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MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

Updated 6 days ago

Arts
News & Politics
Society & Culture
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A weekly roundtable about Indigenous issues and events in Canada and beyond. Hosted by Rick Harp.

Read more

A weekly roundtable about Indigenous issues and events in Canada and beyond. Hosted by Rick Harp.

iTunes Ratings

45 Ratings
Average Ratings
44
0
0
1
0

Awesome!

By Robin the listener - Jun 15 2019
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I learn from every episode of this podcast. Always thought provoking.

Important

By 415perra - Mar 14 2019
Read more
thank u so much for this project

iTunes Ratings

45 Ratings
Average Ratings
44
0
0
1
0

Awesome!

By Robin the listener - Jun 15 2019
Read more
I learn from every episode of this podcast. Always thought provoking.

Important

By 415perra - Mar 14 2019
Read more
thank u so much for this project
Cover image of MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

MEDIA INDIGENA : Indigenous current affairs

Updated 6 days ago

Read more

A weekly roundtable about Indigenous issues and events in Canada and beyond. Hosted by Rick Harp.

Rank #1: Ep. 172: Re-making the Indigenous Family (Pt. 1)

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On this episode’s collected, connected conversations (the sixth in this Summer Series): Part One of “Re-making the Indigenous Family.” Said to be among society’s most sacrosanct institutions, 'The Family' is a core site and source of social reproduction. But is the Settler family form the only way to organize human relations? Does it matter that this dominant, mainstream form differs from those of Indigenous peoples? The answers to these questions are critical, for they are at the heart of why Canada’s child and family welfare systems have failed Indigenous children and families. And yet, as you’ll hear in this episode, what is a failure to some is of benefit to others, on a truly massive scale.

Featured voices this podcast include (in order of appearance): Lakota activist and communications professional, Taté Walker, and Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta; Candis Callison, Associate Professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism; Commentator and entrepreneur Robert Jago plus lawyer and international Indigenous rights advocate Danika Billie Littlechild.

CREDITS // Creative Commons music in this episode includes the track "Beauty Flow" by Kevin MacLeod. Learn more about MacLeod’s work at incompetech.com and filmmusic.io. Our intro music comes via BenevolentBadger.com

This episode was produced and edited by Rick Harp.

Aug 05 2019
1 hour 3 mins
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Rank #2: Ep. 112: Settler Sexuality's Slippery Slope

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On this week's roundtable: Settler Sexuality. A subject at the heart of two recent talks by our own Kim Tallbear (one at the sex-positive communities event ConvergeCon, the other at SoloPolyCon), we thought we'd use it as an opportunity to take a longer look at an often troubling and taboo topic. In particular, we discuss the insights of her keynote — "Yes, Your Pleasure! Yes, Self-love! And Don’t Forget, Settler Sex Is A Structure" — at the 2nd Annual Solo Polyamory Conference in Seattle, Washington.

An associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, Kim discussed her work at the MEDIA INDIGENA roundtable with host Rick Harp and Candis Callison, associate professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Apr 27 2018
57 mins
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Rank #3: Ep. 90: Is Pro-Development Anti-Indigenous, Vice-versa, or Neither?

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1. We pore over a poll showing Native Americans who live in "majority-Native areas" in the U.S. face greater mistreatment than anyone else. 2. Pro-development = anti-Indian, or the other way around? We mine recent media narratives that declare environmentalists and First Nations at odds over resource extraction. 3. Breaking the boys club: we discuss musician and poet Joy Harjo speaking out on her struggles as a female Indigenous artist in male-dominated circles.

At the roundtable this week are Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, and Terese Mailhot, writer and Tecumseh Postdoctoral Fellow in English at Purdue University.

Nov 27 2017
1 hour 1 min
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Rank #4: Ep. 108: Reading the larger lessons of Sherman Alexie's literary rise and fall

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THIS WEEK / 'Sorry' for the racism: As National Geographic tries to atone for its problematic history with non-white people, we assess how much credit (and critique) they deserve. / 'Sorry' for the sexual harassment: As Native American writer Sherman Alexie continues his free-fall amid accusations of mistreating women, we’ll read into his story for larger lessons. / 'Sorry' (not sorry) for the journalism: A Canadian reporter faces potential jail-time for embedding himself inside an Indigenous-led protest against an east coast mega-project.

