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Rank #183 in Food category

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Bartender Journey - Cocktails. Spirits. Bartending Culture. Libations for your Ears.

Updated 3 days ago

Rank #183 in Food category

Arts
Food
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Impassioned talk about Bartending, Cocktails and Spirits. Bartender Culture & Elucidation. Spirit & Cocktail Knowledge.

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Impassioned talk about Bartending, Cocktails and Spirits. Bartender Culture & Elucidation. Spirit & Cocktail Knowledge.

iTunes Ratings

107 Ratings
Average Ratings
103
1
1
1
1

Can't wait to hear each new one!

By PepMan11 - Feb 27 2017
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Really enjoy your podcast; just subscribed on iTunes. Am a home enthusiast.

So much knowledge!

By Bulldog Bravo - May 27 2016
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I look forward to each podcast, constantly learning something new.

iTunes Ratings

107 Ratings
Average Ratings
103
1
1
1
1

Can't wait to hear each new one!

By PepMan11 - Feb 27 2017
Read more
Really enjoy your podcast; just subscribed on iTunes. Am a home enthusiast.

So much knowledge!

By Bulldog Bravo - May 27 2016
Read more
I look forward to each podcast, constantly learning something new.
Cover image of Bartender Journey - Cocktails. Spirits. Bartending Culture. Libations for your Ears.

Bartender Journey - Cocktails. Spirits. Bartending Culture. Libations for your Ears.

Updated 3 days ago

Read more

Impassioned talk about Bartending, Cocktails and Spirits. Bartender Culture & Elucidation. Spirit & Cocktail Knowledge.

Rank #1: Challenges of Owning a Bar

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Vano is on the podcast this week!  We talk with Bar Owners from California about the some of the challenges of serving the general public.  Also, what do bar owners look for when hiring?  And, what are some of the issues Bartenders have with owners?Its a great talk with our friends Brian & Brianna!

Sep 04 2014

28mins

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Rank #2: Wine Knowledge for Bartenders 2.0

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Wine knowledge is an important part of Bartending.  This week on Bartender Journey its a "joint podcast" with the Wine For Normal People podcast!We chat with Elizabeth Schneider - a professional speaker, wine industry consultant and trainer.Elizabeth gives us a fresh, honest look at wine and great advice on how to serve our wine drinking guests.Also a brief review of the book:  Death & Co – Modern Classic Cocktails.As mentioned in this week’s podcast, we previously did a show called The Secret Language of Bartenders which you can find here.Pour a nice glass of wine and take a listen!  Use the player below, or subscribe on iTunes or Stitcher Radio.

Apr 02 2015

52mins

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Rank #3: Pisco Academy

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On
Bartender Journey Podcast # 138 we learn all about the South American
made Spirit Pisco, mix up some Pisco Sour Cocktails, and talk about
using Egg Whites in Cocktails.Listen with the player on below, on bartenderjourney.net or subscribe on iTunes or Stitcher Radio.

·     
Pisco is the native spirit of Peru and
Chile.  It is made from grapes, so can be considered a Brandy.  It is
usually, but not always, a clear (un-aged) spirit.

·     
We will learn all about it with Kappa Pisco
Brand Ambasador Anne-Louise Marquis.  We spoke to Anne-Louise in episode
#121
about Grand Marnier.

·     
Cocktail of the week is Pisco
sour.  I followed the recipe on kappapisco.com:


2 oz Kappa Pisco


1 oz Fresh Lemon Juice, (I used 1 1/4
oz)


1 oz Simple Syrup, (I used 3/4 oz)


1 Egg White


Shake vigorously with ice


Strain into a chilled coup glass (or
they suggest a champagne flute).


Top with a few drops of Angostura
bitters for decoration (and taste).

•              
Book of the Week: Food & Wine Cocktails 2015 Edition
This is a great book that comes out every year from the editors of Food &
Wine Magazine.  They collect cocktail recipes from top bartenders all
around the U.S. and mix in some classics as well.  There are great innovative
recipes in this book and beautiful photos.  It will be a great addition to your cocktail book collection
or a great gift!  (Buy Now on Amazon).

