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The People's Pharmacy

Updated 4 days ago

Rank #141 in Health & Fitness category

Kids & Family
Alternative Health
Health & Fitness
Medicine
Science
Read more

Empowering you to make wise decisions about your own health, by providing you with essential health information about both medical and alternative treatment options. 921997

Read more

Empowering you to make wise decisions about your own health, by providing you with essential health information about both medical and alternative treatment options. 921997

iTunes Ratings

527 Ratings
Average Ratings
403
61
27
21
15

Outstanding

By SC-Sammy - Aug 22 2019
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Thanks so much Joe & Terry!

People’s Pharmacy

By gtgnnc - Aug 22 2019
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Honest news about drugs. Thanks

iTunes Ratings

527 Ratings
Average Ratings
403
61
27
21
15

Outstanding

By SC-Sammy - Aug 22 2019
Read more
Thanks so much Joe & Terry!

People’s Pharmacy

By gtgnnc - Aug 22 2019
Read more
Honest news about drugs. Thanks
Cover image of The People's Pharmacy

The People's Pharmacy

Updated 4 days ago

Rank #141 in Health & Fitness category

Read more

Empowering you to make wise decisions about your own health, by providing you with essential health information about both medical and alternative treatment options. 921997

Show 1180: How to Eat to Nourish Your Brain

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You know your body needs food to fuel it. You’ve probably thought about whether you should be eating more fat or less, how much protein you might need and if you are getting enough vegetables and fruits. But have you thought about how you should eat to nourish your brain?

Managing Your Mood:

Millions of people take drugs to treat depression or anxiety. Probably few people plan their meals to reduce improve their mood. Researchers now have developed good evidence for a link between diet and mental health. How do our diets affect our mental states, and how could we choose more wisely?

What Should You Eat to Nourish Your Brain?

It is time to change the way we think about food. But even people accustomed to burgers or pizza can find delicious ways to eat that will support brain health. Dr. Drew Ramsey offers a recipe for a nutrient-laden pizza he calls “rocket pie.” Find out why. What makes it so good?

You’ll also find out what foods you should avoid. (Hint: liquid sugar in soft drinks is high on the list.) Which foods are especially good to eat to nourish the brain? People who like seafood are in luck, because clams and mussels are great sources of zinc. And zinc is a key nutrient for brain health. But don’t stop there–20 others are also really helpful.

Drugs That Rob the Brain of Nutrients:

Certain medications, such as the diabetes drug metformin, can deplete the body of critical nutrients like vitamin B12. How does the brain respond to this kind of deficit? If you need to overcome a problem of this sort, what should you eat to nourish your brain best?

This Week’s Guest:

Drew Ramsey, MD, is a leading innovator in mental health, combining clinical excellence, nutritional interventions and creative media. He is an assistant clinical professor of psychiatry at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons and in active clinical practice in New York City.
His work and writing has been featured by The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Huffington Post, Lancet Psychiatry, and NPR, which named him a “kale evangelist,” the Today Show, BBC and TEDx.

He is the author of three books: Eat Complete: The 21 Nutrients that Fuel Brain Power, Boost Weight Loss and Transform Your Health, 50 Shades of Kale, and The Happiness Diet. His e-course, Eat To Beat Depression, helps people maximize their brain health with every bite.

He splits his time between New York City and rural Indiana where he lives with his wife, children and parents on his 127-acre organic farm. His website is drewramseymd.com.

The photo of Dr. Ramsey is by Ellen Silverman.

Listen to the Podcast:

The podcast of this program will be available the Monday after the broadcast date. The show can be streamed online from this site and podcasts can be downloaded for free. CDs may be purchased at any time after broadcast for $9.99.

Buy the CD or use the dropdown to download the mp3.

Sep 12 2019
1 hour
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Show 1179: What Should You Do About Digestive Distress?

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Have you ever had horrible heartburn or a really bad bellyache? Most of us have experienced digestive distress at one time or another. When do you need to seek medical attention for your problem?

What Causes Digestive Distress?