Joining host Rick Harp at this week’s roundtable are Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, and Candis Callison, associate professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Mar 30 2018
1 hour 26 mins
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Rank #5: Ep. 155: How Do We Solve "The Settler Problem"?

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What happens when you reverse the lens and try to unpack what it means to be a Settler? What’s the difference between Settler colonialism and white supremacy—is it one of kind or degree? And can we ever hope to solve “The Settler Problem”?

Joining host/producer Rick Harp at the roundtable this week are Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies at York University, Brock Pitawanakwat, and Chris Powell, Associate Professor of Sociology at Ryerson University and the author of Barbaric Civilization: A Critical Sociology of Genocide.

// This episode edited by Anya Zoledziowski. Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Apr 01 2019
48 mins
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Rank #6: Ep. 113: A Second Slide into Settler Sexuality

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Saddle up for our Settler sexuality sequel! Building on last week’s exploration of how Settler norms impact Indigenous notions of intimacy and interpersonal connections, we more explicitly discuss the erotically infused insights of Mohawk/Tuscarora writer, poet and broadcaster Janet Rogers. Insights she shared with our own Kim TallBear (associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta) at ConvergeCon, the annual conference working to build sex positive communities. Joining host Rick Harp to reflect on Kim and Janet's dialogue is Candis Callison, associate professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

May 05 2018
1 hour 10 mins
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Rank #7: Ep. 89: Child Welfare as an Arm of the Colonial State

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This week, an extended conversation with Sarah de Leeuw, co-author of the recent paper, Turning a new page: cultural safety, critical creative literary interventions, truth and reconciliation, and the crisis of child welfare. Written with Margo Greenwood, the paper was produced as part of their work at the National Collaborating Centre for Aboriginal Health, where Sarah is a Research Associate, Margo the Academic Lead. Over the course of this discussion, we explore de Leeuw and Greenwood's argument that the ongoing crisis of Indigenous child apprehensions must be viewed in their historical and cultural contexts. That is, as an extension of long-standing violent discourses that validate the 'rights' of settler-colonial state powers like Canada to intervene into the lives of Indigenous families and communities with impunity. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Nov 19 2017
50 mins
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Rank #8: Ep. 126: Moving beyond lip service for Indigenous languages

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Our sixth Summer Series episode collects and connects conversations about language: more specifically, the politics of Indigenous language rights and funding in Canada. Featured voices this episode include: Lorena Fontaine, an associate professor of Indigenous Governance at the University of Winnipeg; Karyn Pugliese, APTN's Executive Director of News and Current Affairs, along with Lisa Girbav, radio broadcaster and student from the Tsimshian territory; Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, plus Candis Callison, associate professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism.

Creative Commons music in this podcast includes the song 'Endeavour' by Jahzzar. Learn more at freemusicarchive.org

Aug 03 2018
1 hour 1 min
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Rank #9: Ep 61: How Canada's first Indigenous policy was founded on famine

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This week, an extended interview with James Daschuk, author of Clearing the Plains: Disease, Politics of Starvation, and the Loss of Aboriginal Life. The award-winning book is a harrowing, historical account of Canada's original Aboriginal policy—re-location via starvation. In this conversation, originally recorded in 2014, Daschuk discusses his investigation into the roles that disease, climate and politics played in the deaths and subjugation of thousands of Aboriginal people in the late 1800s, an era when Canada’s first prime minister—John A. Macdonald—relentlessly pursued his so-called 'National Dream.' A pursuit that coincided with the often nightmarish existence of first peoples on the Plains. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

May 07 2017
1 hour 7 mins
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Rank #10: Ep. 63: Does '13 Reasons Why' sensationalize suicide? Aboriginal authors on the curriculum

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On this week’s roundtable: sensationalizing suicide? We recount the critiques of 13 Reasons Why, the Netflix teen drama that's sparked controversy for centering the suicide of one of its characters. And shaking off Shakespeare: amid the recent kerfuffle over cultural appropriation, we’ll discuss why one Ontario school board has booted the Bard in favour of Indigenous authors. Joining us at our roundtable are Jessica Deer, a staff reporter with the Eastern Door newspaper in Kahnawake, and, in Phoenix, Arizona, Lakota activist and communications professional, Taté Walker.

