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The Rideshare Guy Podcast : A Community for Rideshare Drivers | Uber | Lyft | Postmates | DoorDash

Updated 3 days ago

Rank #184 in Careers category

Business
Technology
Careers
Read more

A Blog and Podcast For Rideshare Drivers

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A Blog and Podcast For Rideshare Drivers

iTunes Ratings

213 Ratings
Average Ratings
191
11
2
5
4

Amazing!!!!

By Erikabiancospino - Nov 07 2019
Read more
Love the podcast, right on! Everything you need to know and the best way to stay updated.

A must listen for all Rideshare drivers.

By darthblaq - Apr 11 2019
Read more
A brilliant resource for any rideshare driver. Should be required listening

iTunes Ratings

213 Ratings
Average Ratings
191
11
2
5
4

Amazing!!!!

By Erikabiancospino - Nov 07 2019
Read more
Love the podcast, right on! Everything you need to know and the best way to stay updated.

A must listen for all Rideshare drivers.

By darthblaq - Apr 11 2019
Read more
A brilliant resource for any rideshare driver. Should be required listening
Cover image of The Rideshare Guy Podcast : A Community for Rideshare Drivers | Uber | Lyft | Postmates | DoorDash

The Rideshare Guy Podcast : A Community for Rideshare Drivers | Uber | Lyft | Postmates | DoorDash

Updated 3 days ago

Read more

A Blog and Podcast For Rideshare Drivers

Rank #1: RSG046: Why Mindset Matters Most For New Uber Drivers

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A lot of new drivers are surprised at the level of negativity when it comes to rideshare Facebook groups and forums.  But I’ve always ignored the haters since just like any other line of work, there are positives and negatives to driving.  And I don’t think it’s my job to tell people what they should or shouldn’t do.

I’d rather focus on sharing my own personal experience and letting people make the decision for themselves.  Today’s guest on the show is similar in that respect and we go in-depth on the mindset that you need in order to be successful as a driver and in life.

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro

  • Made it to two years of marriage – all right!
  • At FinCon right now, a personal finance conference
  • Interview with Bobby Marchesso, a new Uber Select driver based out of LA
  • Check out driving for DoorDash – we did an article about how you can maximize your DoorDash cash recently, and also consider signing up – 97% of customers tip, and drivers keep 100% of the tips!
  • Missed an episode of one of our podcasts? Click here

Interview with Bobby Marchesso

  • Moved to California to expand acting career and took up Uber driving for the in-between times
  • Heard about Uber late last year, has been driving for 5 months
  • Came across RSG while searching for advice about driving for Uber, found the YouTube videos and podcasts really helpful

Experience as a New Driver

  • Was approved to drive quickly and started researching the practicalities of being a driver
  • Found that the morning and mid-afternoon rush are the most lucrative
  • Didn’t read any of the negative comments during research – wanted to find out on own the pros and cons of driving
  • Found driving came pretty easy as long as it was common sense

Advice for New Drivers

  • Could be considered lucky, but it’s also your perspective on the job
  • Stop hustling around trying to be the fastest at the job
  • Stop trying to compete with all the drivers around you – it’s going to stress you out more
  • You just can’t force it – Uber is going to be there and you’re going to get rides, you have to be patient to get those longer, more profitable rides

Actionable Tips for Uber Drivers

  • Start by relaxing and by knowing your city – what areas draw the most rides? What time of the day is most popular?
  • Don’t stress and try to force rides – it won’t work and passengers know when you’re agitated
  • Get used to driving, get accustomed to the days and get better at driving
  • Focus on the customer service
  • Take a look at your metrics: where did you drive and when was it most lucrative? Go back to basics

Struggles as a New Uber Driver

  • No truly awful or scary rides – it’s about common sense and recognizing when pax want to chat and when they want to be left alone
  • Uber customer could improve

Outro

  • Do some due diligence, put in the time to make yourself successful, and stay positive
  • If being successful is important to you, you’ll make time for it
  • Before I started RSG, I was driving because the money was good and I liked driving – writing about rideshare driving has also allowed me to build up a successful business
  • Feel free to reach out to me at harry[at]therideshareguy.com or follow me on Twitter @TheRideShareGuy
  • Leave comments, questions and feedback below!

Show Notes

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

-Harry @ RSG

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The post RSG046: Why Mindset Matters Most For New Uber Drivers appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Sep 23 2016

50mins

Play

Rank #2: RSG064: Two MRP Students Share Their Best Strategies and Tips

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Maximum Ridesharing Profits is a course I created, along with another experienced rideshare driver, a few years ago, and it’s been incredibly helpful for students who’ve taken the course. Today, I wanted to bring on two MRP students to discuss the strategies they learned from MRP and what they’ve implemented. Both Chike and Adan have some really great tips on today’s episode, and there’s a lot of information in this podcast to help you get on the road and work smarter, not harder.

Interested in Maximum Ridesharing Profits? Click here to sign up.

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro

  • One thing I really like about rideshare driving is that it enables you to be an entrepreneur
  • You’ll notice one of the taglines for this podcast is “Work Smarter, Not Harder”
  • Today I’ll be talking with two Maximum Ridesharing Profit students who are going to share their best strategies and tips
  • Maximum Ridesharing Profits is a course that we created a couple years ago that’s all about helping drivers make more money from their driving
  • If you’re a driver who wants to confirm some of your own strategies, the course has helped students answer the questions, “What am I doing out there? What can I be doing better?”

Interview with Chike Ujagu

  • Started as a part-time driver initially then moved to full-time
  • Prefers part-time driving to full time because it’s easier physically, but makes double as a full-time driver
  • Drives in San Francisco, primarily with Lyft

Suggested Driving Strategies

  • Really important to learn your city and traffic trends, especially if you’re a FT time
  • If you’re a PT driver, you can do airport runs and big events, but driving FT means you have to be more aware and informed to drive consistently
  • Really important to minimize the time from request to pick up – the more time you waste on getting to the rider, that’s like unpaid time
  • It can actually be more profitable to drive for one company (like Lyft) over driving for both – bonuses, prime time, etc.

Experience with Maximum Ridesharing Profits

  • Signed up for the course to confirm driving strategies
  • Learned new things as well, including information on taxes and what you can write off, insurance, etc.

Interview with Adan Castillo

  • Adan is a former engineer and is now full-time entrepreneur
  • He started driving for Uber and Lyft in 2015 because he needed a flexible schedule
  • In 2017, he started WindyCityDrivers.com, a resource for Chicago drivers
  • Driving for rideshare was flexible and could pay the bills, leaving Adan with more time for his family

Suggested Driving Strategies

  • In salary positions, the more you work, the less you make because you’re paid a set amount. Not the same with rideshare driving
  • Now drives full time vs. part-time
  • Chicago is a popular destination for business travelers, and the airports are very busy, so airports are an important part of rideshare driving strategies – but you don’t want to spend a lot of time there
  • Important to talk to people in your city – particularly bartenders!
  • Really important to know your city – know about the big events, but also the smaller events

Experience with Maximum Ridesharing Profits

  • Really helpful that the course helps you think of driving as a business – you’re a business owner
  • Tax advice and strategies was helpful too
  • The advanced strategies were also really helpful, strategies for diversifying your income

Outro

  • Big thank you to Chike and Adan for coming on the podcast and chatting with me!
  • Maximum Ridesharing Profits takes the videos, podcasts, and articles you read on RSG to another level – MRP is like a personal trainer for rideshare drivers
  • This course is for people who are looking to take their driving to the next level
  • Looking to do more of these chats with drivers – would you be interested in sharing your thoughts with me? Let me know!
  • Follow me on FacebookTwitter and YouTube and you can always contact me if you have questions – I like to hear from you all!

Show Notes

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

-Harry @ RSG

Read next: How rideshare drivers are making hundreds of extra dollars per month

The post RSG064: Two MRP Students Share Their Best Strategies and Tips appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Nov 07 2017

52mins

Play

Rank #3: RSG060: What Questions are Uber and Lyft Drivers Asking?

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When I tell people I run a rideshare blog, some people are surprised. “It’s just driving!” they say. Sure, while rideshare driving isn’t rocket science, there is a lot more than “just driving” that goes into being a good rideshare driver. In this podcast, I’m going to be answering a lot of questions that new and veteran rideshare drivers have, including how to make more money, which map apps are the best, and how drivers can improve their ratings. 

Did I miss a question? Leave me a note in the comments or send me an email here!

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro

  • Today’s podcast is just you and me – no guests!
  • People always ask me how hard could it be to be a rideshare driver
  • There are a lot of questions new and even veteran drivers have
  • Going to answer the top reader questions I get from you – whether it’s via email, social media, or YouTube!
  • If you haven’t signed up with Uber or Lyft yet, you can sign up with Uber here using my code 3E3DG or with Lyft here using the code Harry757

How Can I Contact Uber or Lyft?

  • Our most popular article had over 1 million page views – but the easiest answer? Through your Uber app!
  • Can’t access the app? I have another way to contact Uber through their website here and don’t forget their phone support
  • Want to contact Lyft? Going through the app is a good first start, but you might want to check out Lyft on Twitter too

How Much Do Rideshare Drivers Make?

  • This is an easy and not-so-easy question to answer: according to our 2017 survey, drivers can make $15-20 an hour, higher with Lyft
  • It all depends on when you drive, surges, tips, and more
  • Where you drive matters to – San Francisco drivers make more on average, but that doesn’t mean you can’t maximize your earnings with smart driving strategies
  • Take into account the cost of maintenance for your car – a Prius should be cheaper for gas than a big SUV, for example

How Can I Make More?

  • Another popular question – how can drivers make more and compete with driver saturation?
  • Need to consider when other drivers won’t be out – this means that supply will be low, which could trigger surge
  • You should know by now not to chase the surge, but predict the surge
  • I also recommend drivers sign up for delivery companies – staying busy is key to maximizing your earnings. If you’re not driving but you’re “on”, you’re losing money

Why Do I Need Rideshare Insurance?

