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Rank #40 in Food category

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A Taste of the Past

Updated about 1 month ago

Rank #40 in Food category

Arts
Society & Culture
Food
History
Read more

Linda Pelaccio, a culinary historian, takes a weekly journey through the history of food on A Taste of the Past. Tune in for interviews with authors, scholars and culinary chroniclers who discuss food culture from ancient Mesopotamia and Rome to the grazing tables and deli counters of today. Each week Linda explores the lively link between food cultures of the present and past.

Read more

Linda Pelaccio, a culinary historian, takes a weekly journey through the history of food on A Taste of the Past. Tune in for interviews with authors, scholars and culinary chroniclers who discuss food culture from ancient Mesopotamia and Rome to the grazing tables and deli counters of today. Each week Linda explores the lively link between food cultures of the present and past.

iTunes Ratings

163 Ratings
Average Ratings
97
32
10
11
13

New episodes?

By Ellieh723 - Apr 11 2019
Read more
This hasn't updated since mid March; is the podcast finished putting out new shows?

Much better than its 4 Star rating

By Mr. Zelig - Mar 26 2019
Read more
Unique approach to a cooking podcast...combining history and cooking. The host is charming and asks questions to the guests that you’d ask. Enjoy!

iTunes Ratings

163 Ratings
Average Ratings
97
32
10
11
13

New episodes?

By Ellieh723 - Apr 11 2019
Read more
This hasn't updated since mid March; is the podcast finished putting out new shows?

Much better than its 4 Star rating

By Mr. Zelig - Mar 26 2019
Read more
Unique approach to a cooking podcast...combining history and cooking. The host is charming and asks questions to the guests that you’d ask. Enjoy!
Cover image of A Taste of the Past

A Taste of the Past

Updated about 1 month ago

Rank #40 in Food category

Read more

Linda Pelaccio, a culinary historian, takes a weekly journey through the history of food on A Taste of the Past. Tune in for interviews with authors, scholars and culinary chroniclers who discuss food culture from ancient Mesopotamia and Rome to the grazing tables and deli counters of today. Each week Linda explores the lively link between food cultures of the present and past.

Rank #1: Episode 282: How Tea Shaped the Modern World

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Tea has been one of the most popular commodities in the world. Over centuries, profits from its growth and sales funded wars and fueled colonization. Erika Rappaport talks about her new book, A Thirst for Empire, in which she delves into how Europeans adopted, appropriated, and altered Chinese tea culture to build a widespread demand for tea in Britain and other global markets and a plantation-based economy in South Asia and Africa. She shares her in-depth historical look at how men and women—through the tea industry in Europe, Asia, North America, and Africa—transformed global tastes and habits and in the process created our modern consumer society.

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Oct 05 2017
47 mins
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Rank #2: Episode 206: Roman Food Culture

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Elizabeth Minchilli has been eating her way through Rome since she was 12 years old. “Eating Rome,” is her homage to the city that feeds her, literally and figuratively. This week on A Taste of the Past, host Linda Pelaccio is getting Elizabeth’s personal story which is a quirky and deliciously entertaining look at some of the city’s monuments to food culture. Strolling through her favorite open air markets along with details of amazing coffee, pizza, artichokes and grappa are just the starting points for mouth-watering stories about this ancient city. If you are planning your first trip to Rome or if you’ve been a dozen times, tune in as Linda spends this episode traveling through the region with Elizabeth as the perfect travel guide. This program was brought to you by Bonnie Plants.





“The thinking is that the last thing in the world you would want after a big lunch [in Rome] is a big cup of warm milk, which is basically what cappuccino is… so they’ll give it to you but they’ll be very disapproving.” [8:22]

“These [farmer’s] markets which are only open on Saturdays and Sundays are really crowded. I think that shows a rebirth of this interest in buying quality food from the source.” [16:35]

Elizabeth Minchilli on A Taste of the Past

May 21 2015
35 mins
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Rank #3: Episode 22: Ice Cream with Jon Snyder & Jeri Quinzio

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This week on A Taste of the Past Linda spoke with two masters of frozen delights. Jon Snyder of Il Laboratorio del Gelato and Jeri Quinzio, author of “Of Sugar and Snow” stopped by with some delicious insight into the history and future of ice cream.

