Cover image of Ottoman History Podcast
(107)

Rank #34 in Places & Travel category

Education
Music
Society & Culture
News
History
Politics
Places & Travel

Ottoman History Podcast

Updated 4 days ago

Rank #34 in Places & Travel category

Education
Music
Society & Culture
News
History
Politics
Places & Travel
Read more

Interviews with historians about the history of the Ottoman Empire and beyond

Read more

Interviews with historians about the history of the Ottoman Empire and beyond

iTunes Ratings

107 Ratings
Average Ratings
81
13
5
4
4

Thoughtful show / great guests

By lawnchairmaniac - May 24 2019
Read more
Thank you for a thoroughly great production!

Brilliant Podcast

By Χριστοδουλου - Jan 17 2017
Read more
Detailed and well sourced podcast yet entertaining and accessible

iTunes Ratings

107 Ratings
Average Ratings
81
13
5
4
4

Thoughtful show / great guests

By lawnchairmaniac - May 24 2019
Read more
Thank you for a thoroughly great production!

Brilliant Podcast

By Χριστοδουλου - Jan 17 2017
Read more
Detailed and well sourced podcast yet entertaining and accessible
Cover image of Ottoman History Podcast

Ottoman History Podcast

Updated 4 days ago

Rank #34 in Places & Travel category

Read more

Interviews with historians about the history of the Ottoman Empire and beyond

Rank #1: The Idea of the Muslim World

Podcast cover
Read more
Episode 313
with Cemil Aydınhosted by Chris Gratien and Abdul Latif
Download the podcast
Feed | iTunes | GooglePlay | SoundCloud

In political discourses today, the “Muslim world” is evoked in a variety of contexts, ranging from pan-Islamic visions of political unity to a set of racist generalizations that present roughly a fifth of the world’s population as a monolithic whole. But as our guest in this episode, Cemil Aydın explains in his new book The Idea of the Muslim World, the very notion of a Muslim world is recent and requires historicization. In this episode, we explore the imagining of the Muslim World as a concept, tracing its early origins in the history of colonialism and the late Ottoman Empire and considering its transformation over the past century. We also discuss alternate geopolitical imaginaries and reflect on the implications of the racialization of Muslims.
« Click for More »
May 16 2017
Play

Rank #2: Everyday Life and History in Ottoman Illustrated Journals

Podcast cover
Read more
Episode 309
with Ahmet Ersoyhosted by Susanna Ferguson
Download the podcast
Feed | iTunes | GooglePlay | SoundCloud

Photography came to the Ottoman empire almost as soon as it was invented in Europe. Over subsequent decades, however, techniques improved, cameras got cheaper and more portable, and photographic production, circulation, and collection in Ottoman lands moved outside of the rarefied circles of the elite studios and the state. In this episode, Ahmet Ersoy discusses one of the main media for this kind of vernacular photography--the illustrated journals of the late Ottoman empire. What can understanding the circulation of images in this form help us to understand about history, identity, and print culture in the late Ottoman Empire, as well as about how to study photography itself?
« Click for More »
Mar 30 2017
Play

Rank #3: Kemalism and the Making of Modern Turkey

Podcast cover
Read more
Episode 323
with Erik-Jan Zürcherhosted by Andreas Guidi and Elif Becan
Download the podcast
Feed | iTunes | GooglePlay | SoundCloud

In this collaboration with The Southeast Passage, we discuss the emergence of the Turkish nationalist movement under the leadership of Mustafa Kemal Atatürk and the establishment of a sovereign Republic of Turkey in 1923. As our guest Prof. Erik-Jan Zürcher notes, Kemalism can be studied both as a political transformation from armed struggle to a one-party state administration system and as a repertoire of discursive symbols based on the imaginary of nation, civilization, and modernity. This installment is structured along a series of lectures that Prof. Zürcher has given at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales in Paris, in which he has framed Kemalism’s activism and worldview within its contemporary international context as well as along a broader chronological axis continuing into the 1950s.
« Click for More »
Jul 06 2017
Play

Rank #4: America, Turkey, and the Middle East

Podcast cover
Read more
Episode 386
with Suzy Hansenhosted by Chris Gratien
Download the podcast
Feed | iTunes | GooglePlay | SoundCloud