  • Just to give you a quick primer:
    • Period One is when you’re online and waiting for requests
    • Period Two is once you’ve accepted a request and you’re en route to pick up the passenger
    • Period Three is when you’ve acquired that passenger, and you’re now driving to their destination
  • Uber provides $1 million of liability coverage, and they also provide collision coverage but with a $1,000 deductible
  • If you get into a collision and it’s your fault, you’ll have to pay the $1,000 deductible
  • During period 1, you won’t receive any collision coverage and liability limits are lower than normal
  • Uber and Lyft are pretty much identical, except Lyft’s collision deductible is $2,500
  • It’s really not that expensive to get rideshare coverage: lots of drivers report increases of $5, $10 a month
  • It’s a hassle to find a new insurance company that covers rideshare, but we’ve done the hard work for you! Check out the Insurance Marketplace here

What’s the Best Vehicle for Rideshare Drivers?

  • There’s no one right answer for this question 🙂
  • Need to think of gas, mileage and maintenance, but also comfort and style
  • The Toyota Prius is one of the most popular rideshare driver vehicles, but it’s not your only option
  • Think about your personal situation: is this going to be a car you drive full time, drive with your kids and family? Might want a bigger car that can do double duty as a rideshare and family vehicle
  • You need to always be tracking your rideshare miles. I recommend Stride Drive or QBSE, and there’s no reason you shouldn’t be tracking your miles

What’s the Best Phone for Rideshare Drivers?

  • The best phone really comes down to personal preference – do you like Android of iPhone more? Style is up to you
  • Your phone is almost as important as your car – try to get the latest model you can afford
  • One app I highly recommend is Mystro – if you drive for Uber and Lyft, Mystro takes away the hassle of logging into both apps, accepting rides, and logging back in once you’re done with the ride
  • For now, Mystro is only available for Android phones – something to keep in mind!

Will Ignoring UberPOOL or Lyft Lines Get Me Deactivated?

  • For now, a lot of drivers don’t like UberPOOL or Lyft Line
  • You can ignore POOL or Line requests without getting deactivated
  • Might want to be careful because you could be put in a “time out” if you decline too many in a row, or if you have to maintain a certain acceptance rate
  • This is why I like Mystro – you can filter out POOL and Line requests

What Happens if I Can’t Find My Passenger?

  • It happens – it’s busy, dark, an event is getting out, etc.
  • Don’t keep driving around! Pull over somewhere safe and see if you can find your passenger. Good time to call them.
  • It pays to be proactive – if you know a certain area is busy, call your rider and explain the situation, then tell them to meet you at “the intersection of X St. and Y St.”

Can I Advertise for Local Companies/My Business While Driving?

  • More companies are getting involved with this – we reviewed Cargo, which helps drivers make money and keeps passengers happy
  • Had a driver on our podcast who talked to his passengers about the family bakery – easy way to slip your business into the conversation and hand the passenger a business card
  • For the most part, it’s probably a lot of work to establish connections with and get paid by local businesses, but it could be a good way to increase your side income

What Do I Do If a Passenger Asks Me to Do Something I Don’t Want to?

  • For some legal things, like taking a service animal, you have to do it. It’s against the law (and Terms of Service) to refuse a ride to a passenger with a service animal
  • For other things, like going through a drive through or helping with luggage, put yourself in their shoes and try to diffuse the situation
  • Be smart about it: maybe make a joke, or explain the situation (“have to pick up the kids, can’t stop at a drive through – day care charges by the minute after hours!”)

Do I Have to Provide a Ride to a Minor or Infant?

  • Taking an infant without a car seat is a huge liability issue, and for that reason, I wouldn’t take them
  • UberTEEN has rolled out in some states, but in many states you aren’t allowed to give rides to minors (under 18)
  • Now obviously, sometimes it happens. This is why I always recommend having a dash cam in your car
  • It’s “just in case” and commonsense to have a dash cam

Which Map App is the Best for Drivers?

  • I hope you’re not using Uber Navigation!
  • Google Maps or Waze is your best bet – here’s a showdown we did between the two
  • Personally, I prefer Google Maps

How Can I Improve My Driver Ratings?

  • 4.6 is the cut off – you don’t want to be near a 4.6 because that means you can be deactivated from Uber or Lyft
  • Navigation is one of the most important things for passengers – this means you really need to know your city
  • Use Google Maps or Waze but don’t rely on it – get to know where the big events are, the popular bars and restaurants
  • Not all passengers are chatty – if they don’t immediately say anything, I check in and say “how’s your day going” or ask if the air conditioning is okay with them. If they’re not in a talking mood, that’s fine!

Outro

  • Little bit different for this podcast today, but I wanted to get the most common questions out there for you to hear them
  • Did I miss something? Reach out to me and let me know if there’s a question you want me to answer!
  • Driver referrals help me keep the lights on and great content coming, so if you haven’t signed up to drive yet,  you can sign up with Uber here using my code 3E3DG or with Lyft here using the code Harry757
  • Follow me on FacebookTwitter and YouTube and you can always contact me if you have questions – I like to hear from you all!

Show Notes

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

The post RSG060: What Questions are Uber and Lyft Drivers Asking? appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Aug 23 2017

28mins

Play

Rank #4: RSG054: Dash Bridges on Delivering Food For DoorDash

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Delivery seems to be one of the fastest growing sectors in the on demand economy these days.  And whether you’re driving around packages, groceries or meals, there are some unique challenges and opportunities that differentiate it from being a rideshare driver.  Today, we’ve got resident RSG delivery expert Dash Bridges on the podcast to talk all about his experience with DoorDash and a recent foray into the world of Postmates.

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro

  • Welcome to episode 53! Today we’re talking with Dash Bridges, one of our writers here at RSG
  • Dash has written about earnings potential of both DoorDash and Postmates, some of our most popular articles
  • Did you know Triplog offers IRS compliant mileage logs? I didn’t either, but it’s really helpful – especially now! If you use the code ‘RSG‘ when you sign up, you’ll save an additional 20%
  • Stay tuned until the end – Dash was able to take his earnings and make a pretty big purchase!
  • Don’t want to wait? Sign up to drive for DoorDash here!

An Interview With Dash Bridges

  • Dash has a full-time job in Silicon Valley working in operations
  • Over the past few years, he’s done almost 2,000 deliveries and is always looking to maximize his income
  • Had some free time to make extra money, started driving for DoorDash
  • DoorDash is low stress – deliver food and you’re done, you never have to bring work home with you
  • Started tracking data to see which times were most profitable

How Much Money Can You Make as a Delivery Driver?

  • Dash has been tracking his deliveries for more than a year, recent average is $20 per hour
  • Delivery can depend on where you are, though – wealthier, bigger cities where DoorDash is common are going to be more lucrative than smaller cities or in places where DoorDash is brand new
  • It makes sense to diversify with Postmates, Amazon Flex and UberEATS
  • Turnover is more important than size of order – 3 KFC orders in one hour is better than 1 order from a fancy restaurant – fees and, yes, even tips, add up
  • You may have to pass on some of those longer orders that take you out of your way and would be unprofitable

Tips for Delivery Drivers

  • DoorDash isn’t a full-time job – you can probably drive for a couple hours and make good money, but people don’t need food delivery 24/7 like they need rides
  • Lunch, dinner and weekends generally most profitable for delivery
  • Figure out your region – best areas to park, get in and get out quickly
  • Find out which restaurants are the best – for Dashers. Some restaurants get their food out quickly, which helps you make more money by turning over orders quickly. Avoid restaurants that take a lot of time or ignore Dashers
  • Dashers should definitely use a phone mount of some sort – helpful when reading the map and keeping your eyes on the road

Challenges for Delivery Drivers

  • Miles! You will put a lot of miles on your car
  • Bigger vehicles are tougher to park than smaller vehicles, especially for delivery drivers that need the ability to quickly hop in and out
  • It’s sometimes tough to keep your car smelling fresh and looking clean – but the salad you’re delivering doesn’t care if your car isn’t brand new

DoorDash Vs. Postmates

  • Signed up for Postmates recently, very similar to DoorDash
  • Postmates seems to have fewer delivery opportunities than DoorDash
  • Postmates is more cumbersome for delivery drivers than DoorDash – have to take a picture of your receipt, for example
  • Postmates does have positives, though, and it will be around for a while – but Dash will stick to DoorDash

Outro

  • Dashing, as it’s called, enabled Dash Bridges to purchase a condo in Silicon Valley – not bad, especially for driving part-time!
  • Dash and I have the same type of background – we like analyzing numbers and seeing what’s the best way to maximize our earnings
  • But you don’t have to be an expert or even enjoy tracking numbers – let us at RSG do that work for you! That’s why we try to provide spreadsheets and videos walking you through how to calculate your earnings
  • Don’t forget to track your miles with Triplog! Use the code ‘RSG‘ when you sign up to save an additional 20% – you get a free 30 day trial to try it out, and then it’s just $30/year
  • Feel free to reach out to me at harry[at]therideshareguy.com or follow me on Twitter @TheRideShareGuy
  • Have a question for Dash we didn’t cover? Leave your comments or questions below!

Show Notes

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

-Harry @ RSG

The post RSG054: Dash Bridges on Delivering Food For DoorDash appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Mar 28 2017

45mins

Play

Rank #5: RSG024: Taking Your Rideshare Game To The Next Level With Bradley Zane

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Today’s podcast is one I’ve been wanting to record for a while now.  It seems like almost every day I get e-mails from drivers who are looking for ways to really step up their rideshare game.

Now obviously the simplest solution to earning more money is to work harder but as I’ve talked about before, working hard helps, but working smarter helps even more.

RSG024- Taking Your Rideshare Game To The Next Level With Bradley Zane

I met Brad for lunch in Newport Beach a few weeks ago and right off the bat, I could tell that this was a guy who had a lot of it figured out.  Not only had he spent tons of time researching and perfecting his craft, but he also showed an eagerness to learn and continue his education.  In traditional employment, it’s easy to get complacent since once you learn your job, you do it day in and day out.  Being a rideshare driver does NOT fall into that category though.

If you couldn’t tell by now, this is not the type of job where you’ll be able to get into a routine and do it continuously for the next 5 years.  Things change quickly in this industry and it behooves drivers to adapt to a transformative landscape.  What worked yesterday may not work today and savvy drivers know that it’s all about recognizing opportunity and taking advantage.

