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Business
Careers
Management

The Freelancers' Show

Updated 2 days ago

Business
Careers
Management
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Weekly discussion by freelancers and professionals about running a business, finding clients, marketing, and lifestyle related to being a freelancer.

Read more

Weekly discussion by freelancers and professionals about running a business, finding clients, marketing, and lifestyle related to being a freelancer.

iTunes Ratings

19 Ratings
Average Ratings
16
2
1
0
0

So much great info

By ATorb - Jun 03 2018
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Thanks for all the great advice!!

Software freelancing from A to Z

By Dudedudedude111 - Dec 09 2013
Read more
Very good quality content. Amazing job!

iTunes Ratings

19 Ratings
Average Ratings
16
2
1
0
0

So much great info

By ATorb - Jun 03 2018
Read more
Thanks for all the great advice!!

Software freelancing from A to Z

By Dudedudedude111 - Dec 09 2013
Read more
Very good quality content. Amazing job!
Cover image of The Freelancers' Show

The Freelancers' Show

Updated 2 days ago

Read more

Weekly discussion by freelancers and professionals about running a business, finding clients, marketing, and lifestyle related to being a freelancer.

Rank #1: FS 319: Building Your Better Freelance Business in 2019

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Sponsors

  • Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan
  • CacheFly

Panelists:

  • Erik Dietrich
  • Jeremy Green
  • Kai Davis

Episode Summary:

In this episode of the Freelancers' Show, the panel talks about good practices and habits to build in freelance business in the year 2019. The panel gives examples of what they focused on while building their own freelance business and share how they approached areas such as self-care, financial planning and client acquisition goals in their business.

They discuss what strategies to follow during “feasting” cycle and “famine” cycle of business and share tips on how to save for retirement during each cycle. Listen to the show to find out more on which tools to use for bookkeeping and how to communicate with former clients for repeat business and much more!

Links:

Picks:

Erik Dietrich:

Jeremy Green:

Kai Davis:

Jan 24 2019

54mins

Play

Rank #2: 187 FS Starting From Scratch as a Freelancer

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Go check out Freelance Remote Conf!

Freelancers’ Show GitHub Repository: github.com/devchattv/freelancerstopics

02:48 - Luca’s question

05:40 - The Right Things To Do in the Right Order:

08:34 - Timeframe

13:17 - Do you need a blog?

14:21 - Social Media Presence (Earn Traffic and Attention)    

16:47 - Starting a Business While Still Working at Another Job

22:53 - Impostor Syndrome

34:46 - Citing No Past Experience

37:48 - Webinars and Micronars

45:09 - Your Mailing List

Picks

Jessica Jones (Reuven)
SoHelpful (Philip)
Brennan Dunn: How To Start a Freelancing Business That Won't Fail (Philip)
The Tim Ferriss Experiment: Derek Sivers Reloaded – On Success Habits and Billionaires with Perfect Abs (Jonathan)
8 Tips For Software Developers Starting Their Own Business (Jonathan)
Veronica Mars (Jonathan)
CES (Chuck)
Las Vegas (Chuck)

Feb 04 2016

59mins

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Rank #3: FS 259: Anthony English on Making a Radical Change in Positioning

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FS 259: Anthony English on Making a Radical Change in Positioning

 On this episode of the Freelancers’ Show panelists Jonathon Stark, Curtis McHale, Philip Morgan, and Reuven Lerner talk to special guest Anthony English. Anthony discusses making a radical change in positioning. Tune in to learn more about this topic!

[00:02:30] Introduction to Anthony

Anthony has an IT background working with mid-range systems. He has recently been transitioning into being a business coach.

[00:03:31] Who do you work with and what kind of advice do you give them?

Anthony works with people who are service professionals and highly technical but not necessarily in IT. They all share similar characteristics. They feel like they can’t sale, hate networking, and do not know how to translate their skills to clients.

The first advice he gives professionals is to stop talking about their technical skills to clients because it only takes seconds to prove to the client that they are expert in their field. The questions they should be focusing on instead are: why does the client care? What problem are you solving for them? Anthony says that professionals are taking customers from point A to point B. The client needs to see how you will get them there.

[00:14:50] How did you move from IT consulting to business coaching?

