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Mercatus Policy Download

By Mercatus Center

Education
News & Politics
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Looking for smart policy ideas for a growing world? Subscribe to the Mercatus Policy Download for all policy, no punditry, and a path forward. Looking to connect with a scholar you heard on the Download? Email host Chad Reese at creese@mercatus.gmu.edu. Here's to growth!

Read more

Looking for smart policy ideas for a growing world? Subscribe to the Mercatus Policy Download for all policy, no punditry, and a path forward. Looking to connect with a scholar you heard on the Download? Email host Chad Reese at creese@mercatus.gmu.edu. Here's to growth!

iTunes Ratings

15 Ratings
Average Ratings
14
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iTunes Ratings

15 Ratings
Average Ratings
14
0
1
0
0

Top 10 Episode of Mercatus Policy Download

Rank #1: Here's to Dynamic American Cities!

Apr 17 2018
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Just about everyone who lives in a metropolitan coastal area understands the value of affordable housing. It's a given that if you want the benefits that come with living near lots of people and businesses, you're going to have to pay more for your mortgage or rent. That might be most obviously true of California, where growing demand and stagnant supply have produced 10 of the 11 most expensive metropolitan areas in the country. The state is aware of the problem and at least one potential response, California Senate Bill 827, would address it by limiting the ability of local governments to restrict housing supply. This expert panel will get us started by talking about California and SB 827 and then they’ll try to unpack what this means for the rest of the country: Matthew Yglesias, Vox.com Senior Correspondent and author of "The Rent Is Too Damn High” Emily Hamilton, Mercatus Center State and Local Policy Research Fellow Salim Furth, Mercatus Center Senior Research Fellow   Check out Salim's newest paper on California's density deficit and the likely impact of SB 827 here. Download this episode and subscribe to the Mercatus Policy Download on iTunes or wherever you listen to your favorite podcasts. Ideas, comments, suggestions? Email Chad at creese@mercatus.gmu.edu, or find him on Twitter @ChadMReese.

Rank #2: Here's to Ending Self-Destructive Trade Wars!

Apr 10 2018
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What do felt hats, flamethrowers, soybeans, and aluminum all have in common? They're all potential targets for new tariffs in the escalating trade dispute between the United States and China. For some time, the US has been trending towards freer and more open trade, culminating the North American Free Trade Agreement and efforts to finalize the Trans‑Pacific Partnership. But that trend may have come to an abrupt halt under an administration that has famously said, "Trade wars are good and easy to win." Here to explain whether or not we're in a trade war already, what that means for the US and China, and what US policy makers should do going forward, are three experts in the field: Caroline Baum, regular contributor to Market Watch Dan Griswold, and Don Boudreaux, co-directors of the Mercatus Center's Program on the American Economy and Globalization Ideas, comments, suggestions? Email Chad at creese@mercatus.gmu.edu, or find him on Twitter @ChadMReese. 

Rank #3: Here's to Win-Win Regulatory Reform!

May 01 2018
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The word “regulation” can be a pretty loaded one in the world of public policy. To some, it means health and safety protections necessary for a well-functioning economy and society. To others, it means unnecessary bureaucratic restrictions that kill jobs and favor large, established businesses. What just about everyone can agree on, however, is that there’s room for improvement in the existing regulatory system. Today, we’re talking about the idea of “win-win” regulatory reform. Or, put differently, how policymakers can approach improving the regulatory system to make sure it works better for everyone. To do that, we asked our distinguished panel of regulatory experts to discuss what to do with the long laundry list of unnecessary or outdated rules: Laura Jones, Executive Vice-President and Chief Strategic Officer of the Canadian Federation of Independent Businesses and a regulatory economist who has written for the Mercatus Center.  Kevin Falcon, Former Minister of Finance and Deputy Premier for British Columbia, who has worked in the trenches as a policymaker on regulatory reform efforts in Canada.  Patrick McLaughlin, Director of the Mercatus Center’s Program for Economic Research on Regulation, and former Senior Economist at the Department of Transportation.   Download this episode and subscribe to the Mercatus Policy Download on iTunes or wherever you listen to your favorite podcasts. Questions, comments, suggestions? Email Chad at creese@mercatus.gmu.edu or find him on Twitter @ChadMReese.

