Cover image of Food Non-Fiction
(209)

Rank #46 in Food category

Arts
Food
History

Food Non-Fiction

Updated 5 days ago

Rank #46 in Food category

Arts
Food
History
Read more

Food Non-Fiction tells the incredible true stories behind food. We look forward to taking you on this wild food journey - through history, and around the world. Think of us as food historians, food scientists, and food journalists.

Read more

Food Non-Fiction tells the incredible true stories behind food. We look forward to taking you on this wild food journey - through history, and around the world. Think of us as food historians, food scientists, and food journalists.

iTunes Ratings

209 Ratings
Average Ratings
163
29
8
5
4

Great podcast!

By 1482001 - Jul 27 2017
Read more
Awesome! Fun little bit of information!

Love it!

By lingriding - Apr 19 2017
Read more
Love the podcast! More episodes, please! :)

iTunes Ratings

209 Ratings
Average Ratings
163
29
8
5
4

Great podcast!

By 1482001 - Jul 27 2017
Read more
Awesome! Fun little bit of information!

Love it!

By lingriding - Apr 19 2017
Read more
Love the podcast! More episodes, please! :)
Cover image of Food Non-Fiction

Food Non-Fiction

Updated 5 days ago

Read more

Food Non-Fiction tells the incredible true stories behind food. We look forward to taking you on this wild food journey - through history, and around the world. Think of us as food historians, food scientists, and food journalists.

Rank #1: #3 Michelin Stars Restaurant Rating System

Podcast cover
Read more

Intro 0:00

John lying to his Mom 0:17

Undercover Restaurant Reviewers 0:29

Michelin Guide Restaurant Reviewers 1:31

How the Michelin Guide began 2:14

Current use of the Michelin Guide 3:52

Michelin stars and symbols 4:10

Bib Gourmand 5:18

Mystery of the process 5:41

Anonymous Michelin Server 5:49

    Preparing for a Michelin Reviewer 5:59

    Characteristics of a Michelin Reviewer 6:12

Controversies around Michelin Guide 6:55

    Pascal Remy "The Inspector Spills the Beans" 7:01

    Bias for French Cuisine 8:04

    Lax standards for Japanese restaurants 8:39

    Secretive nature of the inspectors 8:58

New Yorker interview with Inspector M. 9:25

Inspector background requirements 9:56

Michelin Guide Social Media Attempts 10:32

Famously Anonymous 10:43

Twitter 11:20

Michelin Guide Locations 11:52

Honor of the Michelin Star 12:18

Chefs that do not want the Michelin Star 12:37

Anonymous Michelin Server 12:49

    Excitement of being reviewed 12:49

    Backslide in interest 13:08

Pressure of expectations 13:33

Star stats 14:29

Digital Age vs. Guide books 15:04

Anonymous Michelin Server: Zagat vs. Michelin 15:15

Michelin Guide earnings and losses 15:29

Future of Michelin Guide to 15:48

Final words- contact us at feedback@foodnonfiction.com 16:00

www.foodnonfiction.com

Other References Used:

Financial Times New Yorker "Death of a Chef" About.com The Telegraph Wiki

Apr 09 2015

16mins

Play

Rank #2: #16 Popcorn from the Beginning

Podcast cover
Read more

In this podcast episode of Food Non-Fiction, we are talking about popcorn! Popcorn is made out of any variety of corn that can be popped. Corn was selectively bred from a wild grass called Teosinte, which was a very tough plant. So right from the beginning of the cultivation of corn, people were making popcorn, because corn kernels were a lot harder and popping it was one of the easiest ways to eat it. Corn spread over Central and South America because it was traded. One of the civilizations that ate popcorn was the Aztecs. They even had a word for the sound of kernels popping - "totopoca". During the Depression, popcorn was one of the few foods that actually rose in sales. This is because it became considered an affordable luxury. So vendors sold popcorn outside of theatres. Eventually, theatres started charging vendors to sell either right outside their doors or even inside the lobby. And then by around 1938, theatres started having popcorn machines inside.