Turkey is a country that most Americans know little about, and yet the United States has played an extraordinary role in the making of modern Turkey. In this podcast, we explore this disparity of awareness and the role of the US in the history of the Middle East through the lens of an American journalist's slow realization of her own subjectivity and the myriad ways in which the US and Turkey have been intertwined. In this conversation with Suzy Hansen about her award-winning book "Notes on a Foreign Country," we critically examine the formation of journalistic and scholarly expertise, and we discuss reactions of readers and reviewers to Hansen's work.
« Click for More »
Oct 15 2018
Play

Rank #5: Ottoman Armenians and the Politics of Conscription

Podcast cover
Read more
Episode 382
with Ohannes Kılıçdağıhosted by Sam Dolbee
Download the podcast
Feed | iTunes | GooglePlay | SoundCloud

The history of Ottoman Armenians in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century Ottoman Empire is inevitably in the shadow of 1915. In today’s episode, we explore new approaches to this history with Dr. Ohannes Kılıçdağı. We speak in particular about the hopes that the empire’s Armenian citizens attached to the 1908 Constitutional Revolution, which were high indeed. On the basis of research utilizing Armenian-language periodicals from across the empire, Kılıçdağı explains how the Armenian community enthusiastically embraced military conscription, and how this phenomenon connects to the theme of citizenship in the late Ottoman Empire more generally. We conclude by considering what use there is for history in the politics of the present.
« Click for More »
Oct 03 2018
Play

Rank #6: Transfer and Partition in the Middle East

Podcast cover
Read more
Episode 389
with Laura Robsonhosted by Chris Gratien
Download the podcast
Feed | iTunes | GooglePlay | SoundCloud

In the wake of the First World War, the League of Nations oversaw internationally-recognized projects of separation and transfer as the new borders of the Middle East were drawn under the influence of British and French imperial rule. In this episode, we speak to Laura Robson about her research for the book States of Separation, which studied how imperial rule under the mandate system in Iraq, Palestine, and Syria shaped communal definition and relations. In our conversation, we focus on the ways in which the states of the period sought to manage and move minority populations through a scheme to resettle Iraq's Assyrians in South America and other policies of the mandate period.  
« Click for More »
Oct 31 2018
Play

Rank #7: Hürrem Sultan or Roxelana, Empress of the East

Podcast cover
Read more
Episode 340
with Leslie Peircehosted by Suzie Ferguson and Seçil Yılmaz
Download the podcast
Feed | iTunes | GooglePlay | SoundCloud

In this episode, we explore the life and times of Roxelana, also known as Hürrem Sultan, a slave girl who became chief consort and then legal wife of Ottoman Sultan Suleiman I (r. 1520-1566). We trace Roxelana's probable beginnings and the possible paths that took her to Istanbul, asking how she rose above her peers in the Old Palace to become a favored concubine and then the wife of the Sultan. We explore her relationship to other women at the Ottoman court, the politics of her motherhood and philanthropy, and her role in Ottoman diplomacy. In the end, Roxelana's work, her relationship with Suleiman, and the unusual nuclear family they created despite the otherwise polygynous patterns of reproduction at the Ottoman court would transform the rules of Ottoman succession, the role of Ottoman royal women, and the future of the Empire as a whole. The life story of this one remarkable woman sheds light on many facets of the history of the Ottoman Empire, showing how a single individual's story can serve as a lynchpin for grasping the complexities of an age.
« Click for More »
Dec 12 2017
Play

Rank #8: The Nahda and the Translators of Damietta

Podcast cover
Read more
Episode 310
with Peter Hillhosted by Nir Shafir and Shireen Hamza
Download the podcast
Feed | iTunes | GooglePlay | SoundCloud

The “Nahda” is often seen as the beginning of the modern intellectual revival of the Arabs, when European Enlightenment ideas were adopted by Middle Eastern thinkers from the mid-nineteenth century onwards. In this podcast with Peter Hill, we discuss a circle of Syrian Christians in Damietta, Egypt who were actively translating Greek, Italian and French Enlightenment texts into Arabic in the first two decades of the nineteenth century, well before the start of the Nahda. Hill describes not only who these translators and patrons were, but also how this challenges diffusionist and connective conceptions of the intellectual history of the Middle East.
« Click for More »
Mar 31 2017
Play

