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Rank #54 in Buddhism category

Religion & Spirituality
Buddhism

Buddhist Geeks

Updated 6 days ago

Rank #54 in Buddhism category

Religion & Spirituality
Buddhism
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Dharma in the Age of the Network

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Dharma in the Age of the Network

iTunes Ratings

359 Ratings
Average Ratings
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Insight and compassion

By mhaliett - May 01 2019
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I appreciate Vince and Emily Horne, not just as compassionate teachers (introducing me to Hokai Sobel), but also their commitment to inclusion and humility. Newest stuff on Ken Wilber is very promising. Listen to 405. Real deal. Thanks for letting me in the online class for what I could afford all those years ago, Vince. It was a transformative course for me, with Hokai stressing the integral connections that moved me forward. Michael Hallett, Florida

Awesome.

By S M F W - Aug 12 2013
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Can't believe I only just discovered this podcast! Thank you!

iTunes Ratings

359 Ratings
Average Ratings
211
101
18
11
18

Insight and compassion

By mhaliett - May 01 2019
Read more
I appreciate Vince and Emily Horne, not just as compassionate teachers (introducing me to Hokai Sobel), but also their commitment to inclusion and humility. Newest stuff on Ken Wilber is very promising. Listen to 405. Real deal. Thanks for letting me in the online class for what I could afford all those years ago, Vince. It was a transformative course for me, with Hokai stressing the integral connections that moved me forward. Michael Hallett, Florida

Awesome.

By S M F W - Aug 12 2013
Read more
Can't believe I only just discovered this podcast! Thank you!
Cover image of Buddhist Geeks

Buddhist Geeks

Updated 6 days ago

Rank #54 in Buddhism category

Read more

Dharma in the Age of the Network

Rank #1: How to HEAL the Brain’s Negativity Bias

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Rick Hanson, Ph.D., is a neuropsychologist, Senior Fellow of the Greater Good Science Center at UC Berkeley, and New York Times best-selling author. He’s been an invited speaker at Oxford, Stanford, and Harvard, and taught in meditation centers worldwide.
In the conclusion to his 2013 Buddhist Geeks Conference keynote address, Rick answers questions from the audience and leads them through the HEAL exercise, a process which trains the brain to reprogram its natural negativity bias towards the positive.
This is part two of a two part series.
Listen to part one: Practicing with the Brain in Mind.
Episode Links:
www.RickHanson.net
Jul 29 2015
38 mins
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Rank #2: Where Science and Compassion Meet

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We’re joined this week by Dr. Kelly McGonigal, to discuss her work at Stanford University, where she is teaching compassion-based practices from the Buddhist tradition, taught in a way that pulls from scientific research and appeals to a secular sensibility.
As part of her work with CCARE she shares some of her background with Stanford as well as her long-standing Buddhist practice, which pulls from both the Zen and Tibetan traditions. We close the discussion by exploring some of the difficulties with teaching meditation in a secular context, as well as some of the benefits that come through framing the teachings in scientific and psychological terms.
Episode Links:
www.kellymcgonigal.com
The Willpower Instinct: How Self-Control Works, Why It Matters, and What You Can Do to Get More of It ( http://amzn.to/lcYMyR )
The Stanford Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education ( http://ccare.stanford.edu )
Cheri Huber ( http://www.cherihuber.com )
Jul 25 2015
27 mins
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Rank #3: This is your Brain on Meditation

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This week we speak with academic nuerologist and Zen practitioner James Austin. Austin, who wrote the well-known book, Zen and the Brain, joins us to explain some of the physical mechanisms underlying both attention and the way we process reality. In terms of attention, he shares with us a very descriptive difference between “top-down” and “bottom-up” modes of attention. He also shares the difference, from the perspective of the brain, between self-centered (egocentric) processing and other-centered (allocentric) processing.
He also shares the ways in which these two are related to the different forms of meditation that are commonly seen in the Buddhist tradition. Although sometimes technical, his descriptions are extremely interesting for those who have an interest on the intersection between meditation and the brain.
This is part 1 of a two-part series. Listen to part 2, The Mechanisms of Kensho.
Episode Links:
Selfless Insight ( http://bit.ly/QRGFu )
Zen and the Brain ( http://bit.ly/KxYDq )
Jul 21 2015
20 mins
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Rank #4: The Emerging Science of Mindfulness Meditation

