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Rank #184 in Self-Improvement category

Business
Education
Self-Improvement
Entrepreneurship

Love Your Work

Updated 5 days ago

Rank #184 in Self-Improvement category

Business
Education
Self-Improvement
Entrepreneurship
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Reconnect with the most powerful fuel of all – the fuel of loving your work. Best-selling author and award-winning designer David Kadavy helps you make it as a creative entrepreneur. Find your creative voice, cultivate the mindset you need to succeed, and be the first to capitalize on new opportunities to make a living making your art.Every Thursday, David presents either a guest or his own learnings from his decade-plus career as a creative entrepreneur. Hear from titans of industry like former AOL CEO Steve Case. Hear from best-selling authors like Seth Godin and James Altucher. Hear from scientists, creators from dancers to a chef to a Hollywood set designer, and visionaries on the cutting edge of creative monetization – whether that's self publishing or blockchain technology.Find out why Wall Street Journal best-selling author Jeff Goins says, "David is an underrated writer and thinker. In an age of instant publication, he puts time, effort and great thought into the content and work he shares with the world."Find out why Basecamp CEO Jason Fried says David has "really good, deep questions, and original questions."Subscribe to Love Your Work today so you never miss a dose of the inspiration and motivation you need to unleash the creator you already know you are, deep inside.

Read more

Reconnect with the most powerful fuel of all – the fuel of loving your work. Best-selling author and award-winning designer David Kadavy helps you make it as a creative entrepreneur. Find your creative voice, cultivate the mindset you need to succeed, and be the first to capitalize on new opportunities to make a living making your art.Every Thursday, David presents either a guest or his own learnings from his decade-plus career as a creative entrepreneur. Hear from titans of industry like former AOL CEO Steve Case. Hear from best-selling authors like Seth Godin and James Altucher. Hear from scientists, creators from dancers to a chef to a Hollywood set designer, and visionaries on the cutting edge of creative monetization – whether that's self publishing or blockchain technology.Find out why Wall Street Journal best-selling author Jeff Goins says, "David is an underrated writer and thinker. In an age of instant publication, he puts time, effort and great thought into the content and work he shares with the world."Find out why Basecamp CEO Jason Fried says David has "really good, deep questions, and original questions."Subscribe to Love Your Work today so you never miss a dose of the inspiration and motivation you need to unleash the creator you already know you are, deep inside.

iTunes Ratings

176 Ratings
Average Ratings
164
6
1
3
2

Nice interview style

By FJNINJA - Apr 22 2018
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Great interview with Ryan Holiday. Great questions and very thought provoking

Thoughtful and honest podcast.

By Raquel_ita - Jan 22 2018
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Thoughtful and honest podcast.

iTunes Ratings

176 Ratings
Average Ratings
164
6
1
3
2

Nice interview style

By FJNINJA - Apr 22 2018
Read more
Great interview with Ryan Holiday. Great questions and very thought provoking

Thoughtful and honest podcast.

By Raquel_ita - Jan 22 2018
Read more
Thoughtful and honest podcast.
Cover image of Love Your Work

Love Your Work

Updated 5 days ago

Read more

Reconnect with the most powerful fuel of all – the fuel of loving your work. Best-selling author and award-winning designer David Kadavy helps you make it as a creative entrepreneur. Find your creative voice, cultivate the mindset you need to succeed, and be the first to capitalize on new opportunities to make a living making your art.Every Thursday, David presents either a guest or his own learnings from his decade-plus career as a creative entrepreneur. Hear from titans of industry like former AOL CEO Steve Case. Hear from best-selling authors like Seth Godin and James Altucher. Hear from scientists, creators from dancers to a chef to a Hollywood set designer, and visionaries on the cutting edge of creative monetization – whether that's self publishing or blockchain technology.Find out why Wall Street Journal best-selling author Jeff Goins says, "David is an underrated writer and thinker. In an age of instant publication, he puts time, effort and great thought into the content and work he shares with the world."Find out why Basecamp CEO Jason Fried says David has "really good, deep questions, and original questions."Subscribe to Love Your Work today so you never miss a dose of the inspiration and motivation you need to unleash the creator you already know you are, deep inside.

Rank #1: Ryan Holiday

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How can your ego hold you back in your aspirations, your successes, and in your failures? Ryan Holiday (@ryanholiday) covers it all in his new book, "Ego is the Enemy." You can buy it at kadavy.net/ego   As Ryan talks about in the discussion, he sort of wrote this book for himself. Ryan had an unusual amount of success very early in life. He dropped out of college at 19 to apprentice under author Robert Greene. He worked for a Beverly Hills talent agency, advising multiplatinum musicians, and he was the head of marketing at American Apparel by the time he was about 21.   In addition to writing books, Ryan helps other authors market their books. He's worked with authors like Tucker Max, (who we spoke with on episode 29), Tim Ferriss, and James Altucher.   In this discussion we talk about how to recognize how ego holds you back in all aspects of life and work, and what to do about it. There are lots of helpful thoughts about how to balance your passion projects with your day job, and we also talk about so-called "pageview economics," something Ryan has a lot of insight into. If you want to know how media works, you should also read his first book, "Trust me I'm Lying: Confessions of a Media Manipulator." You can find it at kadavy.net/trustme    Sponsors: http://wpengine.com/loveyourwork http://activecampaign.com/loveyourwork http://kadavy.net/audible   Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/love-your-work-episode-31-ryan-holiday-tame-the-enemy-inside/

Jun 23 2016

48mins

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Rank #2: Seth Godin

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I first discovered the work of Seth Godin about 13 years ago. Since then he's helped me think about how to make work that's remarkable – The Purple Cow. He's shown me how to think about having a direct relationship with my customers – with Permission Marketing. He's shown me how to push through when things get tough – with The Dip.

