Cover image of Get Booked
(357)

Rank #96 in Books category

Arts
Books
Fiction

Get Booked

Updated 8 days ago

Rank #96 in Books category

Arts
Books
Fiction
Read more

Get Booked is a weekly show of personalized book recommendations.

Read more

Get Booked is a weekly show of personalized book recommendations.

iTunes Ratings

357 Ratings
Average Ratings
286
41
10
9
11

Enjoyable. Would recommend...with a grain of salt.

By Kyle McClelland - Oct 03 2019
Read more
I quite enjoy listening to Jenn and Amanda talk about books in the mornings as I get ready for my day. When I first began listening to this podcast I listened to a couple of the most recent episodes and enjoyed them so much that I went back and listened to all of their past ones, starting with episode 1 and working my way up. I did have to take a small break around and after election time due to Amanda’s negativity about the outcome of said election. Not that I didn’t agree with some of her opinions, but the content was causing me to start my day feeling bitter, which is never good. I would also sometimes pick up on a sense of hatred towards anyone not a POC, which I have a hard time listening to because it’s reverse racism and is just as wrong as racism itself. However, their most recent episodes have been better, with my TBR constantly growing. This is my favorite BookRiot podcast to listen to, and I recommend it whenever possible.

Love this!

By 718_kc - Mar 15 2019
Read more
Making my way through back catalogue and found lots of great reads. Thanks for great podcast!

iTunes Ratings

357 Ratings
Average Ratings
286
41
10
9
11

Enjoyable. Would recommend...with a grain of salt.

By Kyle McClelland - Oct 03 2019
Read more
I quite enjoy listening to Jenn and Amanda talk about books in the mornings as I get ready for my day. When I first began listening to this podcast I listened to a couple of the most recent episodes and enjoyed them so much that I went back and listened to all of their past ones, starting with episode 1 and working my way up. I did have to take a small break around and after election time due to Amanda’s negativity about the outcome of said election. Not that I didn’t agree with some of her opinions, but the content was causing me to start my day feeling bitter, which is never good. I would also sometimes pick up on a sense of hatred towards anyone not a POC, which I have a hard time listening to because it’s reverse racism and is just as wrong as racism itself. However, their most recent episodes have been better, with my TBR constantly growing. This is my favorite BookRiot podcast to listen to, and I recommend it whenever possible.

Love this!

By 718_kc - Mar 15 2019
Read more
Making my way through back catalogue and found lots of great reads. Thanks for great podcast!
Cover image of Get Booked

Get Booked

Updated 8 days ago

Rank #96 in Books category

Read more

Get Booked is a weekly show of personalized book recommendations.

Rank #1: Get Booked Ep. #78: All Mysteries, All Thrillers, All the Time

Podcast cover
Read more
Amanda, Jenn, and guest expert Katie discuss mysteries and thrillers! This episode is sponsored by Start Up by Doree Shafrir and Perfect by Cecilia Ahern.
Apr 25 2017
58 mins
Play

Rank #2: Get Booked Ep. #82: Audible Air Quotes

Podcast cover
Read more
Amanda and Jenn discuss body-positive health books, YA horror, unreliable narrators and more in this week's episode of Get Booked. This episode is sponsored by Amazon Kindle for Kids and Violet Grenade by Victoria Scott.
May 24 2017
48 mins
Play

Rank #3: Get Booked Ep. #80: Do Love A Greek Chorus

Podcast cover
Read more
Amanda and Jenn discuss travelogues, tearjerkers, and books for kids with depression in this week's episode of Get Booked. This episode is sponsored by Elves, written by Jean-Luc Istin and illustrated by Kyko Duarte, and The Radium Girls by Kate Moore. Subscribe to the podcast via RSS here, or via iTunes here. The show can also be found on Stitcher here.
May 10 2017
46 mins
Play

Rank #4: 129: #129: Somebody's Dead So That's Awkward

Podcast cover
Read more

Apr 26 2018
47 mins
Play

Rank #5: Get Booked Ep. #73: Mrs. Dalloway But Grosser

Podcast cover
Read more
Amanda and Jenn discuss LGBT+ history, prickly Westerns, experimental prose and more in this week's episode of Get Booked. This episode is sponsored by Playster and You Are Here by Jenny Lawson.
Mar 22 2017
42 mins
Play

Rank #6: Get Booked Ep. #72: Because Of Murder

Podcast cover
Read more
Amanda and Jenn discuss retellings of classics, San Francisco fiction, westerns, and more in this week's episode of Get Booked. This episode is sponsored by The Book That Made Me.
Mar 15 2017
42 mins
Play

Rank #7: Get Booked Ep. #14: OMG I LOVE READING

Podcast cover
Read more
Jenn and Amanda recommend diverse classics, quiet middle America stories, and more! This episode is sponsored by Murder on Wheels by Lynn Cahoon and Penguin Random House Audio
Feb 04 2016
54 mins
Play

Rank #8: 128: #128: Nonfiction Galore

Podcast cover
Read more

Jenn is joined by Kim Ukura and Alice Burton, hosts of the For Real podcast, for a special nonfiction-themed episode!

This episode is sponsored by Rebound by Kwame Johnson and the Bruno Johnson Series by David Putnam.

Enter our mystery giveaway!

Questions

1. Hi there,

This never-ending winter has me looking forward to the vacation I've planned for this June and I have visions of laying on the beach for days at a time with a good book. I'm not worried about being able to find good vacation reading material for myself, but my wife is a much pickier reader. Can you help me find a book that will keep her entertained so I can relax with my own book? She loves nonfiction and particularly enjoys heavy topics like the holocaust, dictatorships, and cults. Recent reads she has enjoyed include Blitzed: Drugs in the Third Reich by Norman Ohler and Without You, There is No Us: Undercover Amongst the Sons of North Korea's Elite by Suki Kim. I recently put The Road to Jonestown and Lilac Girls in her hands, but neither of those worked for her.

Thanks in advance for your help!

Best,

--Brianna

2. I'm a single woman in my mid-30s and, while I am fine with my single status and enjoying my life as it is, almost all of my friends are partnering off and having children. I was feeling blue about it until I read Rebecca Traister's All the Single Ladies and Kate Bolick's Spinster, and am now looking for more reads that celebrate single women, especially single women without children. I'm looking specifically for books with female protagonists who get to enjoy a happy ending without being coupled off or having kids, or where the happy ending is not focused on coupledom (though it's fine if there's a relationship in the story). I read all fiction genres except horror and I also enjoy nonfiction, especially memoirs and biographies.