Rank #9: Genetics and Nation-Building in the Middle East

Podcast cover
Read more
Episode 324
with Elise Burtonhosted by Shireen Hamza, Chris Gratien, and Maryam Patton
Download the podcast
Feed | iTunes | GooglePlay | SoundCloud

Genetics have emerged as a new scientific tool for studying human ancestry and historical migration. And as research into the history of genetics demonstrates, genetics and other bioscientific approaches to studying ancestry were also integral to the transformation of the very national and racial categories through which ancestry has come to be described over the course of the 19th and 20th centuries. In this podcast, we speak to Elise Burton about her research on the development of human genetics in the Middle East. Burton has studied the history of genetics within a comparative framework, examining the interrelated cases of human genetics research in Turkey, Israel, Iran, and elsewhere. In this episode, we focus in particular on the history of genetics in Turkey and its relationship to changing understandings of nation and race within the early Republic. In a bonus segment (see below), we also look under the hood of commercial genetic ancestry tests to understand present-day science within the context of these historical developments.
« Click for More »
Jul 15 2017
Play

Rank #10: Population and Reproduction in the Late Ottoman Empire

Podcast cover
Read more
Episode 421
with Gülhan Balsoy and Tuba Demircihosted by Suzie Ferguson
Download the podcast
Feed | iTunes | GooglePlay | SoundCloud

How did the experience of pregnancy and childbirth change in the Ottoman Empire in the context of nineteenth-century reforms? In this episode, we discuss how the question of managing a "population" become a key concern for the Ottoman state, bringing new opportunities and difficulties for Ottoman mothers and midwives alike. Questions about childbirth also became enmeshed in late-imperial demographic and cultural anxieties about the relationship between the Empire and its non-Muslim populations. As pregnancy and childbirth drew the attention of medical men, state bureaucrats, and men and women writers in the emerging periodical press, new technologies, regulations, and forms of medical knowledge changed what it meant to give birth and raise a child.
« Click for More »
Aug 07 2019
Play

Rank #11: Mexico and the Modern Sephardi Diaspora

Podcast cover
Read more
Episode 417
with Devi Mayshosted by Chris Gratien
Download the podcast
Feed | iTunes | GooglePlay | SoundCloud

After their expulsion from the Iberian peninsula during the 15th century, Jewish communities settled throughout the Mediterranean, with many finding new homes in the cities of the ascendant Ottoman Empire. Centuries later, Ottoman Jews descended from this early modern diaspora still spoke a language related to Spanish, often referred to as Ladino. During the late 19th century, a new wave of migration out of the Eastern Mediterranean began, giving rise to a modern Sephardi diaspora of migrants from modern-day Turkey, Greece, Bulgaria, and other parts of the former Ottoman world. As our guest Devi Mays explains in this interview, the Iberian heritage and language of these migrants played a distinct role in their global migration experience, as many ended up settling in countries like Mexico, Cuba, and Argentina. In this episode, we explore the history of the modern Sephardi diaspora and its relationship to the history of Mexico. In some cases, Ladino-speaking Jews from the former Ottoman Empire appeared as welcome immigrants in Mexico even when Jews from other parts of the world faced discrimination and increased immigration restriction during the 20th century. In other cases, Iberian heritage meant that Jews looking to settle in the United States could pass as Mexican or Cuban nationals when seeking to cross the border. Through the individual experiences and lives that comprise the modern Sephardi diaspora, we highlight the unique experiences of migrants mediated by gender and class, and we appreciate the strategies such people developed to navigate an increasingly anti-immigrant world.
« Click for More »
Jul 04 2019
Play

Rank #12: Survivor Objects and the Lost World of Ottoman Armenians

Podcast cover
Read more
Episode 407
with Heghnar Watenpaughhosted by Emily Neumeier
Download the podcast
Feed | iTunes | GooglePlay | SoundCloud

