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Comedy
Kids & Family
Parenting

What Fresh Hell: Laughing in the Face of Motherhood

Updated 5 days ago

Comedy
Kids & Family
Parenting
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Hosted by funny moms Margaret Ables (Nick Mom) and Amy Wilson (When Did I Get Like This?), “What Fresh Hell: Laughing in the Face of Motherhood” is a comedy podcast solving today’s parenting dilemmas so you don’t have to. We’re both moms of three, dealing with the same hassles as any parent, albeit with slightly differing styles. Margaret is laid-back to the max; Amy never met an expert or a list she didn't like. In each episode, we discuss a parenting issue from multiple perspectives and the accompanying expert advice that may or may not back us up. We talk about it, laugh about it, call out each other’s nonsense, and then we come up with concrete solutions. Join us as we laugh in the face of motherhood! Winner of the 2018 Mom 2.0 Iris Award for Best Podcast, the 2017 Podcast Awards People’s Choice for Best Family and Parenting Podcast, and finalist for the 2019 Romper's Parent's Choice Award. whatfreshhellpodcast.com

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Hosted by funny moms Margaret Ables (Nick Mom) and Amy Wilson (When Did I Get Like This?), “What Fresh Hell: Laughing in the Face of Motherhood” is a comedy podcast solving today’s parenting dilemmas so you don’t have to. We’re both moms of three, dealing with the same hassles as any parent, albeit with slightly differing styles. Margaret is laid-back to the max; Amy never met an expert or a list she didn't like. In each episode, we discuss a parenting issue from multiple perspectives and the accompanying expert advice that may or may not back us up. We talk about it, laugh about it, call out each other’s nonsense, and then we come up with concrete solutions. Join us as we laugh in the face of motherhood! Winner of the 2018 Mom 2.0 Iris Award for Best Podcast, the 2017 Podcast Awards People’s Choice for Best Family and Parenting Podcast, and finalist for the 2019 Romper's Parent's Choice Award. whatfreshhellpodcast.com

iTunes Ratings

302 Ratings
Average Ratings
269
18
5
6
4

Great listen!

By Loves Dogs!! - Aug 14 2019
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I love this podcast for funny and practical tips to help with motherhood!

Love

By MelHoli - Aug 07 2019
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What an amazing, funny, and encouraging podcast! It’s a must-listen every week!

iTunes Ratings

302 Ratings
Average Ratings
269
18
5
6
4

Great listen!

By Loves Dogs!! - Aug 14 2019
Read more
I love this podcast for funny and practical tips to help with motherhood!

Love

By MelHoli - Aug 07 2019
Read more
What an amazing, funny, and encouraging podcast! It’s a must-listen every week!
Cover image of What Fresh Hell: Laughing in the Face of Motherhood

What Fresh Hell: Laughing in the Face of Motherhood

Updated 5 days ago

Read more

Hosted by funny moms Margaret Ables (Nick Mom) and Amy Wilson (When Did I Get Like This?), “What Fresh Hell: Laughing in the Face of Motherhood” is a comedy podcast solving today’s parenting dilemmas so you don’t have to. We’re both moms of three, dealing with the same hassles as any parent, albeit with slightly differing styles. Margaret is laid-back to the max; Amy never met an expert or a list she didn't like. In each episode, we discuss a parenting issue from multiple perspectives and the accompanying expert advice that may or may not back us up. We talk about it, laugh about it, call out each other’s nonsense, and then we come up with concrete solutions. Join us as we laugh in the face of motherhood! Winner of the 2018 Mom 2.0 Iris Award for Best Podcast, the 2017 Podcast Awards People’s Choice for Best Family and Parenting Podcast, and finalist for the 2019 Romper's Parent's Choice Award. whatfreshhellpodcast.com

Rank #1: Parenting Styles: Which Ones Are We (And Should We Care?)

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Helicopter moms, snowplow moms, tiger moms, free-range moms… we usually define all of these parenting types in the negative: well, at least I’m not THAT.

But are there useful takeaways from each of these parenting styles that we can combine cafeteria-style to create our own? Can we reject some of the judginess of free-range parenting, or the tyranny of tiger momming, and still find things to love? What do we miss when we reject other moms' ways of doing things full-stop? 