Anthony still works in IT a little but states that companies do not put money into upgrading them. He was working with big companies and through agents originally, but when he tried to go on his own people companies told him they were used to paying $40 an hour. This rate was outsourced to companies in India and they wanted him to match that price. Anthony was not able to do so. He thought he should learn different skill sets but then he read Jonathan’s tweet about coding being the least valuable part of your existence, which made him decide to go a different route.

Another reason was that he saw that business owners could be in different fields: there was no vertical. In talking to them he found out what their frustrations were quickly. This made him see that he could do that for service professionals and could teach them how to talk to their clients.

[00:17:45] Was there ever an advantage to being Australian? How did that work and change over time?
The size of the companies he works with have millions of dollars invested in outsource companies. He can’t have a conversation with them about that. The companies are frustrated and know it’s not working but they can’t change it.

[00:18:35] Is there an industry norm to use outsourced body shops?

There is an industry norm for the bigger companies such as banks. For smaller companies they could not see the value of doing anything other than keeping lights turned on.

[00:19:15] What was your first sign that your value was now diminished by other alternatives?

When Anthony actually worked in the business, there was a lot of nervousness from people who had been working in the industry for ten to fifteen years. He saw seemingly irreplaceable employees being replaced easily within a week, showing the dispensable nature of people. Also, people were trying to find any new work, even without knowledge of what they were doing. That is when he realized “the writing was on the wall.”

[00:23:00] How do you get clients to trust you?

Building trust happens fast. Anthony is not sure if it is his personality or a skill. LinkedIn has been a successful method with connected with clients for him. He has made it client focused instead of focused on his own skills. He changed his headline from “IT Specialist,” to “Business Coach. I’m going to get you better leads.” He has sent leads with pointed comments about what they are doing well. This has helped people respond very positively to him, wanting to connect.

[00:36:24] Has additional LinkedIn profile views led to more leads and more business?

Anthony’s LinkedIn profile views are up 50%: he has a larger number of people viewing his profile every week. It has given him more leads. It is too early in the process to know whether it has given him more business. He has found new businesses are connecting with him. It has led him to build many relationships.

Anthony makes a point to connect with point to reach out to connections of those people who like his posts. He sends personal comments along with invitations, who almost always respond to him.

[00:39:21] What kind of people use LinkedIn?

A large number of people do not check their profiles. Service professionals mostly use the social media platform.

[00:48:00] Understand Your Clients

Anthony’s advice to professionals is to worry less about tactics. Instead, learn to understand clients and how to sale. That is the Achilles heel for those with a technical audience. Anthony urges professionals to learn how to understand and talk the language of their clients.

Picks

Jonathan

Curtis

Philip

Reuven

Anthony

Aug 10 2017

1hr

Play

Rank #4: TFS 323: Getting started in your 40s

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Sponsors:

  • Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan
  • CacheFly

Panel:

  • Jeremy Green
  • Erik Dietrich
  • Reuven Lerner
  • Jonathan Stark

Episode Summary:

In this episode of the Freelancers' Show, the panel talks about starting freelancing later in life. They share their own freelancing/consulting journeys as well as tips for a smooth transition.

They give tips on what signs to look for to round out the services offered such as giving talks at conferences or doing case studies with clients. Listen to the show to find out more about how to correctly price freelancing/consulting services, the difference between price and rate and when/how to negotiate.

Links:

Picks:

Erik Dietrich:

Jeremy Green:

Kai Davis:

Reuven Lerner:

Feb 28 2019

56mins

Play

Rank #5: 231 FS When to Move On (Chuck Leaving)

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00:30 Chuck leaving the show

1:18 Introducing the topic: Knowing when to move on

5:40 Leaving a successful podcast

15:11 Deciding when to move on

19:19 Being spread too thin versus being effective

22:54 Improving workflow

25:30 Chuck’s focus on online conferences

28:30 Overcoming resistance to change in business

30:05: Getting through lean times

33:22 Hiring help and outsourcing tasks

35:09 Future of DevChat.tv podcasts

Picks:

Selling to Big Companies by Jill Konrath (Reuven)

Soundbreaking on PBS (Philip)

This American Life: Quitting (Philip)

Philip Morgan - Retired page (Philip)

2017 Wall Calendar - Neuyear.net (Charles)

Amazon Echo Dot (Charles)

Hired.com

Dec 08 2016

47mins

Play

Rank #6: 149 FS When To Turn Down Work

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Freelancers' Answers -- Go here to submit questions for The Freelancers’ Live Q&A shows!

Check out RailsCasts on Kickstarter!!