For much more information about this episode and especially using Egg Whites in Cocktails, please visit the show notes on BartenderJourney.net

Nov 25 2015

40mins

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Rank #4: Pour A Better Pint & Do Inventory Faster

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Pour A Better Pint & Do Inventory Faster

Bartender Journey Podcast # 137

Listen with the player below, or subscribe on iTunes
or Stitcher Radio.

·     
At the 2015 Hotel Experience Show at the Javitz
convention center in Manhattan we got a chance to speak with 2 very interesting
people:

o   Greg
Elliott of the Chill Rite 32 company

o   Vanessa
De Caria from Bevinco

·     
The Chill Rite company makes draft beer systems
that deliver beer to the tap at 32 degrees (or whatever temp you like),
regardless of the temperature of the keg. This system promises zero waste.  We talk to Greg about a lot of issues
regarding draft beer. They also make the Frost Rail.  The frost rail is a frozen rail built into the bar surface,
which the guest sits their drink on and it keeps it cold!

·     
We also speak with Vanessa from Bevinco - a
company that has a system for liquor inventory for bars & restaurants that
is very fast and accurate.  We’ll
learn a lot about doing inventory, (which is such a dreadful task!) 

·     
Book of the Week:  Cuban Cocktails 100 Classic
and Modern Drinks
.  This is a
great book from the Manhattan bar Cienfuegos. There are classic cocktails from
Cuba, plus lots of modern original recipes.  It’s a really fun book with beautiful photos from Cuba. 

·     
Cocktail of the Week is the El Presidente

o   ¾
oz Aged Rum

o   ¾
oz Silver Rum

o   ¾
oz Dry Vermouth

o   ¼
oz Orange Curacao, (I used Grand Marnier)

o   1
Barspoon Grenadine, (I used Jack Rudy)

o   Stir
with ice, strain into chilled couple. Lemon twist.

·     
Toast of the Week:“Here’s to the nights we’ll never
remember, with the friends we’ll never forget”.

Nov 19 2015

30mins

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Rank #5: Meehan's Bartender Manual

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Meehan’s Bartender Manual by Jim Meehan is, true to its name, a Manual.

It details how to layout a bar from start to finish. The section called “The Physical Bar” is extremely specific, starting with the location for your establishment – considering everything from the population density to income levels and more. Then the theme of the bar, or even, “do you really want one of those”. Then moving on to building the interior, the book gives detailed measurements of the ideal distance from the back edge of the bar to the front of the back bar, where the ice bins, coolers POS and more should be placed.

The book gives specific case studies and detailed technical drawings of famous bars such as the NoMad and Dead Rabbit.

There are pages about the sequence of building one round of 11 particularly complicated cocktails. I’ve been thinking about that section constantly at work, trying to maximize my workflow.

Information about icing, stirring, shaking, tasting and much more.

Then there are also 100 great cocktail recipes.

Honestly, this is a must-have book. There are many important details on designing a bar, service plus spirit & cocktail knowledge.

Dec 07 2017

22mins

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Rank #6: Grand Marnier Orange Liqueur

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This week on the Bartender Journey Podcast we chat with the charming Anne-Louise Marquis, Brand Ambassador for Grand Marnier.  We have a great chat about Anne-Louise's experience as a young bartender in Manhattan, about the iconic Grand Marnier Orange Liqueur, and about the life of a Brand Ambassador.  A fascinating conversation!Listen with the audio player below, on the Bartender Journey web site, or subscribe on iTunes or Stitcher Radio.

Aug 05 2015

36mins

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Rank #7: Happy Gin and Tonic Day!

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On this week's episode, Brian chats with Keli Rivers of Sipsmith Gin in honor of National Gin & Tonic Day, which is April 9, 2019.

Apr 04 2019

30mins

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Rank #8: Modern (and historic) Vermouth!

