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Rank #36 in History category

Society & Culture
History

History on Fire

Updated 4 days ago

Rank #36 in History category

Society & Culture
History
Read more

Where history and epic collide--"History on Fire" is a podcast by author and university professor Daniele Bolelli. For more, go to LuminaryPodcasts.com

Read more

Where history and epic collide--"History on Fire" is a podcast by author and university professor Daniele Bolelli. For more, go to LuminaryPodcasts.com

iTunes Ratings

3738 Ratings
Average Ratings
3232
254
113
64
75

Thank you

By DJHofFMaNNNN - Oct 13 2019
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Thank you for this series. I have learned so much.

The best history podcast

By Shane E12 - Sep 26 2019
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Love Daniele’s choices of subjects to cover and his take on each subject is spot on.

iTunes Ratings

3738 Ratings
Average Ratings
3232
254
113
64
75

Thank you

By DJHofFMaNNNN - Oct 13 2019
Read more
Thank you for this series. I have learned so much.

The best history podcast

By Shane E12 - Sep 26 2019
Read more
Love Daniele’s choices of subjects to cover and his take on each subject is spot on.
Cover image of History on Fire

History on Fire

Updated 4 days ago

Read more

Where history and epic collide--"History on Fire" is a podcast by author and university professor Daniele Bolelli. For more, go to LuminaryPodcasts.com

Rank #1: EPISODE 30 Gladiators in Ancient Rome (Part 1): Are You Not Entertained?

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Ancient Romans were obsessed with gladiatorial combat. In this two-part series, we time-travel back to get a sense of what the Games (of which gladiatorial combat was the main attraction) were like. In this episode: the origins of gladiators, human sacrifice, Achilles and the Iliad, feeding the dead with blood, who were the gladiators, female gladiators, the ludus, the different types of gladiators, the battles among the damnati, the naumachia, executions and ‘snuff plays’, the venatio, crushed by elephants or eaten by lions, the collapsing arena that killed over 20,000, the editor of the games, poor Romans eating lion for dinner, thumbs (up and down)...

Feb 01 2018

1hr 48mins

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Rank #2: EPISODE 20 The Conquest of Mexico (Part 1): People Of The Sun

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In the 1500s, two highly militaristic peoples fueled by religious ideologies requiring bloodshed clashed with one another. This is the tale of what happened when a band of Spaniards run into the Mexica (Aztec) empire. By the time the dust will settle, out of the 25 million indigenous inhabitants of Mexico, little over a million will be left standing.

May 25 2017

1hr 57mins

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Rank #3: EPISODE 36 The 47 Ronin (Part 1)

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The tale of the 47 Ronin is one of the most renowned revenge tales to ever come out of Japan. It is the subject of countless books, plays, and movies. It is also a story that has ignited never-ending debates. Some people argue that the 47 Ronin were paragons of virtue—perfect embodiments of the loyalty and honor that should be expected from the samurai. They offered the answer to the riddle that was plaguing the samurai at the beginning of the 1700s: what does being a member of a warrior class at a time of enduring peace? Other people instead look at the same story and walk away feeling like the 47 Ronin were violent thugs animated by questionable motives. In this two-part series of History on Fire, we dive deep into legend & history to find answers.
In this episode:
-A crash course in Japanese history
-The transformation of the status of the samurai
-The curious institution of seppuku
-Ritual disembowelment as a way to say ‘sorry’
-Death poems
-The ‘Kaishakunin’—a pal who would cut your head off to spare you the prolonged agonies of ritual disembowelment
-The “Dog Shogun”
-Asano Naganori: “Given to pleasure in preference of the sober business of government.”
-The consequences of pulling a blade inside the Shogun’s palace
-Bonus revenge story: two angry sisters against a samurai

Jun 28 2018

1hr 27mins

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Rank #4: EPISODE 39 Joan of Arc (Part 1)

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By 1429, the heir to the French throne was about to give up and flee in exile. The English and their Burgundian allies controlled huge parts of the country. With Orleans likely to fall in a not too distant future, the path was open for the English to conquer the rest of France. It looked like the game was up for him. As much as he tried, he couldn’t see any logical path to victory. But little did he know that help was on its way—a kind of help that didn’t seem to be logical, reasonable or likely. Help was coming in the form of an illiterate teenage peasant—a female at that—who was going to change his fortunes; a young woman who through sheer willpower would radically change the course of the war. She arrived at the royal court during France’s darkest hour with news that God had sent her to lift the siege of Orleans, and make sure the heir to the throne would be crowned King of France.
The young woman was Joan of Arc, and she was one of the most unusual individuals in history.