02:19 - Lifestyle Choice and Changes

03:09 - Clients That Have Run Their Course

05:29 - Having More Work Than You Can Handle

12:40 - Non-Résumé Worthy Work

13:33 - Getting Bad Vibes From Potential Clients

21:44 - Transitioning to New Kinds of Work

  • Splitting Your Focus
  • Moving to Product Building

37:14 - Management

39:13 - Reopening Doors to Previous Offers

Picks

Carbon Copy Cloner (Reuven)
Vivis™ Knight V3 13000mAh Dual USB Portable Charger External Battery Pack (Jonathan)
Gin Gins® Spicy Apple Chewy Ginger Candy (Eric)
YouTube (Chuck)
FFmpeg (Chuck)
Ruby Remote Conf (Chuck)
Developer’s Box Club (Chuck)

Feb 26 2015

46mins

Play

Rank #7: FS 296:  Negotiating with Clients

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Panel:

  • Reuven Lerner
  • Jonathan Stark
  • Jeremy Green

In this episode of the Freelancer’s Show, the panelist discuss “Negotiating with Clients.”  The panelist, Reuven, Jonathan, and Jeremy give strategies on how to accomplish a “win-win situation” when clients who are trying to bargain on price.  Each panelist provides their paths and actions to stand firmly on the price of their services. This is a great episode to get some insight on what at the professionals do to get appropriate pay on their services and many other facets of negotiations that are available.

In particular, we dive pretty deep on:

  • Do you negotiate on price?
  • Discounts?
  • Steering away from the prices
  • Comparing your services to others
  • Politely decline
  • “Your prices are higher than the other companies”
  • Losing clients
  • Finding a good fit and getting referrals
  • Problems with giving one discount
  • Hourly rates vs. Fixed
  • Caving on prices once!
  • Removing Scope
  • New Proposals and re-quoting
  • Other things besides money to negotiate on
  • Payment options on service
  • Pricing to guarantee there are not bugs
  • 100% payment upfront
  • 60-day net pay
  • Working around policies to get paid
  • More on payment terms
  • Negotiating  and deadlines
  • Getting Leads
  • And much more!     

Picks

Reuven Lerner

Jonathan Stark

Jeremy Green

May 10 2018

55mins

Play

Rank #8: 247 FS Working with Designers without Wanting to Kill Them

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On today's episode, Philip, Jonathan, and Curtis discuss about Working with Designers without Wanting to Kill Them with James Stone. James is a Design Systems Engineer, and is top contributor to the open source ZURB Foundation. He also teaches at Penn State University. Tune in!

“I've had experiences in the past where I've worked, where a designer would be so caught up with their idea in a design that they'll just root for it and push it through no matter what the cost. Sometimes that ends up being a lot more engineering time to accomplish more less the same thing.” -James Stone 

Apr 27 2017

1hr 2mins

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Rank #9: FS 263: Branden Silva on Better Storytelling for Freelancers

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Tweet this Episode

Branden Silva is the Executive Director of his agency Ambition. He helps his clients tell stories. 

This episode dives into how to create a story around you and your business. Freelancers can use the tool of storytelling to impact culture and business. Branden guides the listener through shaping a story, the elements of the story, and how to connect with your audience.

Some of the areas we dig deep on in this episode are:

  • Honing in your clients' stories and how to be a facilitator of the story
  • How to uniquely position yourself  and your process and inject them into their story.
  • The structure of a good story. The form, the tension, the obstacles, etc.
  • and much much more...

Links:

Picks:

Curtis:

Philip:

Branden:

Sep 07 2017

1hr 5mins

Play

Rank #10: FS 293: Keeping Your Skills Sharp

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Panel:

  • Reuven
  • Jonathan Stark
  • Jeremy Green

In this episode of the Freelancer’s Show, Reuven and Jonathan discuss “Keeping Your Skill Shape,” with Jeremey Green. The panelist discuss ways to improve their game to keep ahead of the curb in freelancing. This is a great episode to learn the different avenues of sharpening your skill with technologies, applications, courses,  project, and literature to stay consistent with an ever-changing industry.

In particular, we dive pretty deep on:

  • Keeping your skill sharp
  • Doing a mix of things to stay ahead
  • Students and questions
  • Teaching, Education, and Training
  • Strategy to learn new things
  • Doing Side Project to keep ahead
  • Blog, Teach a Course, Write a book
  • If you know more about it then everyone else, you are the expert
  • Learning other technologies
  • Becoming specialized in a specific technology
  • Knowing how to finding information when you need it
  • Crafting the right Google query
  • Social Learning Theory
  • And much more!     