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On the Bartender Journey Podcast number 117, we talk with Adam Ford - author of Vermouth: The Revival of the Spirit that Created America's Cocktail Culture, and producer of Atsby Vermouth, (produced in New York!)We
talk about the influence Vermouth had on Cocktail Culture and why it
has been 'under appreciated' over the last several decades.  The tides
have turned once again for Vermouth...quality Vermouth is a hot
commodity once again!

Jul 08 2015

35mins

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Rank #9: The Science of Flavor

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Bartender Journey Number 273This time on the show we talk about the science of flavor with Derek Elefson.Derek shared some great resources with us:Flavor Wheels: Bourbonhttps://modernthirst.com/2014/08/06/the-bourbon-tasting-wheel/#prettyPhoto/0/ Malt Whiskieshttp://malt-review.com/2015/09/10/whisky-flavour-wheels-and-colour-charts/ Ginhttp://www.ginfoundry.com/gin-news/gin-tasting-wheel/ Winehttps://shop.winefolly.com/products/wine-flavors-chart

AROMA-FLAVOR TOOLS FOR SENSORY TRAINING:http://www.aromaster.com/https://www.cicerone.org/us-en/products/beer-flavor-maphttps://www.aroma-academy.co.uk/pages/wsethttps://www.flavoractiv.com/beverage/spirits/ FRUIT CHEMICALSKennedy Fruit Chemicals!  An easy way to quickly educate people about chemicals in fruit.  I highly encourage you to post this image with the link.https://jameskennedymonash.wordpress.com/2014/07/19/ingredients-of-all-natural-cherries/

Our sponsor this week is CAKE POS.CAKE is the Point of Sale system that lets bar & restaurant owners focus on the guest experience. Stop worrying about tracking every sale  - CAKE does that for you. No matter where you are, you can check in on daily reports and know they’ll be up to date. To get started with CAKE, check out trycake.com/bartender. For our Bartender Journey listeners, you can get $750 off the activation fee. That's a 75% discount.

Mar 15 2019

37mins

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Rank #10: Interview with Dale DeGroff!

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A chat over breakfast with King Cocktail himself - Dale DeGroff!Dale gives advice for bartenders who are just starting out.  Also he shares some cocktail history, and gives us a wonderful description of the Neighborhood Bar and its place in society.Don't miss this one!Take a listen with the player below, or subscribe on iTunes or Stitcher Radio.  You can find the Bartender Journey web site at:  bartenderjourney.netAlso, a brief review of the new cocktail book from Death & Co.Cheers!

Feb 05 2015

20mins

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Rank #11: American Single Malt Whiskeys

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When you think of Single Malt Whiskey, you probably think Scotch.  Some
great Single Malts are popping up throughout the U.S. including Westland
made in the city of Seattle, Washington.  We talk with Master Distiller
Matt Hoffman.
Listen with the audio player on this page on the Bartender Journey Web Site or Subscribe on iTunes or Android.  You can also listen on Stitcher Radio.
Matt Hofmann is co-founder and master distiller at Seattle’s Westland
Distillery. Westland has become America’s leading single malt distiller,
which won the title “2015 Craft Whiskey of the Year” at the San
Francisco World Spirits Competition and was named the “2015 Whiskey of
the Year” by the American Distilling Institute.
Book of the Week:
Tasting Whiskey: An Insider's Guide to the Unique Pleasures of the World's Finest Spirits
 by Lew Bryson, forward by David Wondrich
Cocktail of the Week:
Penicillin Cocktail
  • 2 oz. blended Scotch whiskey

  • ¾ oz. fresh lemon juice

  • ¾ oz. honey syrup
  • 2-3 quarter-size slices fresh ginger

  • ¼ oz. smoky Islay single-malt Scotch whiskey or Westland Peated American Single Malt
    Directions:  Muddle ginger in mixing glass.  Add honey syrup.  Muddle
    again briefly.  Add blended Scotch and lemon juice.  Shake with ice. 
    Double strain into an old fashioned glass with fresh ice.  Float smoky
    whiskey on top.  Garnish with candied ginger or lemon twist.

