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(69)

Rank #68 in Government category

Society & Culture
Philosophy
Health & Fitness
Government

The Week in Health Law

Updated 5 days ago

Rank #68 in Government category

Society & Culture
Philosophy
Health & Fitness
Government
Read more

Nicolas Terry and his guests discuss the significant health law and policy issues of the week

Read more

Nicolas Terry and his guests discuss the significant health law and policy issues of the week

iTunes Ratings

69 Ratings
Average Ratings
66
2
1
0
0

Love it!

By angry89 - Apr 03 2017
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A must listen for a healthcare attorney

Incredibly interesting podcast

By RahmCom - Jan 12 2017
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Really brilliant guests, know health law and policy inside and out...bravo!

iTunes Ratings

69 Ratings
Average Ratings
66
2
1
0
0

Love it!

By angry89 - Apr 03 2017
Read more
A must listen for a healthcare attorney

Incredibly interesting podcast

By RahmCom - Jan 12 2017
Read more
Really brilliant guests, know health law and policy inside and out...bravo!
Cover image of The Week in Health Law

The Week in Health Law

Updated 5 days ago

Rank #68 in Government category

Read more

Nicolas Terry and his guests discuss the significant health law and policy issues of the week

166. Too Much Information about State Health Law.

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This episode was recorded at the 2019 meeting of the Southeastern Association of Law Schools during a panel reviewing the year in healthcare financing. In this episode I take a look at state regulation of health insurance, first, from the perspective of states playing defense and shoring up their own laws in case the ACA disappears and, second, how some are playing offense, actually seeing to improve upon the ACA baseline.
Sep 18 2019
30 mins
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165. Thinking Deeply about Public Health Law Research. Guests, Rachel Rebouché & Scott Burris.

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Two great guests this week, Rachel Rebouché and Scott Burris, both from Temple Law School in Philadelphia. We’re here not only to tease Temple Law’s 2019 Law Review Symposium: Looking Back and Looking Ahead, 10 Years of Public Health Law Research, Thursday, September 12, 2019, but also to discuss some cutting edge issues in public health responses to the opioids overdose crisis and the erosion of reproductive rights. Scott, of course, is a Professor of Law at the law school, where he directs the Center for Public Health Law Research. He is also a Professor in Temple’s School of Public Health. He is the author of over 200 books, book chapters, articles and reports on issues including urban health; discrimination against people with HIV and other disabilities; HIV policy; research ethics; and the health effects of criminal law and drug policy. His work has been supported by organizations including the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the Open Society Institute, the National Institutes of Health, and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Rachel Rebouché is a Professor of Law at Temple and also serves as Associate Dean for Research. She teaches Family Law, Health Care Law, and Contracts and is currently a co-investigator on two grant-funded research projects related to reproductive health, one housed at the Emory University Rollins School of Public Health and another funded by the World Health Organization. Her recent research also includes articles in law reviews and in peer-reviewed journals on relational contracts, prenatal genetic testing and genetic counseling, collaborative divorce, parental involvement laws, and international reproductive rights.
Sep 05 2019
32 mins
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164. Will What Happened in Oklahoma Stay in Oklahoma? Guest Jennifer Oliva.

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The Oklahoma opioid verdict was handed down on August 26 and, of course, there’s only one person to discuss it with, Jennifer OIiva. Professor Oliva is on the faculty at at Seton Hall Law where she specializes in health, FDA, and evidence law. An honors graduate of Georgetown University Law Center, Professor Oliva was a Public Interest Law Scholar and served as Executive Notes & Comments Editor of The Georgetown Law Journal. After law school, Professor Oliva clerked on the 10th and 3rd Circuit court of appeals. She also served as the Deputy State Solicitor of the State of Delaware.
Aug 28 2019
29 mins
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163. Trouble in Texas. Guest, Elizabeth Weeks.

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Recorded at the 2019 annual meeting of the Southeastern Association of Law Schools, Professor Elizabeth Weeks, Associate Dean for Faculty Development & the J. Alton Hosch Professor of Law at the University of Georgia School of Law discusses the latest high profile ACA case, Texas v. U.S. Professor Weeks is a highly regarded health law scholar whose teaching and research interests include torts, health law, health care financing and regulation, and public health law.
Aug 23 2019
17 mins
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162. Fortnite Healthcare. Guest, Fazal Khan.

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This episode was recorded at the annual meeting of the Southeastern Association of Law Schools during a panel reviewing the year in healthcare financing. This episode features a talk by Professor Fazal Khan who teaches Health Law & Policy, Bioethics, Public Health Law and International Products Liability at the University of Georgia School of Law. His current research focuses on several major themes:  reform of the American health care system, the effect of globalization on health care and the challenge of regulating emerging biotechnologies. His talk was on the financing of telemedicine and the slow alignment of the technologies with health care value and other models.
Aug 19 2019
16 mins
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161. Here Come’s The Judge. Guest, John Cogan.