Picks:

Jonathan

Reuven

Jeremy Green

Apr 19 2018

56mins

Play

Rank #11: 148 FS How to Attract Clients Without Doing Sales with Jonathan Stark

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The panelists welcome back Jonathan Shank to talk about how to attract clients without doing sales.

Feb 19 2015

1hr 9mins

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Rank #12: 160 FS A Deep Dive on Positioning Yourself As a Specialist with Philip Morgan

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Get your Ruby Remote Conf tickets and check out the @rubyremoteconf Twitter feed for exciting updates about the conference.

02:09 - Philip Morgan Introduction

02:30 - Thinking About Positioning and Communicating What You Do

27:08 - Finding Target Markets

35:25 - Acquiring New Skills to Support a New Position

39:00 - Refining Your Positioning

  • Marketing, Publicity

56:07 - Positioning Exercise

Picks

Kurt Elster: Email Templates for Freelancers (Jonathan)
Expensive Problem: Market Research Cold Email Template (Jonathan)
Bryan Harris: How I Made $10,000 in 24-hours With My First Product (Case Study) (Reuven)
Jewish guide to visiting China by Reuven Lerner (Reuven)
Spark by Readdle (Eric)
AmazonSmile (Chuck)
Listen to other people’s views (Chuck)
Positioning: The Battle for Your Mind by Al Ries (Philip)
Rolls MS111 Mic Switch Latching or Momentary Microphone Mute Switch with Passes Phantom Power (Philip)
The Consulting Pipeline Podcast (Philip)

Jun 18 2015

1hr 17mins

Play

Rank #13: The Freelancers' Show 118 - Preparing For Freelancing: Finding a Niche

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The panelists continue their "Preparing For Freelancing" series and discuss finding a niche.

Jun 19 2014

54mins

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Rank #14: 234 FS Productized Services

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Introduction

  • Productized services
  • Definition

9:50: Copywriting

  • Understand the problem your service solves.
  • Pricing

15:30: Testing with productized service

19:30: Mobile Onboarding

28:30: Freelancers just starting out

38:10: Word of mouth

45:50: Downsides to productized services

  • Pricing
  • Start small
  • Low level of collaboration
  • Minimize risk
  • Give options

Picks:

Building the Perfect Sales Page (Jonathan)

Internet Archive Wayback Machine (Philip)

Examples of Productized Services:

https://draft.nu/revise/
http://websiterescues.com/
https://doubleyouraudience.com/pricing/outreach/
https://memberup.co/membership-roadmap/
http://sessions.superspicymedia.com/
http://uibreakfast.com/services/

hired.com/freelancershow

Dec 29 2016

1hr 11mins

Play

Rank #15: 254 FS Fairness in Pricing

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Fairness in Pricing

Do you have questions about fairness in pricing? This episode features a discussion of this topic between Jonathan Stark, Curtis McHale, Philip Morgan, and Reuven Lerner. Tune in to learn more!

Do you think it’s fair for someone to charge you more for a product than they charge other people?

Reuven’s answer is that it is fair, but annoying. He wants to feel as if he has gotten a good deal, which is based on price for him. It’s fair to charge different people different prices, but he wants it to be to his advantage. 
Jonathan’s take on this is that people are bad at absolute value. Is thing worth X? He argues that value should not be based on price, but instead on value. He does not believe that the word fair can be applied to pricing at all.
 Curtis suggests some people equate fairness and value. He buys locally and will pay more sometimes at local stores, because he sees value in that. This is called the “feel good feeling.”
 Philip describes that he has two decision-making skills when it comes to price. The first is that money is not infinitely available, which he dislikes sometimes because he feels like it holds him back. Then there’s a no brainer category where if something has value to him, he doesn’t compare price. But he does have a threshold where he refuses to overpay, much like Reuven.

