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Health
Fitness & Nutrition
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Marathon Training Academy

Updated 8 days ago

Health
Fitness & Nutrition
Self-Help
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Empowering You to Run a Marathon and Change Your Life

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Empowering You to Run a Marathon and Change Your Life

iTunes Ratings

971 Ratings
Average Ratings
889
34
14
10
24

Love the show

By Tdog7z - Jul 11 2019
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Hi guys. Love the show! So fun to listen too and inspiring! Thanks

Look forward to new Episodes

By debbjordan - Feb 21 2019
Read more
Love listening to Trevor and Angie on long runs!!

iTunes Ratings

971 Ratings
Average Ratings
889
34
14
10
24

Love the show

By Tdog7z - Jul 11 2019
Read more
Hi guys. Love the show! So fun to listen too and inspiring! Thanks

Look forward to new Episodes

By debbjordan - Feb 21 2019
Read more
Love listening to Trevor and Angie on long runs!!
Cover image of Marathon Training Academy

Marathon Training Academy

Updated 8 days ago

Read more

Empowering You to Run a Marathon and Change Your Life

Rank #1: Running Outside The Comfort Zone

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In this episode we bring you an interview with Susan Lacke, author of the new book Running Outside The Comfort Zone -An Explorer’s Guide To The Edges of Running.

In the quick tip segment Angie answers a question about what to do if your training plan doesn’t have the correct number of weeks until race day.

Interview with Susan Lacke

Susan Lacke is a college professor and writer for Women’s Running, Competitor, and Triathlete. Her new book is called Running Outside the Comfort Zone -An Explorer’s Guide to the Edges of Running.

Some of the races she did in her year of running outside the comfort zone:

  • The Pony Express 50 miler in Utah
  • Empire State Building Run Up
  • Grand Canyon Rim-to-Rim
  • Across the Years 24-Hour Race
  • Caliente Bare Dare 5k (naked run)
  • Cooper’s Hill Cheese Roll in the UK
  • Midwest Wife Carrying Championship with her husband
  • The Comrades Marathon in South Africa

Also Mentioned in this Episode

Susan Lacke online: www.susanlacke.com

The Drury Hotels -Use our link to save 15% off your stay at our home away from home.

On-Running Shoes -Try a pair of On’s for yourself for 30 days and put them to the test. That means actually running in them before you decide to keep them.

MetPro.co -Nutrition concierge and coaching company to help you reach your body composition goals.

The post Running Outside The Comfort Zone appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Jul 31 2019
47 mins
Play

Rank #2: The Science of Endurance -Interview with Alex Hutchinson

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In this episode we bring you a fascinating interview with Alex Hutchinson, author of the new book Endure -Mind, Body, and the Curiously Elastic Limits of Human Performance.

In addition to being an endurance science geek, Alex was one of the few journalists allowed access to the Nike Breaking 2 project in Italy where Eliud Kipchoge ran the fastest marathon in history at 2:00:25 (an unofficial world record).

Interview with Alex Hutchinson

Alex Hutchinson writes the @sweatscience column for Outside Magazine. He’s also a contributor to The New Yorker, Popular Mechanics, and Canadian Running magazine. He earned a Ph.D. in physics from the University of Cambridge and worked as a researcher for the U.S. National Security Agency. He represented Canada internationally in track, cross-country, and road racing. Alex currently lives in Toronto.

In this conversation we talk with Alex about The Central Governor Theory, the mind body connection, how to improve your race by smiling more, why more people don’t die in the marathon, and the Nike Breaking 2 project -he was one of the few journalists allowed behind the scenes. You’re going to enjoy this conversation!

photo credit: Alex Hutchinson

Also Mentioned In this Episode

Alex Hutchinson Website: http://www.alexhutchinson.net

Rhode Island Rode Races, Newport -Angie will be running this marathon on April 14, 2018.

Acer -Go to Acer.com, click on “Store”, and enter coupon code TRAINING at checkout to receive 10% off, plus free ground shipping on a Swift series laptop – Including already discounted models.

Omax3 Ultra-Pure -the purest Omega-3 supplement on the market, containing nearly 94% high- quality Omega-3s. Omega-3s are amazing at alleviating joint pain and muscle soreness—and making you feel your best post-workout. They can also improve focus and memory, boost cardiovascular health, and more. Use our link to get a free box.

Sun Basket -makes it easy and convenient to commit to healthy eating. Get $35 off your first order through our link.

Healthiq.com -Marathon Training Academy is sponsored by *Health IQ*, an insurance company that helps health conscious people get special rates on life insurance. Go to healthiq.com/mta to support the show and learn more.

The post The Science of Endurance -Interview with Alex Hutchinson appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Apr 01 2018
1 hour 10 mins
Play

Rank #3: Finding Your “WHY” as a Long Distance Runner

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Why do you run?  In this episode we talk about the importance of finding your “why” if you want be a long term runner and what listeners shared with us about what motivates them.

Plus we give you a quick run down of this year’s MTA Virtual Half Marathon.   And in the quick tip segment, Angie answers a question about how to implement treadmill running into your training. 

Finding Your WHY

When it comes to running or any other important habit that you want to implement in your life it’s important to find your “why.” In fact, finding your why is probably the most important thing you can do to create a sustainable running habit.

I know that right now we’re talking to aspiring runners, brand new runners, lifelong runners, and those somewhere in the middle.  Maybe you’re still a bit on the fence about this whole long distance running thing.  You know that it can be a key to making you healthier and happier, but some days you just don’t have the motivation to get out there and some days you find yourself just plodding along. 

All of this is totally normal.  Not everyone falls in love with running during the first steps…in fact, many very accomplished runners had a bumpy start.  Like Pete Kostelnick who we interviewed on our last episode. He didn’t always pump out 55 mile days for weeks on end.  In fact, after running his first marathon he swore he’d never do another.

Some “Whys”Are More Sticky

One way to turn an “it’s complicated” relationship with running into a full blown commitment is to find your why.  And I’m going to let you in on a little fact…some whys are more “sticky” or meaningful than others. 

My Story

When I first started to run as a teenager my whole motivation was to lose weight.  That began an on again, off again relationship with running that would last the next decade.  As soon as I started feeling too fat or out of shape I’d jump back on the running bandwagon.  But it was a means to an end.

When I started running again at the age of 27 my weight had nothing (or at least little) to do with it.  I was looking for a change in my life.  I was seeking something that I could do for myself to make myself healthier and happier.  And this time it stuck. 

Angie at her first marathon

I ran my first marathon in 2008 and haven’t looked back since.  That’s not to say that there haven’t been bumps in my running journey.  I’ve dealt with setbacks, discouragement, and many runs that just sucked.  But I’ve stuck with it because part of my identity is based on being a healthy and strong person and being a runner makes me feel both of those things.  Along with the benefit of being healthier physically running also helps me manage anxiety and depression.  I also love the way running has allowed me to explore the world. Now I’m one of those people who hopes I can run up until the day I die.

Another thing to keep in mind when thinking about your why is that it may (and probably will) change over time.  It’s important to reevaluate your WHY on a regular basis.  Some of your whys will be serious and life-changing, some will be fun and whimsical, and most people have a combination of reasons.

We asked the participants of the 2nd annual MTA Virtual Half Marathon about their why.   And here’s what they said:

Love of food/drink

“I like eating ice cream and drinking brewpub beer.”  -Kathleen

“I like to drink beer year round.”   -Stephen

Friends/running community:

“Besides my love of food? Well, it’s my running friends.  No matter how crappy my day can be I know they are there to make me laugh.” Kathleen

“Endorphins, girl time, chocolate.”  Jennifer

Races:

“I made a goal. Run 26.2 in all 50 states by the time I turn 50 (2019). Although I’m 2 states away from finishing my goal, I know I won’t stop. It keeps my head level. It’s my ME time. Oh, and it’s my bad ass feeling.”  JoAnn

“Running in the winter can be tough. I always have to sign up for another race to keep up my motivation.” Margaret

Alone time:

“I love being out in nature, having some Me Time with a podcast.”  Amanda

“Running is a huge part of who I am, and I can’t even conceive of a week without running. I run for fun, to enjoy being outside in every type of weather, to challenge my body, to focus my mind, and also to let my mind drift. Plus I love to eat chocolate.” Lynne

Supporting charity:

“I started long distance running to support a local charity. It helped to find the right charity, the right coaches, the right races, and most importantly the right running buddies. I went from a novice to half marathoner to marathoner and will hopefully keep adding on the distances. Running keeps me sane. And the MTA family keeps me motivated.”  Pamela

Because I can:

“Because I can! When I’m running, all of the “I shoulds” turn to “I cans” and then “I dids.”  Rachael

