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Grand Rounds Nation

Updated 3 days ago

Health & Fitness
Medicine
Science
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Grand Rounds, a staple of American medical education for more than 100 years, spans every field of clinical practice. It is a master class on the art and science of medicine, delivered by renowned clinicians in academic settings nationwide. Yet in today's practice, where time is an all-too precious commodity, regular attendance at Grand Rounds sessions has become increasingly difficult. In response to this challenge, ReachMD brings the lecture hall to you, with these outstanding talks from top academic centers across the country.

Read more

Grand Rounds, a staple of American medical education for more than 100 years, spans every field of clinical practice. It is a master class on the art and science of medicine, delivered by renowned clinicians in academic settings nationwide. Yet in today's practice, where time is an all-too precious commodity, regular attendance at Grand Rounds sessions has become increasingly difficult. In response to this challenge, ReachMD brings the lecture hall to you, with these outstanding talks from top academic centers across the country.

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Cover image of Grand Rounds Nation

Grand Rounds Nation

Updated 3 days ago

Read more

Grand Rounds, a staple of American medical education for more than 100 years, spans every field of clinical practice. It is a master class on the art and science of medicine, delivered by renowned clinicians in academic settings nationwide. Yet in today's practice, where time is an all-too precious commodity, regular attendance at Grand Rounds sessions has become increasingly difficult. In response to this challenge, ReachMD brings the lecture hall to you, with these outstanding talks from top academic centers across the country.

Rank #1: CDC - Prescription Drug Overdoses: An American Epidemic, Part 3

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Host: Matt Birnholz, MD

The United States is in the grip of an epidemic of prescription drug overdoses. Over 27,000 people died from overdoses in 2007, a number that has risen five-fold since 1990 and has never been higher. Prescription drugs are now involved in more overdose deaths than heroin and cocaine combined.

For health professionals, policymakers and legislators, addressing this problem is complicated. While they push for education, prevention, and enforcement to reverse this epidemic, they must also ensure that patients with a legitimate need for these medications still have access to them. This important session of the CDC's Public Health Grand Rounds addressed these challenges and explored the innovative state and federal policies and interventions that are showing promise in reducing injury and death from this epidemic.

This is Part 3 of a 45-minute lecture in three parts.

Part 1 >>

Part 2 >>

To view the complete video recording of this and other CDC Public Health Grand Rounds sessions, visit http://www.cdc.gov/about/grand-rounds/.

And for those interested in receiving continuing education credits for the live broadcasts of Public Health Grand Rounds, register at http://www2a.cdc.gov/TCEOnline.


CDC's participation in the activity is not meant to serve as ...

Feb 24 2011

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Rank #2: CDC - TB & HIV: A Deadly Duo, Part 1

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Host: Matt Birnholz, MD

The CDC commemorates Dr. Robert Koch's 1882 discovery of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacteria that causes TB. Over the past 129 years, history has witnessed many advances over in TB control. Through the intervention efforts of CDC, USAID, WHO's Stop TB Partnership, and many others, TB death rates have fallen by 35% since 1990, and as many as 6 million lives have been saved since 1995.

In spite of these successes, TB still remains a serious threat, especially for those infected with HIV. HIV is the single most powerful risk factor for TB disease and one of the leading causes of death among people infected with HIV. Among the 1.7 million lives that TB claimed in 2009, 380,000 were among people with HIV infection. While people with HIV who have TB can be effectively diagnosed and treated, more effort is needed to diagnose and treat TB promptly and effectively, and to scale-up preventive treatment for TB.

This special session of Public Health Grand Rounds shed light on myths and misconceptions about TB and HIV, and discussed actions needed in preventing deaths from this lethal combination.

This is Part 1 of a lecture in three parts.

Part 2 >>

Part ...

Apr 06 2011

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Rank #3: University of Arizona - Approaches in Congestive Heart Failure, Part 1

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Host: Matt Birnholz, MD

Presenting this session of Grand Rounds is Dr. Mark J. Friedman, clinical professor of medicine and director of the Heart Failure Program at the University of Arizona.

This is Part 1 of a lecture in three parts.

Part 2 >>

Part 3 >>

To view the complete video recording of this and other Grand Rounds sessions from the University of Arizona College of Medicine, visit their website.