Foot Problems for Bartenders and others who stand at work.
Spending long periods of time on your feet can cause discomfort or worse!
Find quality work shoes at Shoes For Crews and get $10 off your first order by using this link.
Other helpful ideas:

  • Make sure you have rubber mats on the floor behind the bar.
  • Change your socks, and maybe your shoes halfway through your shift.
  • Alternating shoes one day to the next may help.  Shoes take up to 48 hours to dry out completely.
  • Compression socks
  • Remember, shoes don’t last forever.  It might be time to buy new ones!
  • Stretch and exercise - especially core muscles.
  • Raise
    up one leg when possible.  The reason for the rail that runs along the
    front of the bar is to make it more comfortable to stand for long
    periods of time so that patrons will stay longer.  The same concept may
    be useful behind the bar.
  • Losing weight can help.
  • OSHA Document: Stay Safe in the Restaurant

Toast of the Week:
May your home always be too small to hold all of your friends.

Jun 22 2016

32mins

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Rank #12: Beer Knowledge for Bartenders

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This week on the Bartender Journey Podcast, Vince interviews internationally recognized Beer Expert and author Stephen Beaumont!Having knowledge about the beer you are serving is very important these days.  As Stephen points out:  As a bartender you don't want your guests knowing more about the products you are serving than you do!The subject of Beer Cocktails also comes up, as well as how to serve a great pint of beer.Its another week of great Bartending talk on The Bartender Journey Podcast Episode #65!

Apr 22 2014

26mins

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Rank #13: The Manhattan Cocktail with Philip Greene

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The Manhattan - The Story of the First Modern Cocktail with Author Philip Greene.
It''s the Bartender Journey Podcast Number 181. Listen with the audio player on this page, or subscribe on iTunes, Android or Stitcher Radio.

The first cocktail was what we now know of as the Old Fashioned, but before the Manhattan came along, it was just called a "cocktail".  Vermouth came on the scene in the 1800's and changed the cocktail scene forever.  The Manhattan was the first drink to incorporate a second alcoholic ingredient.
Listen as we chat with Cocktail Historian, Philip Greene.

Sep 13 2016

26mins

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Rank #14: Interview with Jesse. Berkshires Bartender who shares some stories from behind the bar.

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Interview with Jesse - Bartender who works in the Berkshires who shares some great stories from behind the bar.Plus, The Water of Life is a whisky tasting event to benefit charity which will be held in downtown Manhattan on May 6, 2015.  This is the first annual event and its for a great cause.  All the proceeds will be donated to the Life Raft Group which is dedicated finding a cure for a specific type of cancer - GIST.The gentleman who founded this event - Dr. Mattew Lurin is a whiskey aficionado whose stepfather is a GIST patient.The word whiskey comes from the Gaelic phrase for  'water of life' which became the word "whiskey".This is going to be a great event and its for an awesome cause and we encourage you to attend!The format of the tasting will be very unique. It's basically like speed dating with Whisky Ambassadors to find your whisky to love. Each whisky brand will have a table that seats up to 5 guests at a time. They will share drams and stories for 12 minutes. Then, the group will move on individually to their next of many 'whisky dates'...13 in total, with built in breaks for dinner and dessert.Over the course of this event, guests will have the opportunity to try over 25 whiskies, accompanied by food pairings at each table, passed hors d'oeuvres, buffet dinner and desserts.All proceeds raised go to the charity, The Life Raft Group whose simple focus is to cure a form of cancer — Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors (GIST). – and to help those living with it.Use the code RAFT1550 to get an additional $50 off the ticket price, which is a charitable donation, (legal disclaimer - double check that with your account please!)You can buy tix at lrgwateroflife.org and get more info on the charity at liferaftgroup.org.Remember to use the discount code RAFT1550.  Next item of business -- a bit of industry news.  The Manhattan Cocktail Classic was canceled!  The event was passed to new management this year, and apparently they just couldn't sort out the details in time, so they just canceled it.  What a shame...it was such an amazing event.  Well, TOTC is coming up!Book of the week its: All About The Guest -- such a great title!  Author Steve Difillippo bought his first restaurant when he was just 23 years old and now owns lots of restaurants up and down the East Coast.  Steve makes some great points in this book, here is a favorite -- Steve says every decision he makes he asks himself, "is this going to make things better for the guest?"  ... an awesome philosophy.He also talks about how you can't let demanding guests distract you from the others --that is, the easy going guests, who are really who you want coming back anyway!  He says you need to make sure you give all your guests the attention they deserve.  This is good to keep in mind while you are behind the bar!Toast of the Week:I like beer. On occasion, I will even drink beer tocelebrate a major event such as the fall of communismor the fact that the refrigerator is still working.--Humorist Dave Barry