“Because I can and what keeps me going? I am the sole healthy member of an immediate family struggling with morbid obesity. I also live in the second most unhealthy state in the US and see my community struggle with health. Some in my immediate family are completely immobile because of it and I think about that when I run and feel much gratitude for my ability but also sadness and empathy knowing that they cannot do the same. I run for myself and my health but also for those who can’t and hope that I might, in even the smallest way, be an inspiration to someone in a similar circumstance, whether it be in my family or community. I want to challenge the doubts of people who fear starting an active lifestyle and think running (or walking) is not possible. I want to help others love to live healthier active lives. This is my “why” every single day.”  Jennie

To be a positive example:

“I’m a positive example for my kids to follow. It’s something my wife and I share.”  Ryan

“Running is my passion and purpose and allows me to connect with and inspire others. I enjoy running with friends and coaching kids. Reaching goals feels amazing.”  Cari

“My two kids are my why.” Kyle

“My girls, my patients, my health, and because today I can and tomorrow I might not be able to.”  Jennifer

“Started running 2 1/2 years ago for my health. Never thought I would love to run but I do! Helps me keep my head clear, de-stress, sleep better, maintain a healthy weight, and be a role model for my daughters. If their Momma can become a runner at age 45 they can do anything they set their mind to. I ran my first marathon this year.”  Hope

A way to enjoy nature/fresh air:

“I have been looking at running as an opportunity to enjoy ALL seasons rather than always sitting inside waiting for Spring to come and just feeling cooped up and inactive all winter. It has kicked seasonal blues in the butt so far this year!!”  Sara

“Because I love being outside, because it helps me with stress, and because I never feel better than after I’ve finished a run!”  Suzanne

“Fresh air and being outside – I need my outdoor time!”  Jo

Stress relief/better headspace:

“Running is like medicine for me. I’m a pastor and my job is never done. When I finish a run, I feel accomplished something and it helps me with the stress of life. A good long run is one of the few times in my week that my mind can just relax and enter into the pattern of foot-falls, breaths, and motion.” Eric

“I’m in law enforcement and running is my stress relief as well. I started running to lose weight and redirect my thoughts from stress at work.”  Joel

“Because I love it! For my mental health, it makes me happy, the feeling I get after finishing a long run or race is the best!”  Annabelle

Change or improve my health:

“Stay healthy. I also remember how good I feel afterwards.”  Valerie

“About 18 months ago I was fat and unhealthy and hated what I had become. I read a book that spurred me into action, lost 30kg. Then I started running and found my new passion. I did a 282 day running streak, found the MTA podcast along the way…I have first marathon in 7 days time. My why is that running is my new addiction…it’s better than food, better than alcohol, it’s the best way to start my day.” Simon

“I have been running for 5ish years and it’s the whole package of clearing my head of negativity, being healthy and sleeping better.”  Scott

Challenging myself/achieving goals:

“What keeps me going is the challenge and the accomplishments. Plus I feel good after I’ve done it, may it be a half, a full or an ultra. I’m trying to see if I can do a 50 miler next year. Which is definitely another challenge for me. But first, I’d like to finish my 50 states half and full by next year.” Lynne

“I just enjoy challenging myself….trying things I’m not sure I can do….and it’s something I get to do for myself that’s healthy.”  Tom

“The thought of something greater within myself waiting to be discovered.”  Andrew

More confidence:

“I love the process of working towards a goal that is challenging and something I chose for myself. I love how it puts structure into my daily life and how it affects me as a person – I’m so much more confident, independent and enthusiastic than I used to be.”  Cecilia

“Because of all my “nevers” that actually came true. I never thought I could get a doctorate, mountain bike race, have twins, have amazing family and friends, have a rewarding career/business of my own, have a heart attack at 45 and bounce back. Running certain races/distances/times/with friends is a satisfying way to keep quashing my “nevers” and continue to test my limits physically, mentally, and spiritually…on my feet and in my life as a whole.”  Jennifer

“The confidence that running gives me is my reason and my hope is to run forever!”  Tricia

“It makes me feel like a stronger person. Knowing I have the ability to win the battles with feeling tired, being cold, and being lazy. Every time you go running; that’s a win.”  Stephen

“I can’t imagine not having running in my life. My “why” is that it completes who I am. It helps with my fitness and stress and my ability to think more clearly. It provides me with the opportunity to be outside where every run is a different adventure. I love the struggle and the feeling of accomplishment after completing a 20 miler. I love the running community. It’s fun quirky and tremendously supportive. I’m 53 and I’ve only been running for 5 years and my largest regret is that I didn’t find it earlier.”  Gregory

Also Mentioned in This Episode

MetPro -a world-renowned concierge nutrition, fitness, and lifestyle coaching company. MetPro’s team of experts specialize in developing customized nutrition and training programs for high-profile athletes, executives, and celebrities. Using Metabolic Profiling, MetPro analyzes your metabolism and provides you with an individualized strategy to obtain your goals. Just visit www.metpro.co/mta to get started today.

Bombas Socks -the most comfortable socks in the history of feet. Use the code: MARATHON for 20% off your first order.

Action Heat -makes the world’s best heated clothing, like Heated Jackets, Socks, Gloves, Hats, and more.

2018 MTA Virtual Half Marathonsee photos here.

The post Finding Your “WHY” as a Long Distance Runner appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Dec 12 2018
46 mins
Play

Rank #4: How to Go From Couch to Marathon

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In this episode we tell you How to Go from Couch to Marathon, plus we talk with a runner from California who went from weighing 400 pounds to running his first marathon! And just a reminder that you can go through our A-Z system for getting marathon ready inside the Academy. Find out how to join here.

How to Go From Couch to Marathon

One of the things that attracts people to long distance running and particularly the challenge of a marathon is that we all have the desire to live up to our full potential and get the most out of life.

Running is one of those things that connects the mind, body, and spirit in a unique way. We find out what’s inside of us and at the same time connect more fully to our environment.

We’ve heard from hundreds of runners over the years who have confirmed that running a marathon changed their life for the better. But we know that there can be a lot of fear and anxiety connected with taking on a big challenge like this (or any new challenge).

It’s normal to wonder if you have what it takes and sometimes doubt that you’re taking the necessary steps to successfully reach your marathon goal.

There are definitely some common pitfalls that can derail runners from safely reaching the marathon finish line. A few of these have to do with external preparation like gear and training, but having the right mindset is equally important. Here are some essential components to successfully go from couch to marathon (or from desk to marathon, as Trevor says.)

10 Tips to Successfully Take You From Couch to Marathon

1. Pick the Right Gear

You don’t need all the gear, you just need the right gear. One of the most basic items you need in your marathon training is a good pair (or two) of running shoes.

Shoes
When it comes to finding the right pair of shoes this is not the time to get all fancy and buy the most expensive pair you can find or the ones that look the most attractive.  It’s all about comfort and fit when it comes to trainers. You should have plenty of room in the toe box and at least a half inch of space between your longest toe and the end of the shoe. I totally didn’t realize this when training for my first marathon and wore too small running shoes for the first couple of years. Who knew that your feet aren’t supposed to go numb or that your toes aren’t supposed to feel continually battered.

If you’ve never done so before, go to a specialty running store and have your feet and gait evaluated by a professional.  A pair of good fitting running shoes is going to prevent some of the possible injuries that come from the wrong shoes and greatly increase the comfort of your running.

Socks
While we’re talking about foot comfort you’ll probably find that not just any pair of socks will work for long runs. For example, cotton doesn’t breathe very well and will cause heat to build up inside your socks.  This heat combined with friction can leave you with some nasty blisters and have you hobbling around for days.  Basically you want a sock made out of technical fabrics like acrylic, polyester, bamboo, or wool blends. Some of our favorite go-to brands include Bombas, Injinji Toe socks, and Balegas (but there are many good brands).

Running clothes
When it comes to shorter runs you can usually keep it fairly simple and just wear things that are comfortable to work out in. The exception for women is getting a sports bra with maximum support. But as you continue the amount of time you run you’ll find that certain cuts, fabrics, and styles are more comfortable and others leave you swearing that you’ll never wear them for a long run again.  

I would definitely recommend slowly investing in a wardrobe of running clothes made of technical fabrics. Because if you sweat at all you’re going to be unpleasantly weighed down by cotton or things with obvious seams which can cause chaffing.  Cotton may work fine for a 3 mile run, but if you plan on doing long runs cotton is not your friend. I’m still mystified that at nearly every marathon I see at least one runner wearing a cotton shirt. 

In general you want garments that fit well, don’t have a ton of extra fabric, and don’t cause chaffing. Fabric rubbing against skin and skin rubbing other skin can cause this very uncomfortable condition known as chaffing. Use Body Glide or other anti-chafe products anywhere you may suspect that chaffing may occur. It usually only takes a few runs before you find out any potential chaffing locations.

GPS Tracking
It’s very helpful to track your distance and time (and maybe other stats) using either a GPS watch or your phone with a tracking app. If you’ve been running long enough you remember the days before GPS and the extreme focus on stats, graphs, and other metrics. When I was training for my first marathon I had a basic stop watch and drove my running routes in the car to estimate the distance. But having an app or GPS watch makes it so much easier. Some of the most popular apps include Map My Run, Run Keeper, Runtastic, Strava, Edmondo, and Nike Plus. Popular GPS watches include the Apple Watch, Garmin watches, Fitbit, TomTom and many others. They come in a variety of price points (usually associated with how many features you want).