Plus, countless other things. He's written so many books, Tribes, The Icarus Deception, All Marketers are Liars, just to name a few more. He writes a blog post every day. I still love going to Seth's blog because it looks like it came out of another time. It's on typepad. He doesn't even have a custom domain. Still, it's one of the few sites that I visit directly just to read what's there. While people are screaming about how you've gotta figure out a Snapchat strategy, Seth just sticks with good old-fashioned words, and he's so good at it.

Seth has been at the forefront of how technology changes how we communicate with one another. He started his first email newsletter in 1990. In fact, he invented the concept of getting emails from companies. Throughout his career, he's pointed out and described what this new paradigm makes possible. You have to Unleash the Ideavirus, you have to tell stories, you have to build your tribe.

But in more recent years, he's focused more on helping people overcome the emotional barriers of actually putting this advice into practice. This is what I was interested in figuring out coming into this interview. What caused that shift? How does Seth think about doing generous work? How do you gain the courage to do something that might not work?

I also wanted to dig back further into Seth's origin. I'm still struck by how far ahead of his time he was way back in the 80's and 90's, and how long it took for some of those concepts to gel and become true. It's a good lesson that if you want to do work that resonates with people, sometimes it takes a long time.

Here are the three links that Seth sent me about publishing:

Join Love Your Work Premium

Would you like to hear raw, ad-free interviews like this one with Seth Godin, weeks in advance? Just join Love Your Work Premium. For a small amount per month, you'll get access to ad-free interviews weeks in advance. You'll also get access to fully-produced episodes a couple of days in advance. Just go to kadavy.net/premium to sign up.

Sponsors http://freshbooks.com/loveyourwork

http://www.casper.com/loveit

Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/seth-godin-podcast-interview/

Jun 08 2017

1hr 6mins

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Rank #3: 107. Build Good Habits: Stanford Behavioral Scientist BJ Fogg

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BJ Fogg (@bjfogg) is a behavioral scientist at Stanford University. He specializes in "Behavior Design," which aims to influence people for the better through insights about human behavior. In this podcast episode, BJ breaks down how to build good habits.

Why do we fail to build good habits?

Most resolutions to build good habits fail for two reasons:

  1. We think too vaguely. We think things like "I want to eat healthier" or "I want to lose weight." If you want to make something a reality you have to break it down into actions. Specificity makes behavior easier to change.
  2. Our motivation changes. You might start off trying to build good habits and feel very motivated, but your motivation will wane. You may have felt very motivated by something – such as the New Year – but that will pass. Or, life gets in the way, and that causes your priorities to change.
What are some of the hardest good habits to build?

What is a good habit? Well, that's up to you. But some of the most common good habits that people want to build are writing, and meditation. Yet they're the hardest.

It's up to you what you consider to be a good habit. If you need help deciding on one popular habit: Should you make your bed? I've got you covered with that episode.

Since I wrote a book about building writing habits with the aim of writing a book, I'll use that as an example to apply BJ's concepts in this post.

The "swarm of bees" approach to build good habits

We fail to build good habits because we think to vaguely. For example, we might say we want to write a book. You can't just sit down and write a book, especially if you're a beginning writer. An even more vague goal you might hear from people is that they want to "eat healthy."

Neither of these are habits. These are outcomes. They are the results of taking actions, but they aren't actions themselves. So, it becomes mentally impossible to use them to "build good habits," if you aren't intentional about it.

Fogg uses a concept, in his tiny habits training program, he calls the "swarm of bees."

You start with your vague outcome. Fogg calls it an "aspiration." Write it down on a piece of paper. Then, write down a bunch of behaviors you could do that would help lead to that aspiration. It looks like this slide from Fogg's TEDx talk.

[caption id="attachment_4474" align="aligncenter" width="750"] The "swarm of bees" is an outcome surrounded by behaviors that could lead to that outcome.[/caption]

In this slide, the aspiration is "health outcomes," which could be something like losing weight. Let's think of the swarm of bees as something like writing a book.

