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LSE: Public lectures and events

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The London School of Economics and Political Science public events podcast series is a platform for thought, ideas and lively debate where you can hear from some of the world's leading thinkers. Listen to more than 200 new episodes every year.

Read more

The London School of Economics and Political Science public events podcast series is a platform for thought, ideas and lively debate where you can hear from some of the world's leading thinkers. Listen to more than 200 new episodes every year.

iTunes Ratings

166 Ratings
Average Ratings
117
25
12
7
5

Economists Unite!

By DarkKnight47 - Sep 21 2017
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Great public lectures on current events. If you are tired of the same old media nonsense. This is the place to hear cogent analysis! Take a listen and hear facts and opinion that doesn’t burn your brain or appeal to your inherent cognitive bias. Guaranteed to make you think.

Many eye-opening, mind-expanding lectures by a great variety of speakers from around the world

By Listener Erik - May 17 2011
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I am so glad LSE's live lectures and events podcasts are back!

iTunes Ratings

166 Ratings
Average Ratings
117
25
12
7
5

Economists Unite!

By DarkKnight47 - Sep 21 2017
Read more
Great public lectures on current events. If you are tired of the same old media nonsense. This is the place to hear cogent analysis! Take a listen and hear facts and opinion that doesn’t burn your brain or appeal to your inherent cognitive bias. Guaranteed to make you think.

Many eye-opening, mind-expanding lectures by a great variety of speakers from around the world

By Listener Erik - May 17 2011
Read more
I am so glad LSE's live lectures and events podcasts are back!
Cover image of LSE: Public lectures and events

LSE: Public lectures and events

Updated 6 days ago

Read more

The London School of Economics and Political Science public events podcast series is a platform for thought, ideas and lively debate where you can hear from some of the world's leading thinkers. Listen to more than 200 new episodes every year.

