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Faculty Division Bookshelf

Updated 9 days ago

News & Politics
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This audio broadcast series provides commentary by authors and others on important new books and works of legal scholarship. As always, the Federalist Society takes no position on particular legal or public policy issues; all expressions of opinion are those of the speaker. We hope these broadcasts, like all of our programming, will serve to stimulate discussion and further exchange on the topics they address.

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This audio broadcast series provides commentary by authors and others on important new books and works of legal scholarship. As always, the Federalist Society takes no position on particular legal or public policy issues; all expressions of opinion are those of the speaker. We hope these broadcasts, like all of our programming, will serve to stimulate discussion and further exchange on the topics they address.

iTunes Ratings

4 Ratings
Average Ratings
3
0
0
1
0

iTunes Ratings

4 Ratings
Average Ratings
3
0
0
1
0
Cover image of Faculty Division Bookshelf

Faculty Division Bookshelf

Updated 9 days ago

Read more

This audio broadcast series provides commentary by authors and others on important new books and works of legal scholarship. As always, the Federalist Society takes no position on particular legal or public policy issues; all expressions of opinion are those of the speaker. We hope these broadcasts, like all of our programming, will serve to stimulate discussion and further exchange on the topics they address.

Rank #1: The Fourteenth Amendment and the Privileges and Immunities of American Citizenship

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In his new book, The Fourteenth Amendment and the Privileges and Immunities of American Citizenship, Prof. Lash presents the history surrounding the addition of the Privileges or Immunities Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment in 1868. This exhaustively researched book follows the evolution in public understanding of “the privileges and immunities of citizens of the United States,” from the early years of the Constitution to the critical national election of 1866. For the first 92 years of our nation's history, nothing in the American Constitution prevented states from abridging freedom of speech, prohibiting the free exercise of religion, or denying the right of peaceful assembly. The suppression of freedom in the southern states convinced the Reconstruction Congress and the supporters of the Union to add an amendment forcing the states to respect the rights announced in the first eight amendments. But rather than eradicate state autonomy altogether, the people embraced the Fourteenth Amendment that expanded the protections of the Bill of Rights and preserved the Constitution's original commitment to federalism and the principle of limited national power.

Pressor Kurt Lash, Guy Raymond Jones Chair in Law and Director, Program in Constitutional Theory, History, and Law is joined by critical commenter Elizabeth Price Foley, Professor of Law at the Florida International University School of Law.
Jun 04 2014
49 mins
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Rank #2: The Democratic Coup d'Etat - Faculty Division Bookshelf

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In The Democratic Coup d’Etat, Prof. Ozan Varol challenges the conventional public understanding of the coup d’etat, which often evokes the image of a militarized group of elites who seek to overthrow an existing government in order to consolidate power. Often, we consider coups contrary--and even more a threat--to democracy. Prof. Varol argues that coups do not always match that public understanding, and often are used to establish a democracy or advance democratic principles. He traces democratic coups throughout history--from 5th century BC Athens, to actions in the American colonies against corrupt British officials, to the democracy-building revolts against military regimes in countries like Guinea-Bissau, Portugal, and Colombia in the 20th century. In his historical analysis, Prof. Varol explores questions regarding the political nature of coups and the differences in military powers which can lead to the fostering or suppressing of democratic societies.
In this episode, Prof. Ozan Varol of Lewis & Clark Law School and Prof. Tom Ginsburg of the University of Chicago Law School discuss The Democratic Coup d'Etat.
The Democratic Coup d'Etat is available here.
Nov 08 2017
23 mins
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Rank #3: Enlightened Democracy - Faculty Book Podcast 11-19-12

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With the 2012 presidential election now behind us, the unique American presidential election system is fresh in the mind of the public. Some dismiss the Electoral College as outdated, arguing that the system should be replaced by direct popular vote. -- Enlightened Democracy: The Case for the Electoral College? author Tara Ross provides an overview of the history of the Electoral College from the Founding Era to the present, defending the College as an institution and explaining how it protects our republic and promotes liberty. This second edition includes a section discussing the National Popular Vote legislative effort. -- Derek Muller, Associate Professor at Pepperdine University School of Law, interviews Ms. Ross about her book.
Nov 19 2012
22 mins
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Rank #4: Limited Government and the Bill of Rights - Faculty Book Podcast

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Limited Government and the Bill of Rights takes a novel approach to the constitutional connection between the Bill of Rights and principles of limited government. Author Patrick Garry proposes that the Bill of Rights should be viewed primarily as limiting the power of government rather than protecting of the autonomy interests of individuals. He argues that this limited government approach is ultimately the best way to maximize individual liberty, and limits judicial overreach by denying Courts the power to create and enforce expansive, autonomy-based rights. -- Professor Garry, Professor of Law and Director of the Hagemann Center for Legal & Public Policy Research at the University of South Dakota School of Law, is joined by critical commenter Lee Strang, Professor at the University of Toledo College of Law, to discuss the book.
Feb 13 2013
31 mins
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Rank #5: First Amendment Institutions - Faculty Book Podcast