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro

  • I’m moving! From Newport Beach to Long Beach
  • Today’s podcast will be a chat with Bradley Zane
  • There’s a need out there for diversifying your income. Rideshare drivers are business owners, whether it’s casual or something you’re trying to grow
  • Check out my recent article about Vugo
  • Today’s topic will help answer questions for those looking to scale up and expand their income

Interview with Bradley Zane

  • Dallas Uber and Lyft driver since 2013. Flexibility played a big factor in the decision to drive
  • Ridesharing has really revolutionized the taxi industry and made it more competitive
  • Philosophy is to become a better driver, always continue learning, and educate others
  • Part of the American Dream is to find something you enjoy, without feeling like you’re dragging yourself out of bed everyday

Rideshare Driving in Dallas

  • Dallas is very different from San Francisco, LA, NYC
  • Dallas/Fort Worth is no where near the saturation point – lots of opportunities for growth, particularly in the suburbs
  • A big problem is passengers who worry about having any drivers to take them to the airport or into work
  • Until recently, rideshare companies didn’t serve large areas of the Dallas/Fort Worth market
  • Lyft in particular has a huge growth opportunity here, would be better served with a regional office

The Importance of Working Smarter

  • Educating yourself is important and necessary. Get together with others and talk about growth and opportunities in the rideshare industry
  • It’s important to think outside the box, especially for full-time drivers. 50% pay cuts have hurt many drivers
  • Going above and beyond doesn’t just help riders, it helps drivers too. By working smarter, you can increase your income without working yourself 24/7

Rideshare Driving Success & How to Expand Your Income

  • Communication is key, and once you’ve established a good relationship with rideshare passengers, you can expand your income streams
  • Brad’s schedule is mostly Monday-Friday driver, 4 a.m. to 4 p.m. catering to business workers, interspersed with private rides
  • Private rides have been a huge success so far
  • Important to note you’re not marketing your private services to passengers in your car. That could get you deactivated
  • However, after getting the same person several times, it is possible to get people to call you directly for consistent rides. This is more likely for people who live in the suburbs and need rides to the airport, for instance
  • Opportunity to be recognized on social media too, as passengers who enjoyed the service you provided will recommend you online
  • Expand your income stream by establishing networks and getting referrals from your fellow rideshare drivers
  • Big issues are still legal and insurance concerns – Bradley’s insurance knows he’s a rideshare driver and he has a rider on his insurance. Having this peace of mind is important

Tips for Other Rideshare Drivers

  • Networking is important: actively reached out to Harry to meet up – showed initiative as a business owner
  • Important to reach out, educate yourself, communicate with others to take your business to the next level
  • We’re only numbers to ridesharing companies, but at the same time, it’s important for you to separate yourself and be the best driver possible
  • Riders are willing to pay for value, so provide the best value you can every time. You’ll be recommended by people online and by word of mouth
  • Look for other opportunities, like being a mentor, taking advantage of bonuses, etc.

Future Plans

  • A lot of changes within the last 2 years, the field is very volatile
  • Continue to increase the private rideshare business
  • Driving for Uber, UberX, Lyft is not sustainable long term
  • Would love to translate this into a full-time position as an expert in the ridesharing field
  • Contact Bradley through his email at RushTrips@gmail.com

Outro

  • Bradley gave a really thorough response about how to take your game to the next level
  • If you’re doing something that ties in well with this podcast, contact me, leave a comment, or send me a pitch for a future podcast! I’d love to hear how you’re diversifying your income through ridesharing
  • As long as you’re continually positioning yourself for the best opportunities, you’ll be successful
  • Ask yourself what the Return on Investment (ROI) is for your time, like Bradley mentioned
  • I hope this podcast has helped you recognize new opportunities!
  • Really enjoying a new-to-me podcast by Tim Ferriss, author of The Four Hour Workweek
  • Check out the full transcript here
  • Questions, comments, or feedback? Send me an email!
  • Sign up for our email list

Show Notes

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Any questions for Bradley or me about the interview?  Leave a comment below!

-Harry @ RSG

The post RSG024: Taking Your Rideshare Game To The Next Level With Bradley Zane appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Aug 24 2015

1hr 7mins

Play

Rank #6: RSG079: An Interview With a Rideshare Unicorn (4.99 Star Rating After 5,000+ Trips)

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Have you wondered how some drivers can maintain a 4.9 or even 5-star rating after thousands of trips? How do they make it look so easy? In this episode, we’re talking with one of those unicorn drivers, a driver with a 4.99 star rating, who’s given over 5,000 rides. We’ll discuss how he maintained such a high rating, and his secrets for getting five-stars every time.

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro

  • Many passengers don’t know that rideshare drivers are required to maintain a 4.6 rating in order to stay active on the platform
  • Unfortunately, almost every driver has gotten a poor rating and wondered, what did I do? What can I do to control this better in the future?
  • In this episode, I’m chatting with a pro driver who’s given 5,000 trips and maintained a 4.99 rating. We’ll learn what his tips are for other drivers, how he does it all, and how you can get to know your city better and improve your driving habits
  • This podcast episode is sponsored by Take 5, and their goal is to get your oil change done in just a few minutes. In fact, Take 5 will actually allow you to stay in your car while they change your oil! Also, they really only focus on basic services like oil changes, transmission fluid, air filters, etc. so you won’t be upsold anything like “blinker fluid” (which doesn’t exist in real life).
  • Take 5 is not yet in California but they are available in the Southeast, and right now Take 5 is offering 25% off oil changes. Find more about it here!

Interview with Leon, a 4.99 Rated Driver

  • Leon started driving for Uber and only Uber in 2016 and primarily drives in the Louisville, KY market
  • He first heard about Uber from a friend, and since customer service has always been a priority of his, he thought he would try it
  • Louisville is a big market, famous for the Kentucky Derby, plus it’s the bourbon capital of the world. Louisville is becoming a big tourist city
  • Has been driving full-time from the beginning

Driving UberX vs. SELECT

  • Providing excellent service from the beginning is Leon’s mission
  • He started out on X, then traded that car for a SELECT vehicle (Cadillac SRX – used, and pre-leased). Did a lot of research on it before choosing it, and he bought it for passenger comfort
  • He actually made more on UberX, but driving for SELECT has taught him to be more selective about what times and where he drives in the city
  • He gives fewer SELECT rides, but that also means less wear-and-tear on his vehicle. He still does UberX rides (surge pricing – but he doesn’t chase surge!)

How to Become a Pro Driver

  • Get to know your city! Not only the streets, but also the landmarks and history
  • In your downtime, learn about events going on, construction taking place, etc.
  • Treats picking up pax like going on an important interview – car looks and smells good, Leon treats the passenger respectfully
  • Leon uses text-to-speech to contact his pax before he arrives – this sets an expectation for the passenger that they’re getting a thoughtful and thorough driver
  • Opens the door for pax if possible and always greets them with a smile
  • Want to be a better driver? Follow the ‘Golden Rule’ for your passengers and treat them the way you’d want to be treated

Chatting with Passengers

  • One thing that can be difficult, especially for new drivers, is understanding when to talk/not talk with passengers
  • Leon lets passengers control the flow of conversation – some want quiet whereas others want to chat, and he lets them lead
  • Body language is very important – it tells you a lot about what the pax want and don’t want
  • That’s not to say every ride is perfect! Leon has had incidents, and for the most part Uber has handled those incidents very well

The Missing Connection Between Drivers & Uber

  • Leon is obviously going above and beyond to make a connection with his passengers, but Uber doesn’t seem to do the same
  • Leon has shared his success (and his unique license plate!) with Uber, to no response
  • How can drivers feel like Uber respects and appreciates them?
  • For Leon, it’s overall about the passengers and the connection he makes with them – that’s what he likes the most about driving

Outro

  • Big thanks to Leon for coming on and sharing his story about being a rideshare unicorn
  • I really enjoy interviewing drivers, especially drivers like Leon who have a lot to share and teach us about being better drivers, getting better ratings and more
  • Also, this podcast episode is sponsored by Take 5, and their goal is to get your oil change done in just a few minutes. In fact, Take 5 will actually allow you to stay in your car while they change your oil! Also, they really only focus on basic services like oil changes, transmission fluid, air filters, etc. so you won’t be upsold anything like “blinker fluid” (which doesn’t exist in real life).
  • Take 5 is not yet in California but they are available in the Southeast, and right now Take 5 is offering 25% off oil changes. Find more about it here!

Show Notes

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

The post RSG079: An Interview With a Rideshare Unicorn (4.99 Star Rating After 5,000+ Trips) appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Sep 04 2018

39mins

Play

Rank #7: RSG056: Adam Lashinsky on Uber’s Wild Ride

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In today’s episode, I’ll be chatting with an Executive Editor of Fortune, Adam Lashinsky, about his new book Wild Ride: Inside Uber’s Quest for World Domination​Adam’s book is really interesting because not only did he spend a significant amount of time with Travis and the people who know him, but Adam also spent some time as a driver, giving him a perspective journalists don’t usually have. Stick around until the end too – there’s a giveaway!

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Get your first audiobook FREE when you sign up with a 30 day trial of Audible! Sign up with Audible using our link to receive your first audiobook free here.

Intro

  • Today we’re talking with Adam Lashinsky about Uber’s wild ride
  • Adam is an executive editor of Fortune, and he’s the author of a new book titled Wild Ride: Inside Uber’s Quest for World Domination that will be released in May 2017
  • Looking for an app to help automate how you drive for Uber and Lyft? Check out Mystro, a new app that puts you in control of the passengers you accept and when. You can register for their beta program here with the code RSGB3171
  • You might also want to check out Stride Drive for mileage tracking – it’s now available on Android and iOS. You can track your mileage, expenses, and receipts from within the app – sign up with Stride here

An Interview With Adam Lashinsky

  • Adam is executive editor of Fortune, where he oversees all live events and technology-industry coverage
  • Wrote Wild Ride as a narrative first about Uber that seemingly appeared out of nowhere and went global immediately
  • Also covers Uber’s controversial and infamous (and charismatic) CEO, Travis Kalanick
  • Tells the story of Uber from the beginning up until recently
  • Get your first audiobook FREE when you sign up with a 30 day trial of Audible! Sign up with Audible using our link to receive your first audiobook free here.