May 22 2017
1 hour 1 min
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Rank #11: Ep. 171: An Indigenous Chronicle of Christianity

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On this week’s collected, connected conversations (the fifth of our summertime shows): how core concepts of Christianity continue to inspire and infuse the laws, attitudes and actions of supposedly secular Settler states toward Indigenous peoples.

Featured voices this podcast include (in order of appearance): Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta and Candis Callison, Associate Professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism; Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s Department of Drama and Brock Pitawanakwat, Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies at York University; Lakota activist and communications professional Taté Walker.

This podcast was edited and produced by Anya Zoledziowski and Rick Harp. 

CREDITS: Creative Commons music in this episode includes the following works by Kevin MacLeod: "Rising", "Mirage", "Space 1990," "Agnus Dei X", "Comfortable Mystery 2", "Dirt Rhodes", and "Beauty Flow." Learn more about the artist at incompetech.com and filmmusic.io. Our intro music comes via BenevolentBadger.com.

Jul 28 2019
59 mins
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Rank #12: Ep. 173: Remaking the Indigenous Family (Pt. 2)

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On this week’s collected, connected conversations (the seventh in our Summer Series): the other half of our two-part look at remaking the Indigenous family. Last episode, we got into the colonial principles of Settler family forms and norms. This episode, we lay out how they are applied in practice, with Indigenous people often on the receiving end. And if the expression “What you believe in, you budget” holds true here, it would seem the Canadian state has never been one to believe in either Indigenous children or their families.

Featured voices this podcast include (in order of appearance) Sarah de Leeuw, Research Associate with the National Collaborating Centre for Indigenous Health (NCCIH); Kenn Richard, founder and former Executive Director, Native Child and Family Services of Toronto; Brock Pitawanakwat, Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies at York University, along with journalist and photographer Wawmeesh Hamilton; Indigenous homelessness researcher Jesse Thistle; and Ken Williams, assistant professor, University of Alberta's department of drama.

This episode was produced and edited by Rick Harp.

CREDITS // Creative Commons music in this episode includes works by Sascha Ende and Kevin MacLeod; learn more about their work at incompetech.com and filmmusic.io. We also featured songs by Stanislav Vdovin and Ilya Marfin; hear more by them on Fugue. Our intro music comes via BenevolentBadger.com.

Aug 12 2019
1 hour 14 mins
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Rank #13: Ep. 134: What does Settler solidarity with Indigenous peoples look like?

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This week we bring you 'part two' of last week's round table, one that ran unusually long because of our extended discussion about APTN’s controversial reality show, "First Contact." Those outstanding two topics are... Prime directive: A leaked video seems to show Canada’s PM scolding First Nations leaders for their time 'mismanagement'; plus, Settler solidarity—what might it really look like? Two examples from the Antipodes could show the way.

Still seated at the round table: Brock Pitawanakwat, assistant professor of Indigenous studies at the University of Sudbury, and Candis Callison, visiting professor of Canadian Studies at Princeton University.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Sep 30 2018
36 mins
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Rank #14: Ep. 60: Canada's Sexist Status Indian System

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THIS WEEK: We delve into an Indigenous woman's 30-year-plus court battle to regain her Indian Status, a battle that just resulted in victory in Ontario. But will Lynn Gehl's win against the sexism of Canada's Indian Status system endure? If so, what could it mean for thousands just like her? We then look at Bill S-3, a bill that, like Gehl's case, deals with gender discrimination in the Indian Act but, like most federal fixes in this area, only seems to exacerbate the problem it was meant to solve. Joining us again are scholar Pam Palmater and author Paul Seesequasis. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Apr 29 2017
35 mins
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Rank #15: Ep. 148: War on the Wet'suwet'en?

