Cover image of Data Stories
(384)

Rank #174 in Arts category

Arts
Visual Arts

Data Stories

Updated 1 day ago

Rank #174 in Arts category

Arts
Visual Arts
Read more

A podcast on data and how it affects our lives — with Enrico Bertini and Moritz Stefaner

Read more

A podcast on data and how it affects our lives — with Enrico Bertini and Moritz Stefaner

iTunes Ratings

384 Ratings
Average Ratings
217
161
1
2
3

Useful

By AJVirdi - May 29 2019
Read more
Great podcast practical stuff

Insightful conversations with industry pros

By rhymeswithsnake - Sep 16 2017
Read more
Great guests, thoughtful discussions, and nerdy fun.

iTunes Ratings

384 Ratings
Average Ratings
217
161
1
2
3

Useful

By AJVirdi - May 29 2019
Read more
Great podcast practical stuff

Insightful conversations with industry pros

By rhymeswithsnake - Sep 16 2017
Read more
Great guests, thoughtful discussions, and nerdy fun.
Cover image of Data Stories

Data Stories

Updated 1 day ago

Rank #174 in Arts category

Read more

A podcast on data and how it affects our lives — with Enrico Bertini and Moritz Stefaner

Rank #1: 005  |  How To Learn Data Visualization (with Andy Kirk)

Podcast cover
Read more
Hi Folks! We love Andy so much that we decided to keep him with us for another episode (well, actually we hope somebody will eventually pay the ransom). This time we talk about “learning visualization”, which is the perfect topic for him given his experience with his training visualization courses.

We received many requests from people who wanted to know how to learn visualization in the past. So, here we are with a more than one hour long podcast with the three of us talking about it. We just hope you’ll find the time to listen to the entire episode. If not, the breakdown below can help you chunking it into a few sessions. Have fun!

Breakdown of the episode

Introductory thoughts
00:00:00 Intro, Andy Kirk (http://visualisingdata.com) is again our guest
00:01:15 Topic: How to learn visualization
00:01:56 Multidisciplinarity
00:06:31 Reports from teaching practice
00:09:21 Theory and practice – rules vs, free exploration
00:12:24 Do you need to start with a question?

Basic skills
00:15:43 What is the basic skill set to learn?
00:16:15 Visual variables
00:18:53 Statistics and data analytics
00:19:32 Gestalt laws
00:20:32 The journalistic sense – what is an interesting angle?
00:22:19 Position is everything
00:23:38 Color is difficult

Process and tools
00:25:05 Tools
00:26:18 Data types and repertoire
00:27:15 Metaphors
00:28:52 Interaction
00:31:27 The role of design
00:32:57 How to get started?

Learning options and books
00:39:46 Everybody should have a datavis course!
00:41:32 How to learn it yourself? Books, lectures, …
00:42:39 Stephen Few: Show me the numbers
00:43:20 Andy’s first book, and mo is the cinderella of datavis
00:43:52 Readings in Information Visualization: Using vision to think
00:45:09 Edward Tufte: Visual display of quantitative information
00:46:05 Ware: Information Visualization – Perception for Design
00:47:42 Misc.
00:49:23 Our scoop!
00:52:03 Google for “information visualization lecture pdf”

The craft of visualization design
00:53:43 Now that you know everything – how to do it in practice?
00:55:01 DIY vs. template-based tools
00:57:01 Do you need to learn how to program? Yes, yep, yes, yeah. Me too.
00:58:36 Tools
01:00:17 Finding data
01:02:28 Put it out there
01:04:08 The pathetic misery that is creating data visualizations

Conclusion
01:05:52 Trying to wrap it up
01:07:13 see conference – and see+
01:08:44 Trying to wrap it up – again!

Resources and Links

That’s all folks. Let us know how you like it and feel free to ask more questions if you have.

Apr 24 2012
1 hour 10 mins
Play

Rank #2: 000  |  

Podcast cover
Read more

Hi Folks, great news … we are experimenting with a new format for Data Stories that includes … that includes … that includes … guess whaaaaaat? Video!