Thanks in advance. I love the podcast!

--Rebecca

3. Hi Amanda and Jenn!

I just have to say y'all are the best, and I love this podcast so much. My to be read list grows every day (mostly because I just discovered this podcast so I am just binging my way through it :))

I have a request for a book for my boyfriend. He likes to read, but he's a really slow reader (this was my way of saying, he likes to read but doesn't read a lot, you know?), and we just moved in together and I noticed that almost all of his books are by straight white males. My new years resolution is to get him only books by...not straight white males.

So. He likes fantasy and science fiction. (He loved the Name of the Wind, I think he liked Game of Thrones.) But I've already recommended him Octavia Butler, and N.K. Jemisin is on my to-read list.

He also LOVES true crime and nonfiction/historical-ish books, like Devil in the White City. (I also already got him Killers of the Flower Moon before I made my resolution. Whoops.)

Any recommendations are so welcome, in these genres or feel free to go crazy.

Best,

--Rachael

4. I've been feeling the inadequacy of my high school level American History education lately, as I've been listening to a lot of podcasts that have happened to bring up Asian American historical events that I realize I know very little about. I would like to brush up on my Asian American history in general but I don't know where to start. Do you have any nonfiction recs in this area, both in the overview theme and more specific and particular events and ethnic groups? Thank you much!

--Rayne

5. I am getting very interested in language itself. This began with just loving novels with beautiful and pithy prose (so rec's in that vein are certainly welcome). Now I'm increasingly interested in linguistics and philology. While I'm so far fascinated by Steven Pinker's "The Language Instinct", I am hoping for books (nonfiction, memoirs, essay collections, or even novels) more welcoming to the lay linguist. For instance, Bill Bryson's "The Mother Tongue" is very much the sort of thing I'm hoping for more of, and I am currently working through and enamored by Jhumpa Lahiri's beautiful "In Other Words". So, where do I go when I finish that one? Thanks y'all!

--Noah

6. Hi-ya!

I am trying to be a less stupid white person. Recently I have read Between the World and Me by Ta-Nahisi Coates, the March series by Congressman John Lewis, and the quite excellent satire, I Am Not Sidney Poitier by Percival Everett. I loved them all, and would like to read more like them. I am planning to read more satires like Welcome to Braggsville, The Sellout, and Blackass, but are there other books on race that you can recommend, fiction or nonfiction? I would especially love some gems from the past that I may have missed, or something written by a woman!

Many thanks!!

--K

Books Discussed

Not So Stories edited by David Thomas Moore

Bastard Out of Carolina by Dorothy Allison

Bachelor Nation by Amy Kaufman

My Grandfather Would Have Shot Me by Jennifer Teege

Five Days at Memorial by Sheri Fink

Death in the Air: The True Story of a Serial Killer, the Great London Smog, and the Strangling of a City by Kate Winkler Dawson

Bachelor Girl by Betsy Israel (trigger warning: discussion of rape)

The Extra Woman by Joanna Scutts

I Can Barely Take Care of Myself by Jen Kirkman

The Grace of Kings by Ken Liu

The Poisoner’s Handbook by Deborah Blum

Black Dahlia, Red Rose: The Crime, Corruption, and Cover-Up of America’s Greatest Unsolved Murder by Piu Eatwell

The Making of Asian America by Erika Lee

The Song Poet by Kao Kalia Yang

Asian American Dreams: The Emergence of an American People by Helen Zia

“Stories of Your Life” from Stories of Your Life and Others by Ted Chiang

Proust and the Squid by Maryanne Wolf

The Adventure of English: The Biography of a Language by Melvyn Bragg

Eloquent Rage by Brittney Cooper

The Warmth of Other Suns by Isabel Wilkerson

From #blacklivesmatter To Black Liberation by Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor

Apr 19 2018
1 hour 6 mins
Play

Rank #9: 195: Hat Pins Are Involved

Podcast cover
Read more

Amanda and Jenn discuss divorce reads, Latinx fiction, writing advice, and more in this week’s episode of Get Booked.

This episode is sponsored by Book Riot InsidersLibro.fm, and Crown of Coral and Pearl by Mara Rutherford.

Subscribe to the podcast via RSSApple PodcastsSpotify, or Stitcher.

FEEDBACK

Bad Neighbor by Molly O’Keefe (rec’d by Diana)

Lilah Pace’s duology Asking for It/Begging for It (rec’d by Diana)

Cath Staincliffe (rec’d by Stephanie)

QUESTIONS

1. Hey guys!

I’ve recently been inspired to write my own novel and have started envisioning my story, characters and setting. However, as I’ve gotten started I’ve realized I have no idea how to write a book at all let alone a book that people might actually want to read. I’m looking for a book on how to write books, specifically how to design compelling characters, write dialogue, design settings, inspire emotion and just the basics of writing that every writer needs to know. I’ve read Bird by Bird by Anne Lamott and loved it. Im looking for other books to help guide my writing process. If it helps at all I’m hoping to write a character-driven coming of age novel. Thanks so much and I look forward to your suggestions!

– E. W.

2. Hello, ladies!

I was wondering if you had any recommendations for a lesbian regency romance?

I have read a few with male romance, and a ton with hetero romance, and I love these but haven’t heard of any featuring a lesbian romance…

I have read Sarah Waters and some other lesbian romance set in Victorian or early 20th century, but really hoping for a regency romp in the vein of Tessa Dare or Sarah MacLean, or Courtney Milan.

Thank you both!

-Sarah

3. Hey there!

I wanted to get into more books about true crime! It creeps me out but I like reading about it, it’s like watching shows about it, I can’t get enough! Could you guys recommend me some true crime books that’ll really be sending chills down my spine?

-Tamika

4. Hey bookish people!

My fiancé and I are taking a little bit of an unconventional honeymoon in October to Vancouver, Canada. I’m looking for recommendations for books that take place in that area. I love pretty much every genre except horror and romance, and I particularly enjoy stories (both fiction and nonfiction) that emphasize culture and food. Bonus points if it’s a cozy read that will go well with the gloomy October weather!

Thanks ladies!

