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Rank #17 in Natural Sciences category

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Natural Sciences
Social Sciences

Climate One

Updated 8 days ago

Rank #17 in Natural Sciences category

Science
Natural Sciences
Social Sciences
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Greg Dalton is changing the conversation on energy, economy and the environment by offering candid discussion from climate scientists, policymakers, activists, and concerned citizens. By gathering inspiring, credible, and compelling information, he provides an essential resource to change-makers looking to make a difference.

Read more

Greg Dalton is changing the conversation on energy, economy and the environment by offering candid discussion from climate scientists, policymakers, activists, and concerned citizens. By gathering inspiring, credible, and compelling information, he provides an essential resource to change-makers looking to make a difference.

iTunes Ratings

147 Ratings
Average Ratings
125
9
4
3
6

Existential Dread Aloe

By License2gill - Sep 26 2019
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These our important conversations that need to be had if we’re going to save our planet.

Glitch - The podcasts aren’t playing for some reason

By xainabkahn - Aug 27 2018
Read more
Great people and content :)

iTunes Ratings

147 Ratings
Average Ratings
125
9
4
3
6

Existential Dread Aloe

By License2gill - Sep 26 2019
Read more
These our important conversations that need to be had if we’re going to save our planet.

Glitch - The podcasts aren’t playing for some reason

By xainabkahn - Aug 27 2018
Read more
Great people and content :)
Cover image of Climate One

Climate One

Updated 8 days ago

Read more

Greg Dalton is changing the conversation on energy, economy and the environment by offering candid discussion from climate scientists, policymakers, activists, and concerned citizens. By gathering inspiring, credible, and compelling information, he provides an essential resource to change-makers looking to make a difference.

John Browne: Engineering the Future

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Can oil companies reinvent themselves as clean energy providers? John Browne attempted it over more than a decade as CEO of British Petroleum, where he led the company's “Beyond Petroleum” rebranding campaign. In his new book, Make, Think, Imagine: Engineering the Future of Civilization, Browne argues that the solution to reducing emissions and addressing climate change is a mass deployment of engineered technology — and that the tools we need to get there already exist. Join us for a conversation on the potential of energy incumbents to become innovators.

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guest:
Lord John Browne, Former CEO, British Petroleum; Author, Make, Think, Imagine: Engineering the Future of Civilization

This program was recorded at the Commonwealth Club of California on October 30, 2019.

Nov 15 2019

51mins

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California’s Story: How Did It Get Here?

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California has long led the country in environmental action. It established strong automobile emission standards; it preserved fragile lands from development; it set energy efficiency standards for buildings and appliances. But as climate change fuels megafires across the state and the state’s largest electric utility shuts off power to more than a million residents, can the state’s legacy of environmental leadership save it from climate disaster? In a state already accustomed to swinging wildly between drought and flood, what will become of the California dream?

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guests:
David Vogel, Professor Emeritus of Business and Politics, UC Berkeley; Author, California Greenin’ How the Golden State Became an Environmental Leader
Huey Johnson, Founder, The Trust for Public Land; former California Secretary of Natural Resources.
Jason Mark, Editor, Sierra Magazine; Author, Satellites in the High Country: Searching for the Wild in the Age of Man
Mark Arax, Author, The Dreamt Land: Chasing Water and Dust Across California
Diana Marcum, Reporter, Los Angeles Times
Faith Kearns, Scientist, California Institute for Water Resource

This program was recorded at the Commonwealth Club of California on July 24, 2018 and July 17, 2019.

Nov 08 2019

51mins

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Libation Migration: Beer, Wine and Climate Change

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America’s most popular alcoholic beverages are about to take a hit from climate. Mild, sunny growing conditions have made California king of a $62 billion wine industry, and more than 7,000 breweries in the U.S. rely on barley, a key ingredient in beer that is partial to the cool temperatures of northwestern states and Canada. But both grapes and barley are sensitive to a changing climate. And years of disruptions from drought, fires, and rising temperatures have brewers and winemakers wondering: will business as usual survive into the next generation?

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guests:
Esther Mobley, Wine Critic, The San Francisco Chronicle
Dan Petroski, Winemaker, Larkmead Vineyards
Katie Wallace, Director of Social & Environmental Impact, New Belgium Brewing

This program was recorded at the Commonwealth Club of California on October 15, 2019.