2. Get Your Running Form Right

Running form can either make or break your experience as a long distance runner. While it’s true that no person has the exact same form due to biomechanical differences there are some general principles that can save you energy and prevent injuries.

Focus on the following:

  • Run tall. Keep your head up and eyes looking straight ahead.
  • Keep your torso up and shoulders relaxed and arms bent comfortably by sides. Hands should not cross the midline of your body. Make sure your hands stay relaxed and not clenched.
  • The body should lean slightly forward from ankles to shoulders.
  • Your landing foot should be just under the hips which is the center of gravity.
  • Focus on short quick steps and don’t over-stride.

3. Plan for Your Personal Safety

Be sure that you’re cleared for physical activity by your healthcare provider before training for a marathon. Chronic issues like heart or lung problems can need specialized attention. Also, if you experience unusual shortness of breath, arm or neck tightness especially on the left side, numbness, nausea, and a cold sweat call 911 immediately.  These are signs of a heart attack and should not be ignored. 

At some point during your running or marathon journey you’ll probably have at least one non-running acquaintance point out all the cases of people who have died while running. Another thing you’ll run into is people predicting that you’ll need a knee or hip replacement someday. The good news is that statistically runners don’t have higher rates of osteoarthritis than non runners and keeping your weight in check will make for healthier joints. Runners also have a smaller chance of heart disease and Type 2 diabetes.

Some additional safety considerations that you need to make a priority is being aware of your surroundings and being a defensive runner (don’t expect traffic to be looking out for you). We all know the stats of how many distracted drivers are on the roads so make sure you’re aware and alert of your surroundings at all times. You’d be surprised at how many runners don’t do some of these basic things.

Always run facing traffic (left side of the road in the U.S.) or on a side walk and make eye contact with drivers if possible.  Wear reflective gear and lights if you will be running in low light and don’t block out ambient sound entirely by wearing headphones/earbuds. If you choose to listen to music or other audio make sure that you can hear well.  If you’re on a path that is closed to traffic run on the right side and pass on the left. This can make sharing the path with cyclists much more easy. If you’re running with friends don’t run more than two abreast.

4. Take Time to Do Cross-Training

Incorporate strength training and other low impact exercises into your training routine from the beginning. It’s easy to just run but if you don’t build a firm foundation there’s a good chance that you will get injured. Focused cross training will help improve your overall muscle strength and allow you to become a better runner.

We highly recommend low impact activities like core training, lifting weights, cycling/spinning, rowing, swimming, yoga, Pilates, etc. These can be done on your off days from running or even on running days if you have time. As a beginning marathoner it’s best to avoid doing high impact activities every single day which can increase your chance of injury and not allow your body necessary rest and recovery.

5. Nail Down Your Fueling and Hydration

Another important aspect of being physically prepared for the marathon is dialing in your approach to fueling and hydration. This is something that you should begin experimenting with and practicing early in your training so that the only new thing you do on race day is run 26.2 miles (or 42.2km).

The challenging thing about fueling and hydration is that there isn’t a one size fits all formula for success. Many factors like your body size, gender, pace, climate, and dietary preferances will factor into your fueling and hydration requirements. Plus the way you carry your hydration and fuel during training and also on race day will need to be practiced.

Here are some general recommendations to provide a jumping off point.

Hydration:
Most runners will need between 16-28 oz of fluid per hour during exercise. There are definitely some outliers from this range but studies show that regularly consuming over 30 oz per hour puts you at significant risk of overhydration which can lead to hyponatremia (low blood sodium).

The fluids that you take in should be spaced appropriately (every 1-3 miles) because your gastro-intestinal system simply cannot process large amounts at once and that can lead to the “sloshing” feeling in your gut. For extended efforts and hot/humid conditions it’s wise to also use a balanced electrolyte (either in capsule form or dissolved in your hydration of choice). An electrolyte solution containing a balance of sodium, potassium, magnesium and calcium helps ensure the healthy functioning of all body systems.

Fueling:
One amazing thing about the human body is that we have fat stores to kick in during prolonged periods of exercise or fasting. But unless you’ve trained your body to perform in a fasted state having a steady intake of carbohydrates is going to allow you to have the physical and mental energy you need to run your best.

However, the intake of too much fuel or with the wrong formula you may run into things like nausea and GI distress. Typically fewer calories per hour can be processed by runners because much of the blood supply is shuttled away from the GI system into the major muscle groups. But in general, most runners need between 120-200 calories per hour, divided in a way that keeps your energy levels stable.

Here is a video about how I fuel with Generation Ucan

6. Remember, you can’t cram for a marathon

Shortcuts undermine the process and often compromise your health. An essential part of your marathon foundation is building a solid running base. To stay injury free you will want to start your training out slowly.  There’s a tendency when you’re excited about something to start off too hard. Remember that each person gets in shape at their own rate so don’t compare yourself to others.  Make sure you find a running schedule that works for you. 

You may want to begin by running three days per week at first and not run on consecutive days to allow your body recovery periods.  Remember that your body gets stronger and adapts during periods of rest. It’s also okay to start with run/walk intervals and to stick with the run/walk method if that works for your training.

Another important tip is not to run too fast during training runs. Every run should not be attempted harder and faster. You’ll want to maintain a conversational pace as you build your endurance, especially during “easy” and long runs.

7. Always Listen to your body.

One of the best things about becoming a marathoner is that it gives you a different relationship with your body. You begin to have a new appreciation of what your body is capable of. And to fully appreciate and support your body you need to listen to it and intervene when necessary. Take care of any issues or niggles early before they turn into a bigger deal (like an injury or overtraining).

Listening to your body includes things like getting the amount of sleep that your body needs (marathoners need more sleep than the average adult), fueling your body with the foods that lead to muscle growth and decreased inflammation, taking regular days off, and rolling/icing/soaking any areas of concern. It’s also important to seek professional help early if you have a health concern. Doing so will give you the best chance of getting to the marathon finish line and more importantly being a healthy runner for life.

8. Examine your motivation

Your “why” is very important as you deal with the challenges of training. There are some “whys” that are better than others. Some of the common reasons why people take on the marathon include the following:* to challenge themselves, *lose weight, *have more energy, *get into better shape, *fulfill a bucket list item, *to better keep up with their kids, and even because of *pressure from other people. Some of these are good motivations and some may get you going but won’t be reasons to keep you going when things get tough.

9. Don’t fixate on a time goal for your first marathon

Fixating on a time goal is one of the biggest mistakes that I see new marathoners making. They get an idea of an ideal time in their minds based on other people’s first marathons or based on a shorter race time that they accomplished. Instead of setting a time goal try to focus on running strong and healthy and enjoying the experience. Don’t compare yourself to others. Yes, there are a few runners who qualify for Boston during their first marathon but that’s the exception, not the rule.

10. Don’t let fear hold you back.

Moving toward your fears is one important way to becoming a stronger and more resilient person. One thing that often holds people back from marathon training is that they don’t see themselves as a runner. We often get a specific idea in our heads about what a runner looks like. For example, everyone would agree that Shalane Flannigan who won the NYC Marathon last year and sprinter Usain Bolt, also known as the fastest man in the world, are bonafide runners. But there is no one body type that’s necessary to become a runner or marathoner. If you run, you’re a runner. It doesn’t matter how often you run, how far you run, or how fast you run.

Also Featured in This Episode

In this episode we also talk with MTA podcast fan James Lacher whose transformation is definitely one of the most impressive we’ve seen!!

“After topping 400 pounds in 2014 I had bariatric surgery in 2015 and lost over half my body weight. I started rumning 18 months ago and on Sunday I ran my first FULL MARATHON. The pics are me day of surgery and holding up the front page of the local newspaper. I was the cover story on race day. The race was a life changing experience . . . I soaked up every moment and finished in 5hr 25min . . . Thank you Angie and Trevor for all you tips and wisdom I’ve learned from listening to numerous podcast episodes.” -James

James was profiled by the San Luis Obispo Tribune here.

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MTA Virtual Half MarathonCheck out this year’s medal!

YOU HAVE WHAT IT TAKES!

The post How to Go From Couch to Marathon appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Sep 01 2018
1 hour 12 mins
Play

Rank #5: Weight Loss Tips for Marathoners

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In this podcast episode we bring you a special conversation with our nutrition coach, Natalie Mason, about how marathoners can lose weight and still maintain energy to do what they love.

And in the quick tip segment I’ll share how you can incorporate lower body strength training into your routine and never skip leg day again!

Weight Loss Tips for Marathoners

Our Guest on This Episode

Natalie Mason is a Managing Dietitian at MetPro -a company that provides concierge nutrition and fitness coaching. She has a Bachelor of Science in Nutrition & Food Science and Masters of Science in Nutrition Sciences. She’s a Registered Dietitian and Board Certified Specialist in Sports Dietetics.