-Morgan

5. Hi Folks,

I am starting the process of divorcing my husband and I am looking for support and an example from books as I’m struggling to find those things in real life. I am not in an abusive situation, but I’ve finally realized that I deserve a partner, not a dependent. This realization doesn’t make the process easier. Especially because I don’t have any personal experience with divorce. No one among my family or close friends has gone through divorce. Not that I’m complaining, but I don’t have a personal pattern or example to see that one can have a fulfilling life afterwards.

I’m looking for examples of women or non-binary folks (just no dudes please) who have made it through divorce and come out the other side happy and successful (with or without a new partner). I’m open to nonfiction or fiction.

-S

6. I’m looking at a job in Richmond, VA, and I’m a little bit apprehensive about leaving the midwest. I would love to read anything set in Virginia (but not DC) that would give me a sense of the place and its history, though I’m not looking for a Civil War history specifically. Readalikes from other parts of the country that I’ve enjoyed/appreciated include Kristin Hannah’s The Great Alone; J.D. Vance’s Hillbilly Elegy; Min Jin Lee’s Pachinko; and Barbara Kingsolver’s Prodigal Summer (in case that might have been a recommendation!). I don’t have a preference for fiction vs nonfiction, and I read most genres, but am particularly loving multigenerational family stories like Pachinko. Bonus points for LGBT characters.

-Stephanie

7. Hi ladies, I adore the podcast!

I’m a first generation Latina American, and in the wake of the El Paso shooting (and all the hatred surrounding Mexicans and Hispanic people as a whole) I’ve found myself at something of a loss. Reading is a place I inevitably turn to, and I was hoping you two ladies could recommend me some fiction about Latinx characters. It’s something I’ve been doing all summer actually, trying to seek out Latinx authors, and I know you two will have great recommendations. I read pretty much any genre, though my favorite is fantasy. Some books I love and have read this summer are Water For Chocolate, The House on Mango Street, Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe, and a bunch of Gabriel García Márquez. I also read The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo, which I loved, but even though it was a 5 star rating for me, I do feel you can tell it isn’t an own voices book, and right now I really need that.

I’m also Cuban, so if you know any good books about Cubans that would be a major bonus, but not necessary.

-Anon

BOOKS

On Writing by Stephen King

Steering the Craft by Ursula K. Le Guin

A Little Light Mischief by Cat Sebastian

Mrs. Martin’s Incomparable Adventure by Courtney Milan

The Fact of a Body by Alexandria Marzano-Lesnevich (TW: violence against children)

American Predator by Maureen Callahan (tw: home invasion)

The Jade Peony by Wayson Choy

Better Living Through Plastic Explosives by Zsuzsi Gartner

Wild by Cheryl Strayed

Tiny Beautiful Things

Blue Plate Special by Kate Christensen (tw: domestic violence & child abuse, pet death, disordered eating & drinking)

Shine Shine Shine by Lydia Netzer

Animal Vegetable Miracle

The Wettest County in the World by Matt Bondurant

Chilling Effect by Valerie Valdes (out 9/17)

We Set The Dark On Fire by Tehlor Kay Mejia

Aug 29 2019
46 mins
Play

Rank #10: Get Booked Ep. #95: Hot Topic Whimsy

Podcast cover
Read more
Amanda, Jenn, and guest expert Kelly Jensen discuss all things YA in this week's episode of Get Booked! This episode is sponsored by Mask of Shadows by Linsey Miller and Book of the Month.   Questions   1. I just finished Honesty by Seth King. It was intense, heavy and unlike any other literary experience I've had to date -- I was stuck inside the brain of Cole Furman and I couldn't get out for 291 pages not matter how uncomfortable, intense, exciting, lonely or heartbreaking it was! It's a story of young love. It's is also a story of fear and pain. Cole and Nick are falling in love and they are also both closeted LGBTQ nineteen-year- old's with everything to lose in the South. King acknowledged the need for more books featuring more diverse couples that don't live deep in the romance genre. Until now it's something I never thought twice about. THE QUEST: I want to read more stories of diverse couples that lives closer to the YA genre and maybe even one with a happy ending, but not required. Love the podcast! Shout out to Fiona for introducing me to Book Riot! --Jenna   2. Do you have recommendations for YA books that don't include romance? My almost 13 year old daughter is a somewhat reluctant reader, but likes books with strong female characters and prefers no icky love stuff :) She recently read the Divergent Series and enjoyed it, but could have done without the romantic relationships. Thanks! --Julie   3. I've just read The Selection and Cinder and am looking for more YA dystopian Cinderella stories. Any suggestions? --Shaina   4. Hi! I love listening to your podcast and adding tons of books to my TBR list. I read a book last summer called Fiercombe Manor by Kate Riordan and loved it. I would call it a romance/mystery/ghost story. Can you recommend some similar books for my summer reading list? I love YA, so am open to that as well! Thanks! --Rebecca   5. I used to read YA books all the time when I was little, but once I started high school I decided in all my teenage snobbishness that YA was beneath me, and I'd only be reading the classics... and The Perks of Being a Wallflower (obviously). Now I'm in my 20s working on my doctorate in classics, and no longer want to or feel the need to be so snobby. I've recently discovered bookstagram, and I'm constantly seeing all these beautiful covers of YA novels. The only thing is what to read? I tried reading The Raven Cycle, but I found the characters to be so shallowly written. And the whole extreme/unrealistic wealth and privilege just seemed so far fetched. I thought I might have better luck with fantasy YA but there is so much and I have no idea how to sort the good from the bad. --Keira   6. First, let me tell you I love your podcast! Second, I would love your recommendations (obvs). My son and I just read a great YA book called Away Running by David Wright and Luc Bouchard. It resonated with my son who is sports-obsessed because it's about football but it is deeper than most kids' sports books because it takes place in Paris amid racial tensions and immigrations issues. It's deep. I'd love more books like this to engage my son...some sports but more than just sports. Bonus if there are diverse characters (as there are in Away Running) because my son is biracial and seeing himself reflected in the characters allows for us to have even better conversations after reading. Thank you so much! --Cathy   Books It's Not Like It’s a Secret by Misa Sugiura No Is Not Enough by Naomi Klein Genuine Fraud by E Lockhart Tell Me Again How a Crush Should Feel by Sara Farizan Not Your Sidekick by CB Lee Everything Leads To You by Nina LaCour 100 Must-Read YA Books With Little Or No Romance Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein Empress of a Thousand Skies by Rhoda Belleza Life As We Knew It by Susan Beth Pfeffer Ash by Malinda Lo Mechanica by Betsy Cornwell “Glass” in Roses and Bones by Francesca Lia Block A Spy in the House by YS Lee The Walls Around Us by Nova Ren Suma Absent by Katie Williams Saints and Misfits by SK Ali (trigger warning: sexual assault) Ramona Blue by Julie Murphy Piecing Me Together by Renee Watson Miles Morales by Jason Reynolds Mexican WhiteBoy by Matt De la Pena (trigger warning: self-harm) See No Color by Shannon Gibney Leverage by Joshua C. Cohen (trigger warning: sexual assault)
Aug 30 2017
55 mins
Play

