provide a place where we can safely explore these patterns, before searching for similar details in our other work.

What do you think of this conversation with Pascal? Leave a comment in the show notes, or get in touch with me if you would like to discuss this further.

Call: 717-827-6266
Email: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com

Write:

The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

From here, the next regular episode is with Kelly Hart to discuss his book Essential Earthbag Construction.

Until then, explore the wild and the uncivilized, while taking care of Earth, yourself, and each other.

Resources
Outdoor Urban Skills
The Wildcrafting Brewer
The New Wildcrafted Cuisine
Chelsea Green Publishing

Jul 20 2018
Play

Rank #19: 1723 – Change Here Now with Adam Brock

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How do we create the world with the social and economic structures we desire? How do we distill the problems that we see over and over again in that context so they are easy to understand, that lead solutions with a universal application?

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By creating a pattern language, an idea first coined in 1977 by Christopher Alexander in the book A Pattern Language: Towns – Buildings – Construction. My guest today, Adam Brock, took that lens, originally applied to architecture and structures, and used it to examine our invisible structures, which resulted in his book Change Here Now: Permaculture Solutions for Personal and Community Transformation.

During the conversation today we talk about the development of the book and some of his process on going from concept to published manuscript. We also touch on some of the challenging conversations that arise from looking broadly at we apply permaculture and these patterns to our communities, including some of the dialogues we should consider engaging in as neighbors or leaders. We close of course with Adam final thoughts, but not before he shares some of the patterns he developed, including Dynamic Pricing and Nurtured Networks.

You can find out more about Adam and his book, including upcoming events, at AdamBrock.me.

Do this quick introduction to Pattern Languages and the conversation with Adam make sense? Can you see using this kind of patterning and a pattern language in your own work? Will you be picking up a copy of Change Here Now to get a better understanding of these ideas and how to apply them?

Email: show@thepermaculturepodcast.com
Call: 717-827-6266
Write:

The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

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Resources
AdamBrock.me
Overton Window (Wiki)

Aug 20 2017
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Rank #20: 1916 – The Adaptive Habitat Program

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(Pictured: The Design Squiggle, by Damien Newman as mentioned in this interview. CC BY-ND 3.0 US)

Today I’m joined by Rob Avis and Takota Coen, two Canadian permaculture designers and teachers, who, working together, created a systemized approach to permaculture and landscape design. This process, called The Adaptive Habitat Program, reduces drudgery and simplifies complexity by using the best information and techniques currently available from permaculture and related disciplines.

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To understand their process, they lead us through the problems they identified, and the five steps that take us from understanding and clarifying our vision through to incremental implementation and managing your resources.
And that was Rob Avis and Takota Coen. Find out more about their work and start your journey with the Adaptive Habitat Land Design Program at ContourMapGenerator.com. You’ll find a link to this, Google Earth Pro, and other resources, including my first interview with Rob about rainwater harvesting, in the show notes.

As mentioned at the end, this interview is an introduction to this process. I’d like to have Rob and Takota back on to dig deeper into each of the design steps and continue the conversation about how to codify and further the profession of permaculture design. To that end, if you have any questions for Rob, Takota, or me, leave a comment in the notes for this show, and we can include your thoughts in future episodes.

—–

For the summer, I’m stepping back from social media and other online outlets to focus on some behind the scenes projects, so if you would like to get in touch with me directly, the best way to do that, other than leaving a comment, is to drop something in the mail.

The Permaculture Podcast
P.O. Box 16
Dauphin, PA 17018

Until the next time, trust the process that brings your work into the world, while taking care of Earth, your self, and each other.

Resources
The Adaptive Habitat Program
Contour Map Generator (Get Started Here)
Google Earth Pro
The Design Squiggle

Verge Permaculture (Rob Avis)
Coen Farm (Takota Coen)

Essential Rainwater Harvesting with Rob Avis (Interview)

Jul 05 2019
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