Here are links to the books and articles we mention in this episode:

Frank Bruni: Where You Go Is Not Who You'll Be: An Antidote to the College Admissions Mania
Amy Chua: Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother
Foster Cline and Jim Fay: Parenting With Love and Logic
Nancy Gibbs for Time: Roaring Tigers, Anxious Choppers
The Grammarphobia Blog: The Original Tiger Mother?
Dr. James R. Laider for Autism Watch: The "Refrigerator Mother" Hypothesis of Autism
Heather Marcoux for Motherly: 'Snowplow parents' and the lessons we can take from them
Jessica McCrory Calarco for The Atlantic: 'Free Range' Parenting's Unfair Double Standard
Claire Cain Miller and Jonah Engel Bromwich for NYT: How Parents Are Robbing Their Children of Adulthood
Arti Patel for Global News: ‘Panda parenting’ is all about giving children more freedom — but does it work?
Katie Roiphe for Slate: The Seven Myths of Helicopter Parenting
Lenore Skenazy: Free-Range Kids: How to Raise Safe, Self-Reliant Children (Without Going Nuts with Worry)
Emma Waverman for Today's Parent: Snowplow Parenting: The Latest Controversial Technique
Esther Wojcicki for Time: I Raised Two CEOs and a Doctor. These Are My Secrets to Parenting Successful Children

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Aug 21 2019
51 mins
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Rank #2: Husband Crimes: Can This Marriage Be Saved?

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We asked you to tell us your spouses’ most unacceptable-- and also extremely minor-- household infractions.

356 of you responded.

Whether it’s turning off the AC because it's "too cold" at 75 degrees, creating a Sock Mountain of not-quite-dirty-enough laundry, or pausing Netflix to point out plot holes, this episode explores everything spouses do that is trivially horrible.

It must also be said: while these offenses are most often properly termed as Husband Crimes, this episode proves that Wives can also be guilty of using ten water glasses in one day, or of eating potato chips too loudly. It seems that no marriage is entirely free of Spouse Crimes.

 You are heard. You deserve justice.
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Aug 14 2019
57 mins
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Rank #3: Changing How We Talk To Our Kids (with guest Dr. Wendy Mogel)

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It’s easy for most parents to explain what’s wrong with how our kids speak to us: the snark, sarcasm, and eye-rolling are all things we could use a lot less of.  But could the way we talk to our kids use a little fine-tuning as well? 

Dr. Wendy Mogel’s latest book, Voice Lessons for Parents: What to Say, How to Say It, and When To Listen, is just out in paperback. In this episode, Dr. Wendy Mogel tells us how to bridge the ever-more-complicated communication gap between parents and children, no matter what age our kids are. Over the last two years we've quoted Dr. Mogel more than any other parenting expert, and no surprise- this interview is full of "aha moments" and great ideas. You can read and download the full transcript here.

And if you still need a little convincing that we should be focusing on the faults with our own parental communication, rather than the shortcomings of our children’s techniques, consider this quote from another classic of parenting advice, How to Talk So Kids Will Listen and Listen So Kids Will Talk:

"Rather than blaming your kids for all your parenting grief, you can improve communication with them by making a few changes to the way you speak to them and set the tone of a situation. Listening, sharing feelings, and respecting your kids will make your job as a parent far easier.”

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Apr 17 2019
1 hour 3 mins
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Rank #4: Screen Time

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This week’s episode is all about screen time. Given: Unlimited screen time is bad. But how much is okay? How much is too much? How do you handle the nightly battles of “But PLEASE, Mom! Just one more level!” when it’s time to unplug?

 Most importantly: is it ever okay to let our kids’ brains melt just long enough to get dinner finished?

 In this episode, we talk about how to limit screen time for each age group– toddlers to teens– while acknowledging that screens are an increasing part of our children’s lives, both inside the classroom and out.