####How do you calculate overpay?
Philip suggests that there’s a feeling that he can figure out what the lowest price that a product sometimes gets sold for is and what overpaying would be for that product.  Jonathan doesn’t compare the price he is given to what other people spend on the same product. He personally determines the value that he will get out of the product. Philip suggests that the value depends on situation. Jonathan, who says that it has no value to him so he will not pay much for it, gives an example of a screwdriver. He still won’t shop around to find the cheapest one – just the cheapest one for him. 
####Two Types of Consumers: Maximizer and Satisfier   Curtis explains the difference between the two different types of consumers. A maximizer has to find the best price no matter what. For instance, if they buy a pair of jeans but then see a cheaper pair of jeans, then the value of the purchase made decreases. A satisfier has the mindset that if he finds a product that is cheap enough for them, they don’t think about the purchase again. Jonathan has never heard of these terms before, but based on the descriptions, these are the two types of people he hears from through emails. 

Why does this topic matter?

Because, as freelancers, you will set prices for products and services so there is a need to be aware that those two camps exist. Jonathan thinks the best clients are the ones not looking for the cheapest price, which are the satisfiers. He calls these the value shoppers because they are looking for the best product. Curtis agrees that maximizers create the “race to zero” – they lower your price quickly. One group of people will be angry no matter how you sell, so just pick how you are going to do it and stick to that path.


Can you sell to both groups?

Reuven believes that you can sell to both groups although it is challenging. He doesn’t believe many have the luxury of choosing what types of clients they work with yet. The proposed solution is to create a monopoly of a market of one; to differentiate yourself so there’s no other business to compare yours to.

Philip suggests that pricing is a big part of the overall positioning of products.

There are low-end and high-end brands that are controlled by price differentiations. 
He uses BMW as an example. They couldn’t drop the price to $20,000 all of a sudden. Consumers would not be happy because it would no longer be a status symbol or a high-end brand.

Value-pricing

It will be difficult to do value pricing well if you believe that there is fairness in pricing. While there is no scientific evidence to support this belief, Jonathan sites that his experience from clients has informed this belief. There appears to be a correlation between people who believe in fairness in pricing and their ability to value price. Because these people believe they are being unfair with their prices, they lower their prices, which make it tough for them to make money. He suggests for these people to attempt to offer products as services instead and establish set prices. This pricing point may be a better fit for these types of people’s personalities. 
####Relationship between the price set for something and your brand. Philip tells a story about a Hi-Fi Man, a Chinese company that makes headphones. They made headphones in the one to two thousand dollar range. The quality was known as less than what you paid by people when they first came out. In the last six months, they introduced a product priced at six thousand dollars. The reaction from people was very negative. There is a relationship between brand and a company that can justify a price - they couldn’t. Questions are asked when this happens.

What does this mean for freelancers?

Some freelancers decide they are going to price every service as the same thing out of fairness to their clients. But it wouldn’t be nice or fair to charge different clients different amounts of money for the same work. Every client wants a different result. Hourly billing is bad for everyone. People should set prices they are comfortable with selling to their clients. They should be self-aware of their pricing and know what kind of buyers they want to attract.

Picks

Curtis

Are you a satisficer or a Maximizer

Jonathan

Leviathan Wakes

Phillip

My Dad Wrote a Porno Podcast

Reuven

How Online Shopping Makes Suckers of Us All
The Impossible State: North Korea, Past and Future

Jul 16 2017

52mins

Play

Rank #16: TFS 339: The Dark Side of Freelancing

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Sponsors

  • Sentry– use the code “devchat” for two months free on Sentry’s small plan

  • CacheFly

Panel

  • Erik Dietrich

  • Jeremy Green

Summary

Jeremy Green and Erik Dietrich discuss the unforeseen pain points of becoming a freelancer and share solutions that they have used in their lives and businesses to address these pain points. They considered pipeline management, not having enough work, having too much work and having ill-fitting work. How companies treat vendors and dealing with rejection are discussed. The loneliness of a freelancers life and how to combat it are considered. The hidden cost of working on your own and owning a business are addressed, including health insurance and taxes. The positives and negatives of time and money management are compared. They warn against bad clients and give warning signs against them. 

Links

Picks

Erik Dietrich:

Jeremy Green:

Aug 06 2019

46mins

Play

Rank #17: FS 266: Reuven’s Launch Followup

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Panel:

Reuven L.

Jonathan S.

Phillip M.

In this episode of the Freelancer’s Show, Reuven follows up on a previous episode, episode 257, about a launch on a product by Reuven. The team centers their discussion around ideas that were executed well, things that could have been done better, and next steps post-launch.

Reuven gives a brief summary of the Python exercises or classes he turned into a subscription service. Reuven talks about his marketing strategy, and the audience he pitches this course to. The Freelancers talks about the many different areas of marketing and production building to launch a successful product.