References:

New York Times

Livestrong

PBS

Popcorn Origins

Jul 15 2015

9mins

Play

Rank #3: #4 Benjamin Franklin the Foodie

Podcast cover
Read more

This episode covers Benjamin Franklin’s love of food. Benjamin Franklin was a very conscientious eater. At around the age of 16, he became a vegetarian for ethical and frugal reasons, but began eating meat again soon after, while traveling by ship from Boston to New York. He popularised Parmesan cheese in America and introduced soybeans, tofu, and rhubarb to the colonies.

Milk Punch Recipe (recipe written by Benjamin Franklin himself) Benton Brothers Fine Cheese (cheese experts/shop in Vancouver, BC) Special thanks to Brent Bellerive, General Manager at Benton Brothers, for letting us interview him! Benjamin Franklin Book of Recipes Tori Avey Thomas Tryon quotes International Vegetarian Union

Apr 18 2015

18mins

Play

Rank #4: #14 When Paris Ate Their Zoo

Podcast cover
Read more

In this Food Non-Fiction podcast episode, we tell the insane but true story of when Parisians ate zoo animals to survive the 1870-1871 Siege of Paris. We transport you back in time to those five months when Prussian soldiers surrounded Paris to starve the city into surrendering. The five months started in September, 1870. As the months went by, people went from eating cows, pigs and sheep to eating horses. Then they resorted to eating street rats, as well as their own pet dogs and cats. Finally, in December, the zoo put its animals up for sale and the rich bought the meat for exotic meals. The 2 elephants, Castor and Pollux were sold together for 27,000 francs. In one of the most fascinating historical meals, chef Choron created an epic Christmas dinner made of zoo animals. All this was paired with the finest wines. The very rich managed to feast in the midst of starvation.

References:

Engines of Our Ingenuity

Defeated Flesh: Welfare, Warfare and the Making of Modern France by Bertrand Taithe

Chronicles of Old Paris: Exploring the Historic City of Light by John Baxter

Historynet.com Translated Memoir of Balloon Pilot

The Medical Times and Gazette, Volume 2

Jun 30 2015

9mins

Play

Rank #5: #12 A Baker's Dozen

Podcast cover
Read more

In this podcast episode of Food Non-Fiction, we talk about the baker's dozen. When someone says "a baker's dozen" they mean 13. But why is it 13 when a dozen is actually 12? The history of "a baker's dozen" goes back to medieval England. In 1266, King Henry III revived an old statute called the "Assize of Bread and Ale", which set the price of bread in relation to the price of wheat. To make sure that even the poorest of citizens could buy bread (because it was a staple food), bread was priced at a quarter penny, a half penny or a penny. In years when wheat prices went up, the loaves got smaller, but you could still always buy bread for a quarter penny. The Worshipful Company of Bakers was the name of the baker's guild - one of the oldest guild in England. They were given the power to enforce the Assize of Bread and Ale and would punish bakers that sold underweight bread. In order to make sure they wouldn't be punished for selling underweight bread, bakers gave customers extra bread. Extra slices were called "inbreads" and extra loaves were called "vantage loaves".

References:

The Worshipful Company of Bakers Phrase Origins Bakers in the Middle Ages Wonderopolis

Jun 16 2015

10mins

Play

Rank #6: #27 Space Food with Chris Hadfield and Andy Weir

Podcast cover
Read more

In this Food Non-Fiction podcast episode, we begin our interview with astronaut Chris Hadfield (concluded in part 2 of the space episode). We also speak to Andy Weir, author of The Martian (film adaptation out in theatres Oct. 2, starring Matt Damon). We ask Chris Hadfield what breakfast lunch and dinner are like in space and we ask Andy Weir about how he came up with the idea for his book.

Oct 05 2015

12mins

Play

Rank #7: #11 Thomas Jefferson's Garden

Podcast cover
Read more

This Food Non-Fiction podcast episode is about the founding foodie, Thomas Jefferson. More specifically, we talk about his gardens at Monticello. Jefferson collected crops from all over the known world in his time. He planted a huge variety of fruits and vegetables and helped to spread the seeds. The south-facing design of the Monticello gardens allowed him to plant crops from cold to tropical climates as the location captured a lot of sunlight and tempered the cold winters. Jefferson enjoyed salads and even grew sesame seeds so that he could make salad dressing oil out of them. The Monticello gardens are indeed amazing, but they would not have existed without the work of slaves. In this episode we talk about 2 people who were kept as slaves and worked at Monticello. The first is James Hemings and the second is Edith Fossett - both were trained as French chefs and cooked amazing meals.