Related links:
The end of Cabernet in Napa Valley?
Decreases in global beer supply due to extreme drought and heat
Larkmead Vineyards
New Belgium Brewing
Articles by Esther Mobley

Nov 01 2019

51mins

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Cities for the Future

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Cities around the world are bracing for a growth spurt. With over half of the global population living in urban centers, and another 2.5 billion expected to join them by 2050, it’s time to rethink the traditional car-centric cityscape. How do we redesign our cities to withstand the challenges of cars, climate change and rapid population growth?

This week on Climate One, one of our favorite summer 2019 episodes on building sustainable cities that make public life healthier, more inclusive and more dynamic.

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guests:
Liz Ogbu, Founder and Principal, Studio O
Laura Crescimano, Co-Founder/Principal, SITELAB Urban Studio
Jan Gehl, Architect and Founding Partner, Gehl Architects, author, “Cities for People” (Island Press, 2010)

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at The Commonwealth Club of San Francisco on June 3, 2019 and first broadcast on July 12, 2019.

Oct 25 2019

51mins

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Law and Disorder: Climate Change in the Courts

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The jury is out on whether our legal system is equipped to deal with climate change. While some parts of the country are inundated by floods, others are resisting the growth of oil and gas infrastructure — and both are running into the law.

Do youth have a constitutional right to a clean environment? At what point should disaster preparedness become disaster law? Does water have legal rights? A discussion on how many facets of the climate challenge are pushing, and changing, the law.

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guests:
Michael Gerrard, Andrew Sabin Professor of Professional Practice, Columbia Law School
Laura Tuggle, Executive Director, Southeast Louisiana Legal Services
Tanisia Reed Coachman, Resident, Arbor Court Apartments
Nicholas Kusnetz, Reporter, InsideClimate News

Portions of this program were recorded at The Commonwealth Club of California in San Francisco.

Oct 18 2019

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Scorched Earth: Culture and Climate Under Siege

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From the Amazon to the Congo to California, our planet’s forests are being decimated. And along with them, the stability of our climate. Why? Because trees are among our most effective weapons against carbon emissions. The Amazon alone is responsible for removing five percent of the world’s 40 billion tons of CO2 emissions from the air each year.

When forests burn, carbon storage is lost -- along with biodiversity, indigenous culture, and more. Join us for a conversation about the climate factors and the global consumerism driving deforestation, as well as the seeds of change being planted by organizations, corporations, governments and individuals.

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guests:
Paul Paz y Miño
, Associate Director, Amazon Watch
Tara O’Shea, Director of Forest Programs, Planet
Corey Brinkema, President, Forest Stewardship Council U.S.

Related Links:
Amazon Watch
Forest Stewardship Council
Indigenous Environmental Network
Forest 500 – Powerbrokers of Deforestation
H&M, VF Corp. Ditch Brazilian Leather Over Amazon Rainforest Fires (Huffington Post)

This program was recorded in front of a live audience at The Commonwealth Club of California in San Francisco on September 24, 2019.

Oct 11 2019

50mins

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Jonathan Safran Foer: We Are the Weather

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Is clinging to habits and cravings destroying our future? An outspoken critic of factory farming and animal-centric diets, Jonathan Safran Foer writes that stopping climate change begins with a close look at what we eat — and don’t eat — at home for breakfast. At the office, industry leaders like Google are taking steps toward veggie-forward diets by reducing meat, rather than cutting it out entirely.

But when it comes to global food habits, are societies up for changing norms — individually and collectively — at a scale ambitious enough to meet the challenge?

Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode.

Guests:
Jonathan Safran Foer, Author, "We Are the Weather: Saving the Planet Begins at Breakfast"
Helene York, Chief Procurement Officer, Guckenheimer Enterprises; Faculty Member, Food Business School, Culinary Institute of America

This program was recorded at the Commonwealth Club of California on September 24, 2019.

Related links:
We Are the Weather – Jonathan Safran Foer
Guckenheimer’s Culinary Philosophy
Marin Carbon Project – Carbon Farms

Oct 08 2019

51mins

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Heavy Weather: Balancing Joy and Despair

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Can we still find happiness in our daily lives without ignoring the dark reality of climate chaos? Author and meditation teacher Mark Coleman recalls experiencing just that juxtaposition of joy and sadness working on an article on a ridgetop north of San Francisco during the wildfires of late 2018.

“It was just such a poignant moment of going into nature for refuge and solace and at the same time being reminded of the fires and the climate crisis,” Coleman says, noting the irony that he the article he’d been asked to write was about meditation and nature.