Sep 18 2018

1hr 52mins

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Rank #5: EPISODE 38 Monster in the Darkness

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What I am going to tell you is one of the craziest serial killer stories that you have never heard of. And there are very good reason why most people have never heard of this. In 1942, Death stalked London. Death came from the sky in the form of German bombs. And on the ground it came in the form of the blackout ripper—this is the name by which the monster came to be known. But publicizing the infamous activities of the Blackout Ripper is not something that was in the best interest of the nation at that time. The reaction of the citizens of London in the face of the German Blitz, the bombing campaign unleashed by the German Luftwaffe, has always been portrayed in heroic terms. The traditional version tells us that tough British people took the bombing in strides. They’d get bombed all night only to emerge with a smile in the morning ready to go to work as if nothing had happened. In part this was certainly true, many British people displayed incredible courage and resilience in the face of the German attacks. And this was a great propaganda weapon for the British government. It allowed them to tell Germany ‘your bombs can’t shake our resolve. They are having no effect on us, so feel free to stop any time you want and spare yourself further embarrassment.’ There clearly is something powerful in the ability to take your enemy’s best shot and smile back at them. It discourages them, and forces them to reconsider their strategy. So, of course, the last thing you want is to let them know that their strikes are hurting you. If you were to admit that the blackout is giving rise to a huge black market, if you were to talk too loudly about the doubling of the murder rate in your city, if you were to discuss how the bombing campaign indirectly gave a perfect cover for an incredibly brutal serial killer, then it’d be like admitting that bombs were working in opening fissures in British society. And if you were to admit that, then you could be sure that the bombs would keep on falling. And thousands would keep on dying. So, the Blackout Ripper was not just any other serial killer. He was a potential propaganda weapon in the hands of the enemy. For this reason, he had to be stopped, and stopped quickly. And better yet, he should be talked about as little as humanly possible. So, if you are wondering why his Ripper-colleague, Jack the Ripper, is pretty much a household name, whereas few have heard of the Blackout Ripper, you don’t have to wonder no more. The context of WWII made burying this tale a wartime necessity. This is simply not a story that anyone in Britain at the time had any interest in publicizing.

Aug 23 2018

1hr 36mins

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Rank #6: EPISODE 21 The Conquest of Mexico (Part 2): The Dogs of War

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In the 1500s, two highly militaristic peoples fueled by religious ideologies requiring bloodshed clashed with one another. This is the tale of what happened when a band of Spaniards run into the Mexica (Aztec) empire. By the time the dust will settle, out of the 25 million indigenous inhabitants of Mexico, little over a million will be left standing.

Jun 22 2017

2hr 10mins

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Rank #7: EPISODE 32A Anything That Moves (Part 1): The Parallel Stories of Sand Creek and My Lai

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I’m not going to lie. This is one of the darkest episodes of History on Fire. But there are reasons for this journey into the heart of darkness. The stories of Sand Creek and My Lai offer an opportunity to explore human agency, the choices separating good and evil, and how some individuals can choose to become sources of light even in the most horrible circumstances. In this first part, we will explore the events that in Colorado in the late 1850s and early 1860s led to a dramatic clash between the Cheyenne tribe and the United States. Within the context of this painfully ugly story, 26-year-old Captain Silas Soule offers a shining example of heroism.

Mar 07 2018

2hr 11mins

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Rank #8: EPISODE 24 The Pirate Queen

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At the very beginning of the 1800s, a Chinese woman went from being employed as a prostitute in the floating brothels close to Canton to becoming the leader of the biggest pirate confederacy in modern history. Despite ending up as one of the most successful pirates ever, little is known about her. Today, we dive into the mystery and explore her story.