References:

Monticello.org Thomas Jefferson's ice cream recipe (typed out) Thomas Jefferson's ice cream recipe (handwritten original)

Jun 09 2015

8mins

Play

Rank #8: #49 Temple Grandin and The Slaughterhouse Revolution

Podcast cover
Read more

This is a very special Food Non-Fiction podcast episode. We had the immense pleasure of interviewing one of Time's 100 Most Influential People in the Heroes category of 2010. Her name is Temple Grandin. She is a professor of animal science at Colorado State University. In North America, over half the cattle are handled in the humane systems designed by Dr. Grandin.

Thank You to Our Esteemed Guests:

Temple Grandin

Christopher Monger

Mark Deesing

Special Thanks to:

David Porter and Rachel Winks of Cabi.org for all your help.

Thank You to Looperman Artists for the Music:

Memories Acoustic 1 by BradoSanz 

Ambellient by Danke

Primitive Piano by Danke 

Nasty Patterns 4 by flsouto

Funky Guitar by Neems 1 by Neems

Whats Goin Down by rasputin1963

Concert Cello - Heaven by kickklee

Piano Quality Cajsa by MINOR2GO

SynCato by DesignedImpression

Credit to Rosalie Winard for the photos of Temple Grandin

Apr 13 2016

25mins

Play

Rank #9: #10 All About Mangos

Podcast cover
Read more

This Food Non-Fiction podcast episode is all about mangos! This is our first listener requested episode so thank you Spencer! Looking at fossils, we can trace the appearance of the first mangos to around 30 million years ago in Northeast India, Myanmar and Bangladesh. Looking at old Hindu writings found in Southeast Asia and India, we can trace mango cultivation (for domestic use) back to 4000 B.C.E.  so that’s 6,000 years ago. Buddhist monks were amongst the first to cultivate the fruit and it is said that Buddha himself often meditated under the shade of a mango tree. Looking at historical records, we can see how the fruit spread. Mangos were spread over the world by traveling with people. They needed to travel with humans because their seeds are so big that they can’t be dispersed by animals eating them and pooping out or otherwise discarding the seeds further away / and the seeds definitely can’t travel by blowing in the wind. 

Nutrition One mango is around 135 calories and will hold most of your daily recommended vitamin C as well as almost a third of your daily recommended Vitamin A. Actually the vitamin content changes depending on ripeness - when the mango is less ripe/more green, its vitamin C content is at its highest and when it is more ripe, its Vitamin A content is at its highest. Mangos contain over 20 different vitamins and minerals and are a great source of fiber. 

Health Benefits Mangos nutrients support a healthy immune function, normal blood pressure, good vision and strong bones. There are studies that also claim added protection from certain cancers as well as stroke.

Cooking Their natural tenderizing properties make mangos a great ingredient to marinate meat in.

Storage Refrigerate mangos when they’re perfectly ripe. If you haven’t cut them, they’ll stay good for around five days. If you’ve peeled and chopped them, keep them in the freezer in an airtight container. They can last about 6 months like that.

Selection - Check firmness. Push against the mango’s skin and look for something in between squishy and hard. - You should also be able to smell its fruity aroma on the stem end. 

Useful References

Mango Food Nutrition Fruits Production Statistics History and Production

Please subscribe! Visit our site www.foodnonfiction.com.

Jun 02 2015

7mins

Play

Rank #10: #28 Space Food Part 2 - Chris Hadfield, Dr. Louisa Preston, Chris Patil

Podcast cover
Read more

In this podcast episode of Food Non-Fiction, we continue our discussion of Space Food from part 1. This episode features Dr. Louisa Preston, an astrobiologist who discusses with us how realistic the book/movie The Martian was in depicting the growth of potatoes on Mars. We also talk to Chris Patil who is part of the Mars One mission that is hoping to send human colonists to Mars. Finally, we finish our interview with astronaut Chris Hadfield who reveals his favourite space food.

Thanks to our guests Chris Hadfield, Dr. Louisa Preston and Chris Patil for the insightful interviews.