The Uber Narrative and Wild Ride

  • There’s more to the Uber story than the story that’s told on Uber’s site – this is the story of Uber’s meteoric ride with Travis as well as Garrett Camp and Ryan Graves
  • Adam was able to get a lot of access to Travis as well as people who know Travis well – got to know the “good, bad and ugly”
  • Uber didn’t just appear out of nowhere: Travis learned a great deal from his initial companies, and he learned from his mistakes – although he wouldn’t put it like that
  • Uber wasn’t the first company to discover rideshare. Other companies, including Lyft, beat them to a lot of innovations – but Uber just did it all better

Driving for Uber While Writing Wild Ride

  • As a journalist, the opportunity to work for a company while writing about it doesn’t present itself often
  • Adam wanted the opportunity to really illustrate what it’s like as an Uber driver
  • Found out that Uber employees do drive for Uber – it wasn’t like this in the past
  • Drivers are still just numbers to Uber though

Takeaways as a Driver and a Journalist

  • Uber is a company full of contrasts – it’s gotten very big, very fast, but it’s still messy and chaotic
  • How things can go wrong for Uber: if they can’t rebound from their badly damaged public image
  • How things can go right for Uber: the amount of money they’ve raised so far and the loyalty of their customers, who prioritize convenience and cost over anything else

Outro

  • I’m hosting a giveaway of Adam’s book Wild Ride – all you need to do to enter is leave us a review on iTunes, take a screenshot, and email it to harry@therideshareguy.com. For every 5 entries we get, we’ll pick one winner and send you a copy of the book!
  • The book is really great because Adam does have a perspective of Uber many of us will never see – he talked to Travis and those around him plus worked as a driver to get a fuller picture than most
  • In the end, while we do complain about Uber and while there are rightfully a lot of things Uber should address for drivers, we’re all pretty happy to have Uber around
  • Feel free to reach out to me at harry[at]therideshareguy.com or follow me on Twitter @TheRideShareGuy
  • Have a question for Adam? Leave your comments or questions below!

Show Notes

What are your predictions of Uber’s future – will Travis’ combative attitude toward everyone outside of Uber change for the better as the company matures and grows? Or do you think Uber will be just as combative in the future as they are now? 

-Harry @ RSG

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

The post RSG056: Adam Lashinsky on Uber’s Wild Ride appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

May 09 2017

34mins

Play

Rank #8: RSG087: Jay Cradeur Answers YOUR Top 10 Rideshare Questions!

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Over the last five years, we here at RSG have received a ton of questions about rideshare driving! We’ve rounded up the top 10 most frequently asked rideshare questions and had our very own Jay Cradeur tackle those questions and share his thoughts in this podcast episode below. You can read the full FAQ here: The Most Popular Rideshare Questions – Answered.

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro

  • It’s safe to say RSG receives thousands of questions every year about rideshare driving, delivery and more
  • But what we’ve found is that the same 5-10 questions bubble up and are asked over and over
  • We wrote a blog post on these top questions, but today we’re going to get a more in-depth response to these questions
  • Jay Cradeur, RSG writer and a full time driver in San Francisco, tackles these top 10 questions and adds his own personal recommendations
  • Let me know what you think of this podcast format!

[3:16] How can I earn more in [my city]?  

  • The biggest determining factor? What the demand is like for Uber/Lyft in your city
  • Low demand (maybe a small population or rideshare is new), little demand. Bigger city, more demand
  • Surge, prime time will also help your bottom line
  • Your schedule – part time drivers may struggle more with earning bonuses, as may drivers that don’t work on busy days/nights

[6:46] How can I consistently earn money?

  • Put in your hours
  • Always stay busy while you’re on the road – DoorDash, Postmates, Caviar, etc.

[7:32]  Any other tips for driving?

  • Take care of your physical self
  • Avoid excessive caffeine
  • Try the cold brew coffee. 

[9:00]  Where can I find rideshare insurance?

  • We have an insurance page you can check out!
  • Biggest thing to pay attention to: period 1, when your app is on but no passenger in the car
  • This is really when you will want coverage!
  • But having full coverage from an insurance provider we recommend (we check and make sure the companies listed offer coverage to rideshare drivers, or at least won’t drop them for rideshare driving!) is the best way to protect yourself

[11:15] Which rideshare insurance policy is best?

  • Depends on a variety of factors, especially where you live!
  • Check out the insurance page and always ask multiple companies for quotes – don’t just go for the first offer

[11:31] Where can I get a vehicle to drive for Uber and/or Lyft?

[13:18] What do rideshare drivers really need carry in their car?

  1. Phone Mount
  2. Car Charger Hub and Charging Cables
  3. Dash Cam
  4. All Weather Floor Mats
  5. Towels (for cleaning and for service dogs)
  6. Seat Covers
  7. Illuminated Uber/Lyft Window Sign
  8. Car Cleaning Supplies (interior and exterior)
  9. Tip Jar (with a funny picture/message)
  10. Emesis Bags (for throw up/vomit/barf)

[16:27] How can I stay safe while driving?

  • In most states, you can’t bring a gun into your car with Uber/Lyft, so make sure you check all your local laws to see what you can and can’t bring with you
  • Overall, avoid fighting your passengers, even if they are trying to fight you. Get away from the situation (preferably drive away if they are outside of your car)
  • Your safety is the most important thing!
  • If you’ve recently gotten into an accident while driving for Uber/Lyft, we recommend speaking with Bryant Greening, an attorney at LegalRideshare – (312) 767-2222.  Head to the Uber Accident Lawyer page to learn more.

[19:26] How do I contact Uber & Lyft?

  • Best way: through the app
  • In many cities, there is phone support through the app
  • Check out the show notes for more information on phone numbers, critical safety response, and more
  • Another way? Go into an Uber or Lyft Hub! Speaking to someone in person can really help you out and get you clarification

[20:21] Bird Questions

  • The number one question we get now about Bird is when are they coming to my market!
  • Be patient, Bird is expanding and growing their Charger team
  • If you apply to be a Charger and don’t hear back, it’s probably because you either didn’t finish the onboarding process or Bird is not currently adding new Chargers to your market
  • It pays to sign up with Bird right away once they get to your market, just so you can be one of the first people they accept.

Outro

  • This is definitely one of our most comprehensive podcasts we’ve done on ridesharing (and Charging!) in a while, and I hope you got some good information and perspective from Jay and his stories
  • RSG gets 50-100 questions a day from readers, everything from simple questions like the ones above to a lot more complex questions
  • We also get a ton of Facebook messages too!
  • If it takes a little while to get back to you, don’t worry – just working through the pile of emails!
  • But one of the best parts of this job is getting to talk to and interact with you, so please – keep sending me those questions!
  • Let me know what you think of this podcast set up
  • Send me feedback via Twitter – let me know your thoughts on this podcast and the first three people to tweet me will win a copy of my new book!

Show Notes

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

The post RSG087: Jay Cradeur Answers YOUR Top 10 Rideshare Questions! appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Feb 07 2019

25mins

Play

Rank #9: RSG076: Sarah Kessler on the Failed Promises of the Gig Economy

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We’re ten years into the “gig economy”, which was initially conceived of as a way to help workers be their own bosses, work on their own schedules, and still bring in a comfortable wage. 10 years in, we can now take a good look about the benefits and downsides of the gig economy. In this episode, I speak with reporter and author Sarah Kessler about the gig economy and her new book, Gigged: The End of the Job and the Future of Work.

Get your first audiobook FREE when you sign up with a 30 day trial of Audible! Sign up with Audible using our link to receive your first audiobook free here.

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro

  • When the gig economy was first pitched, there was a lot of talk about “being your own boss”, but now that the industry has matured, we’re seeing the gig economy is not all it’s hyped up to be
  • In this episode, I’m speaking with Sarah Kessler, a report from Quartz, about her new book Gigged: The End of the Job and the Future of Work
  • Have you heard of Bird yet? Bird is a new electric scooter service operating all over the US. You can learn more about it here!
  • Becoming a Charger is easy to do – simply sign up with my link and learn more about being a Charger with my free guide
  • Already a Charger? Then join my free Facebook group for Chargers!

Interview with Sarah Kessler

  • Sarah is an editor with Quartz at Work, where she works with other writers, and she recently wrote a book about the gig economy called Gigged: The End of the Job and the Future of Work
  • Gigged is about this promise that Silicon Valley made when they started pitching these apps they called the gig economy
  • At the time, these apps and jobs were pitched as solving the problems of the economy and unemployment
  • In Gigged, Sarah follows the outcome of that promise and how it worked for 5 people she followed who were in different situations working in the gig economy
  • Get your first audiobook FREE when you sign up with a 30 day trial of Audible! Sign up with Audible using our link to receive your first audiobook free here.

Beginning & Allure of the Gig Economy

  • The gig economy isn’t a new trend, it’s just a new name. Began in the 1970s with companies outsourcing work (temp hires, contractors, etc.)
  • Sarah noticed the gig economy trend while she was a tech reporter
  • Apps were framed as “the future of work” or ways to solve an unemployment crisis
  • The allure was not having to work a 9-to-5, not have a boss, work your own schedule
  • But the reality seems to be none of that: it’s not quite as flexible, it’s more difficult to earn enough money, etc.

Will the Gig Economy Keep Growing?