Rank #1: The Coddling of the American Mind [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Jonathan Haidt | A timely investigation into the new safety culture in universities and the dangers it poses to free speech, mental health, education, and ultimately democracy. This event marks the launch of Jonathan's new book, The Coddling of the American Mind: How Good Intentions and Bad Ideas Are Setting Up a Generation for Failure. Jonathan Haidt (@JonHaidt) is a social and cultural psychologist and the Thomas Cooley Professor of Ethical Leadership at New York University's Stern School of Business. He is the author of The Righteous Mind and The Happiness Hypothesis. Paul Dolan (@profpauldolan) is currently Professor of Behavioural Science at the LSE. He is Head of Department in Psychological and Behavioural Science and Director of LSE's Executive MSc Behavioural Science. LSE's Behavioural Science Hub (@LSEBehavioural) is a collaboration across the School in all things behavioural. Its two main goals are to provide a platform to highlight existing behavioural science related activities at LSE and further develop the capacity for top quality research into human behaviour. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEHaidt Video The recording of the Facebook Live of this event is available to watch at The Coddling of the American Mind. Podcasts and videos of many LSE events can be found at the LSE Public Lectures and Events: podcasts and videos channel.
Nov 23 2018
1 hour 24 mins
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Rank #2: LSE IQ Ep 21 | Can we afford our consumer society? [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Dr Rebecca Elliott, Professor Ian Gough, Dr Rodolfo Leyva | Welcome to LSE IQ, the monthly podcast from the London School of Economics and Political Science. This is the podcast where we ask some of the leading social scientists - and other experts - to answer intelligent questions about economics, politics or society. For this LSE IQ we have something slightly different for you – an 'live' episode recorded in front of an audience at LSE at the beginning of November 2018. Economic growth has helped millions out of poverty. The jobs it creates mean rising incomes and consumers who buy more. This drives further growth and higher living standards, including better health and education. Yet WWF, the World Wildlife Fund, has recently warned that exploding human consumption is the driving force behind unprecedented planetary change, through increased demand for energy, land and water. Plastics and microplastics are filling our oceans and rivers and entering the food chain. The production of goods and services for household use is the most important cause of greenhouse gas emissions. The textile industry is responsible for depleting and polluting water resources and committing human rights abuses against its workers. It is also a major source of greenhouse gases, and three fifths of all clothing produced ends up in incinerators or landfills within a year of being made. For this episode of LSE IQ Jo Bale and Sue Windebank ask, 'Can we afford our consumer society?'. This episode features: Dr Rebecca Elliott, Assistant Professor, LSE’s Department of Sociology; Professor Ian Gough, Visiting Professor at LSE’s Centre for the Analysis of Social Exclusion and an Associate at the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment; and Dr Rodolfo Leyva, LSE Fellow in LSE’s Department of Media Communications. For further information about the podcast visit lse.ac.uk/iq and please tell us what you think using the hashtag #LSEIQ.
Dec 19 2018
1 hour 11 mins
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Rank #3: Crime and Global Justice [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Daniele Archibugi, Alice Pease, Professor Christine Chinkin, Professor Richard Falk, Professor Mary Kaldor | Editor's note: We apologise for the poor audio quality of this podcast. In their new book, Crime and Global Justice: The Dynamics of International Punishment, which will be the subject of this discussion, Daniele Archibugi and Alice Pease offer an analysis of the successes and shortcomings of the global justice system from 1945 to the present day. Over the last quarter of a century a new stem of global criminal justice has emerged; national judges have become bolder in prosecuting crimes committed abroad, special tribunals have been able to target national leaders as well as their henchmen, and a permanent International Criminal Court has been established. But how successful have these ambitious transformations been? Have they ushered in a new era of cosmopolitan justice or are the old principles of victors’ justice still in play? Daniele Archibugi is a Research Director at the Italian National Research Council (CNR-IRPPS) in Rome, and Professor of Innovation, Governance and Public Policy at the University of London, Birkbeck College. Alice Pease is a freelance researcher currently working on a modern slavery campaign at the House of Lords. Christine Chinkin is Emerita Professor of International Law and Director of the Centre on Women, Peace and Security at the LSE. Richard Falk is Professor Emeritus of International Law at Princeton University and a Research Fellow in Global Studies at the University of California at Santa Barbara. Mary Kaldor is a Professor of Global Governance and Director of the Conflict and Civil Society Research Unit in the LSE Department of International Development. Gerry Simpson is a Professor and a Chair of Public International Law in the Department of Law, LSE.
Feb 28 2018
1 hour 9 mins