Thanks to Looperman artists for the music:

140BPM Acoustic Guitar by ferryterry HiGuitar by EpicRecord Going up by LarsM

Oct 08 2015

21mins

Play

Rank #11: #34 How Bacon Became Breakfast

Podcast cover
Read more

In this Food Non-Fiction podcast episode, we reveal how bacon became a breakfast food. In 1925, the Beech-Nut Packing Company asked Edward Bernays to help increase bacon sales. Why did they ask Edward Bernays? Because Bernays was a master of influencing public opinions. His campaigns increased smoking amongst women, the use of disposable Dixie cups instead of washable glass cups, and more. Back then, breakfasts were very light meals. For example, a breakfast could be a cup of orange juice, some coffee and a roll. So Bernays asked his physician whether a heavier breakfast would be better for the body, given the logic that the body needs to replenish energy lost during sleep. After his physician concurred with the idea, Bernays asked the physician to write to 5000 other doctors to get their opinion. Bernays then published the findings in magazines and articles, concluding that bacon and eggs would make a great healthy breakfast. He succeeded in increasing bacon sales.

References:

The American Table

Baltimore Post-Examiner

Bloomberg Business

Burpy

Daily Dawdle

Music Thanks to Looperman Artists:

Big Room Lead by djpuzzle EDM Trap 808 by 7venth12 pop drums acoustic drumset 1 by martingunnarson progressive house melodic synth for intro by capostipite Lookin For This by FLmoney

Nov 19 2015

7mins

Play

Rank #12: #24 Ancient Egyptian Honey

Podcast cover
Read more

In this Food Non-Fiction podcast episode, we tell you about ancient Egyptian honey. Did you know that honey that archaeologists have uncovered from tombs that are thousands of years old remain edible? We tell you all about beekeeping from ancient Egypt.

References:

Smithsonian

Eurasianet

Reshafim

Ancient Origins

Book: The World History of Beekeeping and Honey Hunting

Book: Letters from the Hive: An Intimate History of Bees, Honey, and Humankind

Music from Looperman thank you to:

40A

Jensmuse

Sep 16 2015

9mins

Play

Rank #13: #39 How to Spot A Food Trend

Podcast cover
Read more

This is the first Food Non-Fiction episode of 2016, so we are going to talk about food trends. This episode will cover how to spot food trends, how to track food trends and what food trends we can expect in 2016.

Using the New York Times' Chronicle tool, writer Neil Irwin came up with the Fried Calamari Index to track food trends by looking at the frequency at which the NYT mentioned various foods.

Culinary trendologist, Christine Couvelier, forecasts food trends by going to food shows around the world, talking to chefs, visiting grocery stores/gourmet retail stores, and looking at food magazines.

Christine says that food trends start at industry food shows around the world where food companies show their new food ideas. Some ideas are adopted in restaurant menus and the successful flavours then become available in specialty stores and magazines. From there, certain foods make it to grocery stores, thus becoming widespread and easily available to the average consumer. This is the path that balsamic vinegar has taken and this item is now commonplace in kitchens.

In 2016, we can expect to see the flavour combination of sweet and heat. We can also expect new flavours of hummus, as well as vegetable yogurts. Continuing on from 2015, vegetables will be more and more central to dishes. Rather than simply being the healthy option or a garnish, vegetables will be used in enticing new ways - grilled, charred, roasted and smoked.

2016 has been deemed the International Year of Pulses by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization, so we'll be encouraged to use pulses like chick peas, beans and lentils. 

Thank you to our fascinating interviewees:

Christine Couvelier of the Culinary Concierge

Dr. Sylvain Charlebois of the University of Guelph

Special thanks to the musician, truekey, for writing music for Food Non-Fiction:

Soundcloud

Twitter: @truekeymusic 

Jan 21 2016

13mins

Play

Rank #14: #35 The Business of Casino Food

Podcast cover
Read more

In this Food Non-Fiction podcast episode, we tell the story of how Las Vegas became a destination market for gambling, how the nature of destination markets created competition amongst the many casinos, how casino food amenities were used as a competitive tool, and how casino restaurants have changed over time from buffet to gourmet.