  • Outcome: Write a book
  • Behaviors
    • Sit at computer.
    • Put fingers on keyboard.
    • Type.
    • Read about how to write a book.
    • Read about how to publish a book.
    • Do market research.
    • and so on...
Not all behaviors are habits: Three categories of behaviors

As you come up with behaviors to match your aspiration, you'll find each behavior falls into one of three categories:

  1. One-time behaviors: Things you do just once, such as buy a book or schedule an appointment.
  2. Behaviors over a period of time: Things you do over a period of time, such as mow the lawn regularly over the summer.
  3. Habits: Things you do habitually with no time restriction. Brushing your teeth, meditating, or writing.
Pick behaviors that are a good match for you, to build good habits

Now you have an outcome you want to reach, and you have a list of behaviors that will bring you closer to that outcome. Next, you need to pick a behavior that you can build into a good habit.

But you don't want to pick just any behavior. If you want to build good habits, the behavior has to be a good match.

Fogg recommends choosing a behavior with the following three characteristics:

  1. The behavior has an impact: A good behavior will take you toward your aspiration. Since you already did the swarm of bees exercise, this will be a given.
  2. The behavior is something you can do: The good match for you is a behavior that you're capable of doing. If you’re a beginning writer trying to write a book, trying to build a habit of writing 5,000 words a day might be too much.
  3. The behavior is something you want to do: If you don't want to do the behavior, you can't build it into a good habit.
How many days does it take to build a good habit? It depends!

Despite what you might hear about how long it takes to build a good habit, there is no set number of times or days. (Commonly you hear the myth of “21 days” to build a good habit.)

It really depends upon the habit you’re building. Some habits are instant: The moment you touched a smart phone, using it became a habit. When Fogg got a new rocking chair, sitting in it instantly became a habit, because it was so much better than his other chair. Other habits can take more time to take root.

Good habits are like the roots of a plant

More accurately, both good habits and bad habits are like the roots of a plant. Any plant needs to take root in order to survive. You want to pull the weeds (the bad habits) before their roots get too strong, and you want to nurture the good plants (the good habits) so they can take root and thrive for a long time.

If you have a good habit going, but your life gets disrupted, you should take extra care to help that habit take root in your new circumstances. Think of it how you would think of moving a plant from one pot to another – it would need extra care.

Good habits change your personal identity

When you've built a good habit, meaning it's firmly rooted, it changes your personal identity. You start to tell yourself, "I'm the kind of person who...."

Now that I've personally established a habit of writing, I'm more confident in my identity as a writer. "I'm the kind of person who writes." I write every morning during my pre-established writing habit, but now I can write anytime.

Good habits have a "ripple effect." They lead to more good habits.

Fogg has helped thousands of people build good habits through his tiny habits program. He collects data on the effects building good habits on these people.

Fogg has found that, within five days after starting to build one good habit, eighty percent of people start building other habits. They apparently say to themselves, "I'm the kind of person who builds good habits."

Consistency matters more than scale in building good habits

When you're trying to build good habits, consistency matters more than scale. For example, if you have a habit of writing 100 words a day, and you're able to do it every day, that's better than if you try to build a habit of writing 1,000 words a day, but you're only able to do it occasionally.

Why? Because if you keep writing 100 words a day, the habit has a chance to take root. It goes from being a behavior you do for a short period of time, to being a habit that you stick with.

You really know something is a habit if it is easier to do the habit than it is to not do the habit. Think about habits like brushing your teeth or bathing. You don't feel right if you don't do them. They're strongly-rooted habits. It's a part of your identity. "[You're] the kind of person who brushes their teeth."

Back to the writing habit: If you try to write 1,000 words a day, it's hard to remain consistent early on. It's easy to make excuses such as that you're too busy. You can't be consistent, so the habit can't take root.

Tiny habits are the seeds of good habits

Consistency is more important than scale. A small behavior done consistently has a better chance of taking root and changing your identity than a large behavior done inconsistently. This is why Fogg recommends tiny habits. Tiny habits are the seeds of good habits.

I've been talking in this post about how much better it would be to build a 100-word writing habit than to try to build a 1,000-word writing habit. Those 100 words would be the seed that takes root. Your identity changes. You're the kind of person who writes every day. The next thing you know, you're writing much more.

Feel good about your habit, don't feel bad about your habit

For a habit to take root, you have to be consistent with it. You'll have a better chance of being consistent with your habit if you feel good about that habit.

So find ways to feel good about your habit, and avoid ways that make you feel bad about your habit. Here's a few ways to keep you feeling good about your habit, and avoid feeling bad about your habit.

Keep your good habit a tiny habit

If you want to feel good about your habit, it helps to succeed at your habit. Fogg strongly recommends that you keep your habit tiny forever. It's counterintuitive. After all, if you want to write a book, how are you going to do it by writing just 100 words a day?

The key is to allow yourself to do your habit beyond your target. So, if you have a habit of writing 100 words a day, go ahead and write 250 words, or 1,000 words. But keep your target at 100.

I will say that I make a contradictory recommendation in my post, how to write a book. There's value as a writer to getting really good at writing pieces of a certain length. There's also value in building the habit of publishing. It would be incredibly complicated to study these factors, along with the factor of word count, to make a scientific recommendation on what works best.

So, Fogg still staunchly stands by keeping your habit tiny. He's a scientist, and that's what he knows works.

Congratulate yourself for performing your good habit

Every time you do your habit, celebrate in some way. You could have a reward for yourself, but you can also merely tell yourself that you did a good job. This will keep you feeling good about your habit, and prevent you from feeling bad about your habit.