In this conversation will you hear why marathon training doesn’t automatically lead to weight loss, the most common mistakes runners make with their diet, how the principle of “contrast” through “up adjusting” and “down adjusting” leads to metabolic proficiency, and the shocking number of runners who do zero strength training.

How This Interview Came About

In late 2015 I started inexplicably gaining weight despite keeping up my marathon training schedule (I ran 10 marathons and ultras that year) and eating as healthy as I knew how. The weight continued to pile on much to my chagrin.

I finally realized that I was dealing with a hormonal imbalance -probably due to a combination of stress and other factors. I began working with a functional medicine doctor who put me on thyroid medicine for one year until my hormones balanced. Thankfully, I was able to go off all medications but the extra weight (about 35 pounds) did not budge.

I encourage people to appreciate their bodies and keep pursuing their running goals no matter what they weigh. But as a runner the extra weight does impact your joints, energy levels, and can effect your marathon times. For me it was like carrying around an extra 35 pound weight on all of my runs and in daily life.

I started working with Natalie from MetPro in November of 2018 and have lost 26 pounds at the time we recorded this podcast episode. I was initially skeptical at first but MetPro has been an amazing system for helping me reduce fat and keep my energy levels high for doing what I love . . . which is running marathons! And Natalie is a wonderful coach as you will hear in our interview.


Also Mentioned in This Episode

MetPro -Using Metabolic Profiling, MetPro analyzes your metabolism and provides you with an individualized strategy to obtain your weight or body composition goals.

NuNee -designed specifically to relieve that dreaded Runner’s Knee pain. Use code MTA10 for a 10% discount.

High Performance Lifting -Strength Training Program for Runners developed by Jason Fitzgerald.

Love Beets -ready-to-eat beet products, perfect for beet lovers and beet newbies alike! Use code MTA at checkout for 20% off online orders.

Varidesk -converts any desk into a standing desk and is designed with durable, best-in-class materials that fit in any environment or workspace.

The post Weight Loss Tips for Marathoners appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Jun 12 2019
1 hour 3 mins
Play

Rank #6: Ask the Coach Episode + Road Trip Rundown!

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In this episode we bring you an Ask the Coach Episode as we answer questions about hill work, tricks to increasing speed, and what to eat before a race and more.

Plus we give you a rundown of our 7,719 mile road trip across America and Angie will explain how to keep your habit of running while traveling.

Ask the Coach Episode

On this episode we were joined by Coach Kristen Williamson the newest member of the MTA coaching team. Kristen is a Registered Dietitian and Road Runners Club of America certified running coach. She is a 3:29:00 Marathoner, Boston Qualifier, and has a Master of Science in Dietetics as well as a MBA.

Questions for this episode

  1. Hills! How should I be running hills? Do I run them at an easy pace? Fast pace? What level effort should I be at when I’m doing hill runs specifically, is what I’m wondering. Also, what is considered a good elevation gain? I live in Minnesota and it’s not terribly hilly. I can’t stand running on a treadmill, and I don’t mind driving a little. What sort of elevation gain would be considered effective as a hill workout? -Rachel
  2. For speed workouts which do you consider more beneficial to a marathon runner and why 1) Short sprints & short recovery 2) longer sprints with longer recover. -Dave
  3. Tricks to increasing marathon speed? -Amanda
  4. Should you make any specific changes to your diet in the week leading up to a race? I don’t want to deprive myself of well balanced calories and carbs to do well but also don’t want to go in feeling bloated or risk gi distress. -Carolyn
  5. Food for fuel: What do I need to know about calories (the unit to measure energy) versus carbohydrates (sugar broken down to release energy) versus protein (amino acids that build muscle and help body to function)? I know what they are bc my 2 year old is a Type 1 diabetic, but I’m not sure what is most important for long runs and when to eat them. -Bridgit
  6. Debunking benefits of fad diets + how to adjust lifestyle and diet for optimum performance. -Drew

Road Trip Rundown

The “camper”. Our home for 48 days.

The Numbers

  • 48 days on the road
  • 15 states
  • 5 National Parks/ Monuments/ Historical sites
  • 7,719 miles
  • 3 marathons (2 were ultras)
  • Approximately $2,560 on gas
  • 8 German restaurants
  • 2 tire blowouts on the camper

Charlevoix, Michigan


Our first stop was at the Charlevoix Marathon. Hear Angie’s race recap on episode #288.

The Black Hills, South Dakota

Devil’s Tower Monument, Wyoming

Montana



Divide 50k in Butte

Washington

Olympic National Park

The first blowout

Angie and Trevor with Coach Kristen (center)


Also mentioned in this episode

The MTA Virtual Half Marathon. Registration now open! Check out this year’s awesome medal and hat.

MetPro -Using Metabolic Profiling, MetPro analyzes your metabolism and provides you with an individualized strategy to obtain your weight or body composition goals.

NuNee -designed specifically to relieve that dreaded Runner’s Knee pain. Use code MTA15 for a 15% discount.

On-Running Shoes -Try a pair of On’s for yourself for 30 days and put them to the test. That means actually running in them before you decide to keep them.

DripDrop O.R.S. An electrolyte powder developed by a doctor to treat dehydration. Go to dripdrop.com/mta to get 20% off any purchase.

Great sites for finding races and running paths while traveling:

The post Ask the Coach Episode + Road Trip Rundown! appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Aug 11 2019
1 hour 14 mins
Play

Rank #7: Unraveling the Mystery of Your Metabolism

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In this podcast episode we bring you a fascinating conversation about how the body’s metabolism works and how you as a runner can lose weight and keep it off.

Unraveling the Mystery of Your Metabolism

Our guest today is Angelo Poli -an expert on the metabolism and the founder of MetPro. He has worked with NFL players, celebrities, physique models, entrepreneurs, and politicians to help them achieve body transformations. We wanted to have him on the show to pick his brain.

In this episode you will hear . . .

  • The mysteries of the body’s metabolism explained and why it is so unfair
  • What the diet industry gets wrong
  • Considerations for runners
  • Positive disruptive habits that you can start implementing now to see results in your nutritional intake.

Metabolic Profiling

We started the MetPro program the day after Thanksgiving in 2018. In the beginning I was skeptical and less than enthused about following some type of rigid eating plan, especially over the holiday season. But I knew that I owed it to myself to give it a try since nothing else had been working.

I had started gaining weight back in 2015 due to a hormonal imbalance and had put on 30 very unneeded pounds in the following two years. The weight gain was very frustrating considering my active schedule of running, yoga and strength training. The fact that I avoided sugar and most processed foods and attempted to eat healthy also didn’t result in any weight loss.

It took a couple of days to get used to the new schedule of eating and using the MetPro app. But I caught on quickly to being more intentional about my macronutrients and the timing of meals. The fantastic support and guidance from our nutritionist/coach Natalie has been so helpful as well.

I’m thrilled with the fact that I’ve shed 14 pounds in the last 6 weeks. This was certainly the only time I’ve ever lost weight during the holidays. I also have plenty of energy for my training and am feeling so much more confident about getting down to my ideal weight.

What makes weight loss so confusing is that no two people are the same. There are so many factors that influence your personal metabolic rate. Plus, your metabolic rate is a moving target, constantly adapting to your environment (as the body seeks homeostasis). Your body will adapt to whatever eating plan you’re using which is why it’s important to change your intake occasionally.

The key, Angelo says, is contrast. Once your body adjusts to your new nutritional intake the weight loss stalls. It is in the up-adjusting and down-adjusting that revs the metabolism and sheds the pounds.

To illustrate this Angelo has us imagine two women about the same size who both want to lose weight. Looking at their nutritional history, the first woman skips breakfast, has a salad for lunch, and eats barely anything for dinner. The second woman pages and pages of meals and snacks recorded in her food log. Which woman is sure to lose weight quicker? Even if they start the same diet, woman #2 would experience a more drastic contrast from what she is currently doing -resulting in quicker results.

Another important take-a-way is understanding your body type (ectomorph, endomorph, and mesomorph). This is an expression of your genetic predisposition and influences your dietary and training needs in order to reach the ideal body composition for you.

Having the support and guidance of a nutrition coach can help get your metabolism into the fat burning mode. The handy MetPro app keeps the process of tracking your weight, meals, and workouts very simple.

Also Mentioned in This Episode

MetPro – Take a metabolic assessment and schedule a complimentary consultation with one of their experts by going to www.metpro.co/mta

The Tallahassee Marathon -Run a fast course through Florida’s capital city this February 3. Plus meet special guest Meb Keflezighi! Trevor will be doing a live audience interview with Meb on Saturday February 2nd at 1:30 at the race expo. The marathon and half marathon is on February 3rd. Use code Academy for 20% off your race registration.

The Drury Hotels -more than 150 locations. Save 15% on your room with our link.