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Recorded at the 2019 annual meeting of the Southeastern Association of Law Schools during a panel reviewing the year in healthcare financing, this episode features a talk by Professor John Cogan from the University of Connecticut School of Law. Professor Cogan focuses his research and teaching on health care organizations and finance, health law and policy, federal health programs, health care fraud and abuse, and health insurance law. He is the co-author of a treatise on Medicare and Medicaid bankruptcy issues, as well as the author of numerous scholarly articles on a range of health insurance topics, including the Affordable Care Act and HIPAA. In this talk Professor Cogan discussed first, Medicaid: including expansion, work requirements, and the latest court decisions; second, Section 1557 and the proposed civil rights regulations; and third, the DeOtte v. Azar case and the resultant contraceptive mandate mess.
Aug 13 2019
18 mins
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160. Protecting the Herd. Guests, Julie Cantor & Ross Silverman.

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I have two excellent guests this week. Dr. Julie Cantor is an adjunct faculty member at the UCLA School of Law. She is a graduate of Stanford University, UC Berkeley School of Law, and the Yale University School of Medicine. Dr Cantor has two decades of public policy and advocacy experience focused on federal healthcare policy. She has published broadly including in the New England Journal, Annals of Internal Medicine, the Indiana Law Review, the ABA Human Rights Journal, the NYT Debate section, and has submitted amicus briefs in several Supreme Court cases. Making a welcome return to the pod is Ross Silverman, Professor of Health Policy and Management at the Indiana University Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health at IUPUI, and holds a secondary appointment as Professor of Public Health Law at the Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law. His research interests include legal, ethical and policy issues in public health and medicine, mobile health law and policy, interdisciplinary curriculum development, professional school admissions, medical humanities, human rights, and patient safety. Professor Silverman has published extensively on vaccination issues. Our discussion topic rotates around the recent measles outbreaks and the public health and public health law issues they raise. If you happened to pick up the June 5 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine you will have seen articles by both Julie and Ross (co-authored w/ Douglas Opel and Saad B. Omer) addressing aspects of the current law and policy debates. Other sources noted were this op-ed by Prof. Michael Willrich, Yiddish mistranslation, this New York Times risk-benefit analysis, and Angela Shen’s Measles Madness And Value post.
Jun 19 2019
43 mins
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159. Came for the Opioids, Stayed for the Civil Procedure. Guest, Elizabeth Chamblee Burch.

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Elizabeth Chamblee Burch holds the Fuller E. Callaway Chair of Law at the University of Georgia. She has a stunning publication record, published in the New York University Law Review, Cornell Law Review, Virginia Law Review, Vanderbilt Law Review, Washington University Law Review, Boston University Law Review and George Washington Law Review, among others. In 2015, Professor Burch was awarded the American Law Institute’s Early Career Scholars Medal in recognition of her work on class actions and multidistrict litigation, and its potential to influence improvements in the law. She teaches and researches civil procedure, class actions and mass torts. Her new book Mass Tort Deals was published last month by Cambridge University Press. The book is an excellent read and illuminates a highly complex area of litigation. Our conversation explored the role of repeat player lead plaintiffs’ and defense attorneys, the functions and control of the MDL judge, and, of course, we discussed the opioid litigation and how the state cases may impact any settlement.
Jun 04 2019
33 mins
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158. Opioid Litigation Update. Guest, Jennifer Oliva.

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A swift return to the pod by Jennifer Oliva. Jenn is an Associate Professor at West Virginia University in the College of Law and School of Public Health. This Spring she has been a visiting research scholar at The Petrie-Flom Center at Harvard Law School. In the Fall she will be joining the faculty at Seton Hall Law School. Her work has been published by or is forthcoming in the Duke Law Journal, Northwestern University Law Review, Ohio State Law Journal, North Carolina Law Review, and the George Mason Law Review. We continue to explore some of the themes we discussed with Leo Beletsky in the last episode. Here, Jenn and I drill down into some of the issues surrounding the opioid litigation. Issues and questions discussed include the relationship between the federal district court MDL litigation in Cleveland and actions brought by state attorneys-general in their own courts, the implications of the recent Oklahoma settlement, and the chances/challenges of fashioning “public health” remedies that would mitigate the effects of the opioid overdose epidemic.
May 07 2019
27 mins
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157. Misaligned Opioid Policies. Guests, Leo Beletsky & Jennifer Oliva.

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I am joined by guests Leo Beletsky & Jennifer Oliva. Leo is a Professor of Law and Health Sciences and the Faculty Director of the Health in Justice Action Lab at Northeastern University School of Law. He holds a joint appointment with the Bouvé College of Health Sciences. He has broad expertise and an enviable research and publication record in the public health impact of laws and their enforcement, with special focus on drug overdose, infectious disease transmission and the role of the criminal justice system as a structural determinant of health. Jennifer is an Associate Professor at West Virginia University in the College of Law and School of Public Health. This Spring she has been a visiting research scholar at The Petrie-Flom Center at Harvard Law School. In the Fall she will be joining the faculty at Seton Hall Law School. Her work has been published by or is forthcoming in the Duke Law Journal, Northwestern University Law Review, Ohio State Law Journal, North Carolina Law Review, and the George Mason Law Review. We discussed the conceptual and practical flaws in Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs (PDMPs), on which see these great articles by Leo and by Jenn, opioidphobic moves such as Michigan’s NonOpioid Advance Directive, the apparent animosity of federal prosecutors towards evidence-based public health initiatives like SEPs or SIFs, some of which is the subject of ongoing litigation. And of course we talked about the role of social determinants on which, again, see Leo or structural determinants on which I have written.
Apr 28 2019
32 mins
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