After having heard many many times that it’s hard to imagine how a visualization looks like when we are talking about it, we have decided to experiment with a new format.

This is for now just a pilot to see how you guys react, so we would love to hear your feedback about how you like it and how we can improve.

To be clear: we are not planning to substitute our regular podcast with this, we are trying to build a parallel channel.

Here’s the video!

https://vimeo.com/datastories/datastories-tv-00

In this pilot episode the great Gregor Aisch from the New York Times agreed to describe in detail how the amazing 3D Yield Curve Chart has been realized.

As many of you may know, 3D visualization has not a very good reputation among data visualization experts, yet Gregor and Amanda managed to create a super interesting and useful 3D chart.

Gregor shows us where the idea originated from, all the crazy details about how to create a 3D chart that people can actually read, and how to calculate optimal views and a good narrative out of it.

Enjoy the new TV show! We are looking forward to hearing from you.

P.S. A big big thank you to Gregor for accepting to shoot this video with these two totally unexperienced video editors! Thanks Gregor, that was awesome!

May 08 2015
Play

Rank #3: 035  |  Visual Storytelling w/ Alberto Cairo and Robert Kosara

Podcast cover
Read more

Hi all,

Hot topic today! We invited Alberto Cairo and Robert Kosara to discuss the role of storytelling in visualization.  What is storytelling? Is all visualization storytelling? Should we always strive for telling a story? How does storytelling match with exploratory visualization? Should we aim more for worlds and macroscopes than stories as Moritz advocated a while back at Visualized? We went on a somewhat lengthy discussion on these topics and I think we all ended up agreeing on a lot of things and developed a much more nuanced view of storytelling. As you can see from the picture we had lots of fun (thanks Robert for taking the screenshot). Fantastic chat!

Note: Alberto had a lot more to say after the episode so he decided to publish a follow up post that clarifies some of the things he said on the show. But — spoiler alert — listen to the episode first!

P.S. Big, big thanks to Fabricio Tavares for taking care of the audio editing of this episode!

Links

Related episodes

Apr 16 2014
1 hour 18 mins
Play

Rank #4: 140  |  Data Visualization Society

Podcast cover
Read more

[Our podcast is fully listener-supported. That’s why you don’t have to listen to ads! Please consider becoming a supporter on Patreon or sending us a one-time donation through Paypal. And thank you!]

Have you heard of the “Data Visualization Society”? This is a new initiative started by visualization designers Amy Cesal, Mollie Pettit and Elijah Meeks. The DVS started with a simple form and a Slack channel and experienced in a few days a massive level of interest (more than 3000 people signed-up in a matter of days). On the show we talk with the founders to know more about how this happened, interesting stories about what people are doing within DVS and plans for the future. Enjoy the show!

Update: After the recording took place, DVS also launched their annual data visualization community survey. Make sure to take part (before June 15, 2019).

May 29 2019
46 mins
Play

Rank #5: 003  |  How do you evaluate visualization?

Podcast cover
Read more

Hi there, we made it to the third episode (a bit late though, Moritz was travelling to SXSW).

In this episode we first answer to some of the questions we received and then we move on to the main topic: how do you evaluate visualization? We have been discussing some contests in episode #2 and thought evaluation is really a key issue there.

Breakdown of the episode

[00:00] Intro
[01:34] Listener question: Terms and conditions in competitions
[03:46] Listener question: Connect research and practitioners
[07:43] Listener question: How to stay objective about your own work?
[10:23] Listener question: Do we criticize each other?
[11:15] Listener question: How to introduce business people to benefits of visualization beyond Excel?
[13:58] News: Visualizing sprint
[15:54] News: Kartograph
[19:40] SxSW Panel: Intent and Impact: How Visualization Makes a Change
[21:36] Quality criteria and evaluating information visualizations: traditional academic approach
[28:08] Evaluation beyond simple, clear-cut tasks
[33:13] Enrico admits his secret love of David MacCandless
[33:58] Andrew Vande Moere and Helen Purchase: On the role of design in information visualization
[35:00] Truth and Beauty or: “I know it when I see it”
[38:36] Data politics and importance of how the end product came about
[40:36] Tamara Munzner’s nested model for visualization evaluation and design
[44:25] Code of ethics
[45:59] Wrap up and outlook

Links and images

Research papers mentioned in the episode

Have fun and, as usual, let us know what you think!