Rank #4: Here's to Better Financial Regulation!

Mar 13 2018
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Congress is attempting small reforms to Dodd‑Frank. Once the dust settles on the Crapo bill, it's going to be awhile before we hear from them again on the matter. The future of financial regulator policy now lies with the agencies. So what should be on the agenda? Highlights: A new idea for CFPB reform. The table agrees the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is the place to watch. And J.W. Verret gives us a sneak peek of his best idea for reforming it: regulatory contracts. A better way forward for fintech regulation. Brian Knight note that financial regulators should carefully consider the risks associated with regulating via broad discretionary powers rather than via traditional rulemaking, and discussed a federal charter and state regulatory sandboxes as potential policy reform options for emerging fintech firms. What's Project Catalyst all about? No one knows.   The conversation also covered the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC) and the Volcker Rule. Today's guests: Mercatus scholars Brian Knight and J.W. Verret American Banker reporter Rachel Witkowski

Rank #5: Here’s to Cheaper Doctors (And More of Them)!

Mar 27 2018
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While the US health care debate focuses on insurance and funding, many people struggle to schedule a doctor visit in timely manner. In rural areas, simply finding a doctor nearby can be a challenge. Nationwide there could be a shortage of somewhere between 40,800 and 104,900 physicians by 2030. Access to health care, in other words, means more than having insurance. How to address this doctor shortage? Dr. Jeffrey Flier, former Dean of Harvard's Faculty of Medicine, has some ideas: Reform outdated accreditation practices. Remove barriers to creating new accredited US schools and training positions for physicians. This includes developing shorter and less expensive training paths. Allow more foreign-trained physicians. Provide paths to licensure that do not require retraining for qualified interna­tional medical graduates who have completed advanced clinical training in their home countries. These physicians are substantially more likely to practice in rural and poorer communities and in much-needed primary care specialties. Expand the type of care that can be provided by (less costly) physician assis­tants and nurse practitioners, who perform many primary care services as safely and effectively as physicians. This can help mitigate physician shortages in underserved parts of the country. Embrace new medical technology, such as the use of telemedicine, physiologic sensors, mobile health apps, and other potential “force multipliers”—for both medical education and practice. This can increase the number of health providers, raise their productivity, and offer greater convenience to patients.   Guests:  Jeffrey S. Flier, former Dean of Harvard's Faculty of Medicine. @jflier Leck Shannon, manager of the healthcare research portfolio at Mercatus. lshannon@mercatus.gmu.edu   Links: Dr. Flier’s new paper His Stat article   Ideas, comments, suggestions? Email Chad at creese@mercatus.gmu.edu, or find him on Twitter @ChadMReese.

Rank #6: Here's to the Future of the BCFP!

Jul 17 2018
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How to regulate consumer financial products and services has remained one of the most contentious issues in Washington since the financial crisis. Congress created a new agency aimed at dealing with the issue in the wake of the crisis, but nearly 7 years after that agency first opened its doors, the issue remains as relevant as ever. In fact, experts are even divided on what to call the agency. For some, it’s the “Consumer Financial Protection Bureau,” or CFPB. For others, including Acting Director Mick Mulvaney, it’s the “Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection,” or the BCFP. Today, we're going to try and just call it “The Bureau,” and ask our guests to talk a little about the recent nomination of Kathleen Kraninger to direct the agency. More importantly, however, we’ll talk about the future of consumer credit regulation regardless of who runs the Bureau, or what it’s called: Justin Schardin, a fellow with the Bipartisan Policy Center, and the former director of their Financial Regulatory Reform Initiative.  Brian Knight, director of the financial regulatory program here at the Mercatus Center.   Questions, comments, suggestions? Email Chad at creese@mercatus.gmu.edu or follow him on Twitter @ChadMReese.