 Since we recorded this episode the American Academy of Pediatrics has lifted its draconian “no screens under two” rule, which we heartily agree with. Encourage parents to make good choices; don’t treat us like idiots who are incapable of exercising judgment. Really, don’t. You wouldn’t like us when we’re angry.
Here’s links to other writing and products mentioned in this episode:
Resources for when you’re ready to go hard-core

* screenfree.org
* unpluggedchallenge.com
* sabbathmanifesto.org (National Day of Unplugging)
* Time Timer

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Oct 27 2016
43 mins
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Rank #5: Small Changes, Big Difference

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We asked all of you on the show and on Facebook to tell us the small changes you’ve made in your lives (as parents and as, you know, just actual people) that have turned out to make a big difference. This episode is full of game-changing ideas for your home, your school mornings, and your sanity.

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Apr 25 2018
50 mins
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Rank #6: House Rules That Work

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We asked our listeners to tell us their go-to House Rules. Whether these words to live by are hanging in your kitchen written in cutesy script on a faux-weathered piece of wood (“in this house we give hugs”) or have been implanted in your children’s brains simply by your repeatedly screaming them, here are your (and our) best House Rules for:
screens, fighting, pets, personal space, the dinner table, sleep, Saturdays, secrets, and being nice.

Join the conversation in our Facebook group!

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Jun 26 2019
52 mins
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Rank #7: Finding Your Mom Tribe

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Mom tribes are a thing… for some of us. Others find it harder to make and maintain fun, easygoing friendships with other parents. But should we feel bad if we don’t have a “Sex and the City”-style group that are all equally close and whom we see three times a week?  

Our listener Hester describes a mom tribe this way:  
  • like-minded moms with similar age kids who have one another's backs
  • can be one or many, depending on your comfort level  
  • more precious than ever when the traditional support system of close family is not availableIn this episode, we discuss our listeners’ advice on how to find mom tribes, how to deepen connections with the one you may already have-- plus whether online tribes count (yes).  In a day and age when our siblings and parents might live far away, it’s worth investing ourselves in the communities that can happen wherever we are. 
Here's how writer Jenny Anderson explains it:

I used to think that community was as simple as having friends who bring a lasagna when things fall apart and champagne when things go well. Who pick up your kids from school when you can’t. But I think community is also an insurance policy against life’s cruelty; a kind of immunity against loss and disappointment and rage. My community will be here for my family if I cannot be. And if I die, my kids will be surrounded people who know and love them, quirks and warts and oddities and all.

By the way, our Facebook group is a tribe of really cool, funny, supportive parents- join us!

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Jun 19 2019
51 mins
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Rank #8: Teaching Kids Empathy

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What is empathy, exactly? It involves both emotion and action. For our kids, it’s an acquired skill- one that needs our guidance and encouragement to be cultivated. Here’s how to model and teach empathetic behavior.
In this episode we discuss why empathy needs to be taught in the first place, when is the right age to start, the difference between pity and empathy, and how becoming more empathetic can benefit yourself (and your own kids) just as it benefits others.
Amy Webb says that establishing sameness is a great place to start:
"Once your child has some understanding that some people are different, now is a great time to find some common ground: 'I bet she likes a lot of the same toys/games/food that you like.' You can then ask the child or the child’s caregiver what they like to do. Establishing sameness is KEY. This is when the light goes on and children realize, 'Oh, she’s just another kid, like me. We are more alike than different!'"
Here are links to research and other writing on empathy that we discuss in this episode:
Jacqueline Woodson’s Each Kindness is an award-winning book for school-aged children about what happens when empathy is not chosen
Amy Webb for A Cup of Jo: How To Navigate a Special Needs Encounter
Katie Hurley for Scary Mommy: How Can I Teach My Child Empathy?
Sumathi Reddy for the Wall Street Journal: Little Children and Already Acting Mean
Dr. Chris McCarthy: Turn Around Anxiety

Photo by Charlein Gracia on Unsplash

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Jul 03 2019
51 mins
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Rank #9: The Best Mom Advice We Ever Got

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What’s the best mom advice you ever received? We asked our listeners and got a wide range of responses. Some aimed for the eternal perspective:
 The days are long, but the years are short.

