Cover image of ArtCurious Podcast
(359)

Rank #7 in Visual Arts category

Arts
Visual Arts
History

ArtCurious Podcast

Updated 6 days ago

Rank #7 in Visual Arts category

Arts
Visual Arts
History
Read more

Think art history is boring? Think again. It's weird, funny, mysterious, enthralling, and liberating. Join us as we cover the strangest stories in art. Is the Mona Lisa fake? Did Van Gogh actually kill himself? And why were the Impressionists so great? Subscribe to us here, and follow us at www.artcuriouspodcast.com for further information and fun extras. © 2019 Jennifer Dasal // Find us on Twitter and Instagram: @artcuriouspod

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Think art history is boring? Think again. It's weird, funny, mysterious, enthralling, and liberating. Join us as we cover the strangest stories in art. Is the Mona Lisa fake? Did Van Gogh actually kill himself? And why were the Impressionists so great? Subscribe to us here, and follow us at www.artcuriouspodcast.com for further information and fun extras. © 2019 Jennifer Dasal // Find us on Twitter and Instagram: @artcuriouspod

iTunes Ratings

359 Ratings
Average Ratings
324
17
10
5
3

My favorite!

By lucycs1991 - Nov 12 2019
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Truly a terrific podcast! I can’t stop listening and tell everyone I know about Art Curious. More more more!! (From a painter and art lover in general)

Fabulous!

By stephanie history fan - Nov 02 2019
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One of my favorite podcasts- Jennifer is a fantastic storyteller! I love that I get to learn some history, some biographical information about artists, and hear really engaging stories at the same time. Even if you aren’t a big fan of art, you will enjoy this podcast.

iTunes Ratings

359 Ratings
Average Ratings
324
17
10
5
3

My favorite!

By lucycs1991 - Nov 12 2019
Read more
Truly a terrific podcast! I can’t stop listening and tell everyone I know about Art Curious. More more more!! (From a painter and art lover in general)

Fabulous!

By stephanie history fan - Nov 02 2019
Read more
One of my favorite podcasts- Jennifer is a fantastic storyteller! I love that I get to learn some history, some biographical information about artists, and hear really engaging stories at the same time. Even if you aren’t a big fan of art, you will enjoy this podcast.
Cover image of ArtCurious Podcast

ArtCurious Podcast

Updated 6 days ago

Read more

Think art history is boring? Think again. It's weird, funny, mysterious, enthralling, and liberating. Join us as we cover the strangest stories in art. Is the Mona Lisa fake? Did Van Gogh actually kill himself? And why were the Impressionists so great? Subscribe to us here, and follow us at www.artcuriouspodcast.com for further information and fun extras. © 2019 Jennifer Dasal // Find us on Twitter and Instagram: @artcuriouspod

Rank #1: Episode #4: The Problem of Michelangelo's Women (Season 1, Episode 4)

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There are lots of questions that come up in every art history classroom. We hear them over and over again. What is art, really, and how can you define it? Why is the Mona Lisa smiling? What happened to the Winged Victory's arms? And then there's one that you'll hear, or that you'll even think yourself, especially if you are a fan or scholar of Renaissance art.  Why, people ask. Why are Michelangelo's women so... un-womanly?

//SUBSCRIBE and review us on iTunes HERE

And follow us on Twitter and on Instagram for more artsy goodness:

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/artcuriouspod/                                                                  Twitter: https://twitter.com/artcuriouspod

Looking for a transcription of this episode? Check it out here. Not to be used for distribution or any other purpose without permission. 