Mar 15 2012
48 mins
Play

Rank #6: 105  |  Data Visualization at Twitter with Krist Wongsuphasawat

Podcast cover
Read more

[Help us run the show by supporting us on Patreon!]

This week we have Krist Wongsuphasawat on Data Stories to talk about visualization projects at Twitter. Krist has a Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of Maryland, where he worked with Ben Shneiderman. Most recently, he has been a Data Visualization Scientist at Twitter since 2012.

On the show, Krist describes the kinds of projects that the visualization team at Twitter develops. He also walks us through a few of the most popular of these projects, including their famous visualization of Game of Thrones.

Also, don’t miss Krist’s masterpiece post “How I carefully crafted a truly terrible data visualization

Enjoy the show!

Data Stories is brought to you by Qlik. Are you missing out on meaningful relationships hidden in your data? Unlock the whole story with Qlik Sense through personalized visualizations and dynamic dashboards which you can download for free at qlik.de/datastories.

Links

Related Episodes

http://datastori.es/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/krist-promo.m4v

Related episodes

Sep 04 2017
46 mins
Play

Rank #7: 027  |  Big Data Skepticism w/ Kate Crawford

Podcast cover
Read more

Here we go with another great episode. This time more on the data side. We have Kate Crawford, Principal Researcher at Microsoft Research, on the show talking about the other face of big data. That is, after all the excitement, hype, and buzz, she is the one who is asking the tough questions: Is more data always better? Is there any objective truth in it? Is big data really making us smarter?

Papers and articles from Kate

Some of Kate’s Talks

Links

Enjoy it, there’s lots of food for thoughts here!

Related episodes

Oct 17 2013
1 hour 5 mins
Play

Rank #8: 099  |  Data Visualization at Capital One with Kim Rees and Steph Hay

Podcast cover
Read more
In this episode we are joined by Kim Rees and Steph Hay of Capital One. You may have heard the big news that Capital One recently decided to hire Kim Rees (formerly of Periscopic) as their Head of Data Visualization.

It’s great to see such a big company hire a high caliber data viz professional like Kim and create a position with this name. Things seems to be moving in the right direction for viz after all!

Curious about what this news might mean for the industry, we invited Kim and her new boss Steph — Head of Content, Culture, and AI Design at Capital One — to learn about their plans.

This episode is a nice counterpoint to the episode we recently recorded with Elijah Meeks, which centered on the issues that data visualization professionals are facing in the industry.

Now, with Kim and Steph we talk about the decision to create this position, the value Capital One sees in visualization, and how they plan to scale visualization to a company of 40,000 employees.

Enjoy the show!

We’re collecting listener questions, ideas, and suggestions about Data Stories for our upcoming 100th episode. Leave us a message at +1-413-650-2713 and we may just feature your voice in the podcast!

Data Stories is brought to you by Qlik. Are you missing out on meaningful relationships hidden in your data? Unlock the whole story with Qlik Sense through personalized visualizations and dynamic dashboards which you can download for free at qlik.de/datastories.

Links

http://datastori.es/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/kim-capital-one-promo.m4v

[Help us fund Data Stories by donating on Patreon! We’re counting on you to switch to a crowdfunding model. Please visit our Patreon page for more details!]

Related episodes

Jun 02 2017
49 mins
Play

Rank #9: 118  |  Making Data Visual with Miriah Meyer and Danyel Fisher

Podcast cover
Read more

[This podcast is fully supported by our listeners. If you enjoy listening to Data Stories, consider supporting us on Patreon. And now we also accept one-time donations through Paypal: just use this linkThanks so much for your support!]