Rank #11: Get Booked Ep. #94: Harry Potter Meets Lord Of The Rings Meets Pokemon

Podcast cover
Read more
Amanda and Jenn discuss classic retellings, post-Hamilton reads, small town stories, and more in this week's episode of Get Booked. This episode is sponsored by Penguin Random House Audio and Doubleday, publishers The Clockwork Dynasty, the new novel by Daniel Wilson.   Questions 1. We are a group of girlfriends from high school (28 years out!) and we're getting together in the fall for a reunion, something we've been doing every two years. We'd like to read a book in advance to discuss. Maybe it will be the beginning of a long-distance book club that meets in person every two years. What recommendations do you have? I'm thinking themes relating to family, friends, women's issues, current issues... Thanks so much! --Patricia   2. My 1st grade daughter is a precocious reader and is currently reading at about a middle school level. Do you have book recommendations for her that are more advanced reading, yet not advanced topics? She's already read all the Little House on the Prairie books, The Penderwicks, The Mysterious Benedict Society, Roald Dahl, and a bunch others. I'm really looking for new series or newer books since she's read most of the books I read as a child! Thank you! --Julie   3. Recently I read Rebecca and it is now one of my favorite novels. This is the second book I've read based on Jane Eyre- the other being Wide Sargasso Sea, another favorite of mine. Then recently Jenn recommended Longbourn, and I've started reading that. Now I want to read other books based off of classics. I tried looking into it a bit, but all I really found were Pride and Prejudice continuations that, quite honestly, didn't look like they were very well written. Any suggestions? Thanks guys! --Margret   4. Okay, ladies. It's happened. I caught the Hamilton hype and nothing else matters anymore. I'm already listening to the Chernow bio on audio and loving it, but I just need more! Any suggestions for worthy biographies on prominent American figures? I'm particularly interested in presidential biographies or biographies of noteworthy women during the period. Thank you both so much! Love the show! :) --Crystal   5. HELP! I'm in the middle of a terrible reading slump, and I've never been in one quite so extreme before. I'm in the middle of getting my masters degree in Classics at the moment, and between all the ancient greek, and dead white philosophers I just don't have the head space to read as much as I usually do, or even read the kind of books I usually read. Some of my favorite books are the Song of Ice and Fire series, The Secret History (which may or may not have made me want to become a classics major, and thus sealed my fate and slow decent into insanity), Frankenstein, and The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy. I'm open to any genre, as long as it's well written. I just need something that I can read for a little bit at night and clear my mind. Thank you! --Slyvia   6. For some reason I seem to really love books that take place in small towns. I think it's because I enjoy when the location in a book becomes something like a living breathing character, and (as bias as this may sound?) I like exploring the close mindedness, and hatred that often manifests in small towns where everything is the same, and everyone knows each other. Do you guys know of any books that explore those kind of themes, and where the location is very much a character in the novel? --Lois   7. HELP HELP HELP! My whole life I've been trying to convince my mother to read, but she's always told me she's not interested. She endless makes fun of my "snooty" literature (I read mainly classic literature, and a lot of ancient philosophy), and says books are boring. I gave up trying to convince her to read, but a few days ago so told me she'd be interested in reading something! The only problem is I don't know what she'll like. We have such different taste, and I know she'd hate all my favorite books. She watches a lot of reality tv like The Housewives of Some Rich Neighborhood or Whatever, and The Kardashians. Is there a book equivalent to trashy reality TV? She also really likes shows such as Grey's Anatomy, Desperate Housewives, and Revenge. So I think she'd like a book that's over the top like a soap opera kind of? Please help! --Joan   Books Discussed Dreadnought by April Daniels The Novice by Taran Matharu The Secret Son by Laila Lalami Native Believer by Ali Eteraz Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo The Golem and the Jinni by Helene Wecker The Girl Next Door by Jack Ketchum Haunted by Chuck Palahniuk The Mothers by Brit Bennet All Grown Up by Jami Attenberg Esperanza Rising by Pam Munoz Ryan Frazzled by Booki Vivat Princess Academy series by Shannon Hale Rick Riordan’s new imprint Home Fire by Kamila Shamsie Re Jane by Patricia Park John Adams by David McCullough Also please watch this video: the John Adams rap cut from Hamilton Lafayette In the Somewhat United States by Sarah Vowell The Quick by Lauren Owen Infomocracy by Malka Ann Older If I Was Your Girl by Meredith Russo (trigger warning: transphobia) Not Without Laughter by Langston Hughes The Nest by Cynthia D’Aprix Sweeney Blood Defense by Marcia Clark, recommended by Jamie Canaves
Aug 16 2017
46 mins
Play