Sep 14 2017

2hr 14mins

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Rank #9: EPISODE 34 The Magliana Gang (Part 1)

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This series is about the rise of a street gang that took over Rome in the 1970s and 1980s. The Magliana gang was not just one of many criminal organizations who operated in Italy.

May 03 2018

1hr 24mins

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Rank #10: EPISODE 31 Gladiators in Ancient Rome (Part 2): The Spirit of the Gladiator

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In this episode: how gladiators were both superstars and despised outcasts at the same time, gladiators’ groupies, Marcus Aurelius’ wife taking a bath in gladiator’s blood, Commodus and his 620-0 record in the arena, the clash between Christianity and gladiators, the evolution of MMA in the early 1990s, having your violent cake and eating it too, gladiatorial video games, Titus Pullo’s badassery, Conan’s prayer

Feb 14 2018

1hr 49mins

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Rank #11: EPISODE 22 The Conquest of Mexico (Part 3): Tenochtitlan Syndrome

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In the 1500s, two highly militaristic peoples fueled by religious ideologies requiring bloodshed clashed with one another. This is the tale of what happened when a band of Spaniards run into the Mexica (Aztec) empire. By the time the dust will settle, out of the 25 million indigenous inhabitants of Mexico, little over a million will be left standing.

Jul 21 2017

2hr 31mins

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Rank #12: EPISODE 19 Featuring Dan Carlin

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My favorite podcaster and one of my favorite humans joins me for an epic chat ranging across topics

Apr 28 2017

1hr 34mins

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Rank #13: EPISODE 23 The Conquest of Mexico (Part 4): Tenochtitlan Or Bust

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In the 1500s, two highly militaristic peoples fueled by religious ideologies requiring bloodshed clashed with one another. This is the tale of what happened when a band of Spaniards run into the Mexica (Aztec) empire. By the time the dust will settle, out of the 25 million indigenous inhabitants of Mexico, little over a million will be left standing.

Aug 17 2017

2hr 31mins

Play

Rank #14: EPISODE 29 I Drink and I Know Things (Where History and Game of Thrones Intersect)

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In this episode, I am joined by Aziz Al-Doory from The History of Westeros Podcast, and together we discuss some (definitely not all) of the ways in which history has influenced Game of Thrones. In this episode we’ll tackle: The Wall & Hadrian’s Wall, flaying, human sacrifice, feeding enemies to dogs, Agamemnon and Stannis Baratheon, parallels with the Bible, the Dothraki and nomadic steppe peoples, execution by molten gold, the real life examples of the High Sparrow, the walk of shame, the inquisition, the Red Wedding, the siege of Constantinople & the battle of Blackwater Bay, and much more.

Jan 18 2018

2hr 22mins

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Rank #15: EPISODE 37 The 47 Ronin (Part 2)

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The tale of the 47 Ronin is one of the most renowned revenge tales to ever come out of Japan. It is the subject of countless books, plays, and movies. It is also a story that has ignited never-ending debates. Some people argue that the 47 Ronin were paragons of virtue—perfect embodiments of the loyalty and honor that should be expected from the samurai. They offered the answer to the riddle that was plaguing the samurai at the beginning of the 1700s: what does being a member of a warrior class at a time of enduring peace? Other people instead look at the same story and walk away feeling like the 47 Ronin were violent thugs animated by questionable motives. In this two-part series of History on Fire, we dive deep into legend & history to find answers.
In this episode:
-A crash course in Japanese history
-The transformation of the status of the samurai
-The curious institution of seppuku
-Ritual disembowelment as a way to say ‘sorry’
-Death poems
-The ‘Kaishakunin’—a pal who would cut your head off to spare you the prolonged agonies of ritual disembowelment
-The “Dog Shogun”
-Asano Naganori: “Given to pleasure in preference of the sober business of government.”
-The consequences of pulling a blade inside the Shogun’s palace
-Bonus revenge story: two angry sisters against a samurai