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First Amendment Institutions proposes a new approach to enforcing First Amendment laws by arguing that institutions who exercise First Amendment freedoms should have more autonomy to regulate their own affairs, as the courts and a “top-down rules” approach insufficiently account for the complexity of real-world situations. Author Paul Horwitz suggests that such an approach would enhance these institutions’ role in social and political life, thus making the state a part of our social framework as opposed to an overbearing sovereign. -- Horwitz, the Gordon Rosen Professor of Law at the University of Alabama School of Law, is joined by critical commenter Marc DeGirolami, Associate Professor of Law at St. John’s University School of Law, to discuss the book.
Feb 08 2013
31 mins
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Rank #6: Speak Freely: Why Universities Must Defend Free Speech - Faculty Division Bookshelf

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In this episode of Bookshelf, Prof. Keith Whittington, the William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Politics at Princeton University, and Prof. Frederick Schauer, the David and Mary Harrison Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of Virginia, discuss Prof. Whittington’s new book Speak Freely: Why Universities Must Defend Free Speech.
In Speak Freely, Prof. Whittington argues that universities have a distinctive and important mission in American society, one that has been recently challenged due to campus free speech debates. Prof. Whittington articulates the university as that which assembles and nurtures an open and diverse community of scholars, teachers, and students dedicated to the production and dissemination of knowledge. Moreover, he asserts, the robust protection of free speech and civil discourse is essential to that mission. In Speak Freely, Whittington argues that a better understanding of the relationship between the critical functions of the university and the principles of free speech can help guide us in resolving the difficult challenges that confront the members of modern universities.
Our conversation begins with Prof. Whittington’s short introduction to his book, and is followed by Prof. Schauer’s comments to which Prof. Whittington will respond. The two authors will then engage in a bit of a back-and-forth dialogue.

As always, the Federalist Society takes no position on particular legal or public policy issues; all expressions of opinion are those of the speaker. We hope these broadcasts, like all our programming, will serve to stimulate discussion and further exchange on the topics they address.
Jun 12 2018
28 mins
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Rank #7: In Search of Jefferson’s Moose - Faculty Book Podcast

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In Search of Jefferson’s Moose: Notes on the State of Cyberspace? explores the "new world" of cyberspace: what it is, how it works, and what laws it should have. Author David Post compares Thomas Jefferson’s thoughts on the New World in Notes on the State of Virginia to the internet, drawing out the similarities and differences between the two "new worlds," and presents Jefferson’s ideal--small self-governing groups loosely joined together and forming groups of increasingly large size--as a model for self-government in cyberspace. -- David Post, a Professor of Law at Temple University Beasley School of Law, is joined by critical commenter Eugene Volokh, the Gary T. Schwartz Professor of Law at UCLA School of Law, to discuss the book.
Oct 22 2012
36 mins
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Rank #8: When States Go Broke - Faculty Division Podcast

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When States Go Broke: The Origins, Context, and Solutions for the American States in Fiscal Crisis? discusses the problem of fiscal crises in American states and the best way to meet the political and fiscal challenges they present. The book features insights from leading scholars in a variety of disciplines, and facilitates debate about the origin and context of the crises, and what regimes bankrupt states should adopt. -- Author David Skeel, the S. Samuel Arsht Professor of Corporate Law at the University of Pennsylvania Law School, is joined by critical commenter Richard Hynes, Professor of Law and Director of John M. Olin Program in Law and Economics at the University of Virginia School of Law, to discuss the book.
Sep 20 2012
36 mins
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Rank #9: Lawyer Barons: What Their Contingency Fees Really Cost America - Faculty Book Podcast

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Lawyer Barons exposes the high but unseen cost of litigation driven by contingency fees, a method of financing that is said to improve access to the courts for personal injury victims with limited means. Author Lester Brickman argues that there is more to the picture than just improving access, however; that the contingency fee also enables lawyers and judges to collaborate and incentivize litigation to a degree that distorts our civil justice system and imposes other financial and social costs. -- Brickman, a professor at the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, is joined by critical commenter Peter Schuck, the Simeon E. Baldwin Professor Emeritus of Law at Yale University, discuss the book.
Sep 12 2012
30 mins
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Rank #10: Firearms Law and the Second Amendment - Faculty Book Podcast

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This podcast discusses Firearms Law and the Second Amendment: Regulation, Rights and Policy by authors Nicholas Johnson, David Kopel, George Mocsary and Michael O'Shea. -- Firearms Law provides a comprehensive overview of the constitutional right to private firearms, the first traditional casebook on the subject, covering the history and development of the constitutional right to keep and bear arms, and all aspects of firearms law, policy and regulations. The book serves as a starting point for discussion of contemporary gun-law issues raised by the Supreme Court’s 2008 ruling in District of Columbia v. Heller that invalidated a law banning handgun possession in Washington, DC and in its 2010 ruling in McDonald v. Chicago, which extended that right to constrain state action. -- Authors Nicholas Johnson, a Professor at Fordham University School of Law, and Michael O’Shea, a Professor at Oklahoma City University School of Law, are joined by commentator Adam Winkler, a Professor at the UCLA School of Law, to discuss the book.
Aug 08 2012
34 mins
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