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David Vago, an instructor of psychology at Harvard Medical School, has held the position of Senior Research Coordinator for the Mind & Life Institute, a not-for-profit organization dedicated to fostering dialogue and research at the highest possible level between modern science and the great living contemplative traditions.
In this episode David relates how his personal mindfulness practice has integrated with his professional scientific research. He talks about the thriving community of scientists interested in mindfulness that has taken root in contemporary academia and research, and he highlights some current projects and lines of inquiry that have benefited from this uniquely supportive atmosphere.
Episode Links:
www.ContemplativeNeurosciences.com
Mind and Life Institute ( http://www.mindandlife.org )
The Dark Night Project ( http://bit.ly/1gc7P2j )
Mapping the Mindful Brain ( http://bit.ly/1gc7Weo )
Contemplative Mind in Life ( http://contemplativemind.wordpress.com )
Jul 25 2015
35 mins
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Rank #5: Mindfulness++

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Vincent Horn is part of a new generation of teachers translating age-old wisdom into 21st century code. In this talk given to the Buddhist Geeks Dojo and the UNC Asheville Mindfulness Club, Vincent describes Mindfulness++, a multi-paradigm programming language for the mind. The “multi” part refers to multiple training paradigms--including both Buddhist and mindfulness-based ones--and how they differ based on the ‘view’ and ‘intentions’ that power them. Finally Vincent explores using a feedback loop of Uncovering and Practicing that broadens the understanding of what it means to train, practice, and wake up.
- Wikipedia: Mindfulness [change to cohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mindfulnessrrect link]
- Wikipedia: Noble Eightfold Path [ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noble_Eightfold_Path ]
- A Mindful Balance by B. Alan Wallace [ http://www.alanwallace.org/spr08wallace_comp.pdf ]
- Wikipedia: Programming paradigm [ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Programming_paradigm ]
- Buddhist Geeks Dojo [ http://www.buddhistgeeks.com/dojo/ ]
Nov 02 2015
24 mins
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Rank #6: Mapping the Mindful Brain

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Dr. Judson Brewer is an assistant professor at Yale in psychiatry and a contemplative scientist studying the effects of meditation on the brain. He and his colleagues believe they have found a way to use FMRI to give meditators real time feedback on their mindfulness practice. This feedback has led to increased efficacy and efficiency in mindfulness practice. Since making these discoveries, Brewer has joined the Contemplative Development Mapping Project in hopes of creating a common language between meditation traditions to more easily discern progress in meditation practice.
In this episode, Brewer describes to Vincent Horn how his work in addiction treatment led to these discoveries. They discuss the difficulty in objectively marking progress on the path to awakening, how that led to his participation in the Contemplative Development Mapping Project, and how using FMRI to understand mindfulness practice may eventually affect Buddhists and non-Buddhists alike.
Episode Links:
The Dark Night Project ( http://bit.ly/1gc7P2j )
Jul 25 2015
42 mins
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Rank #7: Psilocybin: A Crash Course in Mindfulness

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Roland Griffiths is the lead investigator of the Psilocybin Research Initiative at Johns Hopkins and one of the United States’ leading psychopharmacologists. In the conclusion to his conversation with host Vincent Horn, Roland provides more details on the Hopkins Meditation Study, Vincent shares his personal story of psychedelic experimentation, and they discuss the risks and benefits of mixing meditation practice with the psilocybin experience. This is part two of a two part series. Listen to part one "Meditating on Mushrooms".

Episode Links:

- Hopkins Meditation Study

- "The Trip Treatment"

- Roland R. Griffiths, Ph.D.

Jan 02 2016
37 mins
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Rank #8: Intimacy & Infinity: The Dharma of Sex

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Martin Aylward is a vipassana teacher and founder of Le Moulin Meditation Centre. He has been leading retreats worldwide, teaching meditation, and supporting groups and individuals since 1999.
In this episode taken from the 2013 Buddhist Geeks Conference, Martin speaks on the relationship between the dharma and sex. He examines the general lack of dharma teachings concerning sex, the results of his own inquiry to the subject, and his belief in the potential of sexuality as a powerful tool for transformation.
Episode Links:
www.MartinAylward.com
Le Moulin Meditation Centre ( http://www.moulindechaves.org )
Jul 28 2015
23 mins
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Rank #9: The Evolution of the Mind and Life Dialogues

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This week, Adam Engle, the business mastermind behind the Mind and Life Institute, joins us to discuss both the evolution of the project as well as its larger impact. The first Mind and Life Dialogue was held in Dharamsala, India in 1987 with His Holiness the Dalai Lama. Since then, Adam says, it has done more than any other organization to help “legitimatize the scientific study of meditation.”
Listen in to hear more about how they’ve gone about creating an active collaboration between scientists and contemplatives, and what kind of fruit that collaboration has borne.
Episode Links:
Educating World Citizens for the 21st Century ( http://www.educatingworldcitizens.org )
Mind & Life Institute ( http://www.mindandlife.org )
Jul 21 2015
30 mins
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Rank #10: Meditation is Good for Your Life