In the writing example, let's say you have a tough day of writing. But, you wrote 100 words. Don't feel bad. Instead, congratulate yourself for performing your good habit for the day. Again, if you go past 100 words, that's great, but really congratulate yourself for merely writing 100 words.

Lower your standards to feel good about your habit

Ambitious people tend to have high standards. Not only do they want to write 1,000 words a day, they expect those words to be great.

This just adds another opportunity to feel like you've failed at your habit. Worse yet, you may keep yourself from starting your habit in the first place.

This is why, in my book The Heart to Start, I say you should give yourself "permission to suck." If you're writing badly every day, you have a much better chance of becoming good at writing if you instead decide not to write at all, just because you don't think you're a good writer.

You'd find yourself in a Catch-22 situation: You can't get good at writing because you won't practice it. You won't practice writing because you don't feel that you're good at it.

Don't count habit "streaks"

Fogg recommends against counting "streaks," for your habits. Habit streaks create another opportunity for you to feel bad about your habit, which can lead to you not performing the behavior, which can prevent the habit from taking root.

Imagine, for example, that you have a good habit of writing 100 words a day, and you’ve counted a streak of twenty days. Then, you miss your habit for some reason – maybe you were sick or you had house guests.

Now, not only do you feel bad about missing your streak, you also have the sensation of starting your streak all over again. It’s as if you’re committing to 10,000 words, rather than 100. It would then be easy to abandon your good habit altogether.

In summary...
  • Find behaviors that fit your aspiration.
  • From those behaviors, find a good habit match.
  • Build tiny habits.
  • Feel good about your habits. Don't feel bad about your habits.

Buy The Heart to Start on Amazon You have something to offer the world. Break through fear, self-doubt, and distractions to finally make it real. Buy The Heart to Start.

Join Love Your Work Elite Support the show, get early access to episodes, as well as bonus masterclasses and office hours with me. Sign up at lywelite.com.

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

Show Notes: https://kadavy.net/blog/posts/build-good-habits/

Jan 04 2018

1hr 8mins

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Rank #4: Mark Manson

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Mark Manson is known for writing personal development advice that doesn't suck. He writes at markmanson.net, which has more than 2 million readers a month. Mark writes about a variety of topics, including happiness, self-knowledge, habits, and relationships.

You've probably read Mark's work before. Big hits include "Fuck Yes or No," "In Defense of Being Average," and an article by the same name as his upcoming book: "The Subtle Art of Not Giving a Fuck."

I love Mark's writing because it cuts right through the usual self-help nonsense you read that may make you think that all you need to do is follow your passion and think positively and you'll somehow magically become successful.

Instead, Mark encourages you to see things as they are, to find comfort in discomfort, and to accept that when you try to have it all, you really end up with very little.

So, this interview is great for anyone ready to face the hard truths in life in pursuit of being the best version of themselves.

Find out why mark starts off his new book telling you "don't try." How can you find fulfillment and shut down unhealthy cycles in your life and relationships. How can travel clean away your biases and insecurities. If you're living or considering living the digital nomad lifestyle for awhile, how does Colombia differ from Brazil? How can you get the benefits of travel without leaving your hometown? And how does your lifestyle change when your values change?

Sponsors http://wpengine.com/speedy http://kadavy.net/treehouse http://kadavy.net/audible

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/mark-manson-interview/

Sep 15 2016

1hr 17mins

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Rank #5: 93. Art is Your Job. Creator of NBC's The Blacklist, Jon Bokenkamp, on screenwriting

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Jon Bokenkamp (@jonbokenkamp) wanted to be a screenwriter. So, he decided it was his job. He sat at his desk from nine to five every day, writing frantically, and each night he went to another job. One that paid him. He waited tables.

After three years, he sold his first screenplay. Then he sold some others here and there. Then the phone stopped ringing. After one failed script, he was contractually obligated to write one more.

That script became The Blacklist (Netflix). It's a thriller on NBC starring James Spader. They're starting their fifth season this week.

Spader plays Reddington, a veteran, private-jet-setting criminal who acts as an informant to the FBI, and who has a puzzling interest in agent Elizabeth Keen, played by Megan Boone.

In this conversation, we're going to learn:

  • What was the mindset that Jon put himself in to make it through the three-year project of writing his first screenplay?
  • How does Jon ward off his distractibility, and channel it into his writing method? I think it's a great lesson in how in creative work, the final product is totally different from the process used to get there.
  • How has Jon's writing process changed now that he has a whole team, and basically has to write a movie a week?

Jon is a Nebraska-native like me. Hopefully you won't mind listening to us reminisce a little about that strange place in the beginning. If not, skip ahead, and you'll hear some really great stuff on doing tough and long creative projects.

Image: Flickr user Thibault

Sponsors

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Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/jon-bokenkamp-the-blacklist-interview/ 

Sep 28 2017

1hr 19mins

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Rank #6: 197. Annie Duke: Good Decisions. Good Outcomes.

