Cover image of NHMLA Talks | Natural History Museum of Los Angeles
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Society & Culture
Science
Natural Sciences

NHMLA Talks | Natural History Museum of Los Angeles

Updated 3 days ago

Society & Culture
Science
Natural Sciences
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Expand your world with talks about science, history, and culture held across the Natural History Family of Museums: the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, the La Brea Tar Pits Museum, and the William S. Hart Park and Museum.

Read more

Expand your world with talks about science, history, and culture held across the Natural History Family of Museums: the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, the La Brea Tar Pits Museum, and the William S. Hart Park and Museum.

iTunes Ratings

8 Ratings
Average Ratings
6
1
1
0
0

Great interesting discussions

By allurose - Jul 15 2017
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Love it

Listen to it

By JennWold - Jul 23 2015
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This is a very engaging podcast. It is intelligent but not too precious about itself.

iTunes Ratings

8 Ratings
Average Ratings
6
1
1
0
0

Great interesting discussions

By allurose - Jul 15 2017
Read more
Love it

Listen to it

By JennWold - Jul 23 2015
Read more
This is a very engaging podcast. It is intelligent but not too precious about itself.

The Best Episodes of:

Cover image of NHMLA Talks | Natural History Museum of Los Angeles

NHMLA Talks | Natural History Museum of Los Angeles

Updated 3 days ago

Read more

Expand your world with talks about science, history, and culture held across the Natural History Family of Museums: the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, the La Brea Tar Pits Museum, and the William S. Hart Park and Museum.

Rank #1: Life on the Move: Science and Implications of Migration

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All plants and animals, including humans, move during their lifetimes, but some take truly harrowing or magnificent journeys to new lands and habitats. This fall the La Brea Tar Pits and Museum will join UCLA Institute of the Environment and Sustainability to produce a three-night conversation between the people of Los Angeles and the leading experts on migration. For many species, migration is a question of when, not if. Sometimes it is the result of fresh opportunities in unfamiliar terrain. Other times it is driven by external forces, natural and unnatural. Tonight’s conversation will get to the root causes of migration – From floods and fires to developing societies.

Oct 05 2018

1hr 9mins

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Rank #2: Book Launch - This Is (Not) L.A.

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NHM celebrated the launch of This Is (Not) L.A.: An Insider’s Guide to the Real Los Angeles: Debunking the Clichés, Crushing the Haters, and Generally Making You Wish You Lived Here (or Happier That You Already Do) by Jen Bilik. This evening Jen Bilik hosted a rollicking discussion of why we love L.A. with a panel of Los Angeles luminaries, touching on the research and stories behind the book, followed by a Q&A.

Sep 21 2018

1hr 12mins

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Rank #3: Four Wheels, Two Wheels, No Wheels

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L.A.’s first car hit the street 120 years ago, and through the smog and spaghetti-bowl freeways, L.A. is renowned for its car culture (and traffic). But we're starting to shift gears around here. We flirt with electric cars, pile into ride shares, trick out our bicycles, and hop aboard the Expo Line. In a city built for internal combustion, are we changing the rules of the road?

Jun 02 2018

58mins

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Rank #4: Tall or Sprawl? Remaking L.A. — of, by, and for the People

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It's the City of Angels, but what kind of city is it? It's a place that, in just a handful of generations, grew from adobes and dirt roads to an architectural crazy-quilt built not on a human scale but on the scale of the Model T and the Humvee. In its third century, L.A. tries to reverse-engineer itself to become livable, walkable, and accessible. Can it be done? What would that L.A. be like, to work in and live in?

May 05 2018

1hr 1min

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Rank #5: The Feather Thief

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Author Kirk Wallace Johnson in conversation with NHMLA President Dr. Lori Bettison-Varga about The Feather Thief – A rollicking true-crime adventure about a young American that stole hundreds of rare bird specimens from the British Natural History Museum in Tring. His book is a thought-provoking exploration on the debt we owe institutions that house precious collections and the human drive to possess natural beauty.

Apr 25 2018

59mins

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Rank #6: Women’s Ink: A Discussion by and about Women Tattooists

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Two celebrated artists and a historian discuss the challenges women have faced in breaking into a traditionally male profession, and the ways women’s ink has revolutionized tattoo art.

Apr 13 2018

1hr 11mins

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Rank #7: Returning to Grandmother’s Beauty: Indigenous Women’s Journey of Tattoo

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The Clime in California has been enriched by the emboldened indigenous women and their journey returning to facial tattoos of their grandmothers. These women face American society in stride with their faces and bodies enhanced with traditional tattoos rooted in the dreamtime traditions of their ancestors. They expose their struggles and challenges faced in achieving their walk in contemporary society as full native women.

Mar 30 2018

1hr 23mins

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Rank #8: Imagined Futures For a Hotter Planet

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Artists, writers and media organizations are playing vital roles in conveying the science and ethics of global warming. This conversation will explore how experiments in environmental storytelling and media imagine possible futures for different communities and ecosystems in the context of planetary climate change. With poet-scholar Rita Wong; Media artist and NYU professor Marina Zurkow; KCET Chief Creative Officer, Juan Devis; and Whittier College associate professor and Nadine Austin Wood Chair in American History, Natale Zappia, with moderator Allison Carruth, UCLA professor and director of LENS.