The genre of biography usually applies to people, but could a similar approach be applied to an object? Can a thing have a life of its own? In this episode, Heghnar Watenpaugh explores this question by tracing the long journey of the Zeytun Gospels, a famous illuminated manuscript considered to be a masterpiece of medieval Armenian art. Protected for centuries in a remote church in eastern Anatolia, the sacred book traveled with the waves of people displaced by the Armenian genocide. Passed from hand to hand, caught in the chaos of the First World War, it was divided in two. Decades later, the manuscript found its way to the Republic of Armenia, while its missing eight pages came to the Getty Museum in LA. In this interview, we discuss how the Zeytun Gospels could be understood as a "survivor object," contributing to current discussions about the destruction of cultural heritage. We also talk about the challenges of writing history for a broader reading public.
« Click for More »
Mar 25 2019
Play

Rank #13: Histories of Childhood and Youth in the Middle East

Podcast cover
Read more
Episode 402
with Dylan Baun, Heidi Morrison, and Murat Yildizhosted by Suzie Ferguson
Download the podcast
Feed | iTunes | GooglePlay | SoundCloud

Does everybody have a childhood? What kinds of childhood experiences have defined the modern Middle East? In this episode, three scholars discuss the methodological excitements and challenges of studying the history of childhood and youth in the modern Middle East. They discuss the roles of institutions like the army, the medical mission, and the school; the rise of state and colonial power; and the emergence of youth politics, all with an eye to history's younger actors and witnesses. Throughout, they consider how using age as a category of analysis might change the ways we understand the past and the ways we live in the present.
« Click for More »
Feb 19 2019
Play

Rank #14: Deporting Ottoman Americans

Podcast cover
Read more
Episode 370
narrated by Chris GratienChief Consultant: Emily Pope-ObedaScript Editor: Sam Dolbeewith additional contributions by Torrie Hester and Devin Naar
Download the podcast
Feed | iTunes | GooglePlay | SoundCloud

Most Americans descend from people born elsewhere. But what if instead of simply a nation of immigrants, we see our society as a eugenicist project forged by immigration quotas and selective deportation policies? This proposal may fly in the face of the civic nationalism many hold dear. Generations of politicians have repeated the mantra that anyone can be an American and that our identity is defined not by race or blood but by the embrace of laws and ideals. Yet many historians have dedicated their lives to studying the pivotal role of exclusion in making American identity through the histories of those who were deprived of the American dream because of race, color, and creed. In this introductory episode, we talk to scholars who have written about the emergence of deportation as a method of population control and punishment wielded by the US government on a mass scale since the 1920s. Then, we set the stage for the rest of our series by considering how people from the former Ottoman Empire were part of both the making and unmaking of America as a nation of immigrants.
« Click for More »
Aug 09 2018
Play

Rank #15: The Great War and the Remaking of Palestine

Podcast cover
Read more
Episode 367
with Salim Tamarihosted by Sam Dolbee
Download the podcast
Feed | iTunes | GooglePlay | SoundCloud

Nationalism has greatly influenced the way we think about Palestinian history. In this episode, Salim Tamari discusses this question in relation to his new book, The Great War and the Remaking of Palestine, which explores Palestine under Ottoman rule during World War I. Tamari highlights the transformative nature of the conflict in Palestine, and the Ottomanist roots of many Palestinian and Arab nationalists. He also tackles the question of sources in Palestine, and how family papers have been crucial to his work. We conclude by discussing the stakes of recovering that past as the dispossession of Palestinians continues into the present.
« Click for More »
Jul 17 2018
Play

Rank #16: Exploring the Early Modern Ottoman World

Podcast cover
Read more
Episode 361
with Max Bechtold, Haley Holmes, Matthew Nolan, Megan Rowlands, Tanya Skyba-Bartholomew, and Amber Volz
Download the podcast
Feed | iTunes | GooglePlay | SoundCloud

In our final episode of Season 7, we feature four student contributions on life in the early modern Ottoman world. These student podcasts come from two university courses in which the podcast medium was integral as both course material and assignment: "Cities of the Sultans: Life in the Early Modern Ottoman Empire" (Michael Talbot, University of Greenwich) and "Podcasting the Ottomans" (Dana Sajdi, Boston College). Through these student podcasts, we explore how art and aesthetics figured into Ottoman engagements with their neighbors, and we go beyond the palace walls to explore facets of urban life in Ottoman cities.
« Click for More »
Apr 30 2018
Play