  • The percentage of people actually working in the gig economy is very small – 1 out of 3 people have tried freelance work, but less than 1% are actually making the gig economy their full time job
  • However, the gig economy keeps growing and companies are beginning to see they can save money by outsourcing, turning to freelancers, etc.
  • Overall, Gigged looks at out technology is facilitating outsourcing and what it means for the workers who take on these outsourced or new gigs

Varying Impacts of the Gig Economy

  • In Gigged, Sarah profiles a variety of people in the gig economy
  • One story she profiled was a non-profit in rural Arkansas that tested the hypothesis of the gig economy providing employment, particularly for people who live in poverty. Could the gig economy bring opportunity to a rural community?
  • Overall, the gig economy doesn’t work that simply. It’s one facet of reducing poverty but it’s not a one-size fits all solution

Improving the Gig Economy

  • One benefit to the gig economy has been a discussion around portable benefits – health insurance and other benefits shouldn’t necessarily be tied to a company you work for
  • At the same time, how can companies make jobs better for their employees? Why do people see the gig economy as a solution or a “side job” – what is it about their jobs that don’t pay enough or offer the right compensation?
  • The gig economy has been a big improvement for some, particularly high skilled workers or workers who would otherwise be homebound, but who now can work from home and earn money

Outro

  • Thank you to Sarah for coming on and talking with us about the gig economy
  • Overall, there are definitely pros and cons to the gig economy, and like Sarah said, it is not going away
  • Companies want both sides: reduced payroll costs by using independent contractors but also “employees” they can control – to a degree. It’s interesting to see how this will continue to develop
  • Have you heard of Bird yet? Bird is a new electric scooter service operating all over the US. You can learn more about it here!
  • Becoming a Charger is easy to do – simply sign up with my link and learn more about being a Charger with my free guide
  • Already a Charger? Then join my free Facebook group for Chargers!

Show Notes

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

The post RSG076: Sarah Kessler on the Failed Promises of the Gig Economy appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Jul 03 2018

39mins

Play

Rank #10: RSG058: Efren Rosa on Ditching Uber to Drive Taxi

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In today’s episode, I’m talking to a former Uber and Lyft driver who make the leap from rideshare driving to taxi driving. It turns out, there can be a big difference in how much rideshare drivers are paid compared to taxi drivers. Also, we cover how being creative and thinking ahead can boost your earnings as a driver. Stick around until the end, too – there’s a giveaway you won’t want to miss!

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro

  • Today we’re talking with Efren Rosa, a guy who went from driving for Uber and Lyft to driving a taxi
  • This is a topic we haven’t covered before, and why would anyone want to go from rideshare driving to taxi driving? Keep reading/listening to find out what went into Efren’s calculation to ditch Uber – plus, earnings as a taxi driver
  • Miss our last episode about Mystro? Click here to listen to it!
  • Mystro helps automate your Uber and Lyft driving, like a virtual assistant for rideshare drivers. It’s a safer way to manage rideshare driving, keeping your eyes on the road and hands on the wheel. You can register for their beta program here with the code RSGB3171 
  • Hosting another giveaway! Open until July 20th, you can win your own Navdy (retail $499). Learn more about this heads up display and navigation tool here!
  • To win, leave a review of the podcast in iTunes and send me an email with the subject line Navdy Giveaway. If you’ve already left a review, just screenshot that and send it my way – harry[at]therideshareguy.com or click here.

An Interview With Efren Rosa

  • Ohio native, currently lives in Central Florida. Inventory analyst experience, and music career under “EEZZBEATS” in Colombia from 2013 to 2016
  • Began driving for Uber and Lyft in 2015. No tipping opportunity with Uber, so he created Tip With Miles, which helped boost his tips, but it wasn’t enough
  • Started working for a local taxi company and now makes more than driving rideshare – with less wear and tear on his car
  • Started treating rideshare driving as a business as he began driving full time
  • Analyzed the cost to drive, car maintenance, gas, etc. and realized income wasn’t enough for those expenses, even though he’s close to a tourist hotspot

Tip With Miles

  • People wanted to leave tips but, without cash and a way to do it on Uber, no way to get tips… except with miles
  • Created Tip With Miles, which allows passengers to authorize drivers to drive a few more miles to make money as a tip
  • Sign in car that said “No cash? Tip with Miles”
  • Worked out really well, and Efren used the odometer to show passengers just for added security. Received an overall 4.9 as a rideshare driver
  • Tip With Miles not really necessary now, but it shows how being creative can boost income

Transition to Taxi Driving

  • After a while, realized being a rideshare driver was not making financial sense anymore
  • Went to a taxi company, presented a clean driving record, went through training and was accepted
  • Things got better almost immediately – tips, and being paid at a higher rate for wait times (traffic, drive through lines, etc.)
  • Being a taxi driver in a big tourist area (Disney, Universal, etc.) also helps

Taxi Driving Vs. Rideshare Driving

  • Can rent a taxi to drive for a 12 hour block or a whole week – for a week, you could anticipate making $1,000 after expenses
  • Taxis also provide wheelchair service and car seats
  • Have to pay for your rental fee and gas, and you have to drive once within a month. Otherwise, you’re an independent contractor
  • Have to think of yourself as a business
  • In the future, is there money to be made driving a semi truck? Where will Uber and Lyft be, and where will drivers be? Always be thinking as a business owner

Outro

  • One big takeaway from today’s guest is you have to be prepared to hit some bumps along the way as a driver – things aren’t going to be the same forever
  • Have to think ahead and consider your future earning potential – get creative
  • Don’t forget the giveaway!
  • To win, leave a review of the podcast in iTunes and send me an email with the subject line Navdy Giveaway. If you’ve already left a review, just screenshot that and send it my way – harry[at]therideshareguy.com or click here.

Show Notes

Have you thought about making the switch to a taxi service, or did you drive for taxis in the past? Leave your questions and comments below!

-Harry @ RSG

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

The post RSG058: Efren Rosa on Ditching Uber to Drive Taxi appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Jul 06 2017

54mins

Play

Rank #11: Lyft Interview Questions – How To Survive Your Lyft Interview

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Applying, Interviewing, and Getting a Job at Lyft Corporate

Have you ever wondered what it takes to work at a rideshare company like Lyft? In this episode, I interview Bryan Chung, who interviewed to work at Lyft, about his experience and his takeaways. If you’ve ever wondered what the Lyft application process is like, how to stand out during the Lyft hiring process, or what kinds of Lyft interview questions you’ll come across, take a listen! If you’re interested in a custom Lyft interview prep course, click here for more info.

Lyft Interview Questions

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

If you’re interview at Lyft (or Uber) soon and would like some advice, check out our course: The Uber & Lyft Interview Prep Package

Lyft Application Process

  • Have you ever wondered what it takes to actually work at Uber and Lyft? And no, I’m not talking about driving, I’m talking about as an actual employee.
  • What is the Lyft application process like?
  • In this episode, I’m excited to interview Bryan Chung, who recently interviewed with Lyft.
  • He’s here to share his experience about the interview process, why he chose to interview with Lyft and a whole bunch more.
  • Not yet a driver? Sign up for Uber and Lyft – Lyft even has a new bonus structure you can read about here, and basically all new Lyft drivers earn on a per ride basis, instead of an all or nothing structure.
  • Remember it’s important to sign up with both companies to diversify your earnings and make sure you’re staying busy while on the road.

Podcast Interview with Bryan Chung

  • Bryan is a UCSD grad who, after college, tried the traditional investment banking route.
  • After a few years of that, he wanted to try something new, so he went to Gap to do strategy and operations. 
  • Interviewed recently with Lyft, wanted a consumer-facing job, a company that is fast-paced.

Finding Jobs at Lyft Corporate

  • Initially found out about jobs via LinkedIn.
  • About a week after applying, received a call from a recruiter and spent 45 minutes on the phone.
  • Retail operations strategy – basically, a strategy team that thinks of better ways to use and grow Lyft Hubs.
  • Sometimes applying for jobs online seems like throwing your resume into a black hole, but it is still a way to get jobs.

Tips for Improving Your Chances of Getting a Lyft Interview

  • Get a Lyft interview by doing your research and enrolling in this course
  • Think like a recruiter – what would they want from an employee?
  • Network with people you went to school with or worked with in the past
  • Learn about the industry you want to work in – what’s the newest information about your industry?

Preparing for The Lyft Interview Questions

  • Whether you’re applying for Lyft or another job, think ahead about the kinds of Lyft interview questions you may be asked.
  • Things like, why do you want to work here? How do your past experiences apply to this job?
  • Did research online, like at the Rideshare Guy, to find data on drivers, their pain points, etc.
  • For the Lyft job, took a lot of Lyft rides and talked to drivers.
  • Final interview was 45 minute presentation in front of a panel, then five, one-on-one interviews. Before that, an Excel test that took roughly 90 minutes.

Thinking Ahead

  • In the end, Bryan did not get the job with Lyft but he is moving forward in other areas.
  • People usually talk about the jobs they didn’t get, but few people talk about the 20 they weren’t that into or that led up to the job they currently have.
  • Bryan perhaps could have talked to more drivers, but in the end it came down to experience, which Bryan didn’t quite have at the time.
  • Bryan believes enrolling in our prep course would have increased his chances of being hired

Lyft Hiring Process

  • Thank you to Bryan for coming on and explaining the hiring process at Lyft.
  • Just wanted to show the type of preparation that goes into these jobs, the tests and presentations you have to do, but also how to handle rejection and move on to the next opportunity.
  • Also important to remember applying for jobs is about making your value known – don’t focus on pay first (although it’s important), focus on proving why you’re the best candidate to hire.
  • Not yet a driver? Sign up for Uber and Lyft – Lyft even has a new bonus structure you can read about here, and basically all new Lyft drivers earn on a per ride basis, instead of an all or nothing structure.
  • Follow me on FacebookTwitter and YouTube and you can always contact me if you have questions – I like to hear from you all!

Show Notes

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

-Harry @ RSG

Click here to sign up for the Uber & Lyft Interview Prep Package

The post Lyft Interview Questions – How To Survive Your Lyft Interview appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Jun 12 2018

41mins

Play

Rank #12: RSG067: Jay Cradeur Shares What it Takes to Hit 15,000 Rides

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Have you ever wondered what it’s like to be a full-time driver and entrepreneur? In this podcast episode, I interview RSG contributor Jay Cradeur about what it’s like full-time driving, the strategies he uses to not burn out (he’s given over 15,000 rides!), and how he’s transitioning from rideshare driving into his own business. It’s a really cool episode, and if you have any questions for Jay, please leave them below in the comments!