Nov 17 2017

1hr 7mins

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Rank #9: A Tale of Two Cities in a Hotter World: Los Angeles & Beijing

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It is tough to feel urgency when climate change seems like something happening to future generations, in faraway lands. The reality is, it is and will affect all of us, in every city on the planet. And it’s not all bad, by the way—some cities and people could benefit from global warming. To make climate change personal, local, and real, let’s talk about how it will affect two of the greatest cities in the world, Los Angeles and Beijing. We’ll compare notes on each city’s infrastructure and governance, actual on-the-ground impacts, and how residents might react. With UCLA Professor of Atmospheric & Ocean Sciences and Director, IoES Center for Climate Science, Alex Hall; UCLA Evolutionary Biologist Ecologist and Conservation Biologist, Brad Shaffer; and the founding Director of Natural Resources Defense Council’s China Environmental program, Alex Wang with moderator Stephanie Wear, Senior Scientist and Strategy Advisor at The Nature Conservancy.

Nov 03 2017

1hr 15mins

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Rank #10: Velociraptor Is the Thing With Feathers

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Dr. Michael Habib, Assistant Professor in the Keck School of Medicine of USC and a Research Associate in the Dinosaur Institute at NHM, and Dr. Nathan Smith, Associate Curator in the Dinosaur Institute, dig into a conversation about film and dinosaurs.

May 07 2016

52mins

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Rank #11: Mathemagics

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Using daring displays of algorithmic trickery, lightning calculator and number wizard Arthur Benjamin, mesmerizes audiences with mathematical mystery and beauty. A mathematician who is known throughout the world as the “mathemagician,” Benjamin mixes mathematics and magic to make the subject fun and easy to understand.

Jun 06 2015

27mins

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Rank #12: The Disappearing Spoon

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Why did Gandhi hate iodine? Why did the Japanese kill Godzilla with missiles made of cadmium? How did radium nearly ruin Marie Curie's reputation? And why did tellurium lead to the most bizarre gold rush in history? The Periodic Table is one of our crowning scientific achievements, but it's also a treasure trove of passion, adventure, betrayal, and obsession. The Disappearing Spoon delves into every single element on the table and explains each one's role in science, money, mythology, war, the arts, medicine, alchemy, and other areas of human history, from the Big Bang through the end of time.

Apr 06 2013

47mins

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Rank #13: Bonk: The Curious Coupling of Science and Sex

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From the Masters and Johnson artificial-coition machine to Dutch gymnasts coupling in MRI mchines, the study of human sexual physiology is the most vital, surreal, awkward, and oddly overlooked branch of modern science. Roach salutes the bravery of early pioneers and takes us through the highlights (and a few low points) of the past hundred years.

Feb 02 2013

43mins

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Rank #14: The Believing Brain: From Ghosts and Gods To Politics and Conspiracies - How We Construct Beliefs and Reinforce Them As Truths

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Synthesizing thirty years of research, Michael Shermer upends traditional thinking about how humans form beliefs about the world. Simply put, beliefs come first, and explanations for beliefs follow. The brain, Shermer argues, is a belief engine. Using sensory data that flow in through the senses, the brain naturally looks for and finds patterns - and then infuses those patterns with meaning, forming beliefs.

Jan 07 2012

56mins

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Rank #15: Now Introducing: The Massive Black Hole at the Center of our Galaxy

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More than a quarter century ago, it was suggested that galaxies such as our own Milky Way may harbor massive, though possibly dormant, central black holes. Definitive proof, for or against, the existence of a massive central black hole lies in the assessment of the distribution of matter in the center of the Galaxy. The motion of the stars in the vicinity of a black hole offers a way to determine this distribution. Based on 10 years of high resolution imaging, Dr. Ghez's team has moved the case for a supermassive black hole at the Galactic Center from a possibility to a certainty.

Jun 05 2010

40mins

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Rank #16: Living in the Plate Boundary: Our Torn, Twisted (and Shaky) Landscapes

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With photos, maps, and computer animations, Atwater will describe the peculiar patterns of Southern California's mountains, valleys, and coastlines. Then she'll show how these were formed-one earthquake at a time-by the grinding between the huge North American and Pacific plates.

Apr 03 2010

49mins

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Rank #17: Darwin's Other Great Theory: Sexual Selection, or Why Men are from Mars and Women are from Venus?

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Darwin's is best known for his theory of natural selection which explains how organisms evolve adaptations for survival. His second theory, sexual selection, attempts to describe why males and females of the same species can differ so markedly, and why the sexes can have traits that decrease their ability to survive. Dr. Michael Ryan, Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute and zoology professor at the University of Texas, Austin, reviews our understanding of sexual behavior in animals, including humans.

Apr 04 2009

1hr 9mins

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Rank #18: Finding Your Inner Fish

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Why do we look the way we do? The answers to this question come from seemingly strange places: from the bodies, fossils and DNA of everything from microbes to worms and fish. Dr. Neil H. Shubin is a paleontologist and Associate Dean of Organismal and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Chicago. He'll guide guests through the discovery of a key link between fish and amphibians, and how this ancient event informs the basic structure of the human body.

Mar 07 2009

59mins

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Rank #19: H2-Uh-Oh

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About 15 million years ago, Los Angeles was at the bottom of the ocean. Climate change means land that’s been high and dry for millennia is getting inundated by water again. What do terms like “500-year flood” mean when we have one every ten years? And what can engineering do to make Southern California’s new floodplains survivable?

May 04 2019

55mins

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Rank #20: Higher and Drier

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The amount of water on Earth hasn’t changed appreciably since Caesar and Cleopatra took a little cruise on the Nile. But the hydrologic cycle has changed where that water goes – and we are heading up a very dry creek. California has always teetered on the edge of drought, but hereafter, how we eat, drink, and even survive depends more than ever on the ingenuity of science and human willingness to suck it up by not sucking down so much water.

Apr 06 2019

57mins

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