When the gastrointestinal tract is working as it should, you chew your food and swallow it. Then it traverses the esophagus and goes into the stomach through a valve (the lower esophageal sphincter). After being agitated and acidified in the stomach, the food proceeds to the small intestine so that nutrients can be absorbed in the course of its 20+ feet. Finally, what has not been digested and absorbed goes on to the large intestine for final processing by gut microbes. What could possibly go wrong? We’ll get the answers step by step from our guest, gastroenterologist Nicholas Shaheen.

When Should You Worry?

Some symptoms are common and should not alarm you. Which ones should get your attention immediately? We’ll find out what could be a problem and why.

We’ll also discuss when and how often you should be screened or “scoped” to detect problems such as Barrett’s esophagus or colon cancer. How does Cologuard compare to colonoscopy? Which symptoms of digestive distress could indicate a problem with the liver or pancreas? When should you suspect appendicitis and go to the emergency department?

Join the Conversation:

Our lines are open for your questions and comments this week. Call 888-472-3366 between 7 and 8 am EDT on Saturday, September 7, 2019. You can also reach us by email: radio@peoplespharmacy.com.

This Week’s Guest:

Nicholas J. Shaheen, MD, MPH, is the Bozymski-Heizer Distinguished Professor of Medicine at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine, and Chief of the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at UNC. Dr. Shaheen is a recognized expert in esophageal diseases and endoscopy. He is author of multiple treatment guidelines for gastrointestinal illnesses. He is co-author of a recent article: “Management of Barrett esophagus following radiofrequency ablation.” Gastroenterology & Hepatology, July 2019.

If you like this interview, you might also want to listen to our previous interview with Dr. Shaheen. It is Show 1144: New Ways to Heal Your Digestive Tract.

Listen to the Podcast:

The podcast of this program will be available the Monday after the broadcast date. The show can be streamed online from this site and podcasts can be downloaded for free. CDs may be purchased at any time after broadcast for $9.99.

Buy the CD

Download the mp3

Sep 06 2019
55 mins
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Show 1178: Do We Need a Revolution in Managing Pain?

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Pain is a difficult topic. To begin with, the experience of pain is completely subjective. There are no independent objective measures that doctors can use to assess a patient’s pain. They have to take her word for it. Second, pain has a very significant emotional component that must be addressed along with any physical causes. In addition, pain affects more than a single individual. Each patient’s pain affects his entire family and network of significant social contacts. That means managing pain has wide ramifications.

Managing Chronic Pain:

Sometimes, acute pain that has a discrete, observable cause lingers even after the cause is treated. How does chronic pain develop? When pain becomes a complex regional pain syndrome, it can be extremely difficult to treat. However, our guest, Dr. Sean Mackey, has a six-pronged strategy for managing pain.

The Problems with Opioids for Managing Pain:

Physicians often use opioids as a primary tool for managing pain, but the opioid epidemic has made many people leery of prescribing these powerful painkillers. This may leave some people suffering unnecessarily. When are opioids appropriate, and how can they be used most effectively? When opioids aren’t the right tool, how can doctors help people in pain?

A Revolution in Managing Pain:

Dr. Sean Mackey, Chief of the Division of Pain Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine, says we need a revolution to change how we think about pain. Learn about his six-point approach for managing pain.

This Week’s Guest:

Sean Mackey, MD, PhD, is the Redlich Professor and Chief of the Division of Pain Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine. He is Director of the Stanford Systems Neuroscience and Pain Lab and has additional appointments in the Departments of Anesthesiology, Perioperative, and Pain Medicine, Neurosciences and Neurology, by courtesy. Find him on Twitter: @StanfordPain and @DrSeanMackey.

Listen to the Podcast:

The podcast of this program will be available the Monday after the broadcast date. The show can be streamed online from this site and podcasts can be downloaded for free. CDs may be purchased at any time after broadcast for $9.99.

Buy the CD

Download the mp3

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Aug 29 2019
59 mins
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Show 1177: How You Can Avoid Toxins in Your Home

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Are there toxins in your home? As it turns out, many houses hold furniture, electronics and other products that have been treated with toxic chemicals such as stain repellents and flame retardants. Some of these are there because of misguided legislation requiring them in the past. What are the consequences of chronic exposure to compounds like PFOA and PFOS? How about the bisphenol compounds found in plastic containers? Where are they lurking and what can you do to minimize your exposure and that of your family? We’ll also find out about policy initiatives that could protect everyone better.