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Rank #4: Future Politics: living together in a world transformed by tech [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Jamie Susskind | Jamie Susskind will discuss the publication of his latest book, Future Politics: Living Together in a World Transformed by Tech. At this event, Jamie will discuss how digital technology, from AI to virtual reality, will transform politics and society. He will mention how digital technology will be used to exert control by the state and by big tech firms. This talk will challenge the audience to rethink the meaning of democracy and justice, freedom and equality, power, and property. The great political debate of the last century was about how much of our collective life should be determined by the state and what should be left to the market and civil society. In the future, the question will be how far our lives should be directed and controlled by powerful digital systems - and on what terms? Jamie Susskind (@jamiesusskind) is an author, speaker, and practising barrister. A past Fellow of Harvard University’s Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society, he studied history and politics at Magdalen College, Oxford, graduating first in his year before turning to the law. Tony Travers is the Associate Dean of LSE’s School of Public Policy and a Professor in the Department of Government. The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) equips you with the skills and ideas to transform people and societies. We are an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSETech
Nov 06 2018
1 hour 29 mins
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Rank #5: The Value of Everything: making and taking in the global economy [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Mariana Mazzucato | In her new book, The Value of Everything, which she will discuss in this lecture, Mariana Mazzucato, argues that if we are to reform capitalism, we urgently need to rethink where wealth comes from. Which activities are creating it, which are extracting it, and which are destroying it? Answers to these questions are key if we want to replace the current parasitic system with a type of capitalism that is more sustainable, more symbiotic: that works for us all. Mariana Mazzucato (@MazzucatoM) is Professor in the Economics of Innovation and Public Value at University College London (UCL) where she is also Founder and Director of the Institute for Innovation and Public Purpose. She is author of the highly-acclaimed book The Entrepreneurial State: Debunking Public vs. Private Sector Myths, and winner of the 2014 New Statesman SPERI Prize in Political Economy, the 2015 Hans-Matthöfer-Preis and the 2018 Leontief Prize for Advancing the Frontiers of Economic Thought. She advises policymakers around the world on how to deliver 'smart', inclusive and sustainable growth. She was named as one of the '3 most important thinkers about innovation' in the New Republic. Wouter den Haan is Co-director for the Centre for Macroeconomics and Professor of Economics at LSE. The Department of Economics at LSE (@LSEEcon) is one of the largest economics departments in the world. Its size ensures that all areas of economics are strongly represented in both research and teaching. The Centre For Macroeconomics (@CFMUK) brings together world-class experts to carry out pioneering research on the global economic crisis and to help design policies that alleviate it.
Apr 23 2018
1 hour 21 mins
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Rank #6: Texas, Trump and the Future of America [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Lawrence Wright | Come learn about the most controversial state in America and what it tells us about Donald Trump and the future of the US. This event marks the publications of Lawrence's new book, God Save Texas: A Journey into the Future of America. Lawrence Wright (@lawrence_wright) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning author, screenwriter, playwright and a staff writer for The New Yorker magazine. Peter Trubowitz (@ptrubowitz) is Department Head of International Relations and Director of the US Centre at the London School of Economics and Political Science and Associate Fellow at Chatham House, Royal Institute of International Affairs. The United States Centre (@LSE_US) at LSE is a hub for global expertise, analysis and commentary on America.
May 15 2018
1 hour 22 mins
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Rank #7: The Future of Capitalism [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Sir Paul Collier | Following the publication of his latest book, The Future of Capitalism, Paul Collier will discuss this book and his wider work. Paul Collier is Professor of Economics and Public Policy at the Blavatnik School of Government and a Professorial Fellow of St Antony’s College. From 1998–2003 he took a five-year Public Service leave during which he was Director of the Research Development Department of the World Bank. He is currently a Professeur invité at Sciences Po and a Director of the International Growth Centre. He has written for the New York Times, the Financial Times, the Wall Street Journal, and the Washington Post. His research covers the causes and consequences of civil war; the effects of aid and the problems of democracy in low-income and natural resources rich societies; urbanisation in low-income countries; private investment in African infrastructure and changing organisational cultures. Tim Besley is School Professor of Economics of Political Science and W. Arthur Lewis Professor of Development Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE. STICERD (@STICERD_LSE) brings together world-class academics to put economics and related disciplines at the forefront of research and policy. Founded in 1978 by the renowned Japanese economist Michio Morishima, with donations from Suntory and Toyota, we are a thriving research community within the LSE.