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This week... Another BC battlefront: Why Wet'suwet'en resistance to the Coastal Gas Link pipeline project is—and isn’t—so complicated to understand. Revitalizing MEDIA INDIGENA: Why us taking a break after 147 consecutive weeks is the best guarantee of many more episodes to come. Learn more on our website.

Joining us for this special episode—recorded as a livestream with our supporters on Patreon—are Candis Callison, Visiting Professor of Canadian Studies at Princeton University, Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, and Ken Williams, assistant professor with the U of A’s department of drama.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Jan 14 2019
1 hour 50 mins
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Rank #16: Ep. 67: Why It's Not Okay in Thunder Bay for Indigenous Youth; Does Canada/AFN MOU Go Too Far?

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This week: why things aren't okay in Thunder Bay. In the wake of two more Indigenous teens found dead in this northwestern Ontario city’s waterways, their home First Nations are sounding alarm bells, but local police maintain there is no crisis. And WTF is a MOU, and why should we care? We unpack the recent signing of a joint memorandum of understanding between the Canadian government and the Assembly of First Nations. Back again are Karyn Pugliese, APTN's Executive Director of News and Current Affairs with the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network and Lisa Girbav, a radio broadcaster from the Tsimshian territory and a student at UBC. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Jun 18 2017
51 mins
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Rank #17: Ep. 87: The 12 Dimensions of Indigenous Homelessness

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1. No joke: Why some racist Halloween stunts have people at one Alberta university upset (if not all that surprised). 2. Re-definition: Can expanding and enriching what homelessness means for Indigenous people help yield better responses? 3. Storm clouds: Why has an award-winning video game about a Thunderbird sparked some political rumblings?

Back at the table this week are Brock Pitawanakwat, an assistant professor of Indigenous studies at the University of Sudbury, and Ken Williams, an assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama.

Nov 04 2017
42 mins
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Rank #18: Ep. 122: Canada's systems of (mis)education and Indigenous peoples

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Our second Summer Series episode collects and connects conversations about education: from inadequate funding to lack of Indigenous representation in many school curricula, we explore systemic issues and the lived experience of some Indigenous learners in this realm.

Featured voices this podcast include (in order of appearance): Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama, along with journalist and entrepreneur Patrice Mousseau; Brock Pitawanakwat, an assistant professor of Indigenous studies at the University of Sudbury; APTN News & Current Affairs director Karyn Pugliese; Entrepreneur and commentator Robert Jago and lawyer and international advocate Danika Billie Littlechild; Kim Tallbear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, and Lakota activist and communications professional, Taté Walker; Candis Callison, associate professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism

Creative Commons music in this podcast includes the track 'Endeavour,' by Jahzzar. Learn more at http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Jahzzar/

Jul 06 2018
1 hour 19 mins
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Rank #19: Ep. 123: A taste of Indigenous food politics

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Our third Summer Series episode collects and connects conversations about food: it’s a veritable buffet of some of our most filling discussions, from access to traditional foods to culture clashes over Settler vs. Indigenous diets. Featured voices this podcast include Iqaluit, Nunavut mayor Madeleine Redfern; Kim Tallbear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta; Lakota activist and communications professional Taté Walker; and Candis Callison, associate professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism.

Creative Commons music in this podcast includes the track 'Endeavour,' by Jahzzar. Learn more at http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Jahzzar/

Jul 13 2018
1 hour 4 mins
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Rank #20: Ep. 145: Policing the Police of Thunder Bay

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Policing the police: A new review of Thunder Bay law enforcement finds the quality of their investigations so flawed many need to be re-opened; Fighting fakery: How a BC media outlet is trying to tackle inauthentic 'Indigenous' art; Off track: Why is Mexico’s new president pushing for a railroad no one seems to want, least of all indigenous peoples whose lands would be threatened by it?

Joining host/producer Rick Harp at the roundtable once again are Brock Pitawanakwat, assistant professor of Indigenous studies at the University of Sudbury, and Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama.

// Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic

Note: The 'Horn Honk' sound effect (by Mike Koenig) featured in this episode appears under a CC 3.0 license.

Dec 15 2018
1 hour 1 min
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