In October of 1929, the stock market crashed. October 29th was the worst day of this crash. It was named “Black Tuesday”. On Black Tuesday, over 16 million shares were traded on the New York Stock Exchange. Billions of dollars were lost and the economy was on a downward spiral into the Great Depression of the 1930’s. So, in 1931, Phil Tobin, a 29 year old freshman member of the legislative assembly introduced a bill to legalize gambling in Nevada. He wasn’t a gambler himself, in fact, he was a cowboy, but he knew that legalizing gambling would bring the state of Nevada some much-needed revenue. The revenue would come from gaming taxes.

At this time, in 1931, the Hoover Dam was scheduled for construction. It was built between 1931 and 1936. This meant that thousands of workers would be coming to Nevada. And these would be federal workers, so it was likely that a lof of the illegal casinos would be shut down. So instead, of having the casinos shut down when the workers came, legalizing casinos would bring in a ton of tax revenues.

Phil Tobin’s bill made financial sense. So, on March 19 of 1931, the Governor signed Assembly Bill 98 into law.

Assembly Bill 98 legalized the following games:

Faro Monte Roulette Keno Fan-Tan Twenty-One Blackjack Seven-and-a-half Big Injun Craps Klondyke Stud Poker Draw Poker Slots

The bill is also known as the “Wide Open Gambling Bill”.

After World War II, there were strict gambling laws in most states, so Nevada really became the center of gambling in the U.S. - especially, of course, in the Las Vegas strip - which is, by-the-way, located south of the actual city of Las Vegas.

The Las Vegas strip was, and still is, a destination market. People travel there specifically to experience the gambling and entertainment. Destination markets offer a lot of the same thing. For example, you go to Hawaii to surf so there are a lot of surfing schools and they need to compete.

Same thing with going to Las Vegas to gamble - there are so many places you can gamble that these places need to compete for your dollars. So casinos, over time, 

have offered more and more amenities.

Casino resorts started popping up in the 1940’s. You could go to a casino resort, and not only gamble, but have your hotel, live shows and food, all in one place. Casino restaurants were designed to bring people to the casinos. The strategy back in the middle of the 20th century was to offer cheap food, sometimes even free food. The logic was that if you could offer great price value for food at your casino, then people might choose to come to your casino, rather than go to a standalone restaurant or another casino.

So casino restaurants used to operate as what is called “loss leaders” - casino restaurants would lose a little money, but then gain that money back and more when customers played the gambling games.

There are 2 ways that having a restaurant at a casino can increase revenue. One - is that the restaurant draws in more players Two - is that it gets each player to spend more while they’re at the casino.

The Vegas strip is the ULTIMATE gambling destination, but the relationship between casino restaurants and gambling spending is different in Vegas. Certainly, your average Vegas casino restaurant is not operating at a loss anymore. This shift in Las Vegas from the days of cheap casino buffets, designed for the convenience of gambling clients, to high end, big profit restaurants has been gradual.

Thank you to our interview guests:

Dr. Sarah Tanford

Dr. David G. Schwartz

Thanks to the Looperman Artist for the Music:

Chillwave bass and synth by djpuzzle

Nov 26 2015

10mins

Play

Rank #15: #55 The Sriracha Story

Podcast cover
Read more

This is the story of the extremely popular and iconic Huy Fong Foods hot sauce - Sriracha. The company, Huy Fong Foods, is an American success story. The founder, David Tran, left Vietnam in 1979 and ended up in the U.S., along with many of his fellow refugees. He had been part of the Chinese minority in Vietnam, and because of his Chinese heritage, he had been pressured to leave after the Vietnam War. 

David Tran missed the taste of the hot sauces from Vietnam, and also needed to make money, so he started the company, Huy Fong Foods, in 1980 in California. The company was named after the freighter that he took to leave Vietnam. It was named "Huey Fong". Huy Fong Foods has never spent money on advertising, but it continues to grow year after year. They make Sriracha from fresh red Jalapeno peppers, which comes from Underwood Ranches - their sole supplier. The peppers are delivered within hours of harvesting.

It's believed that the original Sriracha sauce was created by a woman named Thanom Chakkapak from a coastal town in Thailand called Si Racha. The original sauce is still being produced, and it is called "Sriraja Panich". It is sweeter and runnier than the Huy Fong Foods brand Sriracha that we know so well.