Oct 12 2018
1 hour 18 mins
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Rank #8: Role of Trade and Investment in Driving Sustainable and Inclusive Growth [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Shri Suresh Prabhu, Y K Sinha | Editor's note: We regret to inform you that owing to a technical problem the last few minutes of the lecture are missing from the podcast Shri Suresh Prabhu, Minister for Commerce and Industry, Government of India will in this lecture discuss the importance of trade and investment in driving sustainable growth and inclusion. He will also reflect on the future of India-UK collaborations in a changing world. Prior to his current role Dr Prabhu (@sureshpprabhu) was Minister for Railways during November 2014 – September 2017. He is a Chartered Accountant and a member of the Institute of Chartered Accountants of India; has a Law degree; and is pursuing two PhD programs in climate change and economics, in Germany and in Mumbai. Minister Prabhu is visiting London for a meeting of the India-UK Joint Economic and Trade Committee. He has been strategically leading the agenda for the future of multilateral trade at the recent WTO talks in Buenos Aires and beyond. Y K Sinha is the High Commissioner of India to the UK. Nicholas Stern (@lordstern1) is IG Patel Professor of Economics and Government and Director of LSE India Observatory. The India Observatory (@LSE_IO), set up in 2006, is a Centre to develop and enhance research and programmes related to India's economy, politics and society. It is involved in public policy engagement in, and with, India and also works in collaboration with international partners for the generation and exchange of knowledge on India and its position in the world.
Jan 12 2018
1 hour 16 mins
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Rank #9: LSE IQ Episode 9 | Why is social mobility declining? [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Mike Savage, Dr Abigail McKnight, Dr Sam Friedman | We hope you’ve enjoyed listening to the autumn 2017 programme of LSE public events and that you’ll stay tuned for the exciting programme of events we have lined up for the new year. In the meantime we have a new podcast series that we think you might enjoy. LSE IQ is a monthly, thirty minute podcast, where we ask some of the smartest social scientists - and other experts - to answer intelligent questions about economics, politics or society. Recent episodes have tackled questions such as 'What's the secret to happiness?', 'Could social entrepreneurship be the answer to world poverty?' and, 'Is our prison system broken?'. To give you a taste of LSEIQ the latest episode, which asks 'Why is social mobility declining?', is available for you here in our public events podcast feed. To listen to other episodes and to subscribe, search for 'LSE IQ' in your favourite podcast app or visit http://lse.ac.uk/iq . We’d like to hear your opinion too so why not join the discussion on social media using the hashtag #LSEIQ and please also consider leaving a review on iTunes or the Apple podcast app.
Dec 11 2017
38 mins
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Rank #10: The Bullshitisation of the Economy Has Only Just Begun: pointless labour, digitisation, and the revolt of the caring classes [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor David Graeber | The proliferation of useless forms of employment in the professional-managerial sector has placed enormous pressure on the caring professions, leading to a major social conflagration. David Graeber (@davidgraeber) is Professor of Anthropology at the LSE and author of Bullshit Jobs: a Theory. Deborah James is Professor of Anthropology at the LSE. LSE Anthropology @LSEAnthropology is world famous and world leading. We are ranked top Anthropology department in the Guardian League Tables 2018. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEGraeber This event forms part of the “New World (Dis)Orders” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from 25 February to 2 March 2019, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social science can tackle global issues. How did we get here? What are the challenges? And, importantly, how can we address them? Full programme available online from January 2019.
Oct 17 2018
1 hour 12 mins
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Rank #11: The Myth of Millionaire Tax Flight: how place still matters for the rich [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Dr Cristobal Young, Ed Miliband MP, Dr Andrew Summers | If taxes rise, will they leave? In his new book, Cristobal Young publishes the findings from the first-ever large-scale study of migration of the world's richest individuals, drawing on special access to over 45mil US tax returns, together with Forbes rich lists. He shows that contrary to popular opinion, although the rich have the resources and capacity to flee high-tax places, their actual migration is surprisingly limited. Place still matters, even in today’s globalised world. Cristobal Young (@cristobalyoung5) is Assistant Professor of Sociology, Stanford University. Ed Miliband (@Ed_Miliband) is the Member of Parliament for Doncaster North and was leader of the Labour Party from 2010-2015. Andrew Summers (@summers_ad) is Assistant Professor of Law, LSE. His teaching and research specialises in the taxation of wealth. Nicola Lacey is School Professor of Law, Gender and Social Policy, LSE. The International Inequalities Institute at LSE (@LSEInequalities) brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead critical and cutting edge research to understand why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges. LSE Law (@lselaw) is an integral part of the School's mission, plays a major role in policy debates & in the education of lawyers and law teachers from around the world.