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro

  • Roughly half of all new Uber/Lyft drivers end up quitting after one year, so what makes some drivers stick it out and go for the long haul?
  • In this episode, I’ll be talking to one of our RSG contributors, Jay Cradeur, about how he’s given over 15,000 rides – his tips, strategies, and how he’s able to take amazing vacations all because of his rideshare work
  • At the same time, Jay knows rideshare driving isn’t forever and he’s come up with a strict schedule that gets him into a whole other path of entrepreneurship, so stick around for how Jay plans to accomplish his goals while rideshare driving – it’s inspiration for those of you who want to transition from rideshare driving to full-time entrepreneurship or another hustle
  • Have you heard of Mystro? It’s an app that allows Uber/Lyft drivers to simultaneously log on to both Uber/Lyft, accept and decline rides and more. It allows you to drive, accept trips and more all hands-free, which makes driving safer for everyone. You can find out more about Mystro here.

Interview with Jay Cradeur

  • Jay Cradeur is a full-time driver in SF and RSG contrubutor
  • Jay’s worked as a coach in internet marketing, is a world traveler, and author of the book “Radical Freedom”. Prior to becoming a rideshare driver, he lived in Chiang Mai, Thailand, for a year
  • Returned to the US, signed up to start driving and found it pretty fun

Becoming a Full-Time Driver

  • Initially started driving in Sacramento but found San Francisco would be more lucrative, decided to move up to SF and drive full-time
  • Wanted to travel and earn money and found ridesharing to be a good opportunity to earn money while driving around in a new part of the state
  • Typical day: Monday through Fridays starts early, around 5-6 a.m. and drives for 4 hours to catch morning surge. Takes a break for lunch around 10 a.m. then continues until 7 or 8 p.m. to capture the evening surge
  • Does get ruthless about choosing which rides to take: with Lyft, you can see the passenger destination before the passenger gets in the car, and Jay won’t take anyone who will take him outside of the city during surge times
  • At first, Jay took everyone, but that wasn’t profitable given the surges happening in the city – made the business decision to only accept rides that would be quick, put him on track to earning a bonus, made business-sense

Earning More as a Driver

  • Enjoys weekend driving because that’s an opportunity to make more: longer trips, airport rides, etc.
  • Saturdays could drive from 5 a.m. to 8 p.m. and be booked solid – but Jay doesn’t drive that much!
  • Avoids nights and still makes a solid income by ensuring he’s up and ready for early morning rush hour, surge, and airport rides on the weekends
  • Driving is all about freedom and flexibility, but it also takes a certain amount of discipline to get up, shower, put gas in your car and go. Just doing it everyday is the first step and from there you can profit

What’s Next for Jay?

  • Traveling is a passion: Jay has taken 10 vacations since starting rideshare driving
  • Rideshare driving can take its toll on your body, so Jay doesn’t plan on this being his full-time job forever – plans on coaching full-time in June and continue with traveling
  • Driving is a great opportunity to meet interesting people and just learn about them – be inquisitive
  • You can learn more about Jay and his travels at NomadJay.com

Outro

  • One of the reasons I wanted to have Jay on is because he is so disciplined at ridesharing. He knows exactly what he wants to get out of it, and he’s been very successful at rideshare plus his other endeavors
  • If you want to rideshare full-time or use rideshare to transition to another job or entrepreneurial pursuit, Jay’s an excellent person to follow
  • Don’t forget to check out Mystro – I highly recommend this app as another tool in your rideshare toolbox, especially since it helps keep you safe and focused on the road!
  • Do you have a story or experience you want to share on this podcast? Reach out to me – always looking for interesting perspectives!
  • Follow me on FacebookTwitter and YouTube and you can always contact me if you have questions – I like to hear from you all!

Show Notes

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Readers, do you have plans after rideshare driving? Or are you happy to continue rideshare driving indefinitely?

-Harry @ RSG

The post RSG067: Jay Cradeur Shares What it Takes to Hit 15,000 Rides appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Dec 25 2017

40mins

Play

Rank #13: RSG042: Chris Guillebeau On Using Uber To Be A Better Entrepreneur

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Today’s guest isn’t a rideshare driver but he is a New York Times best-selling author and serial entrepreneur.  On the podcast, Chris shares his tips for Uber drivers looking to make a splash with their entrepreneurial ventures and how driving for Uber or working in the on demand economy can make that happen.

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Get your first audiobook FREE when you sign up with a 30 day trial of Audible! Sign up with Audible using our link to receive your first audiobook free here.

Intro

  • Interview with Chris Guillebeau
  • How to use Uber to be a better entrepreneur – but he’s not a rideshare driver
  • This podcast is a little different from our typical podcasts – more entrepreneurial focused
  • Xero smartphone app that helps you track your business expenses right from your phone – check out their video here
  • Xero Tax Touch – will help you figure out taxes and save a bunch of money on your taxes too
  • Shout out to our 5 star reviews from: danekirk, kmaddux, jmckin02, charmingkate, montag98pg
  • Missed an episode of one of our podcasts? Click here

Interview with Chris Guillebeau

  • Lifelong entrepreneur, has community called The Art of Non-Conformity
  • Wrote The $100 Startup and The Happiness of Pursuit – NY Times Bestseller
  • Wanted independence and realized he couldn’t go back to a day job that didn’t have that flexibility
  • Get your first audiobook FREE when you sign up with a 30 day trial of Audible! Sign up with Audible using our link to receive your first audiobook free here.

Experience with Uber as a Rider and Observer

  • Uses Uber frequently, fan of it as a consumer
  • Realized the overlap between drivers and other entrepreneurs as he met them
  • Rideshare driving is very flexible, maybe even more so than being a traditional taxi driver

Flexibility and Entrepreneurship

  • Being an entrepreneur or having a side hustle is becoming more mainstream
  • For entrepreneurs, it’s important to listen to what people are talking about and asking you while driving – what’s your expertise?
  • Goal is to determine what’s worth your time and will it bring in money – doesn’t have to be rideshare driving

Advice for Current Rideshare Drivers

  • First focus on the basics
  • What makes you unique as a driver?
  • Always have a backup plan in case your first entrepreneurial endeavor fails – you don’t have to tell anyone about your backup plan, but have one
  • Success isn’t linear – Born for This book
  • We like to romanticize entrepreneurs, but usually their paths have been all over the place
  • Be willing to adapt

Outro

  • Chris gives a lot of great advice and perspective for rideshare drivers and entrepreneurs
  • Most people listening/reading this podcast aren’t going to drive forever, and some may be side hustling right now and building up their businesses
  • There’s no one way to being successful, but being a rideshare driver gives you a unique opportunity to network
  • Feel free to reach out to me at harry[at]therideshareguy.com or follow me on Twitter @TheRideShareGuy
  • Leave comments, questions and feedback below!

Show Notes

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Drivers, what do you think about Chris’ thoughts on leveraging Uber to be a better entrepreneur?

-Harry @ RSG

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The post RSG042: Chris Guillebeau On Using Uber To Be A Better Entrepreneur appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Jun 27 2016

32mins

Play

Rank #14: RSG073: Taylor Soper on What It’s Like to Deliver Packages for Amazon Flex

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Have you ever wondered how Amazon Flex works? Are you paid hourly, what’s the wear and tear on your vehicle like, and what’s up with drones? Today, I talk with Taylor Soper of GeekWire about his experience working for Amazon Flex. We’ll cover how much you can expect to make, what the pros and cons are, and more in this podcast episode!

Thank you to Isaac S. and Ron, who submitted reviews of The Rideshare Guide on Amazon and emailed me a copy of their review! They’ve won an Amazon gift card for submitting their entry via email. Want a chance to win? Email me a copy of your Amazon review!

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro

  • Have you ever wondered how Amazon is able to deliver to the exact doorstep millions of packages seemingly every day?
  • One of the ways that they’re able to do that is with a program called Amazon Flex
  • I’m speaking with Taylor Soper, a reporter for GeekWire, who recently worked for Amazon Flex over the busy holiday season
  • We’ll be talking about how much money you can make as a Flex driver and how being a Flex driver differs from driving for Uber/Lyft or even Postmates/DoorDash
  • My book is out: The Rideshare Guide! It’s a book for really anyone from new drivers to people who’ve been driving for a while, and it’s meant to be a book you can skip around and find what you’re looking for. You can find out more about it here.

Interview with Taylor Soper

  • Taylor Soper is a GeekWire staff reporter who covers a wide variety of tech assignments, including start ups, the sharing economy and more
  • Taylor isn’t an Amazon-only reporter, but Amazon is based in Seattle, WA (where Taylor is), so they are tracked closely
  • Amazon uses the city as a test bed for many of their services, including Amazon Go and Amazon meal kits
  • Became curious about Amazon Flex because it’s very Uber-esque, where regular people can use their vehicles, do some delivery, and make money

Amazon Flex Program

  • Amazon Flex is basically a package delivery program, designed to alleviate the problem of the last mile cost of delivery
  • Drivers go to the distribution center, load up their cars with packages, and then go out and deliver
  • There aren’t many requirements to be a Flex driver either – a smartphone, 4-door vehicle, a background check, watch some videos that take you through the process
  • Very similar to Uber and Lyft. After you’ve gone through this process, you choose a “block” of time to drive and hit the road
  • You also always know what you’re going to get paid, too, which is better than Uber/Lyft

Amazon’s Delivery Strategy

  • Amazon uses algorithms to determine the best routes, blocks, etc. but there is some strategy to delivering with Amazon
  • Taylor fit 41 boxes in his vehicle – Amazon does have it down to a science when it comes to boxes and delivery
  • One thing drivers have to do is sometimes educate people – they’re not expecting a regular person (not in a delivery uniform) showing up at their house

Pros/Cons of Amazon Flex

  • Good for part-time driving – not enough to make it on full-time
  • Less wear and tear on your vehicle than driving for Uber/Lyft – fewer miles driven
  • Good exercise
  • Make sure you watch the instructional videos Amazon provides – it’s not rocket science, but you want to be informed before you go out

Amazon + Drone Delivery

  • Drone delivery definitely coming
  • Will need to get everything approved, regulated
  • Identified Technologies – one company doing something similar
  • Not every single package will be delivered by drones, but wouldn’t be surprised if in a few years, drones were more prevalent

Outro

  • Thank you again to Taylor for coming on and sharing his story about driving for Amazon Flex
  • One thing I really like about Flex is it’s a fixed hourly rate – you know what you’ll be making. Not always the case with Uber/Lyft
  • Make sure you check out his article and sign up for GeekWire’s daily newsletter
  • Just a reminder – it might take me a couple days to get back to your emails! I can’t respond within an hour, but I generally get back to your questions within two days 🙂
  • Don’t forget – The Rideshare Guide is out!
  • Super pumped about the book – you can also order it here:
  • Follow me on FacebookTwitter and YouTube and you can always contact me if you have questions – I like to hear from you all!