May 16 2011

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Rank #4: University of Arizona - Respiratory Management of Children with Neuromuscular Diseases, Part 2

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Host: Matt Birnholz, MD

Recognizing the respiratory manifestations of neuromuscular disease in children is a critical first step toward protecting their survival and improving their quality of life. In this session of Grand Rounds from the University of Arizona College of Medicine, participants learn about the art of assessing respiratory problems in these children, and the treatment options available for optimizing long-term management.

Presenting this session of Grand Rounds is Dr. Cori Daines, pediatric pulmonologist and associate professor of pediatrics at the University of Arizona College of Medicine. Dr. Daines is director of the pediatric bronchoscopy program, and co-director of the Tuscon Cystic Fibrosis Center.

This is Part 2 of a lecture in three parts.

Part 1 >>

Part 3 >>

To view the complete video recording of this and other Grand Rounds sessions from the University of Arizona College of Medicine, visit their website.

Mar 21 2011

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Rank #5: University of Arizona - Approaches in Congestive Heart Failure, Part 2

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Host: Matt Birnholz, MD


Presenting this session of Grand Rounds is Dr. Mark J. Friedman, clinical professor of medicine and director of the Heart Failure Program at the University of Arizona.

This is Part 2 of a lecture in three parts.

Part 1 >>

Part 3 >>

To view the complete video recording of this and other Grand Rounds sessions from the University of Arizona College of Medicine, visit their website.

May 16 2011

Play

Rank #6: CDC - Sodium Reduction: Time for Choice, Part 3

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Host: Matt Birnholz, MD

The vast majority of US adults consume more than double the recommended maximum of sodium, which is a direct cause of hypertension, a condition that affects nearly 1 in 3 Americans. Hypertension is not only a major contributor to cardiovascular disease (CVD), disability, and health disparities, but the treatment of related CVDs can cost our already overburdened health system $273 billion annually.

Sadly, the public does not always have a choice when it comes to reducing sodium intake: we cannot remedy this problem simply by removing the salt shaker from our tables. Of the 3,400 mg of sodium the average American consumes daily, nearly 80% is invisible in sources such as restaurant and processed foods. And once the salt is in the food, it cannot be taken out!

This session of Public Health Grand Rounds explored the consequences of excessive sodium intake and discussed the technological context for the use of salt in our food supply. The speakers reviewed current sodium control efforts, such as the National Salt Reduction Initiative and food procurement policies, and separated fact from fiction to support actions needed to address this very real public health burden.

This is Part 3 of a lecture in three ...

May 04 2011

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Rank #7: CDC - Creating a Healthier Future through Prevention of Child Maltreatment, Part 2

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Host: Matt Birnholz, MD

Beyond the inherent moral implications, child abuse is a crime, a tragedy, and a significant public health burden. In the United States, approximately 1 in 5 children have experienced some form of maltreatment, including physical and sexual abuse and the often overlooked danger of neglect. Child maltreatment results in over 1,700 deaths each year; however, the negative health effects reach well beyond these fatalities. In addition to physical injuries, maltreatment causes stress that can disrupt brain development. Thus, children who are maltreated are at higher risk for adult health problems such as alcoholism, smoking, depression, drug abuse, obesity, high-risk sexual behaviors, suicide, and certain chronic diseases.

This session of Public Health Grand Rounds from the CDC focused on the epidemiology and costs of child maltreatment, the need for partnerships, and the potential for policy interventions to combat this urgent public health issue.

This is Part 2 of a lecture in three parts.

Part 1 >>

Part 3 >>

To view the complete video recording of this and other CDC Public Health Grand Rounds sessions, visit http://www.cdc.gov/about/grand-rounds/

And for those interested in receiving continuing education credits for the live broadcasts of Public Health Grand Rounds, register at http://www2a.cdc.gov/TCEOnline

CDC's ...

Jun 21 2011

Play

Rank #8: CDC - Sodium Reduction: Time for Choice, Part 1

Podcast cover
Read more
Host: Matt Birnholz, MD

The vast majority of US adults consume more than double the recommended maximum of sodium, which is a direct cause of hypertension, a condition that affects nearly 1 in 3 Americans. Hypertension is not only a major contributor to cardiovascular disease (CVD), disability, and health disparities, but the treatment of related CVDs can cost our already overburdened health system $273 billion annually.