Nov 20 2017
1 hour 25 mins
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Rank #12: The Meritocracy Trap [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Daniel Markovits | Merit is not a genuine excellence but rather a pretence, constructed to rationalise an offensive distribution of advantage. Merit, in short, is a sham. The meritocratic ideal—that social and economic rewards should track achievement rather than breeding—anchors the self-image of the age. Aristocracy has had its day, and meritocracy is now a basic tenet of civil religion in all advanced societies. Meritocracy promises to promote equality and opportunity by opening a previously hereditary elite to outsiders, armed with nothing save their own talents and ambitions. But today, middle-class children lose out to rich children at school, and middle-class adults lose out to elite graduates at work. At the same time, meritocracy entices an anxious and inauthentic elite into a pitiless, lifelong contest to secure income and status through its own excessive industry. In spite of its promises, meritocracy in fact installs a new form of aristocracy, purpose-built for a world in which the greatest source of income and wealth is not land but human capital and free labor. And merit is not a genuine excellence but rather—like the false virtues that aristocrats trumpeted in the ancien régime—a pretense, constructed to rationalize an offensive distribution of advantage. Daniel Markovits is Guido Calabresi Professor of Law at Yale Law School and Founding Director of the Center for the Study of Private Law. Markovits works in the philosophical foundations of private law, moral and political philosophy, and behavioral economics. He publishes in a range of disciplines, including in Science, The American Economic Review, and The Yale Law Journal. Markovits’s latest book, The Meritocracy Trap, places meritocracy at the center of rising economic inequality and social and political dysfunction. The book takes up the law, economics, and politics of human capital to identify the mechanisms through which meritocracy breeds inequality and to expose the burdens that meritocratic inequality imposes on all who fall within meritocracy’s orbit. Oriana Bandiera (@orianabandiera) is the Sir Anthony Atkinson Chair in Economics and Director of STICERD. This event is the Morishima Lecture. This lecture series is held in honour of Professor Michio Morishima (1923-2004), Sir John Hicks Professor of Economics at LSE and STICERD's first chairman. STICERD (@STICERD_LSE) brings together world-class academics to put economics and related disciplines at the forefront of research and policy.
May 08 2019
1 hour 31 mins
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Rank #13: Paul Dolan: happy ever after [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Paul Dolan, Professor Tali Sharot | Paul Dolan launches his new book, Happy Ever After, exploring the narratives society installs in us, using good evidence to debunk bad stories. Paul Dolan (@profpauldolan) is Professor of Behavioural Science at the LSE where he currently serves as head of the Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science. Tali Sharot is a Professor Cognitive Neuroscientist at the Department of Experimental Psychology, University College London, where she is the director of the Affective Brain Lab. Julia Black is Professor of Law at the Department of Law, LSE. PBS@LSE (@PsychologyLSE @LSEBehavioural) is a growing community of researchers, intellectuals, and students who investigate the human mind and behaviour in a societal context. Our department conducts cutting-edge psychological and behavioural research that is both based in and applied to the real world.
Jan 24 2019
1 hour 23 mins
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Rank #14: LSE Festival 2018 | Civil Society and the Five Giants: a global perspective [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Dr Duncan Green, Dr Armine Ishkanian, Dr Michael McQuarrie, Ludovica Rogers | The Beveridge Report's contemporary relevance can only be considered if we properly understand the ways in which civil society actors from across the globe are challenging unequal redistributive systems. The aim of this panel is to challenge the top-down approach of defining welfare needs and well-being and to critically examine how civil society actors, ranging from social movements, NGOs, to trade unions, have campaigned for the recognition of needs and for fairer redistribution. Duncan Green (@fp2p) is Senior Strategic Adviser at Oxfam GB, Professor in Practice in International Development at LSE, Honorary Professor of International Development at Cardiff University and a Visiting Fellow at the Institute for Development Studies. Armine Ishkanian (@Armish15) is an Associate Professor and the Programme Director of the MSc in Social Policy & Development (State and NGO Streams) in the Department of Social Policy at LSE. Michael McQuarrie (@mgmcquarrie) is Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology at LSE. Ludovica Rogers (@ldvcrgrs) was an active participant in the Occupy movement and since then has been active in other groups that formed from or around it, such as the movement of the Commons, the #NoTTIP campaign and Debt Resistance UK. Hakan Seckinelgin is an Associate Professor (Reader) in the Department of Social Policy at LSE.