This week we have Miriah Meyer (University of Utah) and Danyel Fisher (Microsoft Research) on the show to talk about their new book Making Data Visual, which covers areas that other visualization books typically do not address: namely, how to go from formulating questions to building visualizations that solve actual problems that people have.

On the show we talk about how the book came to be; some of the concepts introduced by Miriah and Danyel in the book, such as the use of proxy tasks for data;  and how you could use it for your own projects.

Enjoy the show!

Links:

http://datastori.es/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/27fa4389-8b54-423e-9d6b-9360a3a0b8fc_27923.mp4

Related episodes

Apr 12 2018
33 mins
Play

Rank #10: 056  |  Amanda Cox on Working With R, NYT Projects, Favorite Data

Podcast cover
Read more

I’d give two of my left fingers for this data” – Amanda Cox on the show

We have the great Amanda Cox from the New York Times on the show this time!

Amanda is a graphic editor at NYT and she is behind many of the amazing data graphics that the New York Times has produced in recent years.

In the show we talk about her background in statistics and how she ended up at the Times. We discuss how she uses R software to collect, analyze, and visualize data, and her thoughts on other tools. We also talk about how data graphics are produced at NYT, with lots of funny stories.

Don’t miss the parts about the “what, where, when” of data and the “net joy” concept.

Lots a data wisdom in this show!


This episode is sponsored by Tableau Software,  helping people connect to any kind of data, and visualize it on the fly – You can download a free trial at http://tableau.com/datastories – check the new Tableau 9!

LINKS

Jun 25 2015
1 hour 8 mins
Play

Rank #11: 113  |  What Makes A Visualization Memorable? with Michelle Borkin

Podcast cover
Read more
It’s a whole new year! Consider supporting Data Stories on Patreon!

Michelle Borkin is Assistant Professor at Northeastern University where she studies the use of visualization in science research, in particular how it impacts human perception and cognition. On the show we talk about how the data viz community can better support the work of scientists, her popular research on data visualization memorability and, of course, the infamous data viz dinosaur.

LINKS

http://datastori.es/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/borkin-promo.m4v

Related episodes

Jan 17 2018
44 mins
Play

Rank #12: 135  |  The "Dashboard Conspiracy" with Lyn Bartram and Alper Sarikaya

Podcast cover
Read more

[Our podcast is fully supported by our listeners. Please consider becoming a supporter on Patreon or sending us a one-time donation through Paypal. And thanks!]

Oh dashboards… dashboards… what are they? For some, they are just ugly examples of bad visualization design (speed dials anyone?). For others, they are a first citizen of the data visualization world that deserve to be learned, studied, and understood.

To dig into this debate, we have Lyn Bartram of Simon Fraser University and Alper Sarikaya of Microsoft Power BI on the show to talk about an exciting research project they developed. Their research seeks to build a better picture of what dashboard are and how they are used “in the wild.” The results are summarized in a paper they wrote with their colleagues from Tableau and Honeycomb.ioWhat Do We Talk About When We Talk About Dashboards?

On the show we talk about how the project got started, what they discovered by analyzing a large corpus of dashboards, and the many ramifications of their research.

Enjoy the show!

Links

  • Project page
  • Supplemental material with images of all the dashboards the team analyzed (zip)
http://datastori.es/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/DS-135-promo.mp4

Related episodes

Feb 12 2019
45 mins
Play

Rank #13: 095  |  Challenges of Being a Vis Professional in Industry with Elijah Meeks

Podcast cover
Read more
This week, we have Elijah Meeks on the show to talk about the state of data visualization jobs in the industry.

Elijah sparked a recent debate with the following Twitter message: “Most people in #Datavisualization end up transitioning into data sci/eng or UI because there’s something wrong with the state of dataviz.” His tweet struck an interesting chord, so we thought we would bring him on the show to hear more.