Sun Basket offers 18 weekly recipes including Paleo, Gluten-Free, Vegetarian, Vegan, Pescatarian, and more—all delivered to your door. Get $35 off your first order with our link!

The post Unraveling the Mystery of Your Metabolism appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Jan 01 2019
1 hour 12 mins
Play

Rank #8: Run the Mile You’re In! Interview with Ryan Hall

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In this episode we speak with Ryan Hall -2x Olympian, American record holder, and author of the book Run the Mile You’re In. And in the quick tip segment, we answer a listener question about how to deal with chafing.

Interview with Ryan Hall

Ryan Hall set the U.S. record in the half marathon when he ran 59:43 at the Houston Half Marathon in 2007- the first American to break the one hour barrier. He placed 10th at the Olympic Marathon in Beijing. He’s the only American to run sub-2:05 (2:04:58 at Boston). His wife Sara is currently an elite runner and they have four adopted daughters from Ethiopia. In this episode we walk through the big themes of his new book Run the Mile You’re In.

In this interview Ryan shares . . .

  • What it means to run the mile you’re in.
  • The importance of identity and the ability to not take your failures personally.
  • How the African runners process failure.
  • Goals of the heart.
  • The comparison trap.
  • Dealing with pain.
  • Having a healthy body image.

Mental toughness isn’t something you either have or don’t have. Mental toughness starts with the belief that you are mentally tough, and it is nurtured through positive declarations.

Competing out of love results in superior strength. The next time you find yourself in a painful situation, find a way outside of yourself. Think about your love for God, your family, your friends, those you are helping. There is more strength inside of you than you can imagine when you fix your eyes on Jesus. All you have to do is stay close and stay in love, and you can endure incredible pain.

Also Mentioned in This Episode

Ryan Hall’s website: https://ryanandsarahall.com

NuNee Device -designed specifically to relieve that dreaded Runner’s Knee pain. Use code MTA20 for a 20% discount.

On Running Shoes – The clean and minimalistic design as well as its sole technology gives you the sensation of running on clouds. Try a pair of On’s for yourself for 30 days and put them to the test – that means actually running in them before you decide to keep.

BioLite Headlamp 330 -ultra-thin, super bright, NO-BOUNCE headlamp that’s so comfortable, you’ll actually forget you’re wearing it. Use code MTA at checkout for 15%

MetPro -Using Metabolic Profiling, MetPro analyzes your metabolism and provides you with an individualized strategy to obtain your goals.

The John Muir Trust -help us plant 262 trees!

Resurrected Runner -creator of parody songs for runners

The post Run the Mile You’re In! Interview with Ryan Hall appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Apr 01 2019
1 hour 6 mins
Play

Rank #9: Finding the Joy in Running

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In this podcast episode we discuss how to find joy in your running and training so you can stay motivated year after year. Plus we check in with a listener who just finished the Jerusalem Half Marathon -a great destination race!

Finding the Joy in Running

In 2017 I ran my first marathon and blindly followed a running friend through a rather unusual training plan. The race was tough and I searched for a better training plan for marathon #2. MTA came along and saved the day (of course!). I LOVED the training plan and although race #2 wasn’t brilliant, it was fabulous by comparison to #1. This year marathon 3 is coming up but I’m just not loving training. Work and family responsibilities are much heavier this time around and I feel tired and frustrated. I am not rolling or stretching nearly enough but when it comes time to do so and I have to choose between sitting staring vacantly out of the window or getting to work……I want to find the joy of running again – any suggestions? -Lyndi

This is such a great question because this feeling is so common, especially after going through a long cold winter. While training for your first couple of marathons it’s so new and exciting (and scary) that it often means you have more enthusiasm for training. You often feel like you’re holding on for dear life to take on such a big challenge. But, by the time the 3rd marathon comes around, it can just start to feel like hard work and it’s easy to focus on how much time is being taken up or how much energy is required.

Systems Not Goals

I’ve certainly gone through ups and downs with my training. There have been many, many days, weeks and months when I just wasn’t feeling it. Knowing that these ups and downs are normal has helped me to focus not on one specific goal but on the kind of person that I want to be. My overall goal is to be a strong and healthy runner for life and this helps me to commit to the process of training.

Then when a day/week/month comes along when it’s not exciting I remember that good habits have a compounding effect (and the same is true for bad habits). It’s not groundbreaking or sexy but the truth is that we get what we repeat. Little habits over time make a big difference (an excellent book on this topic is Atomic Habits by James Clear).

If you feel like you’ve let bad habits creep in or have lost the joy of running it might be more beneficial to focus on systems, not goals.

“You do not rise to the level of your goals, you fall to the level of your systems.” -James Clear

Putting effective systems in place leads to goal achievement because you don’t have decision fatigue every day trying to decide if you’re going to run or foam roll or strength train. When you’re able to fall in love with the process this brings greater commitment which leads to success.

Examples of Systems Versus Goals . . .

1) Training to be healthy and strong for life vs. only training for a specific race.
If you’re only training for a race it may lead you to not see the importance of certain runs or maintenance activities (or even sleep). You may make the decision to try and run through injury even though you know it won’t help you in the long term. On the other hand, training to be healthy and strong for life means that there is no end date. The good habits that you develop are compounding to make you strong and healthy now and in the future. Your identity as a runner is secure no matter the challenges you face along the way.

2) Cleaning up your house vs. having systems in place for keeping it clutter free.
Doing a blitz clean and seeing the results feels very satisfying but if you don’t change the reasons why the mess happens then it won’t be long before it returns to its untidy condition. Putting a system for order in place will give you the long term satisfaction of maintaining a clean house.

3) Changing eating patterns to reach a goal weight vs. eating to have energy and strength.
Most of us have gone on a diet to achieve a specific weight or physique. However many times the methods we used weren’t healthy or sustainable in the long term. Maybe we got close to our goal or even reached that magic weight. But the minute we started slacking off and returning to our old patterns of eating the pounds returned in full force. In contrast, when you eat to fuel your body and to have energy and strength it can change your perspective. You’re no longer satisfied with temporary results and feel skeptical with claims that you can lose 10 pounds in a week. You’re more likely to make a meal plan, shop wisely, meal prep, pack a snack, and not keep tempting foods in the house. These behavior changes can lead to sustainable change and an increased sense of mastery.

What helps bring the joy back to running differs a bit for each person. When people start getting burnt out with running it’s often a sign that they don’t have enough margin in their life. It’s easy over time to get so busy and overcommitted that running just seems like another chore to accomplish. Focusing on getting more sleep, eating healthy, starting a meditation practice, saying no more, and taking the pressure off yourself can often help you regain joy in life and running.

Wisdom From Academy Members . .

Change it up!

“Perhaps switch it up. Go for a run on a new trail. Join a local running group for in person motivation. Try running at a different time of day. Sometimes it is hard to get out of a rut. Trying something outside your comfort zone can help jump start your motor again.” Aaron

“I’ve always believed you should be feeling “Hell yes!” or terrified – if you’re not excited, why do it? Try to figure out what’s your why? My suggestions: Change something. Maybe use a different plan? If you’re running 3 times how about doing one with 4 runs instead? How about working with a coach? Or picking a race in a location you’re excited about? Maybe do a trail run? Or an ultra? Or maybe dropping to a half? For me working with a coach has really lit a fire in me and I started doing 4 runs instead of 3 and surprisingly enjoyed that more.” Farida

“The heavy miles of marathon training can feel daunting for most of us. If you’re feeling burdened by it all I’d suggest not doing a full this Spring and focus on shorter races instead.” Peter

“I was in a rut too and have switched to focusing on trail half marathons which has been perfect for me. It’s less hours of training but challenging still plus the weather is starting to become beautiful once again (unless you’re in the southern hemisphere that is). If you could find ways to incorporate work or family into some of your exercise routines that might be helpful. (Biking with the family, run commuting are a couple ideas.) Good luck!” Andrea

“Sign up for some 5K and 10K along the way.” Gretchen

Enlist Some Help!

This can include everything from finding a running partner, signing up for a race with a friend, joining a running group, and hiring a coach. We’ve heard from so many people who have been able to have breakthroughs in their running by enlisting a strong support system. One of the reasons we created the Academy was to be another source of encouragement, motivation, and practical help to runners of all abilities.

“This is also where a good coach can come in handy. They can help modify your training so that you’re not always so mentally burnt out; they can suggest best practices for cross training instead of a run-only schedule; they can come up with creative workouts that don’t focus only on mileage or speed; they can also help keep you accountable, which for many is a great motivational tool when the lure of Netflix calls on a weekend! If a coach is too much of a commitment, finding running buddies can give you a similar effect especially when it comes to accountability. When I schedule a morning speed workout at 6:00am on a Tuesday morning before the sun comes up, it’s pretty unlikely I’ll make it. However if a friend asks me to join them, I can almost guarantee I won’t miss it!” Coach Steve

Buy yourself some new running gear!