Jul 26 2018

1hr 19mins

Play

Rank #16: EPISODE 26 Jack Johnson (Part 1): Bad To The Bone

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By 1900, the federal government had long abandoned Reconstruction, and white supremacy was returning to the South with a vengeance. Jim Crow was in full swing. Segregation was the law of the land. And Fifty years before Jackie Robinson challenged segregation in baseball, there was Jack Johnson.
Lynching was a weekly event. Any black man in the South not acting subservient could find himself dangling from a tree. Even African American leaders like Booker T. Washington preached that accepting segregation, keeping one’s head down, and working hard were the best options for black people.
Jack Johnson clearly didn’t get the memo.
At this time when simply looking a white man in the eyes, or talking to a white woman, could get one lynched, Jack Johnson made a living beating the hell out of white men in the ring. Living defiantly as if prejudice didn’t exist—he felt—was the best way to defeat racism.
It would be easy to mistake Jack Johnson’s story simply as a tale of standing up to racism. It’s about that—sure. But it’s also about a lot more. Because as much Jack Johnson stared down white supremacy, he also battled those black people who insisted that he behaved like a hard-working, God-fearing role model. But JJ wasn’t about to trade a cage for another. He wouldn’t be anyone’s puppet. He would have no master telling him how to live—not white ones, but no black ones either. His story is the tale of a man who, in spite of a time and place that would not allow it, was on a defiant quest to be free, and live life on his own terms.

In this episode:
-How a man who would be among the best fighters in the world grew up as a wimp having his sisters protecting him
-The color line in boxing
-The 1900 Galveston Flood
-Joe Choynski: first KOs Jack Johnson and then teaches him how to fight… in jail
-JJ’s complicated fascination with white women
-The curious story of Saverio Giannone (aka Joe Grim): “I am Joe Grim and I fear no man”
-Chasing Tommy Burns around the world
-Jack Johnson’s defiant smile
-“Jim Jeffries must emerge from his alpha alpha farm, and remove that golden smile from Jack Johnson’s face. Jeff, it’s up to you. The White Man must be rescued.” Jack London

Nov 09 2017

1hr 45mins

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Rank #17: EPISODE 33 On Good and Evil: From My Lai to Sand Creek

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What makes seemingly normal men commit horrific acts against civilians during war? What allows some people to act heroically in the darkest circumstances and what makes others turn into monsters? How does training and leadership play into this? After discussing the stories of Sand Creek and My Lai in Episodes 32A and 32B, in this episode Darryl Cooper (The Martyrmade Podcast) and I sit down with retired Navy Seal, author and podcaster Jocko Willink (The Jocko Podcast) to tackle these questions.

Apr 04 2018

2hr 13mins

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Rank #18: EPISODE 32B Anything That Moves (Part 2): The Parallel Stories of Sand Creek and My Lai

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In part B, I hand the microphone to my friend and master podcaster Darryl Cooper (from The Martyrmade Podcast.) Darryl explores the context of the Cold War in order to come to terms with what happened at My Lai, in Vietnam, in 1968. Horror abounds, but if you are looking for heroes in the midst of the horror, you can do a lot worse than hear about the story of Hugh Thompson.

Mar 08 2018

2hr 36mins

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Rank #19: EPISODE 44 Dan Carlin

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Dan Carlin is the undisputed king of historical podcasting, and one of my favorite human beings. Today we sit down to chat about the differences between Nazism and Socialism, the right-wing vs. left-wing paradigm, our favorite past U.S. presidents, the feeling you have when witnessing slow moving historical catastrophes, and much more.

Feb 18 2019

2hr

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Rank #20: EPISODE 40 Joan of Arc (Part 2)

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By 1429, the heir to the French throne was about to give up and flee in exile. The English and their Burgundian allies controlled huge parts of the country. With Orleans likely to fall in a not too distant future, the path was open for the English to conquer the rest of France. It looked like the game was up for him. As much as he tried, he couldn’t see any logical path to victory. But little did he know that help was on its way—a kind of help that didn’t seem to be logical, reasonable or likely. Help was coming in the form of an illiterate teenage peasant—a female at that—who was going to change his fortunes; a young woman who through sheer willpower would radically change the course of the war. She arrived at the royal court during France’s darkest hour with news that God had sent her to lift the siege of Orleans, and make sure the heir to the throne would be crowned King of France.
The young woman was Joan of Arc, and she was one of the most unusual individuals in history.

Oct 16 2018

2hr 7mins

Play