In the episode, we talk about what is going on in the data visualization field and whether there really is a problem for data visualization professionals in the industry. We also talk about the great survey Elijah run on the state of the vis industry, which attracted around 1000 responses (!).

Enjoy the show!

Data Stories is brought to you by the upcoming 2017 Eyeo Festival. Eyeo brings together people drawn to the intersection of data, art, storytelling and creative technology. Tickets are on sale now, and almost gone. Get yours at eyeofestival.com. Converge to inspire.

Links

http://datastori.es/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/elijah-meeks-promo.m4v

[Help us fund Data Stories by donating on Patreon! We’re counting on you to switch to a crowdfunding model. Please visit our Patreon page for more details!]

Related episodes

Apr 06 2017
53 mins
Play

Rank #14: 134  |  Visualizing Uncertainty with Jessica Hullman and Matthew Kay

Podcast cover
Read more
[Our podcast is fully supported by our listeners. Please consider becoming a supporter on Patreon or sending us a one-time donation through Paypal. Thanks!]

What is uncertainty? Why is it important to take it into account when designing data visualizations? And how do you actually do so? We explore these and other questions with Jessica Hullman of Northwestern University and Matthew Kay of the University of Michigan. Jessica and Matt have written many publications on the topic that help orient us to the intricate world of uncertainty, probabilities, and their relevance to data visualization.

We hope you enjoy the show!

Links

Related episodes

Jan 19 2019
55 mins
Play

Rank #15: 045  |  Nicholas Felton

Podcast cover
Read more

Happy new year, everyone!

We start 2015 with a bang, and have Nicholas Felton on the show. We talk about his personal annual reports, typography, privacy, and how we all deal with data and tracking today. Great conversation.

One more link we only found later: Practical Typography is a great starting point for anyone who would like to learn more about typography and type.

Thanks again to Tableau Software for sponsoring the show! Check out the free trial they have, it’s a great piece of software.

And, in other news: We are looking for support with the audio editing! So, if you have some experience with audio editing podcasts, and could also imagine to help us with collection the links and titling the chapters etc, this would be great. We can offer a small compensation, too. And, of course, you’re among the very first people worldwide to listen to the new Data Stories recordings

Next week, we will record a 2014 review with a few of the usual suspects. What moved you this year? Leave us a comment or tweet us!

Jan 03 2015
57 mins
Play

Rank #16: 119  |  Color with Karen Schloss

Podcast cover
Read more
[This podcast is fully supported by our listeners. If you enjoy listening to Data Stories, consider supporting us on Patreon. And now we also accept one-time donations through Paypal: just use this linkThanks so much for your support!]

In this episode we have Karen Schloss on the show to talk about color. Yes, color! Karen is Assistant Professor at the University of Wisconsin Madison where she conducts research on the effective uses of color in visualization and everyday tasks.

Karen walks us through the intricacies of color: explaining how it works and why it is so hard to get right. We also discuss the infamous rainbow color map, the association between colors and meaning, the tools developed in her lab, and her fascinating research on coloring trash bins!

Enjoy the show…

Links

http://datastori.es/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/e54144bf-2104-4a72-8a46-88f8e2c8d6ad_34298.mp4

Apr 27 2018
54 mins
Play

Rank #17: 026  |  Visualization Beyond the Desktop w/ Petra Isenberg

Podcast cover
Read more
Hi Folks!

We are back after a relaxing summer with a brand new episode! We have Petra Isenberg, from the Aviz team at INRIA (we’ve had other guests from the same lab in the past) to talk about visualization on non-standard devices and environments. Yes, stuff like display walls, surfaces, tabletops, and people collaborating around them. It feels like the future is here and there’s a ton of potentially interesting applications for visualization!

Petra gives us hints about what works and what does not work, what the research says, what has been tried already, and what needs to be explored, etc. She also gives practical recommendations at the end about how to start doing visualization on these devices. Really cool stuff!

Take care,
Enrico & Mo.

