Cover image of Something Wild
(35)

Rank #68 in Government category

Government

Something Wild

Updated 5 days ago

Rank #68 in Government category

Government
Read more

Read more

iTunes Ratings

35 Ratings
Average Ratings
26
5
1
2
1

More

By skkkllhhjj - Aug 20 2019
Read more
I love these and I wish they were longer - like a 1/2 hour

Good and getting better!

By Jo33746 - Jul 06 2017
Read more
A fun and nerdy nature walk. Friendly and informative, something I regularly look forward to.

iTunes Ratings

35 Ratings
Average Ratings
26
5
1
2
1

More

By skkkllhhjj - Aug 20 2019
Read more
I love these and I wish they were longer - like a 1/2 hour

Good and getting better!

By Jo33746 - Jul 06 2017
Read more
A fun and nerdy nature walk. Friendly and informative, something I regularly look forward to.
Cover image of Something Wild

Something Wild

Updated 5 days ago

Rank #68 in Government category

Read more

Rank #1: Something Wild: Is this Salamander a Plant or Animal? Yes.

Podcast cover
Read more
So much of New Hampshire’s natural beauty is obvious; from the top of a mountain trail, from the shore of a lake or pond, even from your kitchen window. You barely have to open your eyes to see it. But take a closer look, and beauty gives way to scientific wonder. That wonder may be inspired by the boiling of watery maple sap to sweet liquid sunshine; or by the majesty of an osprey wresting a writhing fish from a river. But keep an ear out this spring and you may witness wonder on molecular level! Listen for something you only hear this time of year, the first shrill of the spring peepers. That’s your cue. It might be raining a little – or a lot…it’s definitely above freezing – around 43-degrees. It’s time to grab a flashlight and head for the nearest vernal pool. Vernal pools, of course, are depressions that collect snowmelt and the run-off of early spring rain. Despite the cool waters, they are hot beds of tiny, easily overlooked activity this time of year. One salamander in
Mar 15 2019
5 mins
Play

Rank #2: Something Wild: Hiking to Escape

Podcast cover
Read more
Over the years, we’ve spoken to a lot people – mostly biologists – about how they were first bitten by the nature bug. Since these stories came from people who’ve made a living exploring, studying and maintaining the natural world, they follow familiar tropes: like an unexpected experience or sighting, or the influence of a parent or teacher who sparked that initial interest in the outdoors. Andrei Campeanu joined us on a hike co-hosted by Chris Martin and Dave Anderson recently. He isn’t a biologist, he’s just someone who loves going outdoors. But his story starts out similarly…with a sort of family pastime. “Most of my family was of German extraction, so hiking is something you do. You hike. You go to the mountains.” Beckoned by the ancestral siren, Andrei’s mother took him into the woods one day when he was eight years old. “I remember she gave me a stone to keep in my mouth. It’s a tradition but it also keeps your mouth moist.” He later confessed that tradition might well have been
Jan 22 2019
5 mins
Play

Rank #3: Something Wild: Do Mosquitos Like You Better?

Podcast cover
Read more
We often think of the “food chain” in the natural world in linear terms: this eats that, which in turn, is eaten by the other. But today’s subject proves that chain is a little more like a web. The species we’re talking about today feeds on the most dangerous game, the apex of apex predators…us. And the species that prey on us? Mosquitos, of course! We recently spoke with Sarah MacGregor, an entomologist and founder of Dragon Mosquito Control, help us learn more about them. We often think about mosquitos with a capital-M, as if there is just one kind of mosquito. But there’s actually lots of different species. MacGregor has counted over 45 species in New Hampshire with different habits and different habitats. There’s the house mosquito, the salt marsh mosquito, tree-hole mosquitos, rock pool mosquitos and cattail mosquitos among many others. While these common names refer to where you might find these insects, they also refer to distinct species of mosquito. It may be poor consolation
Apr 26 2019
20 mins
Play

Rank #4: Something Wild: Balds Are Everywhere!

Podcast cover
Read more
On a recent edition of NHPR’s The Exchange, Chris and Iain MacLeod, Executive Director of the Squam Lake Natural Science Center were on hand to discuss one of their favorite species. Chris marveled at how bald eagles are everywhere in the state these days. “They’re nesting in Pittsburg; they’re nesting in Hinsdale; they’re nesting in Newcastle.” And they’re noisy, if you listen carefully you can hear their calls all over New Hampshire. The reason for their discussion and the revelation that “balds” are everywhere are based on the results from Audubon’s mid-winter eagle survey. This year’s numbers show an extension of the recent trend of population recovery. As recently as 1980, you’d have been hard pressed to find a bald eagle in New Hampshire. This year’s count found 200 adult eagles and their young, plus another two or three hundred young eagles totaling about 500 bald eagles in the state. But, as we’ve established on Something Wild in the past, a population rebound like this for
Apr 12 2019
5 mins
Play

Rank #5: Something Wild: Sand Dunes are More than Just Piles of Sand

Podcast cover
Read more
This week we have another edition of New Hampshire’s Wild Neighborhoods, where we take a closer look at one of the more than 200 natural communities you can find within the confines of our state border. Communities like the Alpine Zone or Red oak, Black birch Wooded Talus , but those are pretty rare. Today we’re heading to one of the most ubiquitous ecological landscapes in the world. The Coastal Sand Dune is found in nearly all latitudes from just outside the polar regions to the equator. But there are only a few places in the granite state that you’ll find them, and as you might expect they’re all on the seacoast. And there is a particular set of circumstances that are required for Sand Dunes to form. Sand and silt made from eroded rocks further inland washes down mountain streams that feed into ever larger waterways until they reach the mighty Piscataqua and Merrimack rivers. Where the rivers meet the ocean, the water suddenly slows, allowing that silt and sand to precipitate out to
Feb 01 2019
5 mins
Play