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In this episode we speak with Karma Kagyu teacher, Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche. He starts off by telling us about how he got into formal Buddhist practice, at the tender age of 9. He also shares some of his initial challenges with anxiety, and how he was able to work with it on his first 3-year retreat. Rinpoche also shares some suggestions for meditators who are fairly new to the path, suggesting that they focus on 1) Wisdom & 2) Method. In addition to that he speaks about what makes a good teacher and whether or not it is vital to practice in a particular lineage.
We finish our interview with Rinpoche discussing the importance of Joy on the Buddhist path, and of what he calls “Boundless Joy.” Tying in with that he shares what it was like participating in the meditative research conducted by Dr. Richard Davidson, and what the results of that study were.
Episode Links:
Sitting Quietly, Doing Something ( http://happydays.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/07/16/sitting-quietly-doing-something/ )
The Joy of Living: Unlocking the Secret and Science of Happiness ( http://bit.ly/8Se7E )
Joyful Wisdom: Embracing Change and Finding Freedom ( http://bit.ly/UcxEb )
The Yongey Foundation ( http://www.mingyur.org )
Jul 21 2015
24 mins
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Rank #11: Tibetan Buddhist Lineage in the West

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Reginald Ray, Tibetan Buddhist scholar and teacher, is back with us this week to discuss some pretty big topics. We explore the break that he made, several years ago with the Shambhala tradition, and the larger implications of becoming a Western teacher in the Tibetan Buddhist tradition. Connected with that we explore the whole issue of Westerners not being regularly empowered to be teachers, and several of the factors involved in that dynamic. We also touch on whether or not Westeners make the best practitioners, and what seems to keep them from going deep.
This is part 2 of a two-part series. Listen to part 1, The Forest Dwelling Yogi.
Episode Links:
Dharma Ocean ( www.dharmaocean.org )
Your Breathing Body – Vol 1. ( bit.ly/1HOKNVR )
Your Breathing Body – Vol 2. ( bit.ly/1HOKR81 )
Touching Enlightenment ( bit.ly/ia0sJ )
Jul 21 2015
25 mins
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Rank #12: Talking Race, Love, and Liberation

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Rev. angel Kyodo williams Sensei is a maverick spiritual teacher, master trainer, and founder of Center for Transformative Change. She is the author of "Radical Dharma: Talking Race, Love, and Liberation". Sensei williams joins host Vincent Horn to continue the current series on ethics in a talk about race, love, and liberation. They address race and class in American capitalism, the construct of “whiteness” as a social form of ego structure, and how Buddhism provides the tools to uncover entrenched social structures and implicit bias.

Episode Links

Jun 14 2016
1 hour 3 mins
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Rank #13: Zen, Vipassana, & Psychology

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This week we speak to vipassana and Zen teacher, Trudy Goodman. Trudy shares how she got into both Buddhist meditation and psychotherapy, and uses her story to illustrate the powerful ways that these different methods can compliment one another. Trudy also reflects on the differences between her experience in Zen training with Korean Zen Master Seung Sahn, and her practice of vipassana meditation.
This is part 1 of a two-part series. Listen to part 2, The Mindful Therapist.
Episode Links:
Zen Master Seung Sahn ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seung_Sahn )
Insight Meditation Society ( http://www.dharma.org )
InsightLA ( http://www.insightla.org )
Jul 22 2015
22 mins
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Rank #14: Enlightenment for the Rest of Us

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Shinzen Young joins us again to discuss the possibility of a new way to deliver classical enlightenment to the masses. He discusses the classic delivery systems, which included monastic and lay life. He then builds on that to show a hybrid two-fold delivery system that would incorporate his artificial intelligence system with virtually led home retreats. This Home Practice Program is what is currently being offered at BasicMindfulness.org.
Finally Shinzen discusses the “crowning glory” of his mission to unify Western and Eastern technologies, and that is to help nurture the emergence of a “neuro-scientific paradigm for classical enlightenment.” This paradigm could help lead to the emergence of technologies which have the potential to bring classical enlightenment to the masses and hence make large-scale social and individual change. Though Shinzen doesn’t think he’ll see these changes in his own lifetime, he does believe that he can do a lot to help train the future scientists who will.
This is part 3 of a 3-part series. Listen to part 1, Shinzen Young: The Hybrid Teacher & part 2, Building a Dharma Successor.
Episode Links:
Shinzen.org: The Science of Meditation in Action ( www.shinzen.org )
Basic Mindfulness: Home Practice Program ( www.basicmindfulness.org )
Jul 21 2015
25 mins
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Rank #15: Crap, I Forgot to be Mindful Again

