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MEDIA INDIGENA : Weekly Indigenous current affairs program

Updated 22 days ago

Arts
News & Politics
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A weekly roundtable about Indigenous issues and events in Canada and beyond. Hosted by Rick Harp.

Read more

A weekly roundtable about Indigenous issues and events in Canada and beyond. Hosted by Rick Harp.

iTunes Ratings

37 Ratings
Average Ratings
36
0
0
1
0

iTunes Ratings

37 Ratings
Average Ratings
36
0
0
1
0
Cover image of MEDIA INDIGENA : Weekly Indigenous current affairs program

MEDIA INDIGENA : Weekly Indigenous current affairs program

Updated 22 days ago

Read more

A weekly roundtable about Indigenous issues and events in Canada and beyond. Hosted by Rick Harp.

Rank #1: Ep. 67: Why It's Not Okay in Thunder Bay for Indigenous Youth; Does Canada/AFN MOU Go Too Far?

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This week: why things aren't okay in Thunder Bay. In the wake of two more Indigenous teens found dead in this northwestern Ontario city’s waterways, their home First Nations are sounding alarm bells, but local police maintain there is no crisis. And WTF is a MOU, and why should we care? We unpack the recent signing of a joint memorandum of understanding between the Canadian government and the Assembly of First Nations. Back again are Karyn Pugliese, APTN's Executive Director of News and Current Affairs with the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network and Lisa Girbav, a radio broadcaster from the Tsimshian territory and a student at UBC. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Jun 18 2017
51 mins
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Rank #2: Ep. 76: Charlottesville, Guam and the 'Eskimos' of Edmonton

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This week... Why Indigenous people totally relate to recent violence over icons of intolerance in Charlottesville, Virginia; we get into Guam, a strategic US island colony that found itself smack dab in the middle of nuclear brinkmanship with North Korea; and, Inuk singer Tanya Tagaq adds her voice to calls for the Edmonton Eskimos to change their team’s name. Returning to the roundtable are Lakota activist/communicator Taté Walker, and Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta.

Aug 21 2017
1 hour 1 min
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Rank #3: Ep. 112: Settler Sexuality's Slippery Slope

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On this week's roundtable: Settler Sexuality. A subject at the heart of two recent talks by our own Kim Tallbear (one at the sex-positive communities event ConvergeCon, the other at SoloPolyCon), we thought we'd use it as an opportunity to take a longer look at an often troubling and taboo topic. In particular, we discuss the insights of her keynote — "Yes, Your Pleasure! Yes, Self-love! And Don’t Forget, Settler Sex Is A Structure" — at the 2nd Annual Solo Polyamory Conference in Seattle, Washington. An associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, Kim discussed her work at the MEDIA INDIGENA roundtable with host Rick Harp and Candis Callison, associate professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Apr 27 2018
57 mins
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Rank #4: Ep. 99: A deep dive into the Doctrine of Discovery (and how it's never gone away)

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This week: the 'Change the Date' debate. We discuss what seems to have been the most controversial Australia Day yet. Plus, divine intervention? As the Chilean government turns up the heat, why would the Pope push the Mapuche to turn the other cheek? And: bison on the brink? It's an animal many still revere—now, a scientist raises fresh concerns about its future. Joining host Rick Harp this week are Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, and Candis Callison, Associate Professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.  

Jan 29 2018
1 hour
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Rank #5: Ep. 75: Child welfare's links to homelessness; BC overdose data; What is "authentic" Indigenous art?

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This week's Indigenous roundtable: a new study seems to solidify the link between homelessness and contact with the child welfare system; new data reveals a disproportionate number of Indigenous deaths due to overdose in British Columbia; and, with the big Santa Fe Indian Art market around the corner, we discuss its approach to the perennial debate over "authentic" Indigenous art. Joining us are Lakota activist and communications professional Taté Walker and Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Aug 13 2017
57 mins
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Rank #6: Ep.57: Is the Globe and Mail Guilty of Whitesplaining? Third-Party (Mis)Management

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THIS WEEK / Colonial Editorial: Why people like ex-TRC head Murray Sinclair are outraged by a Globe and Mail op-ed rejecting the idea that South Africa's experience with oppression parallels that of Canada’s. Is the Globe guilty of whitesplaining? / Third-party Mis-management: a federal Standing Committee on Indigenous and Northern Affairs continues to hear whether the practice of forcing First Nations to rely on outside managers to run their communities can somehow be improved. The kind of question that kind of answers itself. Joining the roundtable are: Pam Palmater, the Chair in Indigenous Governance with the department of Politics and Public Administration at Ryerson University, along with writer and journalist Paul Seesequasis. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Apr 08 2017
37 mins
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Rank #7: Ep. 85: Acknowledging Toxic Indigenous Masculinity: Are We at a Turning Point?