Apr 29 2015

27mins

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Rank #15: Tasting Whiskey with Lew Bryson

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Sep 14 2017

34mins

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Rank #16: The Old Fashioned

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Bartender Journey Episode #263

The Old Fashioned.

I was at a sitting at a bar the other day and there was a bartender, training a young lady who was obviously brand new to bartending. The younger one asked the one who was doing the training “how long have you been bartending”. She answers “nearly 15 years”.

A ticket comes in for an Old Fashioned. Here’s a learning opportunity for the newbie, right?

She explains how to make it:

  • “Get a rocks glass
  • Get an orange slice and a luxardo cherry and muddle it in the glass.
  • Add ¼ to ½ oz of simple syrup and about the same amount of sweet vermouth.
  • Add ice and then fill nearly to the top with whiskey, (usually you should ask what type of whiskey they would like).
  • Top with club soda.
  • Put 3 or 4 dashes of bitters on top”

There are a lot of problems here. Lets take them one by one.

  • The muddled “fruit salad” Old Fashioned was an unfortunate variation on the classic recipe. Some people like them and even expect them that way, which is fine…the best cocktail for someone is the one made exactly the way they like it. But the classic recipe is water, sugar, bitters and whiskey…we’ll talk about where that description comes from in a few minutes. Somewhere along the road it became popular to muddle an orange slice and a red maraschino cherry with sugar and bitters.The muddling in an Old Fashioned is supposed to be to incorporate the granular sugar (or sugar cube) with a little water and the bitters.
  • Moving on to the second mistake in my example. THERE IS NO VERMOUTH IN AN OLD FAHIONED!   There is sweet vermouth in a Manhattan…not an Old Fashioned
  • Next…she says “top with club soda”. Yes we do want to dilute it a bit. Some books will tell you do this. Personally I add the water by stirring the whole thing in my mixing cup with ice. This chills the drink down and the melting ice adds water or “dilution”. I strain it into a glass with fresh ice.
  • Next she said to “put 3-4 drops of bitters on top”. 100% wrong. I don’t like to flat out say somebody is doing something wrong, but no don’t do that.You want to incorporate the bitters into the drink. While there are drinks which call for drops of bitters on top, such as the Pisco Sour…not the Old Fashioned.

This is my recipe, and its written almost exactly like this in Jeffrey Morgenthaler’s The Bar Book, which is more or less the final word for me personally in all matters Bartending.

In mixing cup:

Stir with ice to chill and dilute.

Strain into an old fashioned glass with one large 2” ice cube. Express oils from an orange twist (use a Y-peeler to make orange twist to order). You could also use a lemon twist, which is delicious also.

Old Fashioneds can of course also be made with Rye whiskey or even rum. I’ve seen Reposado or Anão Tequila Old Fashioneds too.

In Sasha Patraski’s book Regarding Cocktails Sasha’s protégé Sam Ross shares his recipe for an Old Fashioned variation called the Tattletale. Its made with Angostura bitters, honey a blend of a Highlands scotch and a smoky Islay scotch.

So of course, there is no end to variations and methods, but I just feel like its good to know the proper traditional way of making things before going off on tangents.