Running shoe therapy

This may be as simple as some new socks, a new pair of shoes, running sunglasses (like Goodr), Bluetooth earbuds, a new watch you’ve been eying, scheduling a massage, getting some running books (Let Your Mind Run by Deena Kastor is particularly inspiring) and new music.

Inject some fun!

Deliberately think of ways that you can add enjoyment to your running. This may include doing a costume run, a beer mile, an obstacle course race, participating in Parkrun (a free weekly timed 5k run now in 21 countries and growing), trail running, volunteering at a race, or signing up for a bucket list race. It may even mean taking the pressure off yourself to go after PR’s which take a lot of mental and physical energy. You could also give yourself the challenge of taking one or more interesting pictures during every run or thinking of three things that you’re grateful for during your run. Another positive idea would be challenging yourself to pick up a bag of trash during every run.

Focus on other exercises and activities for a while

It’s very helpful both physically and mentally to diversify your activities so that running isn’t the only sport you enjoy. This might mean taking swimming lessons if you’re not confident in the pool, dusting off your bike and doing some cycling, taking a new class at the gym, trying something like Orange Theory or a treadmill class, and working with a strength coach to dial in your weight training. It’s often been during a slump in my running that I’ve developed other interests.

After my first marathon I struggled with ITBS and started doing yoga regularly—something that is very important to me to this day. When I was going through a hormonal imbalance a couple years ago I worked with a strength coach at our local YMCA to take the focus off my lack of progress in running and to get stronger. Doing that has helped me to stay consistent and enjoy strength training to this day.

Sign up for a destination race!

In this episode you will hear one of our coaching clients named Brooke Taylor tell us about the Jerusalem Marathon. Brooke ran the half with her son at the end of a two week tour of the Holy Land. The Jerusalem Marathon is only 8 years old but brings together about 40,000 runners from many nations and has been called by Haaretz Newspaper “the most cosmopolitan event around.” You can read Brooke’s race recap here.

Every action you take is a vote for the kind of person you want to become. -James Clear


Also Mentioned in This Episode

John Muir Trust– contribute a tree to the MTA Forever Forest. We went with the idea of planting 262 trees as a nod to the marathon distance, with donations going toward our tree planting fund to create an ‘MTA Forever Forest’. “Come to the woods for here is rest. There is no repose like that of the green deep woods.” -John Muir

MetPro – Take a metabolic assessment and schedule a complimentary consultation with one of their experts by going to www.metpro.co/mta

Topo Athletic -a gimmick-free running shoe company delivering footwear solutions for healthier, more natural running patterns. A roomy toe box promotes functional foot movement and the cushioned midsoles come in a variety of thicknesses and heel elevations, so you can pick your unique level of protection and comfort.

Healthiq.com -Marathon Training Academy is sponsored by *Health IQ*, an insurance company that helps health conscious people get special rates on life insurance. Go to healthiq.com/mta to support the show and learn more.

Bombas Socks -every pair comes with arch support, a seamless toe, and a cushioned foot-bed that’s comfy but not too thick. Use our link for 20% off!

Atomic Habits by James Clear -what we are reading.

The post Finding the Joy in Running appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Mar 21 2019
56 mins
Play

Rank #10: Smart Pacing Strategies in the Marathon

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In this episode we discuss smart pacing strategies with Coach Steve Waldon -one of our coaches here at MTA and a 3:30 pacer at the New York City Marathon. You will hear how to establish goals, the tricks to pacing (tools and tips), how to adjust mid-race, and how to get through the tough later miles!

Smart Pacing Strategies in the Marathon with Special Guest Steve Waldon

Coach Steve Waldon is a RRCA Certified Running Coach and a 3:30 pacer at the New York City Marathon. He’s a 2:53 marathoner with over 25 marathon finishes, nine 50 mile finishes, and two 100Ks. He also completed the Atacama Desert Crossing -155 mile self-supported stage race.


Topics/Questions Covered in this Discussion

  • Common mistakes people make.
  • Choosing an appropriate pace.
  • What if you start out too fast?
  • Adjusting Mid-Race.
  • The reliability of our GPS watches.
  • What to do in the later miles?
  • What about run/walkers?
  • What does it take to become a pacer at NYC Marathon?

Also Mentioned in This Episode

NuNeeShop.com. Don’t let knee pain keep you from completing your long runs, or worse, sideline you altogether. Let NuNee help you get back to running without knee pain. Use code MTA30 for a 30% discount.

Audible.com. Right now, for a limited time, you can get 3 months of Audible for just $6.95 a month
Text MTA to 500 500.

Action Heat -makes the world’s best heated clothing, like Heated jackets, socks, gloves, hats, and more. Save 20% off your order when you go to www.actionheat.com/MTA

Pace Bands -here are some websites for finding both free and paid pace bands.

The post Smart Pacing Strategies in the Marathon appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Nov 21 2018
51 mins
Play

Rank #11: Interview with Amelia Boone, The Barkley Marathons

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Amelia Boone is a world-class obstacle racer and full time corporate attorney. In March of this year she competed in the infamous Barkley Marathons -the race that eats its young. Since the race was started in 1986 only 15 people have successfully completed all 5 loops of the course.

Interview with Amelia Boone

Amelia Boone is a prolific obstacle course racer with 30 first place finishes to her name. This includes winning the Spartan Race World Championships, The Spartan Death Race, and the World’s Toughest Mudder (3 times)! She lives in San Francisco and is an attorney at Apple.


The Barkley Marathons 2018

Just three weeks ago Amelia ran the Barkley Marathons in Tennessee -which many consider to be the hardest ultramarathon around. So tough, that only 15 people have successfully completed the course before the 60 hour cut off. The race is limited to 40 runners a year and even getting in is a closely guarded secret. This year (2018) some super tough runners were there like Gary Robbins, Mike Wardian, and Amelia Boone but the course won and there were exactly zero finishers.

Also Mentioned in This Episode

Amelia Boone website and social media: www.ameliabooneracing.com | Twitter @ameliaboone | Instagram @arboone11

Barkley Marathon documentary: The Race That Eats Its Young. You can get it on Amazon Prime.

Spartan Race – With over 60 races all around the country, Spartan is an obstacle course racing company with races for every athletic ability and skill level. Visit www.spartan.com/marathon for an exclusive offer, to find a race near you and view training and nutrition tips.

Healthiq.com -Marathon Training Academy is sponsored by *Health IQ*, an insurance company that helps health conscious people get special rates on life insurance. Go to healthiq.com/mta to support the show and learn more.

Fully -standing desks and collection of active chairs that give you the freedom to sit, stand, perch, or lean yourself into healthy, comfortable positions that work for your body’s unique and changing needs. I have the Jarvis standing desk and the Back App chair by Fully and absolutely love love love them!

Listener Question: What About Foot Numbness While Running?

I am so frustrated with my running right now. The toes on the outside of my left foot have been going numb. This started happening a couple weeks ago, and it happens on every run now at about 1.5-2 miles in. It goes away as soon as I stop running. At first I thought it was my shoes as they have about 400 miles on them. So I got new shoes yesterday, a different brand/model and now the numbness is slightly more medial and on the bottom of my foot, but just as bad. I tried tying my laces looser, still numb. So I made them as loose as I could stand, still numb! It’s not painful, but it’s affecting my form, and it makes running exhausting and kinda miserable. Has anyone dealt with this or have any ideas or suggestions? I’m thinking of bringing my old shoes back and getting another pair just like them… maybe I just need a fresh pair of the same shoe. -Logan

I feel your pain! I had a similar problem with a pair of trainers a few years ago and realized that for some reason that particular model just didn’t work with my foot. Actually when I look back on my early running days I dealt with uncomfortable shoes a lot because I wasn’t buying the correct size and I thought that foot pain and numbness was part of the process. How wrong I was!

I was also running with a friend a few months ago and she told me that one of her feet was getting numb. Thankfully I knew to tell her to stop wearing that pair and get back to the running store for a better fit.

Many times you need to size up a half or whole size in running shoes for a comfortable fit. Usually numbness is due to a shoe being too small, either in length or width (sometimes both) or due to tight lacing. Feet size and shape change based on the time of day, menstrual cycle for women, weight loss/gain, aging and other factors and having shoes with enough room is key for comfortable running.

I have a wider foot so brands like Altra tend to work better for me. And I’ve found that for some shoe brands I can absolutely love them for shorter run and hate them for long runs. It can be a frustrating process to find the right shoe but don’t be discouraged if it takes trying a few duds beforehand.

Shoe companies often make changes between different versions of the same model that just might not work for you. Make sure the place you buy your shoes has a generous return policy so that you can get a pair that works well for you. -Angie

The post Interview with Amelia Boone, The Barkley Marathons appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Apr 13 2018
1 hour 15 mins
Play

Rank #12: Strength Training for Runners, Interview with Jason Fitzgerald

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In this episode we talk with coach and fellow podcaster Jason Fitzgerald about the dos and don’ts of strength training when preparing for a marathon.