Rank #17: Turkino

Podcast cover
Read more
Episode 411
Produced and Narrated by Chris Gratien
Episode Consultant: Devin Naar
Series Consultant: Emily Pope-ObedaScript Editor: Sam Dolbee
with additional contributions by Devi Mays, Claudrena Harold, Victoria Saker Woeste, Sam Negri, and Louis Negri
Download the podcast
Feed | iTunes | GooglePlay | SoundCloud

Leo lived in New York City with his family. Born and educated in the cosmopolitan Ottoman capital of Istanbul, he was now part of the vibrant and richly-textured social fabric of America's largest metropolis as one one of the tens of thousands of Sephardic Jews who migrated to the US. Though he spoke four languages, Leo held jobs such as garbage collector and shoeshine during the Great Depression. Sometimes he couldn't find any work at all. But his woes were compounded when immigration authorities discovered he had entered the US using fraudulent documents. Yet Leo was not alone; his story was the story of many Jewish migrants throughout the world during the interwar era who saw the gates closing before them at every turn. Through Leo and his brush with deportation, we examine the history of the US as would-be refuge for Jews facing persecution elsewhere, highlight the indelible link between anti-immigrant policy and illicit migration, and explore transformations in the history of race in New York City through the history of Leo and his family.

This episode is part of our investigative series Deporting Ottoman Americans.

« Click for More »
May 02 2019
Play

Rank #18: Politics of the Family in the New Turkey

Podcast cover
Read more
Episode 358
with Hikmet Kocamanerhosted by Chris Gratien
Download the podcast
Feed | iTunes | GooglePlay | SoundCloud

Discourses surrounding the family and morality have played an important role in modern political debates. In this episode, we discuss the politics of family in Turkey and its relationship to both religion and government policy. Our guest Hikmet Kocamaner discusses how the Turkish Directorate of Religious Affairs--the Diyanet--oversees a range of activities concerning the family as part of the project of a "New Turkey" championed by the ruling Justice and Development Party (AKP). In particular, we discuss family-oriented television programming related to Diyanet. While distinctively Islamic in their rhetoric, these programs in fact serve as a fascinating meeting point for various expert approaches to social issues and the family, demonstrating the complex entanglement of Islamic and secular institutions in modern Turkey.
« Click for More »
Apr 17 2018
Play

Rank #19: Slavery and Servitude in the Ottoman Mediterranean

Podcast cover
Read more
Episode 362
with M’hamed Oualdi & Hayri Gökşin Özkorayhosted by Andreas Guidi
Download the podcast
Feed | iTunes | GooglePlay | SoundCloud

Our latest podcast in collaboration with The Southeast Passage examines how slavery flourished in the Ottoman Mediterranean in the wake of growing connectivity with other world regions and territorial expansion. The discussion draws out the ambiguity between slavery and servitude in the case of the Mamluks of the Tunisian Beylik during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Which economic processes, legal interpretations, and geographic routes impacted the evolution of the slave trade from the sixteenth century until its abolition? What are the possibilities for and problems in retracing the self-narratives of those directly involved in the slave trade?
« Click for More »
May 15 2018
Play

Rank #20: Spies of the Sultan

Podcast cover
Read more
Episode 334
with Emrah Safa Gürkanhosted by Chris Gratien
Download the podcast
Feed | iTunes | GooglePlay | SoundCloud

Along with new maritime networks, information stiched together the empires of the early modern period. One component of the growing networks of information in the increasingly connected space of the Mediterranean world was espionage. As we learn in our latest conversation with Emrah Safa Gürkan about his new book Sultanın Casusları (Spies of the Sultan), the Ottoman Empire was both party and subject to the fascinating exploits of early modern spies. In this episode, we learn about the lives of Ottoman spies profiled in Gürkan's book, and we consider how the transformation of espionage in the Mediterranean relates to the development of early modern empires.
« Click for More »
Sep 25 2017
Play

Similar Podcasts