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When something bad happens, it’s tempting to think that you made a bad decision. But the quality of your decision making doesn’t always align with the quality of your outcomes.

Sometimes you make a good decision, and you have a bad outcome. Even more dangerous, sometimes you make a bad decision, and have a good outcome (you'll learn why).

Annie Duke (@AnnieDuke) is a former professional poker player, and a decision strategist. She's dedicated to improving decision-making skills around the world amongst adults and children. She’s author of Thinking in Bets: Making Smarter Decisions When You Don't Have All the Facts.

In this conversation, you’ll learn:

  • We often think of life as like a game of chess. Why is it actually more like a game of poker?
  • How do we separate luck from skill? Learn the most common mental error people make that holds them back from ever learning to make better decisions.
  • Why do strong opinions make you dumber? Learn how to overcome “motivated reasoning” to make more accurate predictions, and better decisions.
New Weekly Newsletter: Love Mondays

Start off each week with a dose of inspiration to help you make it as a creative. Sign up at: kadavy.net/mondays

About Your Host, David Kadavy

David Kadavy is the author of The Heart to Start and Design for Hackers. Through the Love Your Work podcast and his Love Mondays newsletter, David explores what it takes to make it as a creative.

Follow David on:

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Put your money where your mind is. Patreon lets you support independent creators like me. Support now on Patreon »

 Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/annie-duke/

Sep 26 2019

58mins

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Rank #7: 99. Michelangelo's Creative Process. Ross King, author of The Pope's Ceiling

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Ross King is author of the book The Pope's Ceiling. It tells the story of just how Michelangelo managed to paint 12,000 square feet of ceiling with little or no experience as a painter.

I think there's a dangerous belief in creative work. And that is the belief that certain artists are simply gifted, and that that alone explains their greatness.

It's easy to look up at the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel and conclude that Michelangelo lived up to his reputation as the "divine one." That he wasn't human. That he was actually a god of sorts. Today, we'll talk about the process that Michelangelo actually took to complete this seemingly impossible masterpiece.

In this conversation, you'll learn:

  • How did Michelangelo curate his reputation as a "divine" painter. He really wanted people to believe that, and he shaped that perception.
  • Michelangelo started painting the ceiling with little or no painting experience. He knew he would have failures along the way. How did he turn his failures into success in the project?
  • Even though Michelangelo didn't have experience as a painter, he had built up a bag of tricks to draw from. Learn how he used his other experiences to make his first attempt at painting a success.

Join Love Your Work Elite Support the show, get early access to episodes, bonus masterclasses, office hours with me, and a discount on the Love Your Work T-shirt. Sign up at lywelite.com.

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

Sponsors

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http://storyblocks.com/loveyourwork

Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/michelangelo-creative-process/

Nov 09 2017

51mins

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Rank #8: 131. Build Your Morning Routine. Benjamin Spall, Author of "My Morning Routine"

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Benjamin Spall is co-author of the new book, My Morning Routine: How Successful People Start Every Day Inspired. He and his co-author have interviewed 300 successful people from business, fitness, and the arts. People like Biz Stone, Arianna Huffington, General Stanley McCrystal, and Marie Kondo.

The way you spend your first hour of your day sets the tone for the rest of your day. But there seems to be endless ways to you can spend this precious time. Should you meditate? Go for a jog? Do some writing?

Oh, and I'm in the book as well (page 132). They interviewed me about my morning routine, and my evening routine. I'll tell you why I wear the dorkiest orange goggles imaginable before bed.

They've looked for the patterns amongst successful people to find out the things you'll hear about in this conversation. Things like:

  • What time do successful people get up in the morning? You hear a lot of talk about getting up at 4 a.m.. Is that the norm?
  • How do successful people manage technology to get the most out of their days? You'll hear a tip from a former Love Your Work guest, Nir Eyal.
  • And if you haven't optimized your morning routine, the options can be overwhelming. How can you start making lasting changes now?

Sponsors

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Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/morning-routines-podcast/

Jun 21 2018

52mins

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Rank #9: 122. Writing a Book? 3 Things Nobody Told You

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I've written a couple of books now, and the process is nothing at all like I expected it would be. I think misconceptions about how to write a book prevent many people from writing their books. Just imagine all of the unwritten books that are locked up inside of people around the world because of these misconceptions.

So in this week's essay, I share what I wish I had known about writing a book.

By the way, I have a "short read" about how to write a book. It's called How to Write a Book. It's on Kindle, paperback, and it's now on Audible! So if you enjoy this essay, check out that short read. It takes less than an hour to read so it won't get in the way of you writing your book.

Free Creative Productivity Toolbox

I quadrupled my creative productivity. Sign up and I'll send you the tools I count on: kadavy.net/tools

Donate on Patreon Supporters are currently covering more than half of production costs for Love Your Work. Support the show, get early access to episodes, as well as bonus masterclasses and office hours with me. Sign up at kadavy.net/donate.