History wise:

The earliest known printed definition of the “cocktail” appeared in the newspaper the Balance and Columbian Repository in 1806. It was written in response to a reader who asked for a definition of the word. It said a cocktail is “A stimulating liquor, composed of spirits of any kind, sugar, water and bitters.”

Quoting from Wikipedia, “The first use of the name ‘Old Fashioned’ for a Bourbon whiskey cocktail was said to have been at the Pendennis Club, a gentlemen's club founded in 1881 in Louisville, Kentucky. The recipe was said to have been invented by a bartender at that club in honor of Colonel James E. Pepper, a prominent bourbon distiller, who brought it to the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel bar in New York City.”

Robert Simonson mentioned that it was simply referred to as a “whiskey cocktail” until the late 19th century. Mr. Simonson wrote a great book all about the Old Fashioned called The Old-Fashioned: The Story of the World's First Classic Cocktail, with Recipes and Lore. I’ll have a link to that along with the other books I mentioned.

Speaking of prohibition, as I record this today Dec 5, 2018 it is Repeal Day! This is the anniversary of the end of Prohibition in 1933. Its an unofficial Bartender holiday, or at least excuse for a party! I happened to be almost at the end of binge watching Boardwalk Empire, which was a great show on HBO about the prohibition era. Its fictional, but a lot of historical characters are in the show like Lucky Luciano, Al Capone and Elliot Ness. The show is now available on Amazon Prime if you want to check it out.

So mix yourself up and Old Fashioned. I’d love to see your version. If you could post a picture on IG and give it the hash tag

#BartenderOldFashioned

Depending how many we get, I’ll try to mention them all on the next show.

I’ll be posting mine on my IG which is BartenderJourney.

Here’s a toast:

Here’s to everything that is old.

Old friends, old times, old manners and old fashioneds.

Dec 05 2018

7mins

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Rank #17: Training Day! How to make a Bartender out of a Server in One Night!

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This week on the Bartender Journey Podcast, Vano tells a story about a night when one of his fellow bartenders couldn't make it to work.  It was destined to be a busy night, and the bar was desperately understaffed.  The manager pulled a server from the floor to help out behind the bar...its a story of "Baptism by Fire!"Also, we raise a glass to our Men & Women of the Armed Forces.  Its another week of great bartending talk!

Jun 25 2014

24mins

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Rank #18: The Martini

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The Martini

“Martini, shake or stir”. Here’s my take on that.

James Bond ordered his Martini’s Shaken not Stirred because that is the EXCEPTION to the rule. If he had ordered just a “Martini”, it would have been stirred because that is the classic recipe.

If the guest requests it there is nothing wrong with shaking this drink, but you will never see a decent cocktail book that suggests you to shake a Martini.

The general rule is, if it has only spirits in it, you stir. If it has any type of juice in it, it is shaken.

When stirring a drink you are trying to chill it and also add water to it, or “dilute” it as we say. Try taking some gin and vermouth, put it in a bottle and put it in the freezer. Don’t stir (or shake) it with ice. That’s not a Martini. It will be too strong and it will not taste very good.

When stirring a drink with ice we are looking for a silky texture, which is desirable in a Martini or Manhattan style cocktail. When shaking a drink, like say a Margarita, you are looking to make a bright drink with some air bubbles introduced.

How long do you stir? I was at an event recently and in the swag bag was a bar spoon with a thermometer on the top. It was in Celsius so I was looking to get to about 0 degrees or a little colder. What I discovered was that I wasn’t stirring long enough.

You noticed I said “0 degrees or a little colder”. Interestingly enough, through some science that I may never understand, you can actually make the drink a little colder than the ice!

Dave Arnold, the upmost authority on the science of drink making, talks about that in his great book Liquid Intelligence. Tristan Stevenson also mentions it in his book The Curious Bartender. He and I talked about it when I interviewed him back in episode #122.

