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Business
News & Politics

Business Daily

Updated 13 days ago

Business
News & Politics
Read more

The daily drama of money and work from the BBC.

Read more

The daily drama of money and work from the BBC.

iTunes Ratings

298 Ratings
Average Ratings
223
36
11
11
17

Great daily news

By R Liam - Oct 05 2017
Read more
Good insights, top global stories

Great podcast! Love every episode of it.

By Davo91 - Feb 06 2015
Read more
Great podcast! Love every episode of it.

iTunes Ratings

298 Ratings
Average Ratings
223
36
11
11
17

Great daily news

By R Liam - Oct 05 2017
Read more
Good insights, top global stories

Great podcast! Love every episode of it.

By Davo91 - Feb 06 2015
Read more
Great podcast! Love every episode of it.
Cover image of Business Daily

Business Daily

Updated 13 days ago

Read more

The daily drama of money and work from the BBC.

Rank #1: A Brexit game of chicken

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Is the UK's government really serious about a 'no-deal' Brexit? Ed Butler speaks to Brexit blogger Professor Chris Grey and Charles Grant, director of the Centre for European Reform, about what Prime Minister Boris Johnson's strategy really is. Maddy Thimont-Jack, senior researcher at the Institute for Government, explains why parliament may not be able to stop a no-deal Brexit even if it wanted to, and Alan Soady from the UK's Federation for Small Businesses, explains why planning for such an eventuality is so difficult.

(Photo: Boris Johnson, Credit: Getty Images)
Aug 09 2019
18 mins
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Rank #2: Is Germany Losing its Mojo?

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Germany is booming, yet some commentators suggest the nation's loss of confidence on the football pitch may mirror economic angst back home.
A shortage of skilled workers, inadequate public investment, a failure to grasp new technologies - these are just some of the criticisms that Germans level at their own economic performance. And at the heart of it is a political crisis over the influx of migrants - something many economists say is sorely needed in this ageing nation.
Anna-Katarina Noryskiewicz reports from Berlin, plus presenter Rob Young speaks to Gabriel Felbermayr, director of the Ifo Centre for International Economics in Germany.
(Picture: A German fan looks dejected following defeat in the 2018 World Cup; Credit: Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)
Jun 29 2018
17 mins
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Rank #3: How to be ambitious

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We hear about the negative effects ambition can have, and the tools you need to relieve them, with Neel Burton of Oxford University. Author Rachel Bridge defends the thesis of her book 'Ambition: Why it's good to want more and how to get it'. And what happens when you decide to re-direct your ambition? Joe Udo tells his story of becoming a stay at home dad.

Also in the programme, writers Elizabeth Schenk and Hana Wallace discuss the results of a project they launched looking at the careers of their old university sorority members. Plus, top tips on achieving your goals from Peter Gollwitzer, experimental psychologist at New York University.

This programme was first broadcast on 1 Aug 2017

PHOTO: Little boy in a superhero costume. Credit: Getty Images
Aug 08 2019
17 mins
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Rank #4: Europe's Future

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How do German citizens feel about the future of the world’s largest trading bloc? Ed Butler visits PSM Protech, a specialist engineering firm in Bavaria where he speaks to its owner Irene Wagner about what the EU means to her company plus he asks Volker Wieland, an economics professor at a Frankfurt University and one of Germany’s five key economic advisors, the so-called Wise Men, what the threats to the EU are.

(Picture: Irene Wagner in the PSM Protech factory. Credit: BBC)
Nov 26 2018
17 mins
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Rank #5: Poland Perturbed

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The populist government in Warsaw is accused of picking fights with the EU and dividing the public against each other. Ed Butler reports live from the city of Poznan, where some residents tell him that they no longer discuss politics at home because it has become such a divisive topic within their families.

In a post-Brexit world, few Poles want to follow the UK in leaving the EU, and most agree that their country has benefited enormously since joining in 2004. Ed visits the Solaris bus manufacturing plant, where director Mateusz Figaszewski explains how his company can now easily export to the rest of the Continent. But many Poles feel that Europe is not treating their country fairly, among them are Zbigniew Czerwinski, the deputy head of the ruling PIS party in the Poznan region.