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1. In name only: How did an Ontario city manage to strike up an Indigenous working group—minus any Indigenous people? 2. Ciao, chief! As a gesture of what it calls reconciliation, a school board decides it needs to drop the word “chief” from all of its employees’ job titles. 3. Book bind: After a number of contributors pull out of an Aboriginal anthology over the inclusion of an author convicted of domestic assault, the author asks the publisher to remove his work instead. We’ll discuss whether this sequence of events has made new room to discuss Indigenous male violence. Back at the roundtable are Brock Pitawanakwat, an assistant professor of Indigenous studies at the University of Sudbury, and Ken Williams, an assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Oct 21 2017
57 mins
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Rank #8: Ep. 86: Why your kid will survive not being an 'Indian Princess' on Halloween

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1. Hatin’ on Halloween? Why a non-native writer feels her 4-year-old was cheated of the chance to dress up as "a native princess." 2. Beothuk babble: Is an east coast Indigenous people reducible to their DNA? Some archaeologists and journalists seem to think so. 3. Another meal of seal: We’ll digest your comments about our earlier chat regarding one restaurant’s traditional menu. Back at the roundtable are Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, and Lakota activist and communications professional, Taté Walker. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Oct 28 2017
1 hour 8 mins
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Rank #9: Ep. 134: What does Settler solidarity with Indigenous peoples look like?

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This week we bring you 'part two' of last week's round table, one that ran unusually long because of our extended discussion about APTN’s controversial reality show, "First Contact." Those outstanding two topics are... Prime directive: A leaked video seems to show Canada’s PM scolding First Nations leaders for their time 'mismanagement'; plus, Settler solidarity—what might it really look like? Two examples from the Antipodes could show the way. Still seated at the round table: Brock Pitawanakwat, assistant professor of Indigenous studies at the University of Sudbury, and Candis Callison, visiting professor of Canadian Studies at Princeton University. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Sep 30 2018
36 mins
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Rank #10: Ep. 71: How Boring Bureaucracy Enables Inhumane Inequity in Canada

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This week… a bit of a mid-summer break from our regular format as we take a deep dive into the fiscal infrastructure of colonialism in Canada. As technocratic as that sounds, our guest expertly deciphers how boring bureaucracy can enable inhumane inequity. Our guide on this journey is Shiri Pasternak, Assistant Professor in Criminology at Ryerson University, and the author of a 5-part series entitled, “Resistance 150: Unsettling Canada’s Hidden Economic Apartheid.” It appears on Ricochet.media, a digital news outlet dedicated to public interest journalism. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Jul 15 2017
44 mins
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Rank #11: Ep. 60: Canada's Sexist Status Indian System

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THIS WEEK: We delve into an Indigenous woman's 30-year-plus court battle to regain her Indian Status, a battle that just resulted in victory in Ontario. But will Lynn Gehl's win against the sexism of Canada's Indian Status system endure? If so, what could it mean for thousands just like her? We then look at Bill S-3, a bill that, like Gehl's case, deals with gender discrimination in the Indian Act but, like most federal fixes in this area, only seems to exacerbate the problem it was meant to solve. Joining us again are scholar Pam Palmater and author Paul Seesequasis. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Apr 29 2017
35 mins
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Rank #12: Ep. 155: How Do We Solve "The Settler Problem"?

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What happens when you reverse the lens and try to unpack what it means to be a Settler? What’s the difference between Settler colonialism and white supremacy—is it one of kind or degree? And can we ever hope to solve “The Settler Problem”? Joining host/producer Rick Harp at the roundtable this week are Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies at York University, Brock Pitawanakwat, and Chris Powell, Associate Professor of Sociology at Ryerson University and the author of Barbaric Civilization: A Critical Sociology of Genocide. // This episode edited by Anya Zoledziowski. Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Apr 01 2019
48 mins
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Rank #13: Ep. 108: Reading the larger lessons of Sherman Alexie's literary rise and fall

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THIS WEEK / 'Sorry' for the racism: As National Geographic tries to atone for its problematic history with non-white people, we assess how much credit (and critique) they deserve. / 'Sorry' for the sexual harassment: As Native American writer Sherman Alexie continues his free-fall amid accusations of mistreating women, we’ll read into his story for larger lessons. / 'Sorry' (not sorry) for the journalism: A Canadian reporter faces potential jail-time for embedding himself inside an Indigenous-led protest against an east coast mega-project. Joining host Rick Harp at this week’s roundtable are Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, and Candis Callison, associate professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Mar 30 2018
1 hour 26 mins
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Rank #14: Ep. 96: Is Native Twitter More Than Just a Hashtag?