Want even MORE information? Check out the links below:

Jill Burke's blog: Men With Breasts (Or Why Are Michelangelo's Men So Muscular?) Part 1

Jill Burke's blog: Men With Breasts (Or Why Are

Michelangelo's Men So Muscular?) Part 2

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Sep 26 2016

37mins

Play

Rank #2: Episode #30: Art and Remembrance (Season 2, Episode 10)

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It's interesting that literature seems to have cornered the market on artistic depictions of those who experienced the Holocaust firsthand. We think of The Diary of Anne Frank or Elie Wiesel’s Night first and foremost when we think of how war has been creatively represented by those who survived it-- or didn’t survive it. But it turns out that there were many artists who made visual representations of their experiences, too-- and lots of these individuals were prisoners, like Anne eventually became, in 

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Dec 11 2017

32mins

Play

Rank #3: Episode #3: The Semi-Charmed Life of Elisabeth Vigée Le Brun (Season 1, Episode 3)

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Marie Antoinette, Queen of France, had an image problem: she was seen as frivolous, silly, and out-of-touch. In order to combat her poor press, the royal court commissioned a series of portraits of the queen to make her more relatable and sympathetic. Such images act as excellent propaganda machines, giving Marie Antoinette a much-needed positive spin. But what is even more marvelous is the backstory of the artist who created these portraits-- because the painter who was chosen to portray the highest woman in the land was… another woman.

Talk about a revolution. 

In the third episode of the ArtCurious Podcast, we'll look at the lucky and semi-charmed life of Elisabeth Vigée Le Brun, one of the most popular painters of 18th-century France and the official court painter of Marie Antoinette. 

//SUBSCRIBE and review us on Apple Podcasts HERE

And follow us on Twitter and on Instagram for more artsy goodness:

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/artcuriouspod/                                                                  Twitter: https://twitter.com/artcuriouspod

Looking for a transcription of this episode? Check it out here. Not to be used for distribution or any other purpose without permission. 

Want even MORE information? Check out the links below:

Elisabeth Vigée Le Brun's memoirs

 She Painted Marie Antoinette (and Escaped the Guillotine)

The Praise and Prejudices Elisabeth Vigée Le Brun Faced in her Exceptional 18th-Century Career

Vigée Le Brun: Woman Artist in Revolutionary France

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Sep 12 2016

49mins

Play

Rank #4: Episode #39: Rivals- Picasso vs. Matisse (Season 3, Episode 8)

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This episode receives additional support from Reynolda House Museum of American Art, where you can find one of the nation's most highly regarded collections of American art on view in a unique domestic setting - the restored 1917 mansion of R. J. and Katharine Reynolds surrounded by beautiful gardens and peaceful walking trails. You can browse Reynolda's art and decorative arts collections and see what's coming next at their website,  reynoldahouse.org

The beginning of the Twentieth Century was a glittering time of hope and innovation. It was one of the golden ages of art, particularly in Paris, the glamorous capital of all things cultural, where writers such as Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald and Gertrude Stein hobnobbed and debated ideas with painters like Salvador Dali, Georges Braque and many others who filled the bars, cafes, and salons, working and discussing politics and their idyllic fantasies about what art could be. Thinking and dreaming BIG was the norm-- and collaboration and sharing in each others’ concepts and victories was, too. But there was a shadowy side to such sharing, where friendships and support could morph into jealousy and competitiveness, as the drive to become the best took ultimate control. It is within this sparkling Parisian backdrop that what is possibly the greatest rivalry of art history played out-- what IS modern art, and what should it be?

Please  SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts!

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Episode Credits

Production and Editing by Kaboonki. Theme music by Alex Davis.  Social media assistance by Emily Crockett. Additional writing and research by Stephanie Pryor. 

ArtCurious is sponsored by Anchorlight, an interdisciplinary creative space, founded with the intent of fostering artists, designers, and craftspeople at varying stages of their development. Home to artist studios, residency opportunities, and exhibition space Anchorlight encourages mentorship and the cross-pollination of skills among creatives in the Triangle.

Additional music credits

"Splash In The Ocean" by Daniel Birch is licensed under BY 4.0; "Beach" by Komiku is licensed under CC0 1.0 Universal; "Tundra" by Scanglobe is licensed under BY-NC-SA 4.0 ; "Trace Hunters Departement (ID 281)" by Lobo Loco is licensed under BY-NC-ND 4.0; "La neige tiède" by Fourmi is licensed under BY-NC-ND 4.0; Ad Music: "I Was Waiting for Him" by Lee Rosevere is licensed under BY 4.0