In particular, we dive pretty deep on:

  • Reuven talks about his subscription service, both on a monthly and annual billing model
  • Some discussion about why followers unsubscribe
  • How Reuven was promoting the course or subscription to the audience
  • Reuven talks about how he uses tools like Zapier to help with the email marketing strategy.
  • Tools used like Easy Digital Downloads or EDD.
  • Issues with unsubscribes and PayPal.
  • Phillip references FS 236 about building your own system for billing and possible issues.
  • Reuven talks about issues with running a business outside of the US and using Stripe
  • Freelancers talk about refunding.
  • What is a healthy product?
  • Getting more subscribers
  • Writing a sales campaign email along with Drip automation to reach the email list
  • Redoing the sales page to show customer testimonials
  • Discussion about Python 

Links:

Picks:

Jonathan

Phillip

  • Python Programming Language

Reuven

Sep 28 2017

1hr 12mins

Play

Rank #18: 171 FS Things You Should Do on a Regular Basis

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01:56 - Rest & Leisure Time (Away From the Computer!)

11:44 - Making Time and Creating Habits & Routines

22:23 - Professional Development Training

30:11 - Days/Nights Out with Family & Friends and CoWorking & Networking (Getting Your People Fix)

37:03 - Scheduling Commitments

41:19 - Business Upkeep (Bookkeeping, Client Follow Ups, etc.)

48:07 - Make Small Changes

Picks

100 Days of Burpees Facebook Group (Jonathan)
Kirk Parsley: America's biggest problem @ TEDxReno (Jonathan)
Philip Morgan: CTA-able Content Marketing (Eric)
Twitter Analytics (Reuven)
Animal, Vegetable, Miracle: A Year of Food For Life by Barbara Kingsolver (Reuven)
ElectoralVote (Reuven)
15 Minute Podcast Listener chat with Charles Wood (Chuck)
Pebble Time (Chuck)

Sep 24 2015

55mins

Play

Rank #19: FS 271: Aging as a Freelancer

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Panel:

Jonathan Stark

Phillip Morgan

In this episode of the Freelancer’s Show, Johnathan and Phillip discuss aging as a freelancer. The topics cover the meager beginnings of a freelancer’s life to the advance contractor's success.  Phillip and Johnathan talk about things concerning personal energy levels in a brick and mortar job vs. freelancing, insurances, repetition of the job, staying interested in your job, and networking, and the highs and low expectation of contracting throughout a freelancing career.

In particular, we dive pretty deep on:

  • Aging as you work for yourself
  • Energy
  • Multiple forms of insurance
  • Stability in your career
  • Growing in your career
  • Living out of a car or small spaces
  • Expectation of freelancing
  • Boredom on the job
  • Finding yourself doing the same thing as your younger peers
  • Making a difference in the world
  • Having to learn new platforms to keep your career exciting
  • Laborious feelings about specialization
  • Doing vertical moves, or lateral moves
  • Motivation and expertise to advise
  • And much more!

Picks:

Johnathan

Philip

Nov 09 2017

1hr 11mins

Play

Rank #20: FS 267: Self-Publishing vs. Traditional Publishing

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Panel:

Reuven L.

Jonathan S.

Kai Davis

In this episode of the Freelancer’s Show, the discussion topic is Self Publishing vs. Traditional Publishing. The panel talks about the books they’ve published in the past and the details of each experience before and after launching a book.

We learn the pros and cons of self and traditional publishing. Each panel member discusses their experience with contracts, deals, cash advances and royalties. Also, some in-depth discussion on the when and why you would want to self-publish. Lastly, the panel talks about what is next with their publications.

In particular, we dive pretty deep on:

  • What it means to go to traditional publishing company
  • Advance payments and royalties
  • Limitation on book sales and ending royalties at the same time
  • Translations of book sales
  • Collaborative process
  • Software develops should at least write one book
  • Tradition publishing helps get the book completed and distributed.
  • Help with including in different resources in the traditional route.
  • Traditional publishing helps with editing, moving copies.
  • The money made on self-publishing vs traditional
  • Your book is a 300-page business card
  • Price of book verse the knowledge inside
  • Book sales coupons codes
  • You don’t have to conform with traditional aspects with self-publishing
  • and much more.

Links:

Picks:

Jonathan

Kai

Reuven

Oct 05 2017

1hr 10mins

Play