Sadly, the public does not always have a choice when it comes to reducing sodium intake: we cannot remedy this problem simply by removing the salt shaker from our tables. Of the 3,400 mg of sodium the average American consumes daily, nearly 80% is invisible in sources such as restaurant and processed foods. And once the salt is in the food, it cannot be taken out!

This session of Public Health Grand Rounds from the CDC explored the consequences of excessive sodium intake and discussed the technological context for the use of salt in our food supply. The speakers reviewed current sodium control efforts, such as the National Salt Reduction Initiative and food procurement policies, and separated fact from fiction to support actions needed to address this very real public health burden.

This is Part 1 of a ...

May 04 2011

Play

Rank #9: Alternative Approaches to the Treatment of Depression, Part 2

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Host: Matt Birnholz, MD

This session of Grand Rounds Nation is provided by the American College of Osteopathic Family Physicians (ACOFP), and features Dr. Richard Cottrell speaking on both first line and alternative approaches to the treatment of depression. Comparisons of antidepressive medications, counseling therapy models, and lifestyle modifications are explored. Additionally, novel treatment strategies in current use or on the horizon such as bright light therapy, transcranial magnetic stimulation, electroconvulsive therapy, and deep brain stimulation are investigated.

This is Part 2 of a lecture in two parts.

Part 1 >>

Oct 26 2012

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Rank #10: CDC - Lyme Disease: Challenges and Innovations, Part 1

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Host: Matt Birnholz, MD

Lyme disease is one of the most rapidly emerging infectious diseases in North America and Europe. In 2009, nearly 30,000 confirmed and more than 8,500 probable cases of Lyme disease were reported to the CDC in the United States alone. Named after a small Connecticut town, Lyme disease is transmitted to humans by the bite of ticks infected with the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi. This multi-system infection typically occurs in stages with different clinical manifestations at each stage. While it can be treated effectively with antibiotics, in some cases recovery may be incomplete - although there is no evidence that any of these post-Lyme disease syndromes respond to further courses of antibiotic therapy.

Dr. Allen Steere, the renowned discoverer of Lyme disease, joins an esteemed panel of speakers for CDC's Public Health Grand Rounds to explore the clinical manifestations and treatment of Lyme disease, innovations in laboratory testing, prevention strategies, and national trends of disease emergence. The session gives a rare glimpse into the front lines of those battling and treating Lyme disease while addressing the data gaps, unmet needs, and overall challenges and opportunities for its prevention and control.

This is Part 1 of a lecture in three parts.

Jun 01 2011

Play

Rank #11: CDC - Sodium Reduction: Time for Choice, Part 2

Podcast cover
Read more
Host: Matt Birnholz, MD

The vast majority of US adults consume more than double the recommended maximum of sodium, which is a direct cause of hypertension, a condition that affects nearly 1 in 3 Americans. Hypertension is not only a major contributor to cardiovascular disease (CVD), disability, and health disparities, but the treatment of related CVDs can cost our already overburdened health system $273 billion annually.

Sadly, the public does not always have a choice when it comes to reducing sodium intake: we cannot remedy this problem simply by removing the salt shaker from our tables. Of the 3,400 mg of sodium the average American consumes daily, nearly 80% is invisible in sources such as restaurant and processed foods. And once the salt is in the food, it cannot be taken out!

This session of Public Health Grand Rounds explored the consequences of excessive sodium intake and discussed the technological context for the use of salt in our food supply. The speakers reviewed current sodium control efforts, such as the National Salt Reduction Initiative and food procurement policies, and separated fact from fiction to support actions needed to address this very real public health burden.

This is Part 2 of a lecture in three ...

May 04 2011

Play

Rank #12: University of Arizona - Preclinical Stage Alzheimer's Disease: Characterizing and Defining the Transition Between Normal and Pathological Cognitive Aging, Part 3

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Host: Matt Birnholz, MD

For people who carry genetic predispositions toward Alzheimer's Disease, little is currently known about predicting the onset, course, and severity of disease at the individual level. However, because cogntitive degenerative diseases most often follow a gradual course of symptom progression later in life, medical professionals must be aware of the distinct, discoverable changes that occur at the "preclinical" stage, i.e prior to the symptomatic onset of memory loss.

In this session of Grand Rounds from the University of Arizona College of Medicine, participants learn about Alzheimer's Disease from an unique perspective of the preclinical stage. From classical signs on physicial exam to emerging biomolecular lab tests and novel imaging modalities, the pathophysiologic changes underlying Alzheimer's Disease are explored in depth.