Rank #7: Here's to the Free Flow of Data!

Apr 03 2018
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Many US companies need to move data across borders, and it’s not just the ones you think. In addition to social media and tech firms, traditional companies like payment processors, logistics companies, and physical manufacturers also provide digital services across countries.   This makes them subject to data localization requirements, one of the key emerging issues in trade and trade agreements. Getting these requirements right will position countries to benefit from the increasingly vital benefits of the digital economy. Get them wrong, and countries will be shut out of this growth. In the case of data localization, the rules of the road are being written as we're driving on it. Thankfully our panel today has some ideas to keep us on the right path, with the US keeping to a principled approach that favors openness while safeguarding security and privacy. Guests: Christine McDaniel, a Mercatus scholar specializing in trade issues. Joshua Meltzer, senior fellow at the Brookings Institution  Brian Larkin, the Internet Association's Director for Cloud Policy   Ideas, comments, suggestions? Email Chad at creese@mercatus.gmu.edu, or find him on Twitter @ChadMReese.

Rank #8: Fed Chair Powell and the New Rules of Monetary Policy

Jun 26 2018
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Inflation, rate hikes, hawks, doves, and yes, even dual-mandates. We’re diving into the exciting and, at times, intractable world of the Federal Reserve today to talk about new-ish Fed Chair Jay Powell and the Fed’s recent announcement that it’s increasing its interest rate target now and in the near future. That makes this the perfect time to talk about the direction the Fed may be heading under Powell’s leadership. Here to answer that question, we have an all-star panel of Fed watchers: Jeanna Smialek, data, demographics, and monetary policy reporter for Bloomberg Joseph Gagnon, international macroeconomist at the Peterson Institute for international economics David Beckworth, economist, scholar with our Program for Monetary Policy here at Mercatus, and host of the podcast Macro Musings   Questions, comments, suggestions? Email Chad at creese@mercatus.gmu.edu or find him on Twitter @ChadMReese. 

Rank #9: Why Expanding Skilled Immigration Is Good for the United States

Jul 10 2018
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Everyone seems to agree that America is a nation of immigrants. Beyond that, however, actual immigration policy remains a contentious and often partisan topic. From insistence on a border wall between the United States and Mexico to growing calls for the abolition of the Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency, common ground hasn’t been easy to find lately. That may be because, as the Mercatus Center’s general director Tyler Cowen recently put it, “Immigration is hard,” and “it’s worth thinking about why immigration policy poses such tough dilemmas and how to fix them.” Here to do just that, we have two top immigration policy experts: Kristie de Pena, director of immigration policy and senior counsel at the Niskanen Center Dan Griswold, director of the program on the American economy and globalization here at the Mercatus Center   Questions, comments, suggestions? Email Chad at creese@mercatus.gmu.edu or find him on Twitter @ChadMReese. 

Rank #10: Here's How to Regulate Facebook Productively!

May 15 2018
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Privacy and social media have always had a complicated relationship. On the one hand, users of sites like Facebook often voice concerns when they find out how much of their personal information ends up with advertisers. On the other hand, the roughly 2 billion active users of Facebook continue to provide that data voluntarily in exchange for free use of the platform. Add political advertising to that mix, and you have the ingredients for intense Congressional hearings featuring Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, and a national conversation about whether or not the federal government should take a larger role in social media regulation. Here to address some of those challenges are three experts in the field: Adam Thierer, Mercatus Center Senior Research Fellow Ashkhen Kazaryan, Legal Fellow with TechFreedom Will Rinehart, American Action Forum’s Director of Technology and Innovation Policy   Download this episode and subscribe to the Mercatus Policy Download on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite podcasts. Questions, comments, suggestions? Email Chad at creese@mercatus.gmu.edu or find him on Twitter @ChadMReese.