Dave Arnold’s Liquid Intelligence will be our book of the week. This book is highly recommended and a great resource. Dave is famous for using scientific equipment like rotovaps and centrifuges. I went a long time without reading this book, because I though “I’ll never have a centrifuge”, but he took what he learned using this equipment and uses it to teach interesting techniques and stuff you might not have though of otherwise.

In the book he also talks a lot about the effects of stirring and shaking. Interestingly enough, when stirring or shaking a drink, eventually equilibrium is reached and it wont cool anymore or dilute anymore. It will of course eventually start to warm up and the ice will start to melt, adding more dilution, but it can only get so cold.

This is helpful to know for a couple reasons, one of which is to keep in mind when building a large round of drinks. For instance if a Martini is the order, you might want to add the ingredients to your mixing cup, add the ice, but stir later. Or you can stir and let it sit there with the ice still in the cup while working on the rest of the round, then strain at the last moment. According to Dave Arnolds experiments, there won’t be much difference.

Does the size of the ice matter when shaking or stirring? It seems like the answer is, “not really” although that could be an entire podcast to itself. As a general rule it seems that once proper temperature is reached the dilution will be correct, no matter the size of the ice, although the one exception would be crushed or shaved ice.

The Martini is our cocktail of the week. What’s the best way to make it? The way your guest wants it! Ask a lot of questions when somebody orders one.

The history of the Martini is difficult to trace. David Wondrich, the ultimate cocktail historian will tell you so, and in fact does just that in his great book Imbibe!

In the late 1800’s the drink was usually made with Old Tom Gin, which is sweetened. Sometimes gum syrup was added. The “Dry Martini” appeared around the turn of the century, but it wasn’t dry in the sense that we think of it today. In fact one recipe published around that time period had a 1:1 ratio of Gin to Dry (or “French”) Vermouth.   The Gin was changed to a London Dry style gin or Plymouth Gin which is also not sweet at all.

Back in the day, Orange Bitters were always added, which is a really interesting addition to a Martini. Give it a try! I wouldn’t force it on an unsuspecting guest, but try it yourself, see what you think, and maybe suggest it to an adventurous customer.

Back to the amount of vermouth. I think the average consumer expects very little vermouth in their Martini, although it is becoming popular in Cocktail Bars to have a 1:1 Martini on the menu. It’s a wonderful drink this way, with the orange bitters and a lemon twist, but of course you need to have a quality vermouth that has been taken care of properly and is not too old. Please store your vermouth in the cooler! Write the day you opened it on the back label of the bottle. Ideally you don’t want to keep it more than a month after opening. At 2 months, throw it out! I use Vacuvin wine stoppers in my open Vermouth bottles. This is a very inexpensive item – about $12 – that pumps the air out of open wine bottles to help preserve it. They are perfect for Vermouth and other fortified wines as well.

Next thing to talk about is the glass. Those giant bird bath or “Steakhouse” martini glasses are ridiculous. Believe me I know. I Bartender at a Private Club, we use them. The Members expect nothing less. Those stupid things hold 8 oz if you fill it to the very top, which people seem to expect! That’s not one drink! That’s 4 drinks!

So what kind of glass is good? You often here me talk about a chilled coupe glass, which is ideal for a Martini.   For anyone who might not be familiar – it’s the old fashioned champagne glass that’s like a saucer or bowl with a stem.

Ideally we want the glass chilled in the freezer until the last minute, but if you don’t have a cooler to keep your glasses in, of course you can chill it with ice and water. Before you start making the drink, pack the glass with as much ice as you can fit and fill to the top with water.

For garnish, olives are traditional. If the guest doesn’t specify, its olives. One big or 3 small on a cocktail pic.   Always an odd number, an even number is bad luck. Ha. I don’t know why, but it is. I asked David Wondrich about this one time and he said “it’s a tradition and if you choose to perpetuate it, you should.” I said “I do! I do choose to perpetuate it!”

A lemon twist is my favorite. The best twists are made with a y-peeler. Then hold the twist over the drink and using both hands put it between your thumbs and index fingers and start to sort of fold it in half lengthwise. This expresses the oils from the drink into the glass. Its awesome. Personally, I actually like my Manhattan this way too.