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

Sponsors

http://theprepared.com

Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/three-things-book-writing/

Apr 19 2018

11mins

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Rank #10: 19. Relax! Andrew Johnson on building an app empire; overcoming anxiety, depression, & bad habits through hypnosis

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Andrew's famous "Relax" app has been a key ritual for me for a couple of years now. Andrew has a whole empire of apps with guided recordings that help people not only relax, but Quit Smoking, reduce anxiety, lose weight, or build confidence, amongst many other things. His apps have been downloaded more than 10 million times.

I have literally found Andrew's apps to be life-changing for me, but I've also been fascinated by these apps as a business. They seem so simple.

But, behind Andrew's apps is more than 20 years as a hypnotherapist, and in this interview I'll be digging into how he got into such an unusual career, what are some misunderstandings about hypnosis, and how did he create his own luck to have the best-selling "self-help" recordings on the Apple and Android app stores. We'll also find out why he lights a candle to do his work.

Andrew's Relax app: http://kadavy.net/relax

Treehouse Sponsor: http://kadavy.net/treehouse

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/love-your-work-episode-19-relax-andrew-johnson-on-building-an-app-empire/

Mar 30 2016

1hr 9mins

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Rank #11: 3. Make Something Remarkable: Timehop's Jonathan Wegener on creativity, hiring, and explosive ideas

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Jonathan Wegener (@jwegener) spent 3 months traveling to every subway station in the NYC area, meticulously documenting the fastest way to get out of each station. The app he made with the data supported him for two years, until he built Timehop. Timehop is an app that compiles your memories and sends them back to you, and Jonathan built it in a weekend hackathon with his cofounder. Since then, he's raised over $14 million, and hired a great team. He shares insights on hiring great people, creating remarkable products, and getting press that makes things go viral. Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/love-your-work-episode-3-making-something-remarkable-hiring-getting-press-jonathan-wegener-of-timehop/

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/love-your-work-episode-3-making-something-remarkable-hiring-getting-press-jonathan-wegener-of-timehop/

Dec 14 2015

1hr 8mins

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Rank #12: 173. Austin Kleon: Keep Going

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Austin Kleon (@austinkleon) woke up one day and realized two things: The world seemed to be filled with more and more anger and distraction every day, and – to make matters worse – consistently doing creative work wasn’t getting any easier.

Austin had already written three New York Times bestselling illustrated books. Millions have already learned to Steal Like an Artist – the title of his first book – and they’d learned to put their work out there with Show Your Work.

Austin wasn’t sure how much more he had in him. That inspired him to write his new book, Keep Going: 10 Ways to Stay Creative in Good Times and Bad.

In this conversation, you’ll learn:

  • Why making something for yourself is technically making something for someone else. Learn about the many different ways that focusing on your own creative expression can reach others.
  • How can you be a valuable asset to the creators you admire? Austin shares a specific story that shows you why you have more to offer than you might think.
  • What one thing can you do in the morning – or rather, not do – to do your best work yet?
Links and resources mentioned What should be our next Patreon goal?

Take our survey at kadavy.net/goals.

Free Creative Productivity Toolbox

I quadrupled my creative productivity. Sign up and I'll send you the tools I count on: kadavy.net/tools

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/austin-kleon-podcast/

Apr 11 2019

55mins

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Rank #13: 187. One Small Step, The Kaizen Way: Dr. Robert Maurer

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Dr. Robert Maurer (@Dr_RobertMaurer) is author of One Small Step Can Change Your Life: The Kaizen Way. He’s also Director of Behavioral Sciences for the Family Practice Residency Program at Santa Monica UCLA Medical Center and a faculty member with the UCLA School of Medicine. In One Small Step, Dr. Maurer shows you how to make really big changes with ridiculously small steps.

I first discovered One Small Step on the Amazon page for my own book, The Heart to Start. Amazon kept showing me that people who bought my book were also buying Robert’s book. After it had been sitting there for week after week, I thought to myself, I’ve gotta see what this is about.

You’ve heard me talk about taking small steps on this podcast, including my episode on how to build good habits with B.J. Fogg. It turns out there’s a name for this practice. The Japanese call it Kaizen.

In this conversation, you’ll learn about:

  • How do large goals put us into fear mode? Learn about the neuroscience of why we don’t take actions.
  • How can you start doing anything with small steps? You can start an exercise habit simply by standing on a treadmill, or a flossing habit while flossing only one tooth.
  • How did Dr. Maurer himself write his book by committing to only ninety seconds per day of writing?
Support the show

Put your money where your mind is. Patreon lets you support independent creators like me. Support now on Patreon »

New Weekly Newsletter: Love Mondays

Start off each week with a dose of inspiration to help you make it as a creative. Sign up at: kadavy.net/mondays

About Your Host, David Kadavy

David Kadavy is the author of The Heart to Start and Design for Hackers. Through the Love Your Work podcast and his Love Mondays newsletter, David explores what it takes to make it as a creative.

Follow David on:

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Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/robert-maurer-kaizen/

Jul 18 2019

53mins

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Rank #14: 64. Write first. Coffee later. (optimizing creative productivity by protecting focus in the early morning)

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How do you feel first thing in the morning? If you're human, you're probably at least a little bit groggy. You aren't thinking straight, you can't focus. You're a wasted morning just waiting to happen.

So, the first thing you do is reach for the coffee.