Feb 24 2018
1 hour 13 mins
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Rank #15: Adam Smith: what he thought, and why it matters [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Jesse Norman MP | At a time when economics and politics are both increasingly polarized between left and right, this book, Adam Smith: What He Thought, and Why it Matters, which Jesse Norman will discuss at this event, returns to intellectual first principles to recreate the lost centre of public debate. It offers a Smithian analysis of contemporary markets, predatory capitalism and the 2008 financial crash; it addresses crucial issues of inequality, human dignity and exploitation; and it provides a compelling explanation of why Smith is central to any attempt to defend and renew the market system. Jesse Norman MP (@Jesse_Norman) studied at Oxford, before completing a Masters and PhD in Philosophy at University College London. Before entering politics, he ran an educational project in Communist Eastern Europe and was a Director at Barclays. He has also been an Honorary Fellow at UCL, a Governor of the National Institute for Economic and Social Research, and a Visiting Fellow at All Souls College, Oxford. His previous books include a celebrated study of Edmund Burke. He currently serves as Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for the Department for Transport. Tim Besley is School Professor of Economics of Political Science and W. Arthur Lewis Professor of Development Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE. The Department of Economics at LSE (@LSEEcon) is one of the largest economics departments in the world. Its size ensures that all areas of economics are strongly represented in both research and teaching. The Centre For Macroeconomics (@CFMUK) brings together world-class experts to carry out pioneering research on the global economic crisis and to help design policies that alleviate it.
Jul 09 2018
1 hour 3 mins
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Rank #16: Learning from Data: the art of statistics [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor David Spiegelhalter | In his new book, The Art of Statistics, David Spiegelhalter guides us through the essential principles we need in order to derive knowledge from data, showing us why data can never speak for itself. He explains the basic concepts, from regression to P-values (without using mathematics), and introduces the intellectual ideas that underpin statistics. Drawing on numerous real world examples, he shows us how statistics can help us determine the luckiest passenger on the Titanic, whether serial killer Harold Shipman could have been caught earlier, and if the skeleton in the Leicester car park really was Richard III. Sir David Spiegelhalter is a British statistician and Chair of the Winton Centre for Risk and Evidence Communication in the Statistical Laboratory at the University of Cambridge. Spiegelhalter is one of the most cited and influential researchers in his field, and was elected as President of the Royal Statistical Society for 2017-18. Fiona Steele is a Professor of Statistics and Deputy Head of the Department of Statistics at LSE. Fiona first joined in LSE in 1996 as Lecturer in Statistics and Research Methodology. She then worked at the Institute of Education, University of London 2001-2005, followed by the University of Bristol 2005-2013 where she was Professor of Social Statistics and Director of the Centre for Multilevel Modelling. She returned to LSE in 2013. The Department of Statistics (@StatsDeptLSE) offers a vibrant research environment and a comprehensive programme of undergraduate and postgraduate degrees.
Mar 27 2019
1 hour 28 mins
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Rank #17: LSE Festival 2019 | How to Remain Sane in the Age of Populism [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Elif Shafak | Until not so long ago, some parts of the world—namely, the West— were thought to be solid, steady, stable. Other parts of the world—namely, the non-West— were thought to be liquid, not yet settled. Since 2016 it has become increasingly clear to citizens across the world that there are no solid and in fact, we are all living in liquid times. Fear, anger, anxiety, resentment… emotions guide and misguide politics. The more “informed” we are the less we know. The less we know the less we understand. And the less we understand the bigger our fears. How can we remain sane in the age of populism? Should we retreat into tribes of our own and try to feel more secure there; should we create new tribes, or should we, and can we, find a way beyond tribalism? Elif Shafak (@Elif_Safak) Elif Shafak is an award-winning British-Turkish novelist and the most widely read female author in Turkey. She writes in both Turkish and English, and has published seventeen books, eleven of which are novels. Her work has been translated into fifty languages. Shafak holds a PhD in political science and she has taught at various universities in Turkey, the US and the UK, including St Anne's College, Oxford University, where she is an honorary fellow. She is a member of Weforum Global Agenda Council on Creative Economy and a founding member of