Rank #12: Get Booked Ep. #97: Emo Kid Monster

Podcast cover
Read more
Jenn and guest Eric Smith discuss all things young adult in this week's episode of Get Booked! This episode is sponsored by Landscape With Invisible Hand by M.T. Anderson, The Golden House by Salman Rushdie, and A Conspiracy in Belgravia by Sherry Thomas.   Questions 1. I have a feeling you guys are going to look down on me for this, but one of my favorite things to read about is rich people (mainly teenagers and young adults) and their problems. I'm not really sure why, but I really like that. I think I like looking at worlds that are supposed to be 'perfect' and glimpsing into all the terrible things going on beneath the surface. The Secret History for example, is my favorite book of all time, and I think that encapsulates what I love perfectly. Intellectual (and snooty), pretty rich kids, with LOTS of issues (and murder!). I tried reading We Were Liars, and I didn't dislike it, but I just forgot about it and never finished it. Sometimes I have that problem with YA fiction, I can never say what I don't like about a lot of the books, but I just can't make myself finish them a lot of the time. --Camilla   2. Hi there! I am currently obsessing over the TV show "How To Get Away With Murder" and I was wondering if you had book recommendations for fans of the show? I'm particularly interested / looking for a book that has a diverse set of characters, smart/academic poc adults or young adults (of different ethnic backgrounds, sexualities, etc.) who share a professional and personal relationship. It doesn't have to be murder related, but maybe a cool plot that brings them all together. Thanks and keep doing whatcha doing, love this podcast! :) --Joanna   3. I am in a YA book club for adults. I've loved many of the "1st in a series" books we've read, but the number of sequels on our TBR lists keep adding up as we move onto other selections. Can you recommend some stand-alone YA books for the group? We've already read The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, The Coldest Girl in Coldtown, The Darkest Part of the Forest, Ready Player One, We Were Liars, Paper Towns, and Imaginary Girls. Bonus points for male main character or POV. Thanks! --Christine   4. I'm looking for YA recommendations for my 13-year old daughter who is dealing with an anxiety disorder. She is a good reader with a strong feminist bent, and likes well-written realistic fiction with quirky characters. So many YA novels seem to deal with pretty heavy subjects, (suicide, a sibling or parent's death, dystopian futures, etc.) and those are not great for her right now. Favorite authors have included Rainbow Rowell and Jandy Nelson. Recently she has read Everything, Everything and Simon vs the Homosapiens Agenda and enjoyed them both. Any suggestions? Thanks! --Helen   5. Dear Jenn and Amanda, My younger sister (12) has never been much of a reader, and I've recently decided I wanted to try and find her some books to help her get into reading. She's read and loved Harry Potter and A Series of Unfortunate Events when she was younger. Recently I gave her my old copy of Inkheart and she absolutely loved it. She's reading the sequel right now, but when she finishes the series I'd love to have some books to recommend her right after, while she's still in the spirit of reading. I feel like 12 is a weird age because your not quite old enough for YA and a little too old for middle grade, and when I was her age I was reading Dickens. So as you can see I'm way out of my element here, as I don't think giving Dickens to a reluctant reader is a good idea. Please please please help! --Taylor   6. I'm in my mid-twenties and read a lot of YA fiction. I tend to struggle with adult fiction as I feel I can't relate to some of the characters. I'm always looking for books with characters closer to my age, though they seem to be few and far between. I've enjoyed books with characters in this age range such as Attachments by Rainbow Rowell (I love all her books), The Royal We by Heather Cocks, Someday Someday Maybe by Lauren Graham, Brooklyn by Colm Toibin, Me Before You by Jojo Moyes, and The Help by Kathryn Stockett. I'd like to start branching out into more adult fiction. Any recommendations would be greatly appreciated. Thanks! --Joslyn   7. Hi Amanda and Jenn! I am working on my Master's in Education and am currently in a class about students of diverse backgrounds. You Book Riot ladies and Jeff must live in my head because every discussion the class has about how to make the curriculum more inclusive or your classroom more welcoming to all people, I always say, "Have books about people who are like them in your room". I know you all understand the importance of showing kids that people like them did or are doing cool or important things so they believe that they can too. I plan to teach high school biology and I was wondering if you could give me some recommendations for books about biologists who are not already part of the science cannon a.k.a. the rich, white, sometimes Christian men. I am not 100% sure on the grade level I will be teaching and may teach 7th grade life science, so a mix of middle level, YA, and adult would be nice. Thank you so much for helping me to add to my TBR list and I look forward to hearing your recommendations. --Bobbi   8. I have a friend with a 12-year-old daughter who fell in love with shapeshifter fantasy after reading Twilight. In her quest to find more shapeshifter novels (with a little romance), she's ventured into some territory that's a little more adult than her mom is comfortable with. Can you recommend any YA shapeshifter novels for her? I read a lot of YA, but haven't read many that fit the bill. Another friend recommended Shiver by Maggie Stiefvater, but I'm sure there are others out there. Thanks! --Stacy   Books The End of the World Running Club by Adrian J. Walker Warcross by Marie Lu Jane, Unlimited by Kristin Cashore The New Guy by Amy Spalding Want by Cindy Pon This Savage Song by Victoria Schwab All American Boys by Jason Reynolds and Brendan Kiely The Serpent King by Jeff Zentner Dumplin' by Julie Murphy Eliza and Her Monsters by Francesca Zappia Terrier by Tamora Pierce (Beka Cooper) The Wolf Wilder by Katherine Rundell Young Jane Young by Gabrielle Zevin The Awkward Path to Getting Lucky by Summer Heacock Headstrong by Rachel Swaby Relativity by Cristin Bishara The Epic Crush of Genie Lo by F.C. Yee Seraphina by Rachel Hartman Firelight by Sophie Jordan
Sep 14 2017
45 mins
Play