Love and grief are at the center of Coleman’s practice for coping with climate anxiety. “We love this planet, we love this Earth, we love all of the abundance and the beauty and the diversity and complexity,” he explains, “[and] because we love, we feel the pain we feel the grief. The grief is a natural, healthy immune system response to a problem.”

Mica Estrada, a professor in the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences at the University of California San Francisco, agrees that feeling grief is a valuable coping mechanism – even if it hasn’t always been encouraged.

“I think for a long time that [grief] was seen as a weakness and I think we’re finally hitting an age where grief is seen as a strength,” she says. “I think we have lived in a time when the dominant culture says don’t feel too much. And I do feel like we’re finally growing up and saying listen, real strength is being able to feel what we’re feeling.”

Guests:
Mark Coleman, Mindfulness and Meditation Teacher; Author, Awake in the Wild: Mindfulness in Nature as a Path of Self-Discovery
Mica Estrada, Associate Professor, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, UCSF

Related Links
Mark Coleman - From Suffering to Peace: The True Promise of Mindfulness
Good Grief Network: 10-Steps to Personal Resilience & Empowerment in a Chaotic Climate
Climate Change Education Partnership

This program was recorded at the Commonwealth Club of California on September 5, 2019.

Sep 26 2019

51mins

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My Climate Story: Terry Root

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Scientist Terry Root’s research has helped reveal how climate change puts bird and animal species at risk for extinction. For Root, the climate connection is also personal: she was married to the late Steve Schneider, a Stanford professor and pioneer in communicating the impacts of climate change, who died suddenly in 2010.

“It's been a fabulous career, but it has been very painful at times, very painful,” says Root, who was the lead author of the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change Fourth Assessment Report in 2007 when it was co-awarded the Nobel Peace Prize with Vice President Al Gore.

This piece is published in partnership with Covering Climate Now, a global collaboration of more than 250 news outlets to strengthen coverage of the climate story.

Guest:
Terry Root, Senior Fellow Emerita, Woods Institute for the Environment, Stanford University

Related Links:
10 years after he monkey-wrenched a Utah oil and gas lease auction, Tim DeChristopher is ‘feeling demoralized' by ‘the state of the world’ but sees hope in humanity (The Salt Lake Tribune)
Stephen Schneider, a leading climate expert, dead at 65 (Stanford News)

Sep 20 2019

25mins

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A Tale of Two Cities: Miami and Detroit

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Climate change is upending Miami’s real estate markets, turning one of its poorest neighborhoods into some of the most desirable real estate around. It’s a phenomenon known as “climate gentrification,” a term coined by urban studies professor Jesse Keenan.

In a 2018 paper, Keenan writes that while gentrification is most often driven by supply – that is, a surplus of devalued property that invites development and transformation – climate gentrification is the opposite.

“[It]is really about a shift in preferences and demand function,” says Keenan. “And that's a much broader phenomenon in terms of geography and physical geography or markets in some markets than any kind of localized gentrification in a classic sense.”

In other words, as people are attracted to areas of lower vulnerability, developers see an opportunity to make a killing. Valencia Gunder, a community organizer and climate educator in Miami, recognizes the irony. She says that in that city’s earliest days, Haitian, Bahamian and Caribeean immigrants were barred from living in the tony beachfront areas.

“Black people had to live in the center of the city, which is different than most America, because usually low income black communities are in lower lying areas…and so everything they did that they thought they were doing to hurt us, actually ended up helping us in the long run.”

But there’s only so much Little Haiti to go around. As longtime residents are being priced out of their community, climate change isn’t helping matters.

“Once the water comes in, Little Haiti will be beachfront property,” Gunder predicts.

“Bottom line, it’s gonna be beachfront property, it’s going to be the new shore. So it's become like the hottest toy on the shelf.”

Guests:
Valencia Gunder, Founder, Make the Homeless Smile
Jesse Keenan, Lecturer, Harvard University Graduate School of Design
Guy Williams, President and CEO, Detroiters Working for Environmental Justice

Related Links:
Make the Homeless Smile Miami
The CLEO Institute
100 Resilient Cities
Climate could exacerbate housing crisis in South Florida (Sierra Club)
Climate Gentrification: from theory to empiricism in Miami-Dade County, Florida
Magic City Innovation District
U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit
Retirees flee Florida as climate change threatens their financial future (Money)
Detroiters Working for Environmental Justice

Portions of this program were recorded at The Commonwealth Club of California in San Francisco.

Sep 19 2019

50mins

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