Show Notes

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

-Harry @ RSG

The post RSG073: Taylor Soper on What It’s Like to Deliver Packages for Amazon Flex appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

May 08 2018

33mins

Play

Rank #15: RSG093: Why Lyft COO Jon McNeill is All About The Drivers!

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Lyft has always had the reputation for being a more driver-friendly service, but what have they done lately to keep that goodwill from drivers? In this episode, I speak with Lyft’s Chief Operating Officer (COO) Jon McNeill about investments the company is making to improve things for drivers and distinguish themselves from the competition. 

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro

  • Today I’m chatting with Lyft COO Jon McNeill, who as COO focuses on all things related to the driver and passenger experience
  • Lyft drivers really are the main customers for Lyft, so we spend a lot of time talking about what he’s working on for drivers – including driver pay
  • I also took reader questions before this episode, and two main topics rose to the top: driver safety and the future for drivers + autonomous vehicles
  • Don’t forget to leave a review for the RSG podcast on iTunes – you can leave a review here

Interview with Jon McNeill

  • Jon McNeill is a world class leader who brings experience to Lyft (he previously worked for Tesla) as a game changing transportation executive. Jon leads all business operations at Lyft and focuses on the driver and passenger experience
  • First met with Lyft founders while working at Tesla, found a way to combine Lyft + Tesla
  • Gave up car for a month to take Uber and Lyft’s everywhere – talked to drivers and learned there are a lot of improvements that can be made to change the business for drivers
  • Role at Lyft is to help take the founders’ vision and make it reality on the ground by working with drivers and riders

Express Drive Program

  • As an example of one way to improve the driver experience, the Lyft Express Drive program looks at all the ways to improve the driver & passenger experience
  • Charging cords – can lead to more tipping for drivers
  • Vehicle safety (accident avoidance)
  • Newer cars, so less maintenance and downtime for drivers

How Does Lyft Calculate Driver Pay?

  • The price is the price the customer is willing to pay
  • Need to look at more ways to put money in drivers’ pockets: lower costs to drive so that drivers can take home more (electric vehicle (EV) cars for example)
  • Lyft calculates real time estimates of what customers (passengers) are willing to pay – massive amounts of data go into determining these rates, down to the penny
  • Affected by weather, events, etc. and Lyft watches customer response in real time to determine if their pricing forecast was right – usually pretty accurate
  • NY rate card introduced – example of prices going up (pay going up to drivers) but rides dropped by 20% and now drivers aren’t driving as much
  • Passengers determined they were willing to do other things (walk, ride a bike) vs. pay the increased rates

Communicating with Drivers

  • Lawsuit in NY more about regulations vs. driver pay – Lyft is looking to get fairness for passengers and drivers without market distortions like regulation
  • Could do better messaging Lyft’s position to drivers
  • Driver Advisory Councils help

New Lyft Services for Drivers

  • Wanted to address the 3 big categories of spend for drivers: car, fuel, service
  • On the service side, Lyft looking at reducing the cost of service for drivers up to 50% – so drivers would get their cars back in half the time plus at half the cost
  • Cost of fuel – providing a bank account and cash back card on gas (4%) & food, will add more features over time but really wanted to attack fuel costs
  • Express Drive program – expanding the program and adding to the number of hybrid and electric vehicles in the fleet

How Lyft is Distinguishing Itself from Uber

  • Going all in on Driver Advisory Councils, keeping drivers in the feedback loop and making sure Lyft lowers costs for drivers
  • Hubs/driver support centers for drivers to get frontline support
  • Many team leads have given rides for Lyft and many people at the hubs are also drivers, so the people drivers are talking to are familiar with what they’re talking about

Questions from Readers for Jon McNeill

  • Driver safety – in 2018, Lyft brought on Lisa Monaco, the Homeland Security advisor in the Obama administration, to advise on safety
  • Working on screening and tracking on the backend to help keep drivers safe
  • Future for drivers in light of AV development? AV technology is not going to be overnight – have already been working on it for more than a decade and there are still aspects people can’t solve
  • Massive costs associated with AV too – Lyft will be in the (human) driver business for a long time

Outro

  • Big thanks to Jon for coming on the podcast and talking about Lyft, driver pay, Lyft programs to help drivers and more
  • Spent a lot of time prepping for this interview and making sure I covered topics drivers are interested in – thanks for your questions as well!
  • Lyft cash back card on gas looks very promising – probably will be signing up for that one myself
  • Let me know what you thought of this interview in the comments below, on Twitter, via email

Show Notes

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

-Harry @ RSG

The post RSG093: Why Lyft COO Jon McNeill is All About The Drivers! appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Apr 16 2019

42mins

Play

Rank #16: RSG102: Fair CEO Scott Painter on Rideshare, Cars and Uber

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One of the best parts about rideshare driving is the low barrier to entry, meaning people of any age, gender, race can sign up and drive for companies like Uber and Lyft. However, one pretty expensive barrier to entry can be the vehicle you drive for rideshare. Today, I’m talking to the CEO of Fair, Uber’s official vehicle partner to talk about what it’s like to supply cars to thousands of drivers.

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro


  • Today I’m chatting with Scott Painter, CEO of Fair, about the automotive side of the rideshare business
  • Scott’s the perfect person to talk about this with, since he’s at the intersection of rideshare and the automotive industry
  • Scott has founded three different automotive tech companies and will talk about where he sees the rideshare side of the business going in the future
  • This episode is sponsored by Zum, a rideshare service for kids. Work on your own schedule and make up to $32/hr. Learn more about Zum and sign up here.

Interview with Scott Painter

  • Founder and CEO of Fair
  • Serial entrepreneur
  • Seeks to solve problems, like car ownership, with technology
  • When working on Fair, engineers and other employees were constantly trying to make the process ‘fair’, name stuck and became Fair
  • Naming the company Fair set the tone for everything they did and continue to do

Fair

  • Big idea is that people don’t have to borrow money to get access to mobility
  • People are going into debt to buy cars, not great for depreciating assets
  • People with low credit, no credit, etc. were getting penalized for it – with Fair, we’re letting you borrow a car (with stipulations) – anyone can get access to mobility

What About Autonomous Cars?

  • Preposterous to say autonomy is going to change anything in the near term for Uber/Lyft
  • Autonomy will come in waves – cars will get safer
  • It’s great from a safety point of view, but Uber and Lyft will need human drivers for a very long time
  • At the same time, people’s lives are changing – Fair doesn’t lock them into years-long terms, like car ownership once did

What Makes Fair Different

  • Key is to not buy brand new cars and offer them to drivers – cars depreciate immediately when you drive them off the lot
  • Get the right drivers behind the wheels of the right cars
  • Manufacturers are taking in more lease returns than ever before – creates an oversupply situation and used car prices drop
  • Drivers don’t have to worry about maintenance, but Fair does – Fair makes sure to get reliable cars with low mileage because they don’t want additional expenses either

Working with Rideshare Drivers & Uber

  • Right now, more rideshare than the consumer side
  • Trying to eliminate friction for drivers with the first week free program
  • Rideshare drivers are committed to providing great service and solving problems
  • It can be difficult making sure enough cars are available – demand from Uber drivers is huge

Outro

  • Big thanks to Scott for coming on the podcast and sharing his knowledge on the automotive tech sector
  • Big fan of Fair, and I hope you are after listening to this podcast – offers flexible rentals and leases
  • Wanted to show you what it’s like for a company like Fair – drivers can have one perspective of it, but they don’t see everything that goes on behind the scenes, particularly the supply and demand of cars
  • This episode is sponsored by Zum, a rideshare service for kids. Work on your own schedule and make up to $32/hr. Learn more about Zum and sign up here.

Show Notes

If you’d like to sign up with Fair, please use our affiliate links below

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

The post RSG102: Fair CEO Scott Painter on Rideshare, Cars and Uber appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Jul 25 2019

50mins

Play

Rank #17: RSG069: Will Uber Ever Be Profitable? An Interview with Len Sherman

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If you follow our weekly round ups, you’ve probably noticed a few articles about Uber’s profitability – or lack thereof. Today, I interview Professor Len Sherman of the Columbia Business School about an article he wrote titled “Why Can’t Uber Make Money?” We discuss Uber’s profitability, its business model, and its long term prospects in this episode.

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro

  • Uber has been growing at an exponential pace over the past few years
  • While they’re growing, they’re also losing more money than ever
  • Can Uber turn it around?
  • Today, I’m chatting with Len Sherman about Uber’s profitability
  • You can always hedge your bets with rideshare driving by driving delivery! Sign up today with DoorDash and Postmates

Interview with Len Sherman

  • Len Sherman is an executive in residence and adjunct professor at Columbia Business School, a Forbes contributor and author
  • Len wrote an insightful piece on Uber’s profitability (or lack thereof) titled “Why Can’t Uber Make Money?
  • Got started with Uber and Lyft as a customer first
  • Uber’s size and losses first attracted Len’s attention

Why is Uber Losing Money?

  • Needed to look into Uber’s business plan first
  • What do they do that allows them to sustainably take in more revenues than they have costs?
  • Uber’s business plan seems great at first: they’re getting investors, there are some driver costs, but customer acquisition costs seem low – great, right?
  • Not exactly – why are they still losing billions?
  • Len’s article explains the issue more in depth, but one issue is that the taxi industry itself is not a high-profit market

Is Profitability in Uber’s Future?

  • Back when the taxi industry was unregulated, it wasn’t profitable
  • Regulation helped to restrict supply and led to higher profits for regulated taxi drivers
  • If they stay on their current course, Uber may remain unprofitable – or worse

How Could Uber Turn it Around?