And in this episode’s quick tip we share recommendations on sunglasses for runners.

Plus, we give you an update on our 2 month long road trip . . . something we are calling “Angie and Trev’s Most Excellent Adventure”.


Interview with Jason Fitzgerald

Jason Fitzgerald is the founder of strengthrunning.com and the Strength Running podcast which we were just on recently (Jason interviewed us about marathon training for beginners). He ran competitively in college and is a USATF certified coach. He lives with his family in Colorado.

We were just interviewed on Jason’s podcast here.

In this interview you will hear the compelling case for why you should be doing strength training, common mistakes people make and how to do it the right way. Jason knows his stuff and we know this episode will be a huge help!

Strength Training Program

If you want to learn how to use weight lifting for strength and power Jason has a great program called High Performance Lifting. There are four phases he works you through with video demonstrations by professional athletes.

Quick Tip: Sunglass Recommendations for Runners

Since I don’t usually wear sunglasses while running I turned to the awesome people in our private Academy Facebook group to get their advice.  Here are their top suggestions:

Roka! Stylish and highly functional! I have two styles. My husband uses his pair for every day outdoor activities in addition to running. Emily

It’s a love hate for me…haven’t found a brand that doesn’t collect sweat on the inside of the lenses eventually blurring my vision during long runs….that said usually wear Spy Optics….somewhere in the range of $40 – $60 cuz I can’t stand spending more on sunglasses. Tom

I wear prescription glasses and mine are Ray-Ban wayfarers. When I have races or long runs that start before the sun is out they ride on top of my head nicely without me worrying about losing them. Marty

And we had numerous runners recommend the brand Goodr! I didn’t even know I needed/wanted running sunglasses until I received these as a gift – they’re super lightweight and come in fun colors!

Episode Sponsors

Honest Sport – Made with Less Calories and Sugar and Sea Salt for Electrolytes, Honest Sport is the perfect everyday fitness drink.

Pitney Bowes – Start saving today and get a free 60 day trial of a Pitney Bowes C200 – Visit online at pb.com/MTA

Healthiq.com -Marathon Training Academy is sponsored by *Health IQ*, an insurance company that helps health conscious people get special rates on life insurance. Go to healthiq.com/mta to support the show and learn more.

Spartan Race – With over 60 races all around the country, Spartan is an obstacle course racing company with races for every athletic ability and skill level. Visit www.spartan.com/marathon for an exclusive offer, to find a race near you and view training and nutrition tips.

The post Strength Training for Runners, Interview with Jason Fitzgerald appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Jun 21 2018
1 hour 6 mins
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Rank #13: A Look at How We Are Training for Our Next Marathon

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In this episode we give you an inside look at our training for the London Marathon, what we’ve been doing and how it’s working.

This will be marathon #57 for me and I’m experimenting with higher mileage.

Plus, I’ll explain what I’m doing for strength training and what my morning routine looks like (which is quite the contrast to Trevor’s routine).

And in this episode’s quick tip we feature a listener question about rotating shoes during training.

A Look at How We Are Training for Our Next Marathon

For this episode Trevor decided to interrogate me about my training for the London Marathon which is April 28th 2019.

As you will hear on the podcast my “A” goal is to finish under 4 hours and my “B” goal is to finish as close to 4 hours as I can.

Experimenting with higher mileage
I’ve been experimenting with Hanson’s Marathon Method which calls for lower long run mileage but more running days and longer distance runs midweek. I have also been doing my long runs according to time rather than distance. For example, I’ll run for 3 hours instead of running for a set number of miles.

I ran my PR of 3:35:41 (back in 2012) and also qualified for Boston (in 2014) doing only 4 running days per week and typically my body has started to break down if I train with higher volume. But as you get older you typically get better at listening to your body and knowing when it is safe to push harder. So I’ve been increasing my volume this training cycle.

My Strength Training
I have also been doing one intense strength training session per week. Here is an example of some of the moves:

  • Lunges with weights
  • Dumbbell squats with overhead press
  • Weighted hip thrusts
  • Deadlifts
  • Back squats
  • Banded side walks

I am also doing one yoga session and two core workouts each week.

Trevor asked me how many training days I’ve missed in the last four months. If I have to miss a day I will shift my schedule around and make the missed day a rest day (since I always take one rest day per week). So, not counting the rest days, I’ve only missed three scheduled workouts in the last four months due to sickness and traveling to my cousin’s funeral. I love to workout so staying on task with my training is not hard for me.

My Morning Routine
I’m a morning person. Here is my morning routine from the time I wake up until when I start work.

  • Wake up at 6:00 am
  • 20 minutes of meditation.
  • Make a pot of green tea and oatmeal with chia seeds, coconut flakes, almond slivers, walnuts, and frozen raspberries and blueberries.
  • Make sure our older sons (age 14 and 12) get on the bus at 7:10am. Help my youngest son (age 8) with his morning routine until the school bus comes.
  • Finish my morning tea and read a non-fiction book for a few minutes.
  • Out the door to run and exercise between 8:30-10:00 (unless it’s a long run day which means I may be gone a longer period).
  • Shower, have a morning snack, and start work to get as much done as I can before the kids arrive back from school.

Always Learning Something New About Myself
One thing that I’ve discovered after 10 years of marathon training is that you still learn something about yourself whether you’re training for your first marathon build or your 57th marathon. Long distance running has a way of building up your confidence while still keeping you humble. An example of that is how we talked about avoiding chafing during the quick tip on our last episode. Two days later I got some ridiculous chafing near my collar bone from the zipper seam of a running jacket. I just had to laugh!

Learning to Stay Flexible
One challenge of running a spring marathon is that the weather you train in can often change drastically halfway through. For much of the training cycle you may be dealing with winter weather challenges and then one day spring arrives and suddenly you’re overdressed and sweating profusely.

You may have trained mostly in cold weather (or warm for our friends in the Southern Hemisphere) and then you’re presented with totally opposite conditions on race day. Sometimes the body has some difficulty switching over from conserving heat to being able to sweat and cool efficiently.

This can present a challenge if you have warm conditions on race day so it’s important to be flexible and realize that we can’t control for every outcome. For a Type A personality like myself this can be a challenge but that’s often how many situations in life are. Marathon training can teach us great lessons about being flexible and adjusting to uncertainty.

We installed an extra shelf in our hall closet just for running shoes!

Quick Tip: Rotating Shoes

Love your podcast for help and motivation in training! I was wondering if you could talk about shoes. Should you rotate different running shoes during your training, or find one shoe and stick to it? I’m not a novice runner, but training for my first marathon and I know shoes are important. Haley

Thanks for the great question! I’m sure many runners are wondering the same thing about shoes. When I was training for my first marathon I only used one pair of shoes and struggled on a number of levels. Since that time I’ve seen the value in rotating through different types of shoes in training. I definitely advise runners to have at least two different types of shoes in your rotation and there seems to be evidence to back this up.

Researchers in Luxembourg studied 264 adult recreational runners. They gathered information on training volume, injury rate, cross-training, shoe usage and other variables. Of the 264 runners, 116 were classified as single-shoe wearers: runners in this group did 91% of their mileage in the same shoe, and ran in an average of 1.3 pairs of shoes during the study. The other 148 were classified as multiple-shoe wearers: runners in this group tended to have a main shoe, which they wore for an average of 58% of their mileage, but they rotated among an average of 3.6 pairs of shoes for their training during the study.

The researchers found that the multiple-shoe wearers had a 39% lower risk of injury during the study period than the single-shoe wearers. Researchers speculate that this could be because different shoes distribute the impact forces of running differently, which lessens the strain on any given tissue. They said,

“The use of different pairs of running shoes will provide alternation in the running pattern and vary external and active forces on the lower legs during running activity. Whether the reduced [injury] risk can be ascribed to alternation of different shoe characteristics, such as midsole densities, structures or geometries cannot be determined from these results and warrants future research.”

Supporting this idea of reducing injury risk by varying tissue loads, the researchers also found that runners who reported more cross-training had a lower incidence of injury. (1)

If you keep multiple shoes in your training rotation it’s a wise idea to match them to the particular surface or type of run that you’ll be doing. For example, I tend to “retire” shoes from long runs after they hit around 250 miles because they tend to feel flat and leave my legs feeling more fatigued. Then I’ll use them only for shorter runs until they reach around the 400 mile point (the actual mileage that I retire shoes varies depending on the model).

I also like to keep a pair of trail shoes in the rotation for running in snow, trails, or gravel/dirt roads. I usually save my lightest pair of shoes for speed work and treadmill runs. Another benefit of rotating your shoes kicks in when a company changes or discontinues your favorite shoe. That can cause a panic if they’re the only type of shoe that you run in.

I used to run exclusively in Asics Nimbus until they changed the model a bit and it no longer worked for my foot. What followed was a very angsty period where I frantically tried to find my new favorite shoe. This uncomfortable period included running a marathon in a shoe that made my feet go numb.