Rank #13: Get Booked Ep. #87: Unicorns And Rainbows Coming To Eat You

Podcast cover
Read more
Amanda and Jenn discuss readings on motherhood, Star Wars read-alikes, novels about twins, and more in this week's episode of Get Booked. This episode is sponsored by The Sisters Chase by Sarah Healy and OwlCrate. Subscribe to the podcast via RSS here, or via Apple Podcast here. The show can also be found on Stitcher here.   Questions   1. My husband and I are going on a belated honeymoon adventure at the end of August/early September. We are starting in London, then heading to Croatia, and ending the trip in Tuscany. I am looking for books set in these places. I typically read contemporary fiction and psychological thrillers. I gravitate towards realistic - sorry, no Game of Thrones ;). I also enjoy a good memoir. Thank you so much for your recommendations! (FYI, some favorites: Tell the Wolves I'm Home, All the Ugly and Wonderful Things, Dark Places, Burial Rites - thanks to you two!, The Poisonwood Bible, Dear Fang With Love) --Karoline   2. Hi there! I'm having my first child, a boy, in August 2017. I'm not with the father (who will remain uninvolved), the baby was unplanned, and I will be transitioning from a full time job in downtown Nashville to a remote position in a tiny town in Ohio. I'm looking for books applicable to my situation (early thirties, single motherhood, liberal and cognizant of the need to raise a thoughtful, independent thinking, and respectful white son who is being born during a time when the country is under terrifying leadership). Fiction or non-fiction welcome! I'm a big fan of the site and can't wait to hear your suggestions. --Amanda   3. Hi! I'm a college professor and my wife and I are expecting a baby in July, so I'll have a semester off for the first time in a long time. While I'm sure most of it will be spent sleepless with a baby, I'm also hoping to get in some good reading for fun. In the summer, I tend to love ridiculous sun-soaked literary fiction like The Vacationers and Seating Arrangements. Otherwise, I read/listen to a lot of sci-fi/fantasy and LGBTQ lit. I loved the Argonauts and would love to read more about queer families or parenting. I also recently read The Expanse series and All the Birds in the Sky. What should I read while I'm home with a little one to prevent me from being lonely and crazy? --Nikki   4. My boyfriend is suuuuper into Star Wars. We first bonded over a love of reading, but the vast majority of his already-read pile is Star Wars novels - and there's nothing wrong with that, but I've been enjoying trying to expand his palate. He claims he'll try anything, just never knew where to start, and has already borrowed the Lunar Chronicles from me and really loved it. I also gave him Night Circus (because it's my favorite), but that one seemed to go over less well - his comment was "I can see why you love it so much." The thing I'm noticing, however, is that my personal collection leans much more towards fantasy and fairy tale retellings than sci fi, and I was wondering if you had any ideas of sci fi that *isn't* Star Wars that he might like. He especially enjoys explorations of people in the Empire, I know he was really excited for the recent book about Thrawn, and he loves Lost Stars by Claudia Grey. Thanks in advance! --Anne   5. I have a yen to read more short stories, but I am finding myself at my wit's end trying to find any good collections that suit my reading interests. I really fell in love with short stories recently reading "Diving Belles" by Lucy Wood, and then I absolutely loved "American Housewife" by Helen Ellis. Both these collections contained relatively short, engaging short stories. I think the common factor is that they are primarily about women, and are thoroughly charming. There is darkness without being too much of a downer, but they are not sappy "Chicken Soup for the Soul" type reads, which I don't judge, but don't enjoy. I don't know if I have far too particular tastes, or I just don't know where to look next. I tried to read some Neil Gaiman short stories and I'm not really thrilled so far, although I am not giving up yet! Help! I don't even know where to look next. Kind regards, --Eliza   6. Hello! My older sister recently asked me for book recommendations because she feels like she doesn't have any hobbies. She is in a very different place in life than I am, so I'm not sure what to suggest. She works, is married, and has three kids, all under the age of 8, so she doesn't have a ton of free time. I think the last time she read fiction was 12 years ago, when we were living together and I had my books all over the apartment. Back then, she enjoyed historical fiction set in South Asia (e.g. The Twentieth Wife and The Feast of Roses by Indu Sundaresan). She and her husband are now in the process of building a house, and she has always been very interested in interior design (she loves Pinterest and tells me I should have throw pillows). She also loves to cook and she took a baking class once. Any ideas? Her birthday is coming up in July so I hope you can answer before then. Thanks so much! --Sel   7. Hello! I'm a little worried that my request may be kind of tricky. I'd like to buy my Dad a book for his upcoming birthday. The problem is that while he enjoys reading, he is prefers short novels with straight-forward writing styles. I think that this is because he's dyslexic and gets a little overwhelmed when texts are too "flowery" in their writing style or have a reputation for being "intellectual." He tends to only read a couple books a year (usually the ones I give him) so I feel a bit of pressure! I've had a lot of luck in the past with John Steinbeck (he liked the Pearl but loved Of Mice and Men). He enjoys books with historical elements. He's from Northern California and he gets a kick out of reading books set in landscapes that he knows and loves. Are there books out there that fit some of these guidelines? I know that Steinbeck's canon has a lot of books with these elements, but I don't think my Dad will sit through East of Eden or the Grapes of Wrath, and I'd like to try something a little different. Thank you so much! --Amris   8. I love reading stories about siblings, particularly twins. Got any suggestions? Thanks! --Jonathan     Books Discussed Ruin of a Rake by Cat Sebastian (out August 22 2017) Behind the Throne KB Wagers Girl at War by Sara Novic NW by Zadie Smith Operating Instructions by Anne Lamott The Argonauts by Maggie Nelson Touched by an Alien by Gini Koch What Is Not Yours Is Not Yours by Helen Oyeyemi Saga Vol 1 by Brian K Vaughan and Fiona Staples The Collapsing Empire by John Scalzi Tender by Sofia Samatar Single Carefree Mellow by Katherine Heiny The Painted Veil by W. Somerset Maugham The Girl From the Garden by Parnaz Foroutan Train Dreams by Denis Johnson (recommended by Liberty) California by Edan Lepucki Dead Letters by Caite Dolan-Leach Her Fearful Symmetry by Audrey Niffeneger
Jun 27 2017
46 mins
Play