Presenting this session of Grand Rounds is Dr. Richard Caselli, behavioral neurologist and professor of neurology at the Mayo Clnic in Scottsdale, Arizona.

This is Part 3 of a lecture in three parts.

Part 1 >>

Part 2 >>

To view the complete video recording of this and other Grand Rounds sessions from the University of Arizona College of Medicine, visit their website.

Apr 19 2011

Play

Rank #13: CDC - Lyme Disease: Challenges and Innovations, Part 3

Podcast cover
Read more
Host: Matt Birnholz, MD

Lyme disease is one of the most rapidly emerging infectious diseases in North America and Europe. In 2009, nearly 30,000 confirmed and more than 8,500 probable cases of Lyme disease were reported to the CDC in the United States alone. Named after a small Connecticut town, Lyme disease is transmitted to humans by the bite of ticks infected with the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi. This multi-system infection typically occurs in stages with different clinical manifestations at each stage. While it can be treated effectively with antibiotics, in some cases recovery may be incomplete - although there is no evidence that any of these post-Lyme disease syndromes respond to further courses of antibiotic therapy.

Dr. Allen Steere, the renowned discoverer of Lyme disease, joins an esteemed panel of speakers for CDC's Public Health Grand Rounds to explore the clinical manifestations and treatment of Lyme disease, innovations in laboratory testing, prevention strategies, and national trends of disease emergence. The session gives a rare glimpse into the front lines of those battling and treating Lyme disease while addressing the data gaps, unmet needs, and overall challenges and opportunities for its prevention and control.

This is Part 3 of a lecture in three parts.

Jun 01 2011

Play

Rank #14: University of Arizona - Global Pediatrics: Treatment of Scorpion Envenomation, Part 1

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Host: Matt Birnholz, MD

Presenting this session of Grand Rounds is Dr. Leslie Boyer, founding director of the VIPER Institute in the College of Medicine at the University of Arizona.

This is Part 1 of a lecture in three parts.

Part 2 >>

Part 3 >>

To view the complete video recording of this and other Grand Rounds sessions from the University of Arizona College of Medicine, visit their website.

Jun 16 2011

Play

Rank #15: University of Arizona - Respiratory Management of Children with Neuromuscular Diseases, Part 3

Podcast cover
Read more
Host: Matt Birnholz, MD

Recognizing the respiratory manifestations of neuromuscular disease in children is a critical first step toward protecting their survival and improving their quality of life. In this session of Grand Rounds from the University of Arizona College of Medicine, participants learn about the art of assessing respiratory problems in these children, and the treatment options available for optimizing long-term management.

Presenting this session of Grand Rounds is Dr. Cori Daines, pediatric pulmonologist and associate professor of pediatrics at the University of Arizona College of Medicine. Dr. Daines is director of the pediatric bronchoscopy program, and co-director of the Tuscon Cystic Fibrosis Center.

This is Part 3 of a lecture in three parts.

Part 1 >>

Part 2 >>

To view the complete video recording of this and other Grand Rounds sessions from the University of Arizona College of Medicine, visit their website.

Mar 21 2011

Play

Rank #16: University of Arizona - Approaches in Congestive Heart Failure, Part 3

Podcast cover
Read more
Host: Matt Birnholz, MD

Presenting this session of Grand Rounds is Dr. Mark J. Friedman, clinical professor of medicine and director of the Heart Failure Program at the University of Arizona.

This is Part 3 of a lecture in three parts.

Part 1 >>

Part 2 >>

To view the complete video recording of this and other Grand Rounds sessions from the University of Arizona College of Medicine, visit their website.

May 16 2011

Play

Rank #17: CDC - TB & HIV: A Deadly Duo, Part 3

Podcast cover
Read more
Host: Matt Birnholz, MD

The CDC commemorates Dr. Robert Koch's 1882 discovery of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacteria that causes TB. Over the past 129 years, history has witnessed many advances over in TB control. Through the intervention efforts of CDC, USAID, WHO's Stop TB Partnership, and many others, TB death rates have fallen by 35% since 1990, and as many as 6 million lives have been saved since 1995.