I have a suggestion that may help you get more out of your mornings. Are you ready for this? I think you'll hate me for it.

Well, I think you should let the coffee wait.

I promise, I can explain. You see, that groggy feeling you have in the morning. You can do some amazing things in that state.

It's the subject of this week's episode. This article originally appeared on Medium. You can follow me on Medium at kadavy.net/medium.

Before I begin, how would you like a $20 Amazon Gift Card? Sound good? Well, I'm GIVING AWAY a $20 Amazon Gift Card every Friday from March 10th until April 7th. All you have to do is go to kadavy.net/survey and answer our short listener survey to be entered to win.

It's seriously short. It will take you less than two minutes. I promise.

Remember, I'm giving away a gift card EVERY WEEK, so, the sooner you answer the survey, the more chances you get to win. You only have to answer the survey once, and you'll get up to 5 chances to win.

This episode comes out March 9th, so if you go to kadavy.net/survey and answer the survey RIGHT NOW, you'll have a very high chance of winning a $20 Amazon gift card, because I'm giving away a gift card TOMORROW.

Again, go to kadavy.net/survey for a chance to win a $20 Amazon Gift card.

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/write-first-coffee-later/

Mar 09 2017

6mins

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Rank #15: 4. Find your superpowers: Saya Hillman of Mac & Cheese Productions on self-help, community, & personal development

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After getting fired from her job, Saya Hillman (@sayahillman) made a list of things she wanted to get paid to do. 11 years later, she's made all of those things a reality. She gets paid to play board games, do improv, or scrapbook, for example. Her company, Mac & Cheese Productions runs events that help people face their fears, and connect with others. She shares insights on living a "life of 'yes,'" and finding your superpowers, as well as some productivity tips for running a business while wearing multiple hats. Show notes: http://kadavy.net/podcast

Claim your free Audible Audiobook: http://kadavy.net/audible

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/saya-hillman/

Dec 28 2015

1hr 6mins

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Rank #16: 147. Jason Fried: It Doesn't Have to Be Crazy at Work

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You hear it all of the time. Maybe you even say it yourself: It's "crazy" at work. There are unrealistic deadlines, demanding bosses, and wall-to-wall meetings.

Jason Fried (@jasonfried) believes it doesn't have to be that way. In fact, he'll tell you why in his new book, called It Doesn't Have to Be Crazy at Work.

Jason needs no introduction for many of you, but for everyone else: Jason is the CEO of Basecamp, which is simple yet powerful project management software. Basecamp the software has a long history of staying simple even when it doesn't make intuitive sense. Basecamp the company, with Jason at the helm, has a long history of espousing sensible work practices, even when they don't make intuitive sense.

We'll talk about:

  • What's the difference between deadlines, and "dreadlines?" How can this simple distinction help you stay in control of your projects?
  • How does Jason and his company struggle with it being "crazy" at work, and what do they do about it? Hear about their fascinating "uphill/downhill" tactic for deciding when to quit a project that just won't end.
  • Hear specific ways to handle clients that make it "crazy" at work. Jason will tell you exactly what to say, and guide you through a real-life scenario using the stoic technique of "negative visualization."

Jason was the very first guest on Love Your Work, three years ago. I'm thrilled to have him back.

Image credit: Michael Berger

Love Your Work is now fully listener-supported!

Patreon supporters are now covering ALL production costs for Love Your Work! Join our wonderful Patreon backers at patreon.com/kadavy.

Free Creative Productivity Toolbox

I quadrupled my creative productivity. Sign up and I'll send you the tools I count on: kadavy.net/tools

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

Sponsors

http://gusto.com/loveyourwork http://earthclassmail.com http://babbel.com

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/jason-fried-podcast-2/

Oct 11 2018

57mins

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Rank #17: 92. Listen to "The Voice"

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I'm working on a new book. It's called Getting Art Done, and it's going to help you boost your creative productivity and make your masterpiece.

Today I'm going to read a sample chapter from the first draft of Getting Art Done. It's about the voice inside your head, and how it can lead to your most explosive ideas.

To learn more and preview Getting Art Done, visit gettingartdone.com.

Join Love Your Work Elite Support the show, get early access to episodes, as well as bonus masterclasses and office hours with me. Sign up at lywelite.com.

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/the-voice-podcast/

Sep 21 2017

16mins

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Rank #18: 68. 10 unconventional ways to achieve full focus (sleep, mindfulness, minimalism, & travel)

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I take focus seriously. The way I see it, being productive is not about time management. It's about mind management. If you're fully-focused on the task at hand, you can have way more creative output.

So, I experiment a lot with ways to deepen my focus. Some of the methods I've settled into are unconventional. I'm going to share them with you today.

This article originally appeared on Medium.