Rank #14: Get Booked Ep. #102: Hard Cheese In Your Pocket

Podcast cover
Read more
Amanda and Jenn discuss grown-up American Girl stories, soft sci-fi, LGBTQ romance, and more in this week's episode of Get Booked. This episode is sponsored by What Counts As Love by Marian Crotty and 36 Questions That Changed My Mind About You by Vicki Grant.     Questions 1. Hi, I have just finished the latest installment of the Throne of Glass series and have read everything by Sarah J Maas, I also love most of the whole dystopian YA female lead genre ( loved the Cinder series, all the Grisha books, Red Queen, Graceling etc.) I am 20 and would read a big range of books from pretty much any genre was wondering if you had any recommendations for similar books that aren't necessarily YA ( or are I'll read anything!). A series of an author who has a lot of books of a similar type would be brilliant as once I find something I love I devour it !! Love the podcast and thank you for your help, --Holly   2. Hi ladies! When doing some cleaning, I found dozens of American Girl doll books and I was struck with nostalgia. I LOVED these books growing up - I still attribute these books with my deep love of history. As I was holding these books lovingly, I immediately thought to ask you two if you had any recommendations for "grown up" American Girl doll books. Any suggestions for historical fiction featuring strong and spunky female characters? Thanks, love the show! --Chelsea   3. Hi Amanda and Jenn, Listening to the Book Riot podcasts has increased the number of books on my TBR pile steadily for the past couple of months, thanks for all the great recommendations! What I'd like to ask you: I've read Mary Doria Russell's The Sparrow this year, and I loved it. I also read both of Becky Chambers' Wayfarers books and I loved them as well. Do you have any recommendations for soft sci-fi books? Thanks! --Jill (from Belgium)   4. Hello Amanda and Jenn, First of all, I love your podcast and have discovered many books and authors because of it. You guys both do an amazing job! My recommendation request is for my 7 year-old son. He recently read Ghosts by Raina Telgemeier (thanks to your recommendation from a previous episode) and then made his way through the rest of her work with Sisters, Smile, and Drama. He's read all four of these books over the course of the last week and I would like to find some read-alikes, preferably that are part of a series, for him to read next. He has read all of the books in the Diary of a Wimpy Kid series, Captain Underpants series, and several of the Big Nate books. Thank you in advance and keep up the awesome work! --Angela   5. Hi! I'm looking for some sweet romance to dive into. I'm not much for the genre, but sometimes you just need something to squeal about. Preferably something lgbtqai - though not so much about coming out or such as a major plot detail. Something light but sweet and if the couple are non male that would also be a huge plus! Thanks! --Sonja   6. Amanda & Jenn, First off, I love the podcast! Thank you for all the great recommendations. I've written in a few times with requests, so sorry if you keep seeing my name pop up! This time I'm writing requesting recommendations for my 15 year old son. He is a rather reluctant reader but very much enjoys listening to audiobooks when we take road trips. If we don't finish the audiobook in the car he asks me to buy it for him to finish in book form. He mostly likes dystopian novels, preferably with some type of corrupt government. He's enjoyed 1984, A Clockwork Orange, Fahrenheit 451 & Ready Player One. Not in that theme he read & enjoyed The Outsiders. His book suggestions mostly come from what his friends are reading in school. I've tried a few times to pick up books I thought he would like but haven't been able to find anything he got in to. I tried The Maze Runner, The 5th Wave & I can't remember what else. Any suggestions? Thank you! --Valerie   7.I am not a "classics" reader (I didn't love Jane Eyre. I know -Who am I?!) I did like The Awakening by Kate Chopin. Can you recommend another classic or semi-classic to read next? --Andrea   Books Discussed Giveaway! bookriot.com/bookstoregiveaway The Four Tendencies by Gretchen Rubin Of Mess and Moxie by Jen Hatmaker The Tiger’s Daughter by K. Arsenault Rivera The Fifth Season by NK Jemisin Moon Called by Patricia Briggs An Extraordinary Union by Alyssa Cole Kopp Sisters books by Amy Stewart (Girl Waits With Gun) The Wanderers by Meg Howrey Provenance by Ann Leckie Eerie Elementary series by Jack Chabert (The School Is Alive) Chronicles of Claudette by Jorge Aguirre and Rafael Rosado (Giants Beware) Georgia Peaches and Other Forbidden Fruit by Jaye Robin Brown Out on Good Behavior by Dahlia Adler Want by Cindy Pon Brave New World by Aldous Huxley Warcross by Marie Lu Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf The Living is Easy by Dorothy West
Oct 18 2017
46 mins
Play

Rank #15: Get Booked Episode #11: The Night Circus Void

Podcast cover
Read more
Amanda and Jenn recommend books to read after college, what to read to fill the void left by The Night Circus, and more. This episode is sponsored by Jakob's Colors by Lindsay Hawdon and the Book Riot Store.
Jan 14 2016
1 hour 4 mins
Play

Rank #16: Get Booked Episode #5: Asking for Audiobooks

Podcast cover
Read more
This episode covers food writing, audiobooks, essay collections, and more. The guest is bookseller Hannah Oliver Depp. This episode is sponsored by Penguin Random House Audio and ROOM the movie.
Nov 05 2015
1 hour 2 mins
Play

Rank #17: Get Booked Ep. #103: 200 Year Old Spoilers

Podcast cover
Read more
Amanda and Jenn discuss '80s sci-fi, family drama, working class classics, and more in this week's episode of Get Booked. This episode is sponsored by Libby from OverDrive and Penguin Random House Audio.   Questions   1. Hello! This year, I’ve really been interested in seasonal reading. I find this super easy during Halloween but as I prep my TBR pile for November and December, I’m coming up short. I typically read YA and am looking for holiday reads that are inclusive of traditions and people. It seems that the options are fairly small in this regard so I’d be happy with books that just set a cozy/winter scene but also feature diverse characters. Thank you! --Caitlin   2. Hello again ladies! My group, Geek Girls, is doing an all 80s theme in the month of November so we are hoping to pick a scifi or fantasy book from the 80s for the book club. Any suggestions? Only stipulation, they must be available on audio. Happy Halloween! -Jeanne   3. Hi Amanda and Jenn! I just booked my dream trip to Stockholm and Copenhagen! I really want to read something set in these cities, but everything seems to be a crime thriller (great, but not always) or about 120 years old and written by Serious Old Men. Can you please recommend something set in one of these cities that doesn't fall in one of those two camps? For reference, some of my favourites are Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides, Pachinko by Min Jin Lee, Saints for All Occasions by J. Courtney Sullivan, and The Great Gatsby. So, if you know of any fun Scandinavian family sagas, please help me!!! Thank you! --Olivia   4. Hi Get Booked! I am a non-binary person and can never find books featuring characters that share that aspect of my identity. I'm not interested in reading books *about* being non-binary, but I would like to read about non-binary characters doing other stuff! I'm open to most genres -- no horror or gory crime stuff please! I'm also not big on biography/memoir, though don't seem to mind it when in graphic novel form or when it reads like fiction. I also can't get through really dense, long books. Thank you! --Frances   5. Hello ladies! I love the podcast and have gotten many great recs for my TBR from you all. After the garbage fire that was the 2016 election, I am feeling the need to better inform myself on some key issues. One that I am particularly interested in is immigration. I have read The Book Of Unknown Americans and Americanah, both of which were life-changing reads. I would like to read some non-fiction on this subject, especially as it relates to American immigration policies. Thanks for all your great work. --Heidi   6. I just discovered your podcast and really enjoyed it, it's great getting all the recommendation, I've added a lot to my TBR pile. I'm looking for some books that are like the prime time soaps from the 80's like Dallas and Dynasty, focusing on family and full of intrigue. Thanks, --Melissa   7. Hi, I recently finished reading North and South by Elizabeth Gaskell, which I loved. It made me realise how fed up I am with reading about the English gentry and aristocracy. I am also really bored with books set in London and the Home Counties. I live in a post-industrial town called Chesterfield and want to read about towns like mine and the people that lived in them. I am looking for relatively unknown classics (I have read most of the famous English classics) or historical fiction novels set in towns and cities in the North of England about ordinary, working class people. I am primarily looking for books set in the 18th and 19th centuries. Cheers. --Amy     Books Discussed Bookstore giveaway! bookriot.com/bookstoregiveaway Future Home of the Living God by Louise Erdrich SPQR by Mary Beard Dreidels on the Brain by Joel Ben Izzy My True Love Gave To Me edited by Stephanie Perkins Alanna by Tamora Pierce Dawn by Octavia Butler Number the Stars by Lois Lowry My Dirty Little Book of Stolen Time by Liz Jensen Lizard Radio by Pat Schmatz Uncovering Ray by Edie Danford Undocumented by Aviva Chomsky In The Country We Love by Diane Guerrero Land of Love and Drowning by Tiphanie Yanique The Family Hightower by Brian Francis Slattery The Mill on the Floss by George Eliot David Peace
Oct 25 2017
43 mins
Play