 Some were more practically applicable:
 Don’t ever bring a vomiting child into your bed.
 (Truer words were never spoken, Stacy.)
 In this episode break down the best advice we ever received for parenting babies, toddlers, kids and teens. Here’s one essay we reference in the episode:
 Jenny Anderson for NYT’s Motherlode: Seeing Tantrums as Distress, Not Defiance
Thanks to everyone who contributed their mom words to live by!
Announcing our next live show! What Fresh Hell is coming to The Theater at North in Scranton, PA (Amy’s hometown) on Thursday, April 19th.  The performance is a benefit in memory of Lindsay Doherty and will benefit the St. Joseph’s Center Baby and Children Pantry (one of Lindsay’s favorite causes). Join us for a night of many laughs and a celebration of Lindsay’s life! Tickets are available here
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Mar 07 2018
55 mins
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Rank #10: What is Up With Toddlers?

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Have you a short fat dictator in your home? Do you cower before a 24-pound child demanding pizza– no, not THAT kind of pizza! the other kind, the kind she likes NOW, which apparently has neither sauce nor cheese?
 What is *UP* with toddlers?
 In this episode we discuss

 * why toddlers’ tantrums may have, at least at one time, been biologically necessary
 why taking your toddler’s french toast sticks away makes him feel like he’s suddenly swimming alone in open ocean
 how expecting a toddler to be “magically cute” is extremely problematic
 why, if you really must ice-skate with a toddler, you must always, always take your own skates off first

 And here’s links to some fascinating research, helpful tips, and funny toddler stuff we reference:
 Kate Gammon for Popular Science: Birth Of Memory: Why Kids Forget What Happened Before Age 7
Patrick Sauer for Fatherly: What’s Going On Inside A Toddler’s Brain, According To Science
Alison Gopnik’s TED talk: What Do Babies Think?
Mo Willems and his perfect description of how a toddler goes “boneless”
Toddlerography with James Corden and Jennifer Lopez
…and from England’s First Steps Research, a study indicating that a toddler’s daily caloric output is the equivalent of going 83 rounds in a boxing ring.
This episode also features our interview with Heather Spohr, co-author of the new book The Toddler Survival Guide: Complete Protection From the Whiny Unfed. Spohr’s book is hilarious *and* has practical advice (our favorite combo) for surviving the inevitable onslaught of the Toddler Apocalypse in your own household. Take heart, and plan ahead.
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Jan 10 2018
50 mins
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Rank #11: Yelling Less

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When it comes to mom-yelling we hold these truths to be self-evident: never yelling is not possible; less yelling is desirable.
 Let’s be real: there are times when every parent’s got to yell. Here’s how Lisa Belkin put it in The New York Times:

When all else fails, a few claps of oral thunder certainly show that Mom or Dad has had it, that humans can be pushed just so far, and this is what it looks like when you’ve pushed them too much.

But although we might agree that a little bit of hollering has its place, we’d both like to do less yelling in our homes, due to two other unavoidable parenting truths:
• The more you yell, the more you have to yell.
• The more you yell, the more your kids will yell.
In this episode, we discuss what we yell about, and then what to do about it. There’s usually an easier solution to what you’re yelling about than yelling, or at least a quieter one. Parenting expert Carolyn Dalgiesh, author of The Sensory Child Gets Organized, calls it a “workaround for the source of tension.”  In Amy’s house, for example, an extra set of toothbrushes in the downstairs bathroom cut the morning yelling by half.
And sometimes we have to face the fact that parenting without yelling takes a little more effort than parenting with. As Margaret’s sister-in-law likes to say,

Really saying ‘no’ means getting off the couch.

Here’s some links to other takes on the topic we discuss in this episode:

Amy Wilson for Redbook: Could You Go a Week Without Yelling at Your Kids? (spoiler alert: I could not)
Hilary Stout for The New York Times: For Some Parents, Shouting is the New Spanking

Sue Shellenbarger for the Wall Street Journal: Talking to Your Kids After You Yell
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May 24 2017
49 mins
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Rank #12: How To Be a Happier Parent (with KJ Dell’Antonia)

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Is a mother only as happy as her unhappiest child? In our experience, yeah, pretty much. And studies (referenced below) back that up– although they also suggest many parents also derive their greatest happiness from their child-raising.
 So how do we separate out our own sense of well-being from our children’s struggles? And in a more everyday sense, how do we find happiness in the daily slog?
 We talk it out with guest KJ Dell’Antonia, former lead editor of The New York Times’ Motherlode blog and author of the brand-new book How to be a Happier Parent: Raising a Family, Having a Life, and Loving (Almost) Every Minute. KJ says the key is finding simple, concrete solutions for what isn’t working– and letting go of some of the rest.
As KJ puts it:

When we’re not putting all our energy into getting our kids to eat and study and do everything exactly the way we want them to, we can put it into a much more positive place.