Chapters

  • 00:00 Back from summer break
  • 02:41 Our guest today: Petra Isenberg
  • 05:59 Moving beyond the desktop
  • 11:55 New challenges in collaborative settings
  • 22:25 Interactions with very large screens
  • 38:14 Practical use and how to get started
  • 48:53 More resources

Links and papers:

Resource list from Petra

Research links:

Technology links:

Software frameworks/libraries for developing vis on surfaces:

  • Most Pixels Ever (Processing for very large wall displays – I forgot to mention this one during the podcast)
  • kivy (Python framework for developing multi-touch applications)
  • libavg (maintained by Ulrich von Zadow who has worked on several visualization + interactive surface installations)
  • ZVTM (Java toolkit for developing ZUIs, includes possibilities to run visualizations on a cluster)
  • Microsoft Surface SDK
  • (for mobile check out iOS and Android SDKs)
Sep 09 2013
58 mins
Play

Rank #18: 084  |  Statistical Numbing with Paul Slovic

Podcast cover
Read more
We have Professor Paul Slovic from University of Oregon on the show to talk about “Statistical Numbing.” Professor Slovic is a renowned expert on the effect of numbers and statistics on empathy (or lack thereof). His fascinating, if not depressing, experiments have consistently shown how hard it is for statistics to elicit any sense of scale in human tragedies and how numbers can often even be detrimental if the goal is to elicit compassion and generous actions from an audience.

On the show, we talk about “Statistical Numbing” and it psychological underpinnings. Professor Slovic also describes his experiments and their implications. And we address one of the most important questions: Is there hope? Is there something we, as practitioners, can do to counteract these negative effects?

Enjoy this deeply scientific episode and let us know what you think!

This episode of Data Stories is sponsored by FreshBooks, the small business accounting software that makes your accounting tasks easy, fast and secure. FreshBooks is offering a month of free unrestricted use to all of our listeners. To claim your free month of FreshBooks, go to http://freshbooks.com/datastories and sign up for free without the use of a credit card. Note: Remember to enter “Data Stories” in the section titled “I heard about FreshBooks from…”

http://datastori.es/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/Paul-Slovic-promo.mp4

LINKS

Related episodes

Oct 06 2016
56 mins
Play

Rank #19: 101  |  Surprise Maps with Michael Correll and Jeff Heer

Podcast cover
Read more

[If you enjoy the show, consider supporting us on Patreon! You pay a small fee for each episode we publish.]

In this episode, we have Michael Correll and Jeff Heer from the University of Washington to talk about a novel visualization technique they developed called “Surprise Maps”: a new kind of map which visualizes what is most surprising in a dataset.

Using their own words: “The idea behind Surprise Maps is that when we look at data, we often have various models of expectation: things we expect to see, or not see, in our data. If we have these models, we can also measure deviation or difference from these models. This deviation is the unexpected, the data that surprise us.

On the show we talk about how they came up with the idea for Surprise Maps, how they work, and potential applications and extensions for the technique.

Enjoy the show!

Data Stories is brought to you by Qlik. Are you missing out on meaningful relationships hidden in your data? Unlock the whole story with Qlik Sense through personalized visualizations and dynamic dashboards which you can download for free at qlik.de/datastories.

Links

http://datastori.es/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/surprise-maps-promo.m4v

Related episodes

Jun 30 2017
22 mins
Play

Rank #20: 044  |  Tamara Munzner

Podcast cover
Read more

Hi Folks! We have Prof. Tamara Munzner from University of British Columbia with us in this episode. Tamara is one of the most prominent figures in visualization research. She has done tons of interesting work starting from the nineties (look into her publications page) including the famous “Nested Model of Visualization Design” and her numerous design studies work, like the excellent “Overview,” a tool for journalistic investigative analysis. We also talk about her new book “Visualization Analysis and Design.” Finally a textbook teaching how to create visualization tools for analysis purposes!

Enjoy the show!

Links

Related episodes

Dec 22 2014
1 hour 18 mins
Play

Similar Podcasts