In spite of these successes, TB still remains a serious threat, especially for those infected with HIV. HIV is the single most powerful risk factor for TB disease and one of the leading causes of death among people infected with HIV. Among the 1.7 million lives that TB claimed in 2009, 380,000 were among people with HIV infection. While people with HIV who have TB can be effectively diagnosed and treated, more effort is needed to diagnose and treat TB promptly and effectively, and to scale-up preventive treatment for TB.

This special session of Public Health Grand Rounds shed light on myths and misconceptions about TB and HIV, and discussed actions needed in preventing deaths from this lethal combination.

This is Part 3 of a lecture in three parts.

Part 1 >>

Part ...

Apr 06 2011

Play

Rank #18: University of Arizona - Preclinical Stage Alzheimer's Disease: Characterizing and Defining the Transition Between Normal and Pathological Cognitive Aging, Part 2

Podcast cover
Read more
Host: Matt Birnholz, MD

For people who carry genetic predispositions toward Alzheimer's Disease, little is currently known about predicting the onset, course, and severity of disease at the individual level. However, because cogntitive degenerative diseases most often follow a gradual course of symptom progression later in life, medical professionals must be aware of the distinct, discoverable changes that occur at the "preclinical" stage, i.e prior to the symptomatic onset of memory loss.

In this session of Grand Rounds from the University of Arizona College of Medicine, participants learn about Alzheimer's Disease from an unique perspective of the preclinical stage. From classical signs on physicial exam to emerging biomolecular lab tests and novel imaging modalities, the pathophysiologic changes underlying Alzheimer's Disease are explored in depth.

Presenting this session of Grand Rounds is Dr. Richard Caselli, behavioral neurologist and professor of neurology at the Mayo Clnic in Scottsdale, Arizona.

This is Part 2 of a lecture in three parts.

Part 1 >>

Part 3 >>

To view the complete video recording of this and other Grand Rounds sessions from the University of Arizona College of Medicine, visit their website.

Apr 19 2011

Play

Rank #19: CDC - TB & HIV: A Deadly Duo, Part 2

Podcast cover
Read more
Host: Matt Birnholz, MD

The CDC commemorates Dr. Robert Koch's 1882 discovery of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacteria that causes TB. Over the past 129 years, history has witnessed many advances over in TB control. Through the intervention efforts of CDC, USAID, WHO's Stop TB Partnership, and many others, TB death rates have fallen by 35% since 1990, and as many as 6 million lives have been saved since 1995.

But in spite of these successes, TB still remains a serious threat, especially for those infected with HIV— the single most powerful risk factor for TB disease and one of the leading causes of death among people infected with HIV. Among the 1.7 million lives that TB claimed in 2009, 380,000 were among people with HIV infection. While people with HIV who have TB can be effectively diagnosed and treated, more effort is needed to diagnose and treat TB promptly and effectively, and to scale-up preventive treatment for TB.

This special session of Public Health Grand Rounds sheds light on myths and misconceptions about TB and HIV, and discusses actions needed in preventing deaths from this lethal combination.

This is Part 2 of a lecture in three parts.

Part 1 >>

Part ...

Apr 06 2011

Play

Rank #20: University of Arizona - Preclinical Stage Alzheimer's Disease: Characterizing and Defining the Transition Between Normal and Pathological Cognitive Aging, Part 1

Podcast cover
Read more
Host: Matt Birnholz, MD

For people who carry genetic predispositions toward Alzheimer's disease, little is currently known about predicting the onset, course, and severity of disease at the individual level. However, because cogntitive degenerative diseases most often follow a gradual course of symptom progression later in life, medical professionals must be aware of the distinct, discoverable changes that occur at the "preclinical" stage, i.e prior to the symptomatic onset of memory loss.

In this session of Grand Rounds from the University of Arizona College of Medicine, participants learn about Alzheimer's Disease from a unique perspective of the preclinical stage. From classical signs on physicial exam to emerging biomolecular lab tests and novel imaging modalities, the pathophysiologic changes underlying Alzheimer's disease are explored in depth.

Presenting this session of Grand Rounds is Dr. Richard Caselli, behavioral neurologist and professor of neurology at the Mayo Clnic in Scottsdale, Arizona.

This is Part 1 of a lecture in three parts.

Part 2 >>

Part 3 >>

To view the complete video recording of this and other Grand Rounds sessions from the University of Arizona College of Medicine, visit their website.

Apr 19 2011

Play