Nobody’s saying that you have to live in denial of your kids’ reality. But we think disengaging from our children’s struggles just enough so that our happiness isn’t directly pegged to theirs is the key to happier, more effective parenting.
Here’s links to other research and resources discussed in this episode:
Jordan Schrader for Alcalde: Parents’ Happiness Linked to Their Least Happy Child’s
Claire E. Ashton-James, Kostadin Kushlev, Elizabeth W. Dunn: Parents Reap What They Sow: Child-Centrism and Parental Well-Being
Julie Beck for The Atlantic: Study: Parents Only as Happy as Their Unhappiest Child
“Welcome to Holland,” by Emily Perl Kingsley
and Shakespearean voice teacher Patsy Rodenburg’s book The Second Circle, which Amy says has influenced her more than any book she’s ever read. Read its excerpts on parenting here.

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Aug 22 2018
51 mins
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Rank #13: Let’s Not Care About What We Weigh

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We won’t lie to you- we probably spend more time than we should thinking about what we weigh. Which is, admittedly, variable. But while we think about what we weigh plenty when we’re unhappy with what the scale says, we spend even more of our bandwidth on it in order to get to the number we have decided is arbitrarily acceptable (and then fight a losing battle to stay there).
 Something’s not right about that. But we suspect we aren’t alone— especially among mothers, who have seen our bodies change forever with pregnancy and childbirth, and then never quite change back. 
 What if we didn’t care? Okay: what if we cared just a little bit less? In this episode we talk about feeling good, and looking good, and how to maybe put a little bit of daylight between the two. 

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Apr 18 2018
58 mins
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Rank #14: Conquering Clutter

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America has 3% of the world’s kids… and 40% of the world’s toys. We’ve got clutter, right here in River City.
In our opinion the best decluttering advice, from Joshua Becker of Becoming Minimalist, is to “slow the accumulation of new possessions.” In other words, don’t let all that junk in the front door in the first place.

But assuming your household missed that memo— as ours both have— in this episode we discuss:

* non-vehicular nonsense
* our kids’ anxiety about purging toys, even long-forgotten ones
* the personal blind spots we have when clutter-clearing (Margaret has T-shirts from HIGH SCHOOL)
* the procrastination-enabling, problem-compounding reality of owning a storage unit
* the great unused potential of the back of your closet doors
* why the roasting pan you use once a year can become your toy room’s greatest strategy
* the surprisingly plausible “super-fun cleaning party”

Amy organizes a little bit at a time; she thinks emptying a junk drawer a day is the key to a tidy home.  Margaret says her house is way beyond the help afforded by cleaning out her makeup bag on a Tuesday afternoon. But wherever you lie on the clutter continuum, this episode is full of ideas for eating that elephant. One delicious bite at a time.
Here’s some links to research and resources discussed in this episode:

* the UCLA social science study in 2012 that shows our collective clutter-induced doom: Life at Home in the 21st Century: 32 Families Open Their Doors
* “low self-worth apparel”  as defined by creativity guru Julia Cameron
* the “decluttering burst,” from  Courtney Carver of Be More With Less
* the “30 Day Declutter Challenge,” from Liz Neiman of the Love and Marriage Blog
* from Beth Teitel for the Boston Globe: Today’s Families are Prisoners of Their Own Clutter

This episode is brought to you by Blinkist, which distills the best takeaways of popular non-fiction into 15- minute “blinks” you can listen to or read while you’re on the go. Check out decluttering “blinks” like Marie Kondo’s The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up or Julie Morgenstern’s Organizing from the Inside Out with our special code: http://bit.ly/freshblinkist
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Sep 13 2017
1 hour 4 mins
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Rank #15: When Your Kids Take Everything Out On You

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Most parenting experts say being our kids’ safe space includes letting some amount of their snarkiness roll off our backs. It’s normal. Don’t take it personally.
And knowing that it’s universal helps. Sometimes. A little.