Sponsors http://freshbooks.com/loveyourwork

Show Notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/10-unconventional-podcast/

Apr 06 2017

9mins

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Rank #19: 35. Using Paleo & Ketogenic Diet Principles to Fight Inflammation – Dr. Terry Wahls on ketosis, anti-inflammatory foods, & the microbiome

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Dr. Terry Wahls (@terrywahls) is an inspiring example of turning a struggle into an opportunity, but I was more interested in her area of expertise.   You may have already seen the inspiring TEDx talk of Dr. Terry Wahl's. She has MS, and was confined to a wheelchair for 4 years. But, using her knowledge of biology, Dr. Terry engineered a diet based upon paleo and ketogenic principles to feed the power centers of her cells. Now, she rides her bike to work, and is out of the wheelchair.   Dr. Terry is now running clinical trials based upon her diet protocol, and has written a book. I recently picked up, The Wahl's Protocol to seek relief from chronic inflammation, and I've implemented her diet with great results. I have less pain, more energy, and I've also noticed my mental performance improve. You can pick up the book at http://kadavy.net/wahls   In this interview, we cover some of the building blocks of Dr. Terry's diet: What really does "paleo" mean? How does this "ketosis" thing you've heard about so much lately really work, and what does it mean for your health – especially for epilepsy and cancer? What does someone really mean when they say a diet is "detoxifying," and how does detoxification work?   What are the challenges in proving and implementing dietary treatments, and how do you evaluate the potential upsides or downsides of experimental approaches in general. We'll even talk about stem cell transplants, fecal transplants, and the microbiome.   If you or anyone close to you is battling an illness, you may find something useful in this interview, and even if you are healthy, you'll hear interesting and exciting things on the frontiers of health.   Sponsors http://wpengine.com/loveyourwork http://activecampaign.com/loveyourwork http://kadavy.net/audible   Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/terry-wahls-interview/

Jul 21 2016

54mins

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Rank #20: 127. Art Is Hard. Tim Kasher, Rock Star/Filmmaker of Cursive, The Good Life, & No Resolution

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Tim Kasher's (@timkasher) work is deeply embedded in my creative DNA. When I was a young 20-something sitting in a cubicle in Omaha, Nebraska, Tim's work and his success was there to inspire me to find my own creative voice.

Tim is one of the pioneers of indie music. He's the frontman of Cursive. Of all of the Cursive songs out there, you're most likely to have heard "The Recluse."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9JcFgL2qO9Y

The Recluse is on Cursive's most successful album. The Ugly Organ recently passed its 15-year anniversary, and has sold an amazing 170,000 copies.

Before Cursive, Tim was in a band with Conor Oberst, of the band Bright Eyes, called Commander Venus. After leaving Commander Venus to focus on Cursive, Tim also started a folk band, The Good Life.

Omaha in the mid 90's and early 2000's was an indie-rock fan's paradise. Artists like Kasher and Oberst cross-pollinated. They started producing their own cassettes, and eventually formed the label Saddle Creek Records, featuring bands like Bright Eyes and The Faint.

The success of Saddle Creek records was a sign of the times. The Internet was allowing great music to spread. They could use lower-cost production and distribution, and communication for spreading their music and booking shows, and a cluster of kids from Nebraska could build a fanbase around the world.

I personally always found the story of Saddle Creek records and Tim Kasher inspiring. When the world was telling me to live one way, it seemed like the band members of the various Saddle Creek bands were always underfoot in any bar I stepped into. They were there to remind me you could do things your way, no matter where you're from.

I guess that message was still with me when I left Silicon Valley, and as I moved to Colombia to double down on writing and making this podcast. The message that you can "make it" anywhere. You can get by on the power of your ideas.

I also love that Tim isn't afraid to follow what interests him. He was brave to split genres between Cursive and The Good Life, and now he's branching off into other crafts. He recently wrote, directed, and produced his first feature film, No Resolution. Following the theme of dysfunctional relationships you'll often hear in Tim's lyrics, No Resolution is about a rift between an engaged couple on a particular New Year's Eve.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3f6Uzn6LgOI

Since Tim is multi-talented, he couldn't stop at writing and making an entire film, he even made a soundtrack to go along with it.

I'm thrilled to have Tim Kasher on the show. This is a great conversation for anyone looking to find their creative voice, and the courage to follow their unique path. Learn:

  • How does Tim think about genre? Fitting the confines of a genre can water your creative work down, but it can also help it find an audience.
  • How did Tim avoid the "sophomore slump?" He had to push himself to find his creative truth.
  • How does Tim follow his many interests? You can worry that you're spreading yourself thin, but Tim wanted to pave the way for other artists to do what's interesting to them.

Clips you'll hear during the interview are The Martyr, and Art Is Hard.

Free Creative Productivity Toolbox

I quadrupled my creative productivity. Sign up and I'll send you the tools I count on: kadavy.net/tools

Donate on Patreon Supporters are currently covering more than half of production costs for Love Your Work. Support the show, get early access to episodes, as well as bonus masterclasses and office hours with me. Sign up at kadavy.net/donate.

Feedback? Questions? Comments? I love to hear anything and everything from you. Leave a review on Apple Podcasts, Tweet at me @kadavy, or email me david@kadavy.net.

Sponsors

http://skillshare.com/loveyourwork http://weebly.com/loveyourwork

Show notes: http://kadavy.net/blog/posts/tim-kasher-podcast-interview/

May 24 2018

35mins

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