Thank You to Our Interviewees:

Griffin Hammond

Ernesto Hernandez-Lopez

Craig Underwood

Thank You to Looperman Artists for the Music:

relaxed chillout strings by rasputin1963

within reach piano by designedimpression

DNB EXPLOSION Piano by frogdude34

Jul 26 2016

17mins

Play

Rank #16: #5 Save the Salmon - Part 1

Podcast cover
Read more

This episode is a timely look at California's drought and how it has affected salmon runs. Specifically, we look at the Chinook salmon, also called the King salmon. These salmon can grow to be the size of a small person - up to 58 inches (4.8 feet) in length and up to 129 pounds. You don't find them in regular sushi places, because they're a more high-end species of salmon. They have the highest fat content of any salmon and that makes them delicious! 

Special thanks to our guest, Kari Burr, a biologist from the Fishery Foundation of California.

Apr 24 2015

8mins

Play

Rank #17: #44 California Roll Creators

Podcast cover
Read more

This Food Non-Fiction podcast episode investigates the question - who created the California Roll?

Thank You to Our Interviewees:

Hidekazu Tojo

Trevor Corson

David Kamp

Thank You to Looperman Artists for the Music:

Drum Loop Republic by attackyak

Japanese Vibes Rhodes Only by raphael29

edm pluck for intro by capostipite

Dusted Jazz Loop by LeuNatic

Poppy Acoustic 2 by BradoSanz

Poppy Acoustic 3 by BradoSanz

Feb 25 2016

12mins

Play

Rank #18: #41 How An Accountant Created Bubble Gum

Podcast cover
Read more

In this Food Non-Fiction podcast episode, we tell you how the accountant, Walter Diemer, ended up creating the world's first commercially available bubble gum. Walter worked for the Frank H. Fleer Corporation founded by Frank H. Fleer who had invented the world's first (not commercially available) bubble gum. After Frank died, his son in law, Gilbert Mustin, eventually took over the company. There are few sources on how Walter became involved with making bubble gum, but according to a book titled, "It Happened In Philadelphia", Mustin had set up a lab for working on a gum base. This lab happened to be near Walter's office. Walter helped watch over a gum concoction one day and became fascinated with the idea of making a successful bubble gum. He played around with recipes and eventually created Dubble Bubble.

Thank you to Looperman artists for the music:

edm pluck for intro by capostipite Drum Loop Republic by attackyak Japanese Vibes Rhodes Only by raphael29

Thank you to Bob Conway for the interview

Website

Feb 04 2016

10mins

Play

Rank #19: #7 The World's Greatest Food Fight

Podcast cover
Read more

This episode starts with the true story of Ryan Shilling and the huge food fight in his UK school, Jarrow, in the town of Jarrow. We then piece together the history of food fights, starting with the creation of the pie-in-face gag from the Vaudeville era to the first pieing scenes in silent films to our modern day idea of food fights in schools. Next, we tell you about the world's greatest food fight - La Tomatina in Bunol, Spain. We interviewed Rafael Perez, the organizer of the event.

Special thanks to our interviewees:

Thank you Ryan Shilling! Thank you Rafael Perez!

Promised Links:

3 Stooges Pie Fight  Telegraph article on the Colombian La Tomatina  La Tomatina-esque events in the US

Other References Used: La Tomatina Colorado Tomato War The Salt Blog history of food fights Evolution of Pieing Web Urbanist list of food fights

Contact us at: feedback@foodnonfiction.com

Visit Our Site: www.foodnonfiction.com

May 10 2015

22mins

Play

Rank #20: #52 The Price of Vanilla

Podcast cover
Read more

This Food Non-Fiction podcast episode is about vanilla! We explain the causes behind the rise and fall of the price of vanilla. It is a product that has very erratic cycles of prices skyrocketing then crashing, skyrocketing then crashing. The supply never seems to match the demands. We discuss a possible solution to this - fair trade.

Special Thanks to Our Interviewees:

Felix Buccellato of Custom Essence

Richard J. Brownell

We highly recommend this book about vanilla:

"Vanilla Orchids: Natural History and Cultivation" by Ken Cameron

Thank You to Truekey for the Music, as well as Looperman Artists:

Memories Acoustic 1 by BradoSanz

chillwave bass and synth by Djpuzzle 

Going Up by LarsM

May 20 2016

12mins

Play