But we still struggle. Shouldn’t we insist on respect from our kids? And what happens when the eye-rolling and "God, Mom, don't you know anything?" really starts to wear us down?

In this episode we discuss why kids take things out on us as parents (spoiler alert: it gets worse before it gets better) and how we can lower our reactivity in order to respond more effectively.

Here’s links to research and other writing on the topic that we discuss:
Christa Santangelo, PhD: A New Theory of Teenagers (book)
Alice G. Walton for The Atlantic: 12 Ways to Mess Up Your Kids
Sara Bean for Empowering Parents: “I Hate You, Mom! I Wish You Were Dead!” — When Kids Say Hurtful Things
Kim Abraham for Empowering Parents: Anger, Rage and Explosive Outbursts: How to Respond to Your Child or Teen’s Anger
Janet Lehman for Empowering Parents: Do Your Kids Respect You? 9 Ways to Change Their Attitude
Stephanie Klindt: 10 Ways To Set Appropriate Boundaries With Teens
Dr. Wendy Mogel: Mothers, don't take teen rejection personally
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Jul 10 2019
54 mins
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Rank #16: Saying No When Other Parents are Saying Yes

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How should we handle group situations where we have different parenting styles? When our particular rules around bedtimes, screens, curfews, or sugar are up against more lax rules (or none at all)?
 This topic was suggested by our listener Jessica:

 How do you deal with group situations where you parent differently without it causing friendship or family strain?  Especially once your kids are old enough to ask why there are different expectations?

 Being in close proximity with people who parent differently can make us question how we do it. When other parents have other, looser rules, those of us who are more strict can feel judged. When other parents have firmer rules and tighter structures, those of us who don’t also feel judged.
 Meanwhile, our kids are standing there watching us, wondering if we’ll cave and let them stay up until 12:30 just this once or not.
 In this episode we discuss:

 matters of preference versus matters of philosophy- and how to tell the difference
 the importance of offline discussions
 the role that “spaces and places” play (things might be a little looser at Nana’s house)
 when to default to the rules of the household you are in
 what happens when you have different rules from your co-parent
 why saying “because I said so” is a missed parenting opportunity

 Here’s links to articles discussed in this episode:
 Lisa Belkin for The New York Times: Different Families, Different Rules
Wendy Bradford for On Parenting: When One Child’s Rules Are Different Than The Other’s
Pete Wells for the New York Times: Happy-Meal Me
Here’s our takeaway: It’s okay to reconsider your own rules in these situations… just not in real time, and no matter what you do, not in front of your kid.
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Nov 28 2018
44 mins
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Rank #17: Do We Really Have To Play With Our Kids? When Parenting Feels Relentless

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According to researcher Patrick Ishizuka, "intensive parenting has become the dominant cultural model." Sounds about right. We spend triple the time actively engaging with our kids that our own parents did with us. And even then, we all feel guilty that we're not doing more. (Or that we kind of hate playing with LOL Surprise! Dolls, and we aren't hiding it very well.)

But is more always better? Are our modern hyper-organized days creating children who have no idea how to occupy themselves, who need either a screen or one-on-one adult attention at all times? Do we *have* to play with our kids? Is there a way for parenting to feel a little less relentless?