Watch Out for Mold:

Some of the toxins in your home may be natural. That doesn’t make them less dangerous, however. Have you inspected your crawl space or basement lately? If you did, did you find mold?

We may consider mold an unpleasant and unsightly problem, but in fact chronic or intense exposure to mold may trigger health problems. What are the symptoms of mold exposure, and what can you do to help your body recover?

Five Tools to Conquer Mold:

Dr. Jill Crista, a naturopathic physician, has spent decades working with patients to help them recover from their exposures to mold. She has her own story that helped her take their problems seriously. Now, she offers us five tools to conquer mold and feel better. Find out how to treat a flooded building and what else to do about mold that may show up with other toxins in your home. Dr. Crista also tells us how to overcome the negative health effects of mold exposure. To treat the building, she recommends building experts certified by the ACAC, the IICRC or the BBEC.

This Week’s Guests:

Arlene Blum PhD., biophysical chemist, author, and mountaineer is Executive Director of the Green Science Policy Institute and a Research Associate in Chemistry at UC Berkeley. Blum’s research and policy work has contributed to preventing the use of flame retardants and other harmful chemicals in children’s sleepwear, furniture, electronics, and other products world-wide. Her current “mountain” is to educate decision makers and the public to reduce the use of entire classes of harmful chemicals in everyday products.

Learn how you can reduce your own exposure to such chemicals at www.sixclasses.org/

Dr. Jill Crista is a nationally recognized educator on illnesses associated with mold and mycotoxin exposure. She shares what she learned after over a decade working with people struggling with chronic diseases related to mold. Dr. Crista is the author of Break The Mold: 5 Tools to Conquer Mold and Take Back Your Health. Her website is drcrista.com

Find out if you could be having health problems due to mold: https://drcrista.com/quiz

Listen to the Podcast:

The podcast of this program will be available the Monday after the broadcast date. The show can be streamed online from this site and podcasts can be downloaded for free. CDs may be purchased at any time after broadcast for $9.99.

Buy the CD

Download the mp3

Aug 22 2019
54 mins
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Show 1176: The Health Benefits of Our Relationships with Animals

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Can you tell what your dog is thinking? Chances are, you have a good idea much of the time. And likewise, your dog pays close attention to your expressions and behaviors to decipher your mood. What are the health implications of our relationships with animals?

Empathy Cements Our Relationships with Animals:

The capacity for empathy is not limited to humans. It is, however, critical to our ability to relate to other beings. During Hurricane Katrina, many people had to evacuate without their pets. This caused additional trauma at a time that was already stressful.

Health Benefits of Companion Animals:

You probably realize that you feel better when your cat is purring in your lap or your dog is wagging its tail in greeting. But did you know that spending time with your companion can lower your heart rate and blood pressure? Learn how empathetic kind relationships with animals, from cows, pigs and horses to cats, dogs and even mice, are vital to our well-being. They teach us how to practice empathy with other humans as well.

Life-Changing Effects of Relationships with Animals:

Many veterans who return from combat zones with PTSD have found comfort and solace through service dogs. Their relationships with animals help them cope with the challenges of returning to civilian life.

We also learn how a mobster rescued an abused street dog. That relationship turned his life around. Has your life been transformed by your relationships with animals?

This Week’s Guest:

Aysha Akhtar, MD, MPH, is double board-certified in both neurology and preventive medicine, as well as a master’s in public health.
She is the Deputy Director of the Army’s Traumatic Brain Injury Program. Previously she worked for the Office of Counterterrorism and Emerging Threats of the FDA. She is a Lieutenant Commander in the US Public Health Service, in which she deploys to assist with national public health emergencies.

Dr.Akhtar is a fellow of the Oxford Centre for Animal Ethics and is a consultant editor for The Journal of Animal Ethics.

Dr. Akhtar is the author of Animals and Public Health, and her latest book is Our Symphony with Animals, On Health, Empathy and our Shared Destinies. Her website is AyshaAkhtar.com.