May 20 2010
33 mins
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Rank #4: Episode 241: Food in the Gilded Age: What Ordinary Americans Ate

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America's Gilded Age, the last quarter of the nineteenth century, is renowned for the excesses of robber barons and tycoons and their culture of conspicuous consumption. The lavishness of their tables impressed contemporaries and historians alike. But what about the eating habits of ordinary people at the time? Robert Dirks, author of Food in the Gilded Age, poses that question and discovers some surprising answers by peering through the lens of what then was a newly emerging science of nutrition.

Jun 16 2016
37 mins
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Rank #5: Episode 46: Origins of Curry

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This week’s discussion on A Taste of the Past focuses on curry, one of the most widley used – and misused – terms in the culinary lexicon. Joining Linda is Colleen Taylor Sen, a food historian and journalist specializing in the cuisine of India. Linda and Colleen trace the history of curry, from the East India Trading Company to British fast food chains. Tune in and learn what should and shouldn’t be considered curry and how curry leaves differ from curry powder. This episode was sponsored by Cain Vineyard & Winery. For more information visit www.cainfive.com

Jan 13 2011
32 mins
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Rank #6: Episode 93: Downton Abbey

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Hooked on Downton Abbey? Curious what food was like during the Edwardian Period? Tune in to an especially historic episode of A Taste of the Past with Linda Pelaccio as she is joined by Cathy Kaufman, chair of the Culinary Historians of New York. Find out why English food has a rich tradition and why it gets such a bad reputation these days. Learn about early haute cuisine, table settings, cookbooks and the important of the dining room as it relates to the period of time featured on Downton Abbey. This program is sponsored by Cain Vineyard & Winery.



“English food at that time [The Edwardian Era] had fabulous butter, cream and meats. The houses all had wonderful gardens. There was no reason for the food not to be good. English food gets its bad reputation because of the true hardships with food rationing that the population underwent after World War I, The Great Depression and World War II.”

“In England unlike in the US, while you would have some flowers and silver candelabra, it would not be overly profuse. I think there’s an interesting juxtaposition between American and English tables at this time. The American table is rather gaudy by comparison.”

–Cathy Kaufman, Chair of the Culinary Historians of New York on A Taste of The Past

Mar 08 2012
30 mins
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Rank #7: Episode 71: Eat Your Words: A Culinary History of the English Language

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What do beat, bean, and leek all have in common with each other? Find out on this week’s episode A Taste of The Past where Linda goes into the history of food and culinary etymology with Ina Lipkowitz teacher of English literature and Biblical Studies at MIT and author of Words to Eat By. Discover the semantic shift in the word meat, the influence of the ancient Romans on plant breeds, and how much religious symbolism is based off food. Listen and become aware about how much food words have an impact on us. This episode is sponsored by The Hearst Ranch.

Aug 18 2011
31 mins
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Rank #8: Episode 21: Heirloom Seeds with Amy Goldman

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Linda sits down with author, horticulture legend and the worlds premiere vegetable gardener Amy Goldman. Amy also serves as the Board Chair for Seed Savers exchange, a nonprofit organization dedicated to preserving heirloom plant varieties.

May 13 2010
30 mins
Play

Rank #9: Episode 202: Sugar and its Dark History

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This week on A Taste of the Past, host Linda Pelaccio is talkin’ sugar and its checkered, dark past with guest Andrew F. Smith, author of “Sugar: A Global History.” It’s no surprise that sugar has been on our minds for several millenia. First cultivated in New Guinea around 8,000 B.C.E., this addictive sweetener has since come to dominate our appetites-whether in candy, desserts, soft drinks, or even pasta sauces-for better and for worse. Offering highlights of the book and other historical factoids of this simultaneously beloved and reviled ingredient, Andy relays how sugar has held its incredible value as a global commodity up against its darker legacies of slavery and widespread obesity. Tune in to hear a layered and definitive tale of sugar and the many people caught in its spell-from barons to slaves, from chefs to the countless among us born with that insatiable devil, the sweet tooth. This program was brought to you by Cain Vineyard & Winery.





“The American Revolution is directly tied to sugar and molasses.”