Here are links to research and other writing we discuss in this episode:

Claire Cain Miller for the New York Times: The Relentlessness of Modern Parenting
Rebecca Onion for Slate: Playtime is Over
Suzanne M. Bianchi et al: Changing Rhythms of American Family Life
Janet Lansbury: RIE Parenting Basics (9 Ways to Put Respect into Action)
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May 15 2019
51 mins
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Rank #18: Mom Worsts

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In this episode, Amy and Margaret advocate for their own lists of Mom Worsts, and discuss:
 —whether that most classic of Mom Worst plagues— lice— can even compare to the daily, unending hell of preparing three meals per day
 —whether Flat Stanley (insert your child’s own anthropomorphized “classroom mascot” here) is perhaps the worst thing ever imposed upon motherhood, or if the pinewood derby is even worse
 —whether the “All-Family Stomach Flu” is the absolute worst Mom Worst of all (spoiler alert: when Margaret says she will not go into details – DO NOT BELIEVE HER)

 Only one link this week: Amy’s own Mom Worst, as told to Parenting Magazine:
An Aerial Disaster: One Mom’s Tale of Flying Solo with Her Three Children

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Apr 26 2017
56 mins
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Rank #19: Mom Friends- How to Make Them, How To Keep Them

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Do you go on a moms’ night out and talk about … your kids? Does morning dropoff chit-chat feel  like a middle school cafeteria?
 In this episode we talk about deepening bonds with your mom friends, and keeping those relationships going when your kids graduate from whatever preschool or karate class brought you together in the first place.
 In this episode, we discuss:

 how to make the leap from a “mom chat” to a mom friend
 whether you have to be a phone talker to be a good mom friend (Amy hopes not)
 what to do when it’s your third kid and you’re plumb out of friend-making bandwidth
 the Bechdel test and its useful application to your mom-friend conversations (if you don’t know “Bobby’s mom’s” first name, try harder)
imposter syndrome, sadly universal in the mom friend world
what to do when your kids don’t want to be friends anymore but you still like each other
how to maintain your relationships with friends who aren’t parents (remember them?)

We love this advice from Darcy Shapiro for Scary Mommy: “How Making Mom Friends Feels Just Like Dating”

A wise friend once told me about the rule of threes- that is, she always makes sure when she likes someone (male, female, friend or date), she makes a point of hanging out with that person three times in quick succession, thereby never letting the momentum lull. After three times, a level of comfort is generally established whereby it becomes acceptable once again to take things for granted and get lazy. I fully ascribe to this strategy.
If you’re looking for another great parenting podcast, check out Joyful Courage. Hosted by Casey O’Roarty, Joyful Courage is a “conscious parenting podcast” featuring real talk with parenting experts designed to support, inspire and inform those of us on the parent journey. Casey believes our kids choose us, and that the challenges they present us with are exactly the challenges we need. How’s that for perspective? 
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Nov 22 2017
53 mins
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Rank #20: Is This Battle Worth Fighting?

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A couple weeks ago, we asked our friends on our Facebook page to tell us what battles they’re currently fighting in their homes— or choosing not to.
As we all know, there are some parenting buttons our children push that are perhaps best left ignored. Then there are dishes left in the sink instead of the immediately adjacent dishwasher, which we believe we have no choice but to interpret as a spouse’s call to arms.
In this episode we decide once and for forevermore which of the following battles are worth fighting:

* messy playrooms
* messy kids’ rooms
* food outside the kitchen
* co-sleeping children
* co-sleeping pets
* matching outfits (for school, church, family weddings)
* shorts in the winter
* picky eating
* hats at the dinner table
* saying “like” like, every third word

Even if a battle is worth— let’s say “skirmishing”— there are more and less productive ways of making your point, and in this episode we lay out what does and doesn’t work for us.
We also love Stephanie Dolgoff’s article for Parenting: How To Choose Your Battles.
Stephanie suggests creating a short “family-values list” of non-negotiable points (like no name-calling) in a non-confrontational moment. And when all else fails, don’t be afraid to compromise. As Stephanie writes,

“When [your kids] see you work out what’s really important, they learn how to work out for themselves what’s really important.”

See that? Choose your battles, and you just might win a few.
This episode is brought to you by Pip & Grow, makers of the Smitten Sleep System for babies. Inspired by the Finnish tradition, the durable and lightweight Smitten is ready to go wherever your infant goes. You can assemble the Smitten in five minutes or less— no cursing required!– and the Smitten meets all of the safe sleep recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics.
Use the code “FRESH” to get $10 off a Woodland Smitten. (That’s the gray baby box with the cute deer silhouette and birch pattern.) Find out more at pipandgrow.com— and tell them we sent you!
Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 25 2017
52 mins
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