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This week: #NativeTwitter—more than just a hashtag? Can its influence be felt off-line? Or is it simply a case of tweeting to the choir? Seal for sale—Facebook reverses its refusal of seal-skin-related items on its platform. Split-shooter—a British Columbia court rules that a U.S.-based Indigenous man can legally hunt in Canada because his people’s territory pre-dates the border. Back at the roundtable are Ken Williams, an assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of Drama, and Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studiesat the University of Alberta. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Jan 07 2018
47 mins
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Rank #15: Ep. 54: The Crime of Being Indigenous; Food Sovereignty Starved of Support

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On this week's Indigenous roundtable: Do growing calls for tougher laws deliberately target some more than others? A look at the apparent push to increasingly criminalize Aboriginal behaviour by non-Aboriginal interests. Plus, how a disproportionate number of Indigenous people throughout Canada struggle with severe food insecurity. Returning to the roundtable are Danika Billie Littlechild and Robert Jago. // Our theme is nesting by birocratic.

Mar 18 2017
33 mins
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Rank #16: Ep. 132: Culture-making in an Age of Assimilation and Appropriation

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1. 'Sinful' ceremony: a Cree community finds itself at spiritual odds over whether to allow a pow-wow some regard as blasphemous. // 2. Must the show go on? Robert Lepage's first attempt to tell "the story of Canada through the prism of [white-Indigenous] relations”—minus a single Indigenous actor—got cancelled. Now it appears the famous Quebec playwright will get to stage the show after all. // 3. Boyden’s back, and there’s gonna be trouble! Why a movie adapted from a controversial author’s work has made some uneasy in their seats. Back at the roundtable are Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta's Department of Drama, and Brock Pitawanakwat, assistant professor of Indigenous studies at the University of Sudbury. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic

Sep 14 2018
1 hour 2 mins
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Rank #17: Ep. 113: A Second Slide into Settler Sexuality

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Saddle up for our Settler sexuality sequel! Building on last week’s exploration of how Settler norms impact Indigenous notions of intimacy and interpersonal connections, we more explicitly discuss the erotically infused insights of Mohawk/Tuscarora writer, poet and broadcaster Janet Rogers. Insights she shared with our own Kim TallBear (associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta) at ConvergeCon, the annual conference working to build sex positive communities. Joining host Rick Harp to reflect on Kim and Janet's dialogue is Candis Callison, associate professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

May 05 2018
1 hour 10 mins
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Rank #18: Ep. 135: What Does Indigenization of Education Really Mean?

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This week, our special live-audience episode in Edmonton, where we discussed... Protocol Schmotocol: What one professor’s slide into another’s DMs on Twitter in search of help on a highly-sensitive subject can teach us about ethical research... 'Indigenous Renaissance': Just one of many pointed phrases in the victory speech of Maliseet musician Jeremy Dutcher at this year’s Polaris Music Prize ceremony. But as Indigenous artists continue to rack up recognition in the broader arts world, should we see their success as made-in-Canada, or made despite it? Education 'Indigenization': Confused by what different institutions mean by the term? Special guest Adam Gaudry (Associate Dean and Associate Professor, Faculty of Native Studies at the University of Alberta) walks us through what true reconciliation might look like in the academy. Featuring regulars Rick Harp, Kim TallBear and Ken Williams, it's the first-ever MEDIA INDIGENA roundtable recorded in front of a live audience. Thanks again to our event sponsor—the U of A Faculty of Native Studies—for making it all possible! // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Oct 07 2018
1 hour 15 mins
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Rank #19: Ep. 68: Language Funding Inequity Irks Inuit; Google Maps Adds Indigenous Communities

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This week... When words fail: Especially when one hears about the enormous equity gap in federal funding between French and Inuit languages in Nunavut. Plus... Putting us on the map—literally. Google announces that users of its Maps app will now get to see thousands more Indigenous communities. But will that hide as much as it reveals?   Back again at the roundtable are Karyn Pugliese, APTN's Executive Director of News and Current Affairs, plus Lisa Girbav, a radio broadcaster and student from the Tsimshian territory.

Jun 25 2017
47 mins
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Rank #20: Ep. 120: Looking at Trump's brutal border policies through an Indigenous lens

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THIS WEEK / Separation anxiety: as the U.S. catches criticism for splitting up migrant families and isolating their kids, some wonder if the concern comes off as just a little bit selective / Tipi takedown: an encampment set up near Saskatchewan's legislature in honour of stolen Indigenous youth is removed for being 'disruptive' / Right idea, wrong route: the Supreme Court rules that the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal does not have the legal mandate to go after discrimination in the Indian Act. Ken Williams, an assistant professor with the University of Alberta's department of drama, and  Brock Pitawanakwat, assistant professor of Indigenous studies at the University of Sudbury, re-join host Rick Harp at the roundtable. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Jun 21 2018
51 mins
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