(Picture: Protest against supreme court reforms in Poland; Credit: Maciej Luczniewski/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
Nov 29 2018
17 mins
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Rank #6: The listening device in your pocket

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Does the proliferation of microphones in our mobile phones and home smart speakers mean that anyone can eavesdrop on us?

Manuela Saragosa hears from the BBC's own technology correspondent Zoe Kleinman about a creepy experience she had when her phone appeared to listen in on a conversation with her mother, and how it led her to discover how easy it is to hack someone's microphone and spy on them.

That's exactly what Dutch documentary film maker Anthony van der Meer did, when he purposely let his phone get stolen so he could use it secretly to record the thief. Cyber-security expert Lisa Forte says these stories may be the tip of the iceberg, with everyone from governments to big tech firms to hackers and cyber-criminals potentially listening in on our private conversations.

(Picture: Outline of a mobile phone visible in the back pocket of a woman's jeans; Credit: Yuri Arcurs/Getty Images)
Apr 05 2019
18 mins
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Rank #7: The smart home hype

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Has technology really made our homes better? Ed Butler talks to Henry Shepherd from the company Cornflake, which installs high-end smart home systems in London. So why haven't more of us installed the latest technology? Brian Solis, principal analyst and futurist at tech research firm Altimeter in California explains.

(Photo: A smart speaker at home, Credit: Getty Images)
Aug 07 2019
18 mins
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Rank #8: Trump's Tax Scandal - Who Cares?

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Why has there been so little political fall-out from allegations by the New York Times that the US President and his family dodged hundreds of millions of dollars in tax, in some cases through outright fraud?

Manuela Saragosa speaks to Susanne Craig - one of the journalists making the claims after 18 months of painstaking research. Yet the US public remains unmoved. Bloomberg editor John Authers fears for what that says about the breakdown in trust in modern Western society.

Plus Pippa Malmgren, a former advisor to President George W Bush, explains why she thinks the tax investigation may represent a bigger threat to Donald Trump than the much-reported Mueller investigation.

(Picture: Donald Trump; Credit: Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Oct 12 2018
17 mins
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Rank #9: Mongolia's Mega Mine

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The gigantic Oyu Tolgoi copper mine will certainly make some people rich, but how many of them will be Mongolian?
Ed Butler speaks to the BBC's Roger Hearing, who is at the mine, fresh from taking a taxi ride hundreds of metres below ground. He has been delving into who will profit more from this vast project in the middle of the Gobi Desert - the Mongolian state or mine operator Rio Tinto. Meanwhile, above ground, the BBC's Joshua Thorpe speaks to some disgruntled herdsmen.
(Picture: Mongolian herdsman; Credit: BBC)
Jul 06 2018
17 mins
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Rank #10: A Spectacular Merger

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Two companies dominate the global eyewear industry - and now they are merging into a glasses behemoth. What does it mean for the bespectacled public?
Manuela Saragosa investigates the story behind these two anonymous giants - Italian fashion frames designer Luxottica, and French lens-maker Essilor - with the help of American eyewear retail pioneer E Dean Martin, and Gordon Ilett of the UK's Association of Optometrists. And she asks the European Commission why they were happy to wave through their merger earlier this year. Producer: Laurence Knight.
(Picture: Glasses model frames - black silhouettes isolated on white; Credit: Alxyzt/Getty Images)
Jul 09 2018
17 mins
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Rank #11: Should prostitution be a normal profession?

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What's the best way to help sex workers? We hear the cases for full decriminalisation, versus abolition of what's often dubbed the world's oldest profession.

In the Netherlands - a country with some of the most liberal laws on prostitution - a petition is due to be debated in parliament that calls for it to be made illegal to pay for sex. The initiative, spearheaded by young Christians and feminists, has sparked an outcry with many claiming it would actually make life harder for the sex workers it is intended to help, as the BBC's Anna Holligan reports.

It's a controversy we bring back into the BBC studio. Ed Butler hosts a fiery dispute between the British feminist and journalist Julie Bindel, and the Nevadan sex worker-turned-PhD student Christina Parreira, who wants her profession to be treated in law just the same way as any other. Plus Professor Prabha Kotiswaran of Kings College London explains why it doesn't make much difference what the law says, if it is arbitrarily enforced by the police.