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Susan Kaiser Greenland developed the Inner Kids mindful awareness program for children, teens and their families. She is author of The Mindful Child: How to Help Your Kid Manage Stress and Become Happier, Kinder, and More Compassionate (Free Press, 2010). In this keynote from the 2014 Buddhist Geeks Conference, Susan shares some of the tools she uses to connect with students and teachers, and the three important components to the Inner Kids training: worldview, practice, and community.
Episode Links:
www.SusanKaiserGreenland.com
The Mindful Child: How to Help Your Kid Manage Stress and Become Happier, Kinder, and More Compassionate ( http://www.susankaisergreenland.com/book.html )
Crap, I Forgot to Be Mindful Again ( http://slate.me/1MUQoNU )
Jul 29 2015
42 mins
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Rank #16: Buddhist History 101

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This week we speak with esteemed scholar, and the former professor of Buddhist Studies at UC Berkely, Dr. Lewis Lancaster. Lewis shares with us the important history of the Buddhist tradition, focusing in particular on the unique attributes of Buddhism that made it the first “world religion,” a religion that is able to detach from it’s original homeland and language and travel wide and far.
We also discuss the recent history of Buddhism transitioning to the West, and how Buddhism continues to morph and change through time. Listen in for a great dose of geeky history!
Episode Links:
Buddhism in a Global Age of Technology ( https://youtu.be/cX2f6QHkU-I )
Electronic Cultural Atlas Initiative ( http://www.ecai.org )
Jul 21 2015
29 mins
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Rank #17: Secular Buddhism

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Ted Meissner is the host of The Secular Buddhist podcast and the Executive Director of the Secular Buddhist Association. In this episode with host Vincent Horn, Ted shares examples of secular Buddhism, why he is skeptical but not cynical about religion, and he stresses what he thinks is the importance of right speech in the modern world.
This is part one of a two part series.
Episode Links:
The Secular Buddhist Association ( http://secularbuddhism.org )
The Secular Buddhist Podcast ( http://secularbuddhism.org/the-secular-buddhist-podcasts/ )
Jul 27 2015
32 mins
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Rank #18: The Buddhist Atheist

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Secular Buddhist teacher Stephen Batchelor joins us to explore some of the ideas presented in his newest book, Confession of a Buddhist Atheist. We start off by examining the two Buddhist doctrines of karma and rebirth, using the original teachings of the Buddha, especially the “imponderables” as a touchstone for the conversation. Stephen’s basic claim being that the belief in rebirth doesn’t have sufficient evidence behind it, and it actually takes away from the core practices and teachings of the Buddha. We conclude the interview by exploring the difference between agnosticism and atheism, which Stephen claims can be integrated together into what he calls an “ironic atheism.”
Episode Links:
Stephen and Martine Batchelor ( http://www.stephenbatchelor.org )
Buddhism Without Beliefs ( http://amzn.to/bHGkI7 )
Confession of a Buddhist Atheist ( http://amzn.to/9WL5X1 )
Jul 22 2015
25 mins
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Rank #19: The Mechanisms of Kensho

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"A perception, sudden as blinking, that subject and object are one, will lead to a deeply mysterious wordless understanding; and by this understanding will you awaken to the truth of Zen." – Zen Master Huang-po
The above quote, taken from James Austin’s newest book Selfless Insight, is a description of kensho, an "initial awakening" to the true nature of things. We continue our discussion, this week, with James Austin about the importance of both kensho and satori in the Zen tradition, and his hypothesis as to what is happening in the brain, leading up to and during these events. We also discuss the vast importance of the thalamus, which Austin describes as a type of gateway of perceptual experience.
Finally, Austin makes a strong distinction between both the absorptions and various types of quickenings that can precede kensho or satori, but that are not the same as them.
This is part 2 of a two-part series. Listen to part 1, This is Your Brain on Meditation.
Episode Links:
Selfless Insight ( http://bit.ly/QRGFu )
Zen and the Brain ( http://bit.ly/KxYDq )
Jul 21 2015
32 mins
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Rank #20: Practicing with the Brain in Mind

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Rick Hanson, Ph.D., is a neuropsychologist, Senior Fellow of the Greater Good Science Center at UC Berkeley, and New York Times best-selling author. He’s been an invited speaker at Oxford, Stanford, and Harvard, and taught in meditation centers worldwide.
In this first part of the keynote address Rick presented at the 2013 Buddhist Geeks Conference, he explores the intersection between dharma practice and neuroscience. Rick explains the basic mechanisms of brain change, the power of mindfulness, how to activate the neural networks of self-compassion, how to tap the hidden power of everyday experiences to grow happiness and other inner strengths in your brain, and why our planet needs us to take charge of our Stone Age brains in the 21st century.
This is part one of a two part series.
Listen to part two: How to HEAL the Brain’s Negativity Bias.
Episode Links:
www.RickHanson.net
Jul 29 2015
35 mins
Play

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