Cover image of Hidden Brain
(18176)

Rank #3 in Science & Medicine category

Science & Medicine

Hidden Brain

Updated 23 days ago

Rank #3 in Science & Medicine category

Science & Medicine
Read more

Shankar Vedantam uses science and storytelling to reveal the unconscious patterns that drive human behavior, shape our choices and direct our relationships.

Read more

Shankar Vedantam uses science and storytelling to reveal the unconscious patterns that drive human behavior, shape our choices and direct our relationships.

iTunes Ratings

18176 Ratings
Average Ratings
14430
1982
790
456
518

I love Shankar

By Nadia Rice - Jun 12 2019
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Excellent topics and enlightening ideas that appeal to the most human aspects of our nature.

One of my favorite podcasts

By Creepy Monkey Boy - Jun 08 2019
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LOVE Hidden Brain. Easy to listen to, easy to understand, and yet thorough at the same time.

iTunes Ratings

18176 Ratings
Average Ratings
14430
1982
790
456
518

I love Shankar

By Nadia Rice - Jun 12 2019
Read more

Excellent topics and enlightening ideas that appeal to the most human aspects of our nature.

One of my favorite podcasts

By Creepy Monkey Boy - Jun 08 2019
Read more

LOVE Hidden Brain. Easy to listen to, easy to understand, and yet thorough at the same time.

Cover image of Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

Updated 23 days ago

Rank #3 in Science & Medicine category

Read more

Shankar Vedantam uses science and storytelling to reveal the unconscious patterns that drive human behavior, shape our choices and direct our relationships.

Our Animal Instincts

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Does living with animals really make us healthier? Why do we eat some animals and keep others as pets? This week on Hidden Brain, we talk with psychology professor Hal Herzog about the contradictions embedded in our relationships with animals.

Jun 17 2019
48 mins
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Me, Myself, and IKEA

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Are women named Virginia more likely to move to Virginia? Are people with the last name of Carpenter more likely to be carpenters? This week on Hidden Brain, we bring you a favorite 2017 episode about our preference for things that remind us of ourselves, and why this tendency can have larger implications than we might at first imagine.

Jun 10 2019
24 mins
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People Like Us

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Generations of Americans have struggled against segregation. Most of us believe in the ideal of a colorblind society. But what happens when that ideal come up against research that finds colorblindness sometimes leads to worse outcomes?

Jun 03 2019
35 mins
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More Divided Than Ever?

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Many of us intuitively feel that the bitter partisanship of American politics is bad for our nation. So should we be concerned about the health of our democracy? This week on Hidden Brain, we revisit two of our favorite conversations about U.S. politics. We start by talking with political scientist John Hibbing about the psychological differences between liberals and conservatives. Then, we explore the role of conflict in democracy with historian David Moss.

May 27 2019
52 mins
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Losing Face

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It happens to all of us: someone recognizes you on the street, calls you by name, and says hello. You, meanwhile, have no idea who that person is. Researchers say this struggle to read other faces is common. This week on Hidden Brain, we revisit a favorite 2016 episode about "super-recognizers" and the rest of us.

May 20 2019
24 mins
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What's Not On The Test

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Smarts matter. But other factors may play an even bigger role in whether someone succeeds. This week, we speak with Nobel Prize-winning economist James Heckman about the skills that predict how you'll fare in life. We'll also look at programs that build these skills in the neediest of children – and new research that suggests the benefits of investing in kids and families can last for generations.

May 13 2019
45 mins
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Creating God

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If you've taken part in a religious service, have you ever stopped to think about how it all came to be? How did people become believers? Where did the rituals come from? And what purpose does it all serve? This week, we bring you a July 2018 episode with social psychologist Azim Shariff. He argues that we should consider religion from a Darwinian perspective, as an innovation that helped human societies to thrive and flourish.

May 06 2019
50 mins
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A Dramatic Cure

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Placebos belong in clinical trials, not in the doctor's office. That's the conventional wisdom, anyway. This week, we ask what placebos might teach us about healing.

Apr 29 2019
50 mins
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Why No One Feels Rich

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If you've ever flown in economy class on a plane, you probably had to walk through the first class cabin to get to your seat. Maybe you noticed the extra leg room. The freshly-poured champagne. Maybe you were annoyed, or envious. Social psychologist Keith Payne says we tend to compare ourselves with those who have more than us, but rarely with those who have less. This week, we explore the psychology of income inequality, and how perceptions of our own wealth shape our lives.

Apr 22 2019
32 mins
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The Sorting Hat

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The desire to find our tribe is universal. We like to know who we are and where we belong. This fascination has led to a thriving industry built on the marketing and sale of personality tests. These tests offer individuals – and, increasingly, employers – quick and easy insights that can be used to make some of life's biggest decisions. But most fail to stand up to scientific scrutiny. This week, we revisit our 2017 episode about the world of personality testing, and explore the many different ways we assess personality and potential – from the Chinese zodiac to Harry Potter houses to the Myers-Briggs test.

Apr 15 2019
50 mins
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