You can also find her on Facebook and on Twitter.

Listen to the Podcast:

The podcast of this program will be available the Monday after the broadcast date. The show can be streamed online from this site and podcasts can be downloaded for free. CDs may be purchased at any time after broadcast for $9.99.

Buy the CD

Download the mp3

Aug 16 2019
54 mins
Play

You Can Order Your Own Lab Tests from Verisana

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We invite you to learn more about our sponsor, Verisana Lab. We have long been advocates of home testing to monitor your health. This German-based clinical laboratory makes it easy for you to learn about many hitherto hidden aspects of your health. You can listen to our interview with the CEO, Christian Ziegert. He will explain why home testing is so valuable. Click on the green arrow under the photo to hear it.

What Tests Do You Need?

Have you ever wondered about your hormone balance? Does discussion of our complex digestive ecosystem leave you guessing about the composition of your personal microbiome?

Verisana Lab offers the opportunity for holistic health testing with minimally invasive laboratory tests. They can be used by healthcare professionals to get more information about how you are doing. In addition, you can also order specific tests yourself. The laboratory follows German quality-control standards and provides you with detailed answers you can discuss with your healthcare provider.

Measuring Hormones Through Verisana Lab:

Tests available include hormone tests. You provide saliva, and the lab measures male or female hormones, the stress hormone cortisol, a weight hormone check or a comprehensive hormone check. If you wish to evaluate your gut health, you can learn about candida, intestinal inflammation, the adiposity index or gluten intolerance, as well as comprehensive gut microbiome examinations. Sending in a stool sample to Verisana Lab with their specially designed kit makes it easier than you ever imagined.

Get Your Discount at Verisana Lab:

To learn more, go to www.Verisana.com. When you have selected the test you want and are ready to order, enter the code PEOPLE. This will give you a great 20 percent discount on your first test order–absolutely worth it!

Aug 15 2019
21 mins
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Show 1175: How to Mix Conventional and Ayurvedic Medicine for Cancer

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When a doctor is diagnosed with cancer, you can bet he will try to find the best possible treatments for the disease. Dr. Timothy McCall has long added yoga and Ayurvedic medicine to his standard medical toolkit. So when he was diagnosed with neck cancer and couldn’t schedule the first allopathic (Western medicine) treatment right away, he found it natural to visit his friends in India. How did he mix allopathic and Ayurvedic medicine to treat oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer that had spread to his lymph nodes?

Ayurvedic Medicine to Strengthen the System:

Dr. McCall spent a month in India before he began chemoradiation in the US. The Ayurvedic treatments he got there were not intended to cure his neck cancer. For that, he would rely largely on his oncologist’s recommendations. Instead, he turned to Ayurveda to strengthen and balance his system before he started a potentially grueling cancer treatment in the US.

Negotiating with the Oncologist:

Many people don’t realize that they have a say in the cancer treatment they get. Dr. McCall had done research on the treatment of the neck cancer he had. It was caused by HPV (human papillomavirus) rather than by environmental insults like tobacco or alcohol. He negotiated with the radiation oncologist regarding the exact extent of radiation.

He took several steps to mix allopathic and Ayurvedic medicine to treat his neck cancer. Among other things, he found that an over-the-counter turmeric cream from India was helpful in counteracting the effects of radiation on his skin. In addition, yoga helped him maintain his energy throughout the treatment. Acupuncture was also helpful.

Starving the Cancer:

Another approach that Dr. McCall found useful was intermittent fasting. Fasting before his chemo infusions helped reduce the nausea that is usually associated with this treatment. He also used an informal type of hyperthermia–soaking in a hot tub to help heat up the lymph nodes affected by the cancer. While cancer cells are known to be sensitive to heat, this was not part of a clinical trial. Consequently, we don’t know whether it made a difference for his treatment.  

Should You Mix Allopathic and Ayurvedic Medicine?

Conventional medicine in comparison to holistic medicine is similar, he found, to conventional agriculture compared to organic gardening. Rather than choose one or the other, however, we might all benefit from considering how to mix allopathic and Ayurvedic or other therapies when faced with a health crisis.