Rank #18: 138: #138: Full-Frontal Ben Affleck

Podcast cover
Read more

Amanda and María Cristina recommend light books in translation, books for breakups, reads about saints, and more.

This episode is sponsored by My Plain Jane and Harry's Trees.

Books Discussed

The Madonna of the Sleeping Cars by Maurice Dekobra, translated by Neal Wainwright

Kalpa Imperial: The Greatest Empire That Never Was by Angélica Gorodischer and translated by (wait for it…) Ursula K. LeGuin

Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn

Trail of Lightning by Rebecca Roanhorse

Sister Teresa by Barbara Mujica

The Life You Save May Be Your Own by Paul Elie

My Awesome Japan Adventure by Rebecca Otawa

My Neighbor Totoro: A Novel by Tsugiko Kubo and Hayao Miyazaki

The Charmed Children of Rookskill Castle by Janet Fox

Quest for a Maid by Frances Mary Hendry

Want by Cindy Pon

Batman: Nightwalker by Marie Lu

Bonfire by Krysten Ritter

Any Man by Amber Tamblyn

Jun 28 2018
52 mins
Play

Rank #19: 143: #143: The Weirdest Book I Own

Podcast cover
Read more

Amanda and Jenn discuss novels about the Balkans, contemporary YA, really weird books, and more in this week's episode of Get Booked.

This episode is sponsored by Book Riot Insiders, Legendary by Stephanie Garber, and Megabat by Anna Humphrey, illustrated by Kass Reich.

Questions

1. Hello Ladies!

My friend and I are going on a trip to the Balkans (Croatia, Montenegro, Serbia, Bosnia, Belgravia, Macedonia and Albania). We love historical fiction or narrative non-fiction and would love to read more about these countries before visiting.

Thanks!

-Britany

2. Looking for an interesting essay collection for the Read Harder Challenge!

-Rachael

3. Hello from Canada! I love your show :)

I'm looking for book recommendations for my sister. She's in her late 20s, and has described herself as "enjoys reading, not books shopping, but only likes weird stuff". She seems to like John Wyndham books...Books that are weird, creepy, not very sci fi, and not very magical- something more in between. I suggested the Library at Mount Char (one of the weirdest I own), but she was turned off due to the title and perhaps my poor pitch. She will pick up Dark Matter, and the Southern Reach Trilogy due to my persistence. but I'm not sure they are right for her. Please help!

-Dominique

4. Hi ladies!

I just finished Retta’s So Close To Being The Sh*t Y’all Don’t Even Know and loved it. I was hoping you could recommend something similar. I loved the behind the scenes stories and comedic tone. I’ve also read and enjoyed books by Tina Fey, Amy Poehler, Mindy Kaling and Anna Kendrick.

-Whitney

5. Hello ladies!! Love your podcast and look forward to listening to it every week at work!! I love your passion for books and helping people find new books!! Anyways, I am in the process of pursuing my dream and writing my first novel, however I would love your thoughts on books for creativity and writing. I've read Big Magic, and Stephen King's novel on writing, so anything that could help with encouragement and motivation would be lovely! Open to nonfiction and fiction! Thank you so much!!

-Kaitlin

6. Hello,

I love to listening to YA novels and could use some new recommendations. I have recently listened to and enjoyed When Dimple Met Rishi, I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter, And What I Saw and How I Lied.

I also really enjoy Rainbow Rowell. Eleanor & Park is the only one I have left to read and it is currently on my to be listened to list, as well as Dumplin'.

Thanks!

-Megan

7. Thanks to Read Harder, I've read 2 books this year - Pachinko and Do Not Say We Have Nothing - which really made me realize that I know very little about 20th century East Asian history. I'm looking for nonfiction to give me some more grounding in the topic. It doesn't have to specifically be about the Japanese colonization of Korea or the Cultural Revolution, I'd be happy with anything compelling and readable about 19th or 20th century China, Japan, Korea, or even southeast Asia. Thanks!

-Laura

Books Discussed

Girl At War by Sara Novic

The Tiger’s Wife by Téa Obreht

The Fire This Time edited by Jesmyn Ward

How to Write an Autobiographical Novel by Alexander Chee (tw: child abuse)

The Beauty by Aliya Whiteley

The Book of M by Peng Shepherd

This is Just My Face by Gabourey Sidibe

We’re Going to Need More Wine by Gabrielle Union (tw: rape)

Bird by Bird by Anne Lamott

13 Ways of Looking at the Novel by Jane Smiley (rec’d by Attica Locke on Recommended)

Valley Girls by Sarah Nicole Lemon

Anger is a Gift, narrated and written by Mark Oshiro

Wild Swans by Jung Chang

The Court Dancer by Kyung-Sook Shin

Aug 09 2018
51 mins
Play

Rank #20: Get Booked Episode #4: Haunted by Horror

Podcast cover
Read more
This week's episode is about all things horror, with guest Becky Spratford.This episode is sponsored by We'll Never Be Apart by Emiko Jean and the Room movie.
Oct 22 2015
1 hour 5 mins
Play