Rank #6: Something Wild: How Trees Survive NH Winters

Podcast cover
Read more
Here at Something Wild, we don’t have a problem with winter. Aside from the snow and the cold and the freezing rain… okay, maybe we have a couple issues. But we have sweaters and hot cocoa and Netflix. Trees, however, do not. As the snow piles up, you may see trees bent over with their crowns nearly touching the ground, leafless and haggard. They can’t escape or hide from the cold, so how do trees survive? Just like any living thing, trees have adapted over time to deal with the range of environmental conditions thrown their way. In this case, freezing rain, ice-loading, or heavy wet snow. Trees that aren’t adapted to survive periodic ice loading don’t live here. We don’t find trees that can’t cope with heavy snow and ice storms in New Hampshire. Southern trees struggle to survive in northern climates. Some compete successfully, others don’t. Some trees (like pine or spruce) simply bend or fold branches to shrug off snow. Other trees (like oaks) try to stand rigid and inflexible. Stout
Jan 04 2019
5 mins
Play

Rank #7: Something Wild: N.H.'s Wildest Neighborhood ... Peatlands

Podcast cover
Read more
Here at Something Wild we love all things wild (even blackflies !) but sometimes it can be helpful to look beyond a single species and consider how many species interact within a given environment. In our periodic series, New Hampshire’s Wild Neighborhoods, we endeavor to do just that and this time we’re looking at peatlands. Our Sherpa today is Ron Davis, a retired professor of ecology, limnology and wetland science from the University of Maine, Orono. Peatlands, as you might have guessed are classified by the mat of peat at its heart. Peat is formed from dead organic matter (leaves, branches, dead bugs, etc.), but that organic matter is only partly decomposed because there is no oxygen in the mat, or the water that you often find in such locations. The two most prominent kinds of peatlands in New Hampshire are bogs and fens. Davis explains that, “bogs are rather infertile environments. The plants that grow in them barely hold on and eke out an existence and grow very, very slowly.”
May 24 2019
12 mins
Play

Rank #8: Something Wild: Why Are Peepers So Loud?

Podcast cover
Read more
It’s an unmistakable sound. One that elicits memories, sights and scents of events long ago. It recalls the joy of youth, the possibility of a spring evening. But it can also incite insomnia and the blind rage that accompanies it. Pseudacris crucifer is better known as the spring peeper, and for most people it is a more welcome harbinger. These remarkable frogs spend the winter under leaf litter in a state if suspended animation. Once overnight temperatures are regularly in the forties, they start thawing out and begin singing. So that ringing chorus is a signal that we’re finally shedding winter’s icy grip. We dare to hope that we’ve seen our last nor’easter of the season; and that warmer and greener days are close at hand. That hope manifests around the state on Facebook and Twitter (#peepers) – though not Instagram because photos of this tiny frog are elusive. It’s fun to watch the state gradually thaw from south to north, vicariously through social media. Posts always pop up first
Mar 29 2019
5 mins
Play

Rank #9: Something Wild: Tested with Fire

Podcast cover
Read more
The diversity of New Hampshire’s habitats is staggering, as we’ve mentioned in the past there are more than 200 natural communities within our borders. This week, in another edition of New Hampshire’s Wild Neighborhoods Something Wild, again visits a rare habitat type. We’re going to visit the pitch pine scrub oak woodland, more commonly referred to as “pine barrens.” There are a few examples of this habitat in New Hampshire, but globally it’s pretty rare, too. To understand why pine barrens are so rare in the northeast we need to talk for a moment about forest succession . The default landscape in New England in general and in New Hampshire, specifically is forest. If you left your back yard, you’d have a forest before your lawn mower could rust out. And there is a well-established succession of tree species that our forests follow. You can actually tell how old a forest is by what types of trees you see. Pine barrens one of many forest types that are often in turn succeeded by taller
Dec 21 2018
4 mins
Play

Rank #10: Something Wild: Photosynthesis in Winter

Podcast cover
Read more
It’s stick season in New Hampshire; the leaves are gone, our landscape exposed; a white nivean blanket covers everything you see. Our trees are dormant. Aren’t they? To look at them, it wouldn’t seem that trees aren’t doing much right now. But it turns out there’s more going on than meets the eye. The phenomenon of photosynthesis is well documented, we all know that plants use their leaves to convert sunlight into sugar, or carbohydrates. But that’s not the only place photosynthesis happens. “Photosynthesis can happen in plant tissues other than leaves,” as Scott Ollinger, a professor of Natural Resources at UNH tells us. Though it is weather reliant, for example trees “can’t do this if the temperatures are below freezing for extended periods of time.” And those tissues other than leaves he’s talking about? He means bark. In woody plants, a corky layer of inner bark contains chlorophyll. When sunlight can penetrate the thin outer bark of beech or white birch, or the bark of tender
Feb 15 2019
6 mins
Play

Similar Podcasts