  • Need to re-trench – may need to shrink in order to grow
  • Uber and Lyft may need to work it out more together – no race to the bottom
  • Look at the airline industry: sure, we’re crammed into more seats with less room, but airlines are surviving and profiting
  • Uber needs to focus on its drivers, too – it’s a service-industry and having disgruntled drivers does not help their service focus

Final Thoughts on Uber

  • Uber is going to have to get profitable before they go public
  • Right now, the financials don’t make sense to go public and succeed
  • To learn more about Len Sherman and read his books/articles, please visit his website here

Outro

  • Big thank you to Len Sherman for coming on and sharing his thoughts on Uber’s profitability with us
  • His article was one of the most astute analyses I’ve seen of Uber’s profitability from someone with the credibility of a Columbia Business School professor
  • Len gives us a lot to think about regarding Uber’s profitability and even viability in the future, but these tough questions need to be asked so they can be addressed
  • If you want to give delivery a shot, check out DoorDash and Postmates
  • Follow me on FacebookTwitter and YouTube and you can always contact me if you have questions – I like to hear from you all!

Show Notes

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

-Harry @ RSG

The post RSG069: Will Uber Ever Be Profitable? An Interview with Len Sherman appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Feb 06 2018

44mins

Play

Rank #18: RSG020: What It’s Like to Be a Brand New Rideshare Driver

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Even though I’ve only been driving for Uber and Lyft for about a year, I’m actually considered one of the experienced guys.  There’s a lot of turnover in this industry and more importantly, there are lots of new drivers joining every day.  In fact, according to Uber, they are still signing up 30-40,000 drivers each and every single month.  That’s a whole lot of drivers and on today’s podcast, I wanted to interview one of those brand new drivers.

I think a lot of us may have forgotten about what it’s like when we’re first getting started and I think Ned provided some great insight into the initial challenges he faced as a new driver and what tools/methods he used to solve them.  In the interview, we talk about Ned’s motivation for becoming a driver, how his expectations lined up with reality and all the pros/cons of being a new driver.

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro

  • Finished up Business of Rideshare course – you can get it completely free at Maximum Rideshare Profits
  • This course will teach you how to set up an LLC, business credit cards, and more
  • Shout out to iTunes reviewers for leaving awesome 5 star reviews
  • Interview with a brand new rideshare driver, Ned Malone

About Ned

  • Drives in Washington DC
  • Drives for Lyft right now, driving for Uber eventually
  • Gap in income and decided to pick up rideshare driving
  • Liked being a passenger and wanted to check out driver’s perspective
  • Driving for 2 1/2 weeks, 63 rides given total

New Driver’s Perspective

  • Enjoyed being a Lyft passenger & Lyft had better signup promotions
  • Driving gets easier over time
  • Need to be patient to get a real understanding and feel comfortable with driving
  • Naive about how much money could be made
  • A lot more goes into driving than you originally thought – more than going from Point A to B

Helpful Tools for the New Driver

  • Sherpashare helps you dig deeper into the numbers – how much do you actually make driving?
  • Helps to track data, analyze it, and become more strategic when driving
  • Rideshare Guy Blog
  • Gas Buddy app
  • Gas rewards credit cards
  • Maps navigation tools
  • Driving encourages you to manage your time better

Benefits of Driving

  • Meeting new people
  • Pay has been good, as long as you’re working smarter and not harder
  • Favorite thing: autonomy! You’re your own boss
  • Driving has lots of carryover among industries
  • Can work for other companies like Instacart and Postmates

Cons of Driving

  • Will not make as much money as advertised
  • Need to be patient and strategic
  • Sitting for long stretches of time
  • Driving can be addictive, especially when you have downtime at home
  • Need to remember to maintain relationships
  • Don’t get into the trap of driving just to drive

Outro

  • Hope this episode helped some new drivers understand rideshare driving a little better!
  • Maximum Ridesharing Profits ridesharing course helps new and veteran drivers
  • Be aware of return on investment – don’t drive just because you have time. Work smarter, not harder
  • Any topics you want to hear covered? Contact me!

Sign Up To Drive

Show Notes

What did you think about our interview with Ned Malone? What do you think new drivers should know before they start driving?

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

-Harry @ RSG

The post RSG020: What It’s Like to Be a Brand New Rideshare Driver appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Jun 01 2015

44mins

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Rank #19: RSG010: What Can We Learn From The Black Car Guy?

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Today’s guest is someone you guys may already be familiar with and since so many of you enjoyed his posts I wanted to bring the Black Car Guy on to the podcast and talk some rideshare.  BCG as I like to call him started off as a taxi driver and has now become one the top paid and rated UberBlack/SUV drivers.  I know most of you aren’t Black/SUV and don’t have any intention of switching but I think there is still a lot that we can learn from the BCG.

Today’s podcast will cover a lot of interesting topics and if you’d like some more background on BCG before listening to this podcast, you can check out his first guest post here: From Low Paid Cab Driver To $10,000 A Month Uber Driver

Intro

BCG’s Story

  • Professional driver to salesman to taxi driver to Sidecar driver to UberX driver
  • Now an UberBlack/SUV driver
  • BCG’s mentor and how he found him
  • How BCG and I met

What To Do When Adversity Hits

  • Rate cuts really cut into BCG’s earnings as an UberX and Lyft driver
  • What it’s like to be a black car driver
  • Why business travelers are good for business
  • Not going to wait around for Uber and Lyft to make things better

Analyzing The Situation

  • Looking at industry wide trends
  • Sales background is a big help for entrepreneurs

Taking Your Game To The Next Level

  • Get up early and do some airport rides!
  • You can make a lot more doing longer rides
  • Drivers need to be able to adapt to their situation
  • Don’t get too comfortable
  • The industry is seeing radical and rapid change and you have to adapt as a driver

What Works and What Doesn’t Work?

  • Learning the flows of people
  • Working smarter, not harder
  • You have to be willing to do what other people aren’t willing to do

Working For Multiple TNC’s

Advice From BCG

  • How to boost your ratings
  • Be safe out there

Our Next Podcast Will Be Released Dec. 16

I’m definitely psyched to announce that our next podcast will be a dual release.  I’ll be a guest on John Lee Dumas’ Entrepreneur on Fire podcast and he will also be coming on my show to talk some rideshare.  So make sure you tune in on Dec. 16 or subscribe to our e-mail list and you’ll be notified when that podcast goes live!

Show Notes

  • Leave a review on iTunes and I’ll try and give you a shout-out on air!
  • Get an oil change from YourMechanic for $20 when you use the code ‘RSG15’
  • Serial podcast hosted by Sarah Koenig of This American Life fame
  • Startup podcast by Alex Bloomberg from Planet Money
  • A list of all of BCG’s articles (and podcast appearances too)
  • “There is a poetic randomness to how everything works” -BCG
  • “If you’re willing to be creative and try things, you’d be surprised what you can learn” -BCG
  • “A lot of what client service is, is what doesn’t happen.  A great ride is a non-eventful ride.” -BCG

What do you guys think of our interview with BCG?  How can BCG’s story inspire you or help you to become a better driver?

-The Rideshare Guy

The post RSG010: What Can We Learn From The Black Car Guy? appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

Dec 01 2014

47mins

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Rank #20: RSG096: Surge Only Rideshare Driving in Los Angeles

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In this episode, we’re going to take a deep dive into the world of rideshare driving with a driver in Los Angeles. If you’ve ever wanted to learn what a day in the life looks like for a high-earning ($30-35/hr) driver (and get his tips!), this is the episode for you.

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

Intro

  • Today I’m chatting with Sergio, a rideshare driver with 5 years experience in LA and frequent commenter here
  • You may notice in the comments that Sergio never fails to ask the tough questions, and I appreciate that
  • For a long time, Sergio was hesitant to share his strategies for driving, but I was finally able to get him on the show!
  • Sergio is also a driver coach, so if you have questions or want tips on being a better driver, check out our Rideshare Coaching page
  • Our newest sponsor is Zum! Zum is a rideshare service for kids – drivers can earn up to $32/hr and many make $750 a week. Check out Zum here!

Interview with Sergio Avedian

  • Has been driving for 3 years with Uber and Lyft, around 5,000 trips
  • Drives in Los Angeles – with price cuts, drives less now
  • Finance degree and worked for a Wall Street firm for 18 years
  • Teaches golf

Sergio’s Driving Philosophy

  • Not a 9-to-5 job – understand that
  • Drive when there is demand – set your own parameters
  • If you drive full-time, try to split your shifts and take advantage of surge

Airport Driving Strategy


  • Try to avoid the queue!
  • Keep an eye on scheduled rides to the airport – check your app and pick up scheduled rides
  • Tries to keep himself in the core of the city after rides to the airport
  • Get to know business travelers

A Day in the Life of an LA Driver

  • Lives outside of the city, uses the destination filter to get into the city
  • Makes sure to treat driving as a small business
  • Doesn’t chase any bonuses – tries to work only during surge
  • Would rather take one passenger for a higher rate than taking many pax in 1 hour

Additional Driving Strategies

  • Uses two phones to see where it’s surging
  • Waits for surge to build – takes a break, gets a coffee
  • Uses destination filters to get downtown, even when working night shifts (burn all of your destination filters)

Thoughts on Uber and Lyft

  • Push to become profitable
  • The only way they can be profitable? At the drivers’ expense
  • Cut rates for drivers – writing is on the wall
  • Recommends drivers not accept everything Uber/Lyft throws at them – be thoughtful about how you drive and maximize your earnings

Outro

  • Big thanks to Sergio for coming on the podcast, I definitely learned a lot about his strategies – remember: patience is key!
  • Even with the rate cuts, Sergio is still earning $30-35/hr – goes to show you if you employ the right strategies, you can keep your earnings up
  • Don’t forget to check out our page on Rideshare Coaching if you’re interested in being coached by Sergio or Jay
  • Also, check out Zum – Zum is a rideshare service for kids – drivers can earn up to $32/hr and many make $750 a week. Check out Zum here!

Show Notes

If you’d like to read a transcript of this podcast, please click here.

The post RSG096: Surge Only Rideshare Driving in Los Angeles appeared first on The Rideshare Guy Blog and Podcast.

May 21 2019

50mins

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