(Picture: A group of sex workers and supporters are seen holding a banner during a demonstration in Amsterdam, Netherlands; Credit: Ana Fernandez/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)
Apr 18 2019
18 mins
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Rank #12: What's Up with Whatsapp?

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The developing world's favourite chat app is accused of spreading malicious rumours. In India the rumours led to the lynching of people falsely accused of child abduction, while in Uganda the government has introduced a controversial tax on social media platforms to stop alleged political gossip.
Ed Butler visits Kampala where he discovers how popular the app is, both for socialising and for business. Meanwhile Rahul Tandon reports from Kolkata on the unnervingly fast spread of the app across India. Plus Samantha Bradshaw of the Oxford Internet Institute explains what makes Whatsapp particularly well suited for lower income countries.
(Picture: Ugandan woman with painted nails using a cell phone; Credit: Godong/UIG via Getty Images)
Aug 06 2018
17 mins
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Rank #13: How to Spot a Narcissist

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Almost all offices have them. The person whose self-belief exceeds their abilities, who belittles their co-workers, and who considers themselves so special and unique, they're left infuriated when others fail to recognise them.
We're talking about the office narcissist. Tim Judge, an organisational and leadership psychologist at the Ohio State University, tells us how to spot one.
Karlyn Borysenko, author of a book called Zen Your Work, found herself working for what she later realised was a narcissistic boss. She said she had to make use of a number of strategies to cope.
And Don Moore, professor at the Haas Business School, says that while self confidence is ok, overconfidence destroys businesses and politics.
(Picture: A woman kissing a mirror; Credit: Getty Images)
Jul 30 2018
18 mins
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Rank #14: Britain's Brexit Befuddlement

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The UK still doesn't know what kind of future trading relationship it wants with the EU, more than two years after voting to leave and with less than nine months left to go.
Ed Butler and BBC politics correspondent Rob Watson explore the difficult choices that London politicians still refuse to face up to. Audrey Tinline looks at one of the most vexing issues in the negotiations - the Irish border. And Ed speaks to Allie Renison of UK business lobby group, the Institute of Directors, about what kind of a deal her member companies would like to see.
(Picture: British Prime Minister Theresa May stands at an EU press conference podium; Credit: JP Black/LightRocket via Getty Images)
Jul 05 2018
17 mins
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Rank #15: Death of the Dollar?

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The US unleashed what it calls its "toughest ever" sanctions against Iran. The Trump administration reinstated all sanctions removed under the 2015 nuclear deal, targeting both Iran and states that trade with it. They will hit oil exports, shipping and banks - all core parts of the economy.

But what difference will they actually make? Ed Butler hears from Professor Jeffrey Sachs of Columbia University, an outspoken policy advocate who thinks Trump's America First policies are endangering the very status of the dollar as the world's chosen reserve currency.

And to explain how a reserve currency works, Ed hears from Barry Eichengreen, a well-known currency expert and professor of economics at Berkeley in California. And the programme considers whether China's renminbi, or the euro, could ever take over from the mighty dollar.

(Picture: An Iranian protester burns a dollar banknote; Credit: Majid Saeedi/Getty Images)
Nov 05 2018
17 mins
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Rank #16: Are Things Getting Worse?

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Millennials are the first generation set to be worse off than their parents. Daniel Tomlinson, economic researcher at the Resolution Foundation in the UK, explains. But one notable exception to the trend is Norway. The BBC's Maddy Savage reports from Oslo. And are things really getting worse? Hear why there are reasons for optimism from Gregg Easterbrook, author of a book called It's Better Than It Looks.
(Photo: A fishing cabin in Norway, Credit: Getty Images)
Jul 25 2018
17 mins
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Rank #17: Putin's Great Nemesis

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Businessman Bill Browder was singled out by Russian President Vladimir Putin, at his summit with US President Donald Trump, as a "person of interest".
In an extended interview, Manuela Saragosa asks the man who was once the biggest foreign fund manager in Russia how he came to incur Mr Putin's ire, and about his campaign to get Western nations to pass a "Magnitsky Act" imposing sanctions and visa restrictions on Russian individuals. Plus Dr Florian Otto of political risk consultancy Maplecroft explains what Mr Browder's case can tell us about the risks of doing business in Russia.
(Picture: Bill Browder testifying to the US Senate; Credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
Jul 20 2018
17 mins
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