ECFR (European Council on Foreign Relations). An advocate for women's rights, LGBT rights and freedom of speech, Shafak is an inspiring public speaker and twice a TED Global speaker, each time receiving a standing ovation. Shafak contributes to major publications around the world and she has been awarded the title of Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres. In 2017 she was chosen by Politico as one of the twelve people who would make the world better. She has judged numerous literary prizes and is chairing the Wellcome Prize 2019. Jonathan White (@JonathanPJWhite) is Deputy Head of the European Institute and Professor in Politics at LSE. Twitter hashtags for this event: #LSEFestival #NewWorldDisorders This event is part of the LSE Festival: New World (Dis)Orders running from Monday 25 February to Saturday 2 March 2019, with a series of events exploring how social science can tackle global problems.
Feb 27 2019
57 mins
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Rank #18: Being Alone [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor John Burnside,Professor Barbara Taylor,Professor James Warren | ‘Hell is other people’, noted Jean Paul Sartre—rather rudely, it might seem to an outside observer. But is the pursuit of philosophical understanding an inherently solitary pursuit by its nature? From Augustine to Kant, philosophy has cherished the image of the deep thinker immersed in solitudinous reflection. But how does solitude differ from loneliness? And in an age of increasing social atomization, can we think about our lonely condition in ways that might allow us to overcome it? We explore the idea of loneliness as an aesthetic and socio-political phenomena, as well as an existential question. John Burnside is Professor in Creative Writing, St Andrews University and a poet and novelist, winner of both the Geoffrey Faber Memorial Prize and the Whitbread Poetry Award. Barbara Taylor is Professor of Humanities, Queen Mary, University of London. James Warren (@JIWarren) is Professor of Ancient Philosophy, University of Cambridge. Shahidha Bari (@ShahidhaBari ) is a Fellow at The Forum and Lecturer in Romanticism in the Department of English, Queen Mary, University of London. The Forum for European Philosophy (@ForumPhilosophy) is an educational charity that organises a full and varied programme of philosophy and interdisciplinary events in the UK.
Jan 24 2018
1 hour 23 mins
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Rank #19: LSE Festival 2018 | The Future of Ageing [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Professor Rebeca Aldunate, Nicci Gerrard, Professor Michael Murphy, Jane Vass | With the average life expectancy increasing from 66.7 in 1942 to 81.25 in 2017, and set to continue, population ageing is poised to become one of the most significant social transformations of the 21st century. This panel discusses how ageing could come to dominate the giant issue of health and social care, and potentially all areas of the welfare state. Rebeca Aldunate is Director of the Biotechnology School, Faculty of Science at Universidad Santo Tomás, Chile. Nicci Gerrard (@FrenchNicci) is the co-author, with Sean French, of the bestselling Nicci French psychological thrillers and has written six novels under her own name, including The Winter House and Missing Persons. She was on the staff of The Observer for many years and still writes for that paper, in 2016 winning the Orwell Prize for 'Exposing Britain's Social Ills'. She is also a co-founder of John’s Campaign, that fights for more compassionate care in hospital for people with dementia, and a humanist celebrant. Michael Murphy is Professor of Demography in the Department of Social Policy at LSE, having joined the School in 1980. He is a Fellow of the British Academy, the United Kingdom's national academy for the humanities and the social sciences. He has acted as an adviser to UK and US Governments, and international organisations, such as EU, UN and OECD. His current research areas include demographic modelling of ageing and mortality trends, social care and living arrangements and well-being of older people. Jane Vass is Director of Policy and Research at Age UK since April 2015. Prior to this Jane was Head of Public Policy at Age UK from 2012, having joined Age UK’s predecessor, Age Concern England as Financial Services Policy Adviser in 2006. Carrie Friese (@CarrieFriese) is Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology at LSE. Her research is in medical sociology and science and technology studies, with a focus on reproduction across humans and animals. Update, Wednesday 21 February: Due to unforeseen circumstances, Olivia Casanueva and Joanna Latimer are no longer able to speak at this event, but we are delighted to be joined by Rebeca Aldunate.
Feb 22 2018
59 mins
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Rank #20: The Problem of Modernity: reinterpreting decolonisation and the modern? [Audio]

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Speaker(s): Amit Chaudhuri | How might the modern, rather than the human, be recovered as a way of looking at a common inheritance? And why is modernity resistant to being recovered? Amit Chaudhuri (@AmitChaudhuri) is an essayist, literary critic and the author of seven novels. Robin Archer is the Director of the Ralph Miliband Programme, LSE. The Ralph Miliband Programme (@RMilibandLSE) is one of LSE's most prestigious lecture series and seeks to advance Ralph Miliband's spirit of free social inquiry.
Jun 06 2019
1 hour 24 mins
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