“It wasn’t until the late 19th century that you had the granulated sugar and sugar cubes and things that we now know and and love.”

“Companies now have several different names for sugar so it doesn’t look like it’s the number one ingredient, which it is.”

Andrew F. Smith on A Taste of the Past

Apr 16 2015
35 mins
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Rank #10: Episode 218: New Orleans Food History

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Using restaurants as a lens to observe the city’s cuisine, Lolis Elie talks about food, culture and customs of New Orleans on this week’s edition of _ A Taste of the Past _.

“There are at least two traditions in Louisiana gumbo. The New Orleans tradition, and that gumbo tends to be thinner, tends not to have as thick or dark of roux, and also, when I think of Creole gumbo I think of a mix of sausage, seafood, and occasionally some poultry.” [15:05]

–Lolis Elie on A Taste of the Past

Nov 12 2015
33 mins
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Rank #11: Episode 214: 100 Years of Pyrex: How it Changed the Way America Cooks

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Look in your kitchen cabinet, there’s no doubt a Pyrex dish in there somewhere, whether it be a glass pie plate or the ubiquitous glass measuring cup with the red incremental markings.  This year marks the 100th anniversary of Pyrex, and Linda Pelaccio is celebrating on today’s episode of _ A Taste of the Past _ with guest Regan Brumagen of the Rakow Research Library at the Corning Museum of Glass.  As one of the curators of the “America’s Favorite Dish: Celebrating a Century of Pyrex” exhibit, Regan and Linda engage in a fascinating conversation from all things measuring cups to the vintage advertising to the product’s place in the emergence of home economics.  Tune in for more!

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Oct 15 2015
35 mins
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Rank #12: Episode 235: Foodways and Cooking of Appalachia

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Appalachian food has been sustainable and organic for generations. They have been offering “farm to table” fare forever, without needing to call it that. And the iconic dish of soup beans and cornbread is "culinary harmony," a perfect blend of the native beans with the rendered fat of the pig, an animal brought to the lower South by the Spanish in the 16th century and to the upper South by the English in the 17th. Fred Sauceman, Appalachia born and raised, tells the story.

Fred Sauceman is Senior Writer and Associate Professor of Appalachian Studies at Eastern Tennessee State University. His latest book is Buttermilk & Bible Burgers: More Stories from the Kitchens of Appalachia, published by Mercer University Press. He is also the author of the three-volume book series on Appalachian foodways, The Place Setting: Timeless Tastes of the Mountain South, from Bright Hope to Frog Level, published by Mercer as well. In addition, he is editor of Cornbread Nation 5: The Best of Southern Food Writing.

Apr 28 2016
43 mins
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Rank #13: Episode 156: Robert Sietsema on The History of Pizza

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This week on a thrilling episode of A Taste of the Past, Linda Pelaccio brings in features writer for EaterNY.com, Robert Sietsema. Robert educates us on the history of pizza, and enlightens us about where many aspects of modern pizza originated. After the break, they discuss more in depth how pizza and the pizza industry spread throughout Italy and the U.S. This program has been sponsored by Heritage Foods USA. Music provided by Pamela Royal.

“Totonno must have made one hell of a flatbread.” [13:50]

“In Naples when you get a piece of pizza, you know what you drink? You drink that great old American beverage, Coca-Cola.” [21:45]

Robert Sietsema on A Taste of the Past

Dec 12 2013
35 mins
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Rank #14: Episode 55: America’s Vanished Foods

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Linda Pelaccio explores America’s Vanished Foods on this week’s episode of A Taste of the Past with Andrew Beahrs, author of Twain’s Feast: Searching for America’s Lost Foods in the Footsteps of Samuel Clemens. Tune in to hear about some of the original “heritage” foods of America including raccoon, oysters and terrapin soup. Learn about the food history and culture that can be drawn from the writings of Mark Twain and find out why things have changed drastically since those times. This episode was sponsored by Cain Vineyard & Winery. For more information visit www.CainFive.com

Mar 24 2011
35 mins
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Rank #15: Episode 284: The South, A - Z

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The American South is a diverse region with its own vocabulary, peculiarities, and complexities. Even Southerners can't always agree on all things Southern. A new book by the editors of Garden & Gun Magazine is a good source for answers. S is for Southern is an encyclopedia of Southern life, culture, and history, covering age-old traditions and current zeitgeists. Executive managing editor Phillip Rhodes, born and bred in the south, talks about the fun facts.

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Oct 26 2017
38 mins
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Rank #16: Episode 70: The Great American Debate: No National Dish

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This week on A Taste of the Past, Linda is joined by author and teacher Megan Elias, author of the forthcoming book “Taste of the Nation: American Cookbooks and Culture”. Linda and Megan explore the history of American recipes, cuisine and cookbooks and ask the question “what is America’s national dish?”. Tune in to learn how our “stop and go” culture has influenced our cuisine and how our food ideas trickle down into many different outlets. This episode was sponsored by Cain Five.

Aug 04 2011
33 mins
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Rank #17: Episode 217: Nordic Cuisine

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From smoked arctic char, meatball stew and savory puffed pancakes to Swedish almond wreaths, cardamom braids and whipped berry pudding, tune in as _ A Taste of the Past _ goes Nordic with Darra Goldstein. Illustrating the glorious and diverse flavors of classic Nordic cooking, Darra’s recipes in the new book “Fire + Ice” have been tailored for home cooks of all abilities. As the foremost American authority on this region, she offers readers an opportunity to discover the history, lore, and rich culinary traditions of Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden with deeply personal essays about each country, as well as information on the history of foraging, the iconic ingredients of the north, and regional cooking techniques. More than just a usable cookbook, Fire + Ice is a travelogue and love letter to Scandinavia, inviting readers and cooks alike on a guided exploration of this unique region, its people, and its culture.

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he land really offers up a lot of riches but you have to work for them. It’s not a climate where the soil is so rich with minerals and fertility that you can stick a seed in the ground and watch it grow.” [9:17]

"One of the most classic Scandinavian dishes that is now a high-end food is gravlax, but it comes from the Swedish word ‘gravadlax’ which is simply ‘buried salmon.'” [10:21]

–Darra Goldstein on A Taste of the Past

Nov 05 2015
39 mins
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Rank #18: Episode 108: Herbs: A Global History

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What differentiates an herb from a weed? And what historical significance do herbs hold? Today’s episode of A Taste of the Past is a culinary history of herbs. Linda Pelaccio is joined by Gary Allen, herbalist and author of the recent book, Herbs: A Global History. Tune in to hear the difference between herbs and spices. Learn about extinct herbal plants and their ancient uses. Hear about the exchange of regional herbs, and how it has changed the culinary landscape and the food we eat today. Culturally, herbs are symbols for for memory, love, and fidelity. How did these associations come to be? Find out this, and so much more on this week’s A Taste of the Past. This episode has been sponsored by Whole Foods.



“Technically herbal teas are not teas- they are infusions. True tea is only the tea plant: camellia sinensis.”

“All foods are fusion foods, because every time anyone runs into anyone from anywhere they adapt their dishes to new ingredients and new circumstances.”

“Rosemary is often associated with memory because its scent lingers for so long.”

Gary Allen on A Taste of the Past

Jun 28 2012
27 mins
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Rank #19: Episode 67: Voices from the Food Revolution

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This week on A Taste of the Past, Linda is joined by journalist and creator of the “Voices From the Food Revolution” oral history project at NYU, Judith Weinraub to discuss how we came to this food renaissance in America. Tune in to learn what we share with our culinary ancestors and why oral history is so important in passing down recipes, traditions and ideas. This episode was sponsored by Fairway Market – like no other market.

Jun 23 2011
37 mins
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Rank #20: Episode 42: Heritage of Chinese Cooking: The Wok

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This week on A Taste of the Past, Linda is joined by author and wok master Grace Young. Her latest book is Stir-Frying to the Sky’s Edge, a book that explores everything from the origins and health benefits of stir-frying to the technique’s great economy of time and fuel. Linda and Grace discuss the history of both stir-frying and the wok, and how American culture has reshaped how we see both. Tune in to learn which cookware is the best to stir fry with, how immigrants adapt when they can’t find ingredients of their native cuisine and what happens when Chinese and Jamaican chefs work side by side. This episode was sponsored by the good people at Fairway Market, like no other market!.

Dec 09 2010
36 mins
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