This Week’s Guest:

Timothy McCall, MD, is a board-certified internist, Yoga Journal’s Medical Editor since 2002 and the bestselling author of Yoga as Medicine and Examining Your Doctor: A Patient’s Guide to Avoiding Harmful Medical Care. His latest book is Saving My Neck: A Doctor’s East/West Journey Through Cancer. He teaches yoga therapy seminars in the US and around the world.

His website is DrMcCall.com

Listen to the Podcast:

The podcast of this program will be available the Monday after the broadcast date. The show can be streamed online from this site and podcasts can be downloaded for free. CDs may be purchased at any time after broadcast for $9.99.

Buy the CD

Download the mp3

Aug 08 2019
54 mins
Play

Show 1174: What to Do About Skeeter Syndrome

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Have your summer evenings outside been spoiled by the whine of a mosquito coming in for a bite? How do you deal with the resulting itch? Mosquito bites usually itch for a while and then go away, but some people suffer excessively. Do you have skeeter syndrome? Although it sounds fanciful, we actually found this term in a medical paper. Find out about the remedies people have used and share your own favorites.

How Do Anticholinergic Drugs Affect Your Brain?

Could the medicines you are taking contribute to cognitive decline? A recent study in JAMA Internal Medicine has strengthened the link between certain drugs, termed anticholinergic medicines, and an increased risk of dementia. The study covered a quarter million Britons in primary care practices. Almost 59,000 of them had been diagnosed with some type of dementia. Comparing them to others of similar age without dementia revealed that those taking anticholinergic drugs were 50 percent more likely to develop difficulties with memory, concentration and judgment. Are you taking any medications that might hasten cognitive decline? (You can find a list of anticholinergic drugs here.)

Neuropathy Caused by Statins:

Statin medications lower cholesterol, so doctors prescribe them to a wide range of people at risk for heart disease. The questions of who should be taking statins and whether these medicines also carry some significant risks have been quite polarizing. Many physicians, especially cardiologists, think that the benefits of statins for most patients clearly outweigh the risks. Yet researchers continue to present evidence of potentially serious side effects such as long-lasting neuropathy (pain or lack of feeling due to nerve damage). The latest is German research published in JAMA Network Open this spring (May 31, 2019)

How do you make sense of the great statin debate? Have you taken statins and found them helpful? Or have you experienced side effects that loomed larger than the benefits?

Join the Conversation:

Our lines are open for your questions and comments this week. Call 888-472-3366 between 7 and 8 am EDT on Saturday, August 3, 2019. You can also reach us by email: radio@peoplespharmacy.com.

Listen to the Podcast:

The podcast of this program will be available the Monday after the broadcast date. The show can be streamed online from this site and podcasts can be downloaded for free. CDs may be purchased at any time after broadcast for $9.99.

Buy the CD

Download the mp3

Aug 02 2019
59 mins
Play

Show 1173: How Is Diabetes Diagnosed and Treated?

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Diabetes has nearly become an epidemic, both in the US and around the world. This metabolic disorder interferes with the way the body processes energy and affects more than 30 million Americans. That’s approximately one person out of every ten.

Type 1 and Type 2:

Do you know the difference between type 1 diabetes (once called juvenile onset diabetes) and type 2 diabetes (once considered solely an adult’s or older person’s condition)? When sugar can’t get into the cells, the tissues react as if they are starving. That may happen even when there is a lot of sugar in the bloodstream. The cells require insulin to chaperone sugar in. If it is absent (type 1) or if they have stopped responding to it (type 2), the consequence is an energy crisis.

How Is Diabetes Diagnosed?

One way doctors diagnose diabetes is through an oral glucose tolerance test. A fasting person drinks a known dose of glucose. Over the next two hours, blood sugar is measured at prescribed intervals. This is an accurate way to evaluate diabetes, but it is time-consuming and cumbersome.

The most common diagnostic test physicians utilize is known as the glycosylated hemoglobin test, abbreviated HbA1c. This is preferable to a single measurement of blood sugar because it gives a snapshot of glucose levels in the blood over the past several weeks. It is far more convenient than the oral glucose tolerance test, though it may not be quite as accurate.