Since that time I’ve always kept at least two different types of shoes in my line-up. Given the evidence that rotating between more than one pair of shoes can reduce your chance of injury and also prolong the life of the shoe (partly because the cushioning has a chance to rebound between uses) it also makes financial sense for the average runner.

Here are some suggestions on building up your shoe rotation:

  • Don’t wait until your current shoes are worn out before purchasing a new pair. Instead, work a new pair into the rotation midway through the mileage you usually put on your trainers so that you don’t end up with worn out and brand new shoes. We get a lot of questions from runners wondering if they should wear a brand new pair of shoes for their marathon or a worn out pair. By planning ahead you can avoid this dilemma.
  • Look for discounts on shoe models that you like and maybe pick up an extra pair if there’s a good sale. Many shoes will go on sale right after the newest model is released and they’re trying to clear their inventory of the older model. (3)
  • When it’s time to say goodbye to your trainers try to find a place to recycle your old running shoes. Our local running store has a box to put shoes that need to be recycled. Look at the 4th link under resources to see a list of organizations that recycle shoes. (4)

Here are some ways to prolong the life of your running shoes:

  • Store shoes carefully away from extreme heat and cold. Don’t pile heavy boots or gear on top of shoes which can collapse the uppers.
  • Hand wash if needed as many performance components of the shoes aren’t meant to go through a washer and dryer. Instead you can use a stiff brush to get off crusted dirt and then use baby wipes or a little soap and a damp rag to clean.
  • Dry wet shoes by taking out the insoles and lightly packing with wadded newspaper (replacing when it becomes damp). Putting them by a heater or radiator can cause damage to the shoes.
  • I’ve read that it’s not a good idea to stockpile more than 2 years worth of shoes at once as midsole life is often limited and some materials may start breaking down.
  • Give each shoe a 48 hour break between wearing to allow the foam to decompress.
  • Untie shoes between wearing them instead of jamming your foot in and out without untying.
  • Keep track of the mileage on your shoes so that you know when to rotate them out of your long run line up and use them only for shorter runs.
  • Don’t wear your running shoes for activities like mowing the lawn or doing other outdoor activities which can cause unnecessary wear and damage. Retired running shoes can often turn into walking, cross training, or yard work shoes. (2)

Sources:
(1) www.runnersworld.com/health-injuries/a20820451/study-backs-rotating-shoes-to-lower-injury-risk/
(2) www.runnersworld.com/gear/a26655055/running-shoe-care/
(3) www.running.pocketoutdoormedia.com/sole-man-quiver-running-shoes_107583
(4) www.running.pocketoutdoormedia.com/feel-good-options-for-old-shoes_90394

Also Mentioned in This Episode

Lactigo -a topical gel that improves athletic performance and recovery. LactiGo is an effective, fast-acting topical gel with menthol and carnosine that
helps people maximize their athletic performance and speed muscle recovery. Applied directly to the skin above the desired muscles for targeted relief. Get a 10% discount by using the promo code MTA.

NuNee Device -designed specifically to relieve that dreaded Runner’s Knee pain. Use code MTA20 for a 20% discount.

On Running -Swiss made trail shoes

On Running Shoes – The clean and minimalistic design as well as its sole technology gives you the sensation of running on clouds. Try a pair of On’s for yourself for 30 days and put them to the test – that means actually running in them before you decide to keep.

BioLite Headlamp 330 -ultra-thin, super bright, NO-BOUNCE headlamp that’s so comfortable, you’ll actually forget you’re wearing it. Use code MTA at checkout for 15% off.

MetPro -Using Metabolic Profiling, MetPro analyzes your metabolism and provides you with an individualized strategy to obtain your goals.

The John Muir Trust -help us plant 262 trees!

Resurrected Runner -creator of parody songs for runners.

The post A Look at How We Are Training for Our Next Marathon appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Apr 12 2019
58 mins
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Rank #14: Interview with Fitness Expert Ben Greenfield

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In this episode we speak with author and fitness guru Ben Greenfield and in this episode’s quick tip, Angie will answer a listener question about how to stay in marathon shape.

Interview with Ben Greenfield

Ben Greenfield has been in the health and fitness podcasting space longer than we have. He was the first influencer to reach out to us after we launched and we used to have him on the show once a year. He’s a competitive triathlete, personal trainer, biohacker, speaker, and author of the book Beyond Training. He is a walking encyclopedia of health and fitness! In this conversation we talk to Ben about transitioning to obstacle course racing, building strength, tips on breathing for runners, ways to biohacker your house, and his thoughts on screen time and screen time for kids.

Tools and Take-a-Ways

To improve at obstacle course racing you should work on:

  • Grip Strength
  • Running Efficiency
  • Lactic Acid Tolerance

Three new terms to add to your knowledge base

Products and Books Mentioned

Also Mentioned in This Episode

John Muir Trust– contribute a tree to the MTA Forever Forest. We went with the idea of planting 262 trees as a nod to the marathon distance, with donations going toward our tree planting fund to create an ‘MTA Forever Forest’. “Come to the woods for here is rest. There is no repose like that of the green deep woods.” -John Muir

London Marathon Meet Up –See details here.

Yoga Trapeze -Yoga teacher Lucas Rockwood has come up with a unique solution called, The Yoga Trapeze. This lightweight, versatile inversion sling can hang in a doorway or from an exposed beam. It is excellent when used for yoga poses, core work, and traction (1-7 minutes upside down daily is recommended). You can try the Yoga Trapeze for 30 days for just $1 by going to YogaTrapeze.com, and if you use coupon code “marathon”, you’ll get a free instructional DVD with your order. 


MetPro – Take a metabolic assessment and schedule a complimentary consultation with one of their experts by going to www.metpro.co/mta

Topo Athletic -a gimmick-free running shoe company delivering footwear solutions for healthier, more natural running patterns. A roomy toe box promotes functional foot movement and the cushioned midsoles come in a variety of thicknesses and heel elevations, so you can pick your unique level of protection and comfort.

Athletic Greens -the best of the best in All-In-One whole food supplements and the easiest way to build a healthy habit each and every morning.

Shout out to MTA Coach Steve Waldon

Whew glad that’s over! Ran the Napa Valley Marathon this morning in preparation for Boston. Wanted to keep this under 3 hours but there were 26 miles of headwinds! After 2 hours 59 minutes and 48 seconds I crossed the finish but had to dig a little deeper than I wanted. 3rd in age group so I got a bottle of champagne! Coach Steve

The post Interview with Fitness Expert Ben Greenfield appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Mar 12 2019
1 hour 11 mins
Play

Rank #15: How to Use Suffering to Your Advantage as a Runner

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In this podcast episode you will learn how to use suffering to your advantage as a runner and transform fear into positive growth as we talk with ultra runner and author Akshay Nanavati.

Interview with Akshay Nanavati

Akshay Nanavati is a Marine Corps veteran and ultra marathoner who has set a goal of running across every country in the world. When we spoke with him he had just finished the country of Liberia.

He’s the author of the book Fearvana -The Science of How to Turn Fear into Health, Wealth, and Happiness.

Akshay has set a goal of running from boarder to boarder across every country in the world. When we spoke to him he had just finished a 167 mile trek across Liberia.

What is Fearvana?

Fear and Nirvana (bliss) are seemingly contradictory ideas. But they are actually very complementary. Fear is an access point to bliss and ultimately enlightenment itself. It is the bliss that results from engaging our fears to pursue our own worthy struggle. Without struggle there is not growth . . . so find, live, and love your worthy struggle.

Finding Peace in Chaos

For more context, here is a short talk Akshay gave at Harvard.


Also Mentioned in This Episode

Akshay Nanavati website: https://fearvana.com

Yoga Trapeze -Yoga teacher Lucas Rockwood has come up with a unique solution called, The Yoga Trapeze. This lightweight, versatile inversion sling can hang in a doorway or from an exposed beam. It is excellent when used for yoga poses, core work, and traction (1-7 minutes upside down daily is recommended). You can try the Yoga Trapeze for 30 days for just $1 by going to YogaTrapeze.com, and if you use coupon code “marathon”, you’ll get a free instructional DVD with your order. 


Blinkist -Blinkist is the only app that condenses thousands of nonfiction books into the best key takeaways and need-to-know information. 8 Million people are using Blinkist right now and it has a massive and growing library which ranges from self-help, business, and health to history books.

Mace -When runners hit the road or trails, they shouldn’t have to worry about self-defense. You can stay focused when you carry Mace Pepper Spray, because you’ll be prepared when it counts. Mace actually invented pepper spray – and they offer tons of other self-defense products. Enter promo code MTA for 20% off your kit today.


Shoutout!

At age 62 I just completed my first marathon (Disney) in a time of 4:06:09. Couldn’t have done it without the very helpful MTA podcasts. Proud to say I just signed up as a MTA member. Now I can become even more informed! Jeff

The post How to Use Suffering to Your Advantage as a Runner appeared first on Marathon Training Academy.

Jan 31 2019
1 hour 1 min
Play

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