So the Martini – seems like a simple drink on the surface, but there are some things to consider.

Dave Arnold, Don Lee and Greg Boehm, who founded Cocktail Kingdom, are opening a new bar in Manhattan. It should be opening any day now…that should be really interesting. Don Lee is a super smart dude and Dave really knows his stuff. Greg is a very interesting guy too. One innovation that I read about at this new spot is: those in a hurry can buy bottled cocktails from vending machines with a $15 token. I can’t wait to check this place out.

Your can still apply for Bar methods for the August 2018 session. I’m recording this on June 6, 2018 and applications are still open for a few more days. I did this course back in 2016 and trust me, you wont regret it. Its 3 days of education in Manhattan, with happy hours and dinners and parties. You stay in the awesome Park South Hotel and the price is extremely reasonable. Trust me. Apply at barmethods.com

Another great educational opportunity - BarSmarts Advanced is coming to Philadelphia on September 26. This is a full day of education for the likes of Dale DeGroff, David Wondrich, Paul Pacul, the list goes on. For this you need to do the BarSmarts online course first. Check that out at BarSmarts.com

There are a few more sessions of CITC for this year with Gary gaz Regan. Not sure if he has any room left, but that is a wonderful experience. You can find out about that at gazregan.com/cocktailsinthecountry

I’ve done all three of these educational experiences. I get nothing for telling you about them, but I just want you to know about them, because they are all amazing (and affordable).

I missed a few podcasts in the last few weeks. I have a lot on my plate right now family wise, I wont go into the details, but if you are interested you can scroll back in the feed to the show called “Real Talk From Bartender Journey”. It looks like things are starting to get better, so hopefully we’ll be back on track soon.

I am definitely going to Tales of the Cocktail this year – the trip is already booked, so I’ll have lots of great stuff for you from there as well.

Please follow me on IG. @ Bartender Journey

Here’s our toast:

May the chicken never be hatched that will scratch your grave.

Jun 07 2018

16mins

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Rank #19: The Complete Cocktail Manual with Lou Bustamante

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This week we talk to Lou Bustamante. He is the author of The Complete Cocktail Manual: 285 Tips, Tricks, and Recipes. This is a great book and is sanctioned by the United State Bartender's Guild.

It is Bartender Journey Podcast # 206! Listen with the audio player on this page, or subscribe on iTunesAndroid or Stitcher Radio.

Cocktail of the Week – El Presidente

1½ oz. rich white rum


1½ oz. Dolin Vermouth Blanc

1 barspoon orange Curaçao or Grand Marnier


½ barspoon real grenadine
*

  • Stir ingredients well with cracked ice and strain into a chilled glass. Express oils from an orange twist over the top and drop in or discard. Garnish, if desired, with a cherry.
  • *Real Grenadine
:

    2 cups fresh pomegranate juice or POM Wonderful 100% pomegranate juice

    
2 cups unbleached sugar

    
2 oz pomegranate molasses

    1 tsp orange blossom water

    Warm juice just enough to dissolve sugar.  Add pomegranate molasses and orange blossom water.  Keep chilled.

    Morgenthaler Article on grenadine

  • This drink was was apparently named in honor of Mario García Menocal, president of Cuba from 1913 to 1921. Of course in 1920 when Prohibition took effect in the US, many people would fly down to Cuba for the weekend to get some legal booze and live it up a little. The cocktail spread around, and was soon found in some of the illegal US Speakeasies during Prohibition.

Mar 31 2017

34mins

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Rank #20: Bartender Journey Episode #20

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Another week of great bartender talk!

Listener questions:  How to prepare for "The Rush" & how to deal with a regular customer who gets unruly.
Also, a great interview with Andrew Quady who makes an awesome Vermouth!  Vince & Vano mix up (and enjoy), some nice cocktails made with Andrew's products while talking to him.
Mix yourself a cocktail and take a listen!

Sep 24 2013

39mins

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