How Diabetes Is Treated:

For people who have diabetes, the HbA1c can offer a helpful measurement of how well they are controlling their blood sugar overall. Doctors have long encouraged patients to get this number as low as possible. However, they are now starting to re-think that advice. First, it may encourage people to obsess about what they eat. More importantly, though, it can expose people with diabetes to episodes of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). This complication can be especially dangerous for older individuals.

Research such as the ACCORD trials produced startling results: instead of people thriving as the measures of blood sugar control, cholesterol and blood pressure dropped, they did less well. Have these studies changed the way doctors treat diabetes?

Are Older People Being Overtreated for Diabetes?

Aging may reduce physiological resilience. As a consequence, when older people have an episode of lower-than-average blood sugar, they may become dizzy or even fall. In some cases, this could have catastrophic consequences. Moreover, when older people suffer symptoms of hypoglycemia, medical personnel could mistake these for a transient ischemic attack (TIA), a precursor to a stroke. In response, some diabetes experts try just as hard to prevent low blood sugar as high blood sugar in their older patients.

Why Do Some Patients Ration Their Insulin?

Insulin is a life-saving medication for anyone with type 1 diabetes and for some of those with type 2 diabetes. It’s not “nice to have” but rather “must have.” Yet the price of insulin has been skyrocketing. Many people with diabetes find they cannot afford the insulin they must have and cut back on how much they use, putting their health and even their lives at risk. Our guest, Dr. Kasia Lipska, testified to Congress about these risks.

Find out how diabetes is diagnosed and treated. How can people with this condition live as healthy a life as possible?

This Week’s Guest:

Kasia Lipska, MD, MHS, is Assistant Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology) at the Yale School of Medicine and a Clinical Investigator at the Yale-New Haven Hospital Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation (CORE).

Listen to the Podcast:

The podcast of this program will be available the Monday after the broadcast date. The show can be streamed online from this site and podcasts can be downloaded for free. CDs may be purchased at any time after broadcast for $9.99.

Buy the CD

Download the mp3

Jul 24 2019
54 mins
Play

Show 1145: Are Big Corporations Hacking the American Mind? (Archive)

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The distinction between pleasure and happiness might seem like a philosopher’s quibble. Fat Chance author Dr. Robert Lustig tells us why this difference is vitally important to our national wellbeing. Corporations are hacking the American mind because of our ignorance about the difference between them.

Pleasure vs. Happiness:

Dr. Lustig describes the neurochemical foundations behind the difference between pleasure, fueled by dopamine, and happiness, powered by serotonin. He attributes the negative extremes of addiction, due to an overload of dopamine, and depression, from too little serotonin, to the ways that corporations have manipulated Americans with marketing. That’s why he titled his book The Hacking of the American Mind.

How Does Neuro-Marketing Enable Hacking the American Mind?

Dr. Lustig details how neuro-marketing plays into the sad state of affairs that has resulted in too many Americans ending up fat, sick, broke, stupid, depressed, addicted or unhappy. How has our government enabled these developments? What roles have our educational systems played? And most importantly, how can we break out of this vicious cycle?

To dampen dopamine and increase serotonin for more lasting contentment, we need to pay attention to the four Cs: Connect, Contribute, Cope and Cook. Learn about the science behind the corporate takeover of our minds.

This Week’s Guest:

Robert H. Lustig, MD, MSL, is professor of pediatrics in the Division of Endocrinology and a member of the Institute for Health Policy Studies at the University of California, San Francisco. Dr. Lustig consults for several childhood obesity advocacy groups and government agencies.

Dr. Lustig is the author of Fat Chance: Beating the Odds Against Sugar, Processed Food, Obesity, and Disease, and his latest book, The Hacking of the American Mind: The Science Behind the Corporate Takeover of Our Bodies and Brains.

Listen to the Podcast:

The podcast of this program will be available the Monday after the broadcast date. The show can be streamed online from this site and podcasts can be downloaded for free. CDs may be purchased at any time after broadcast for $9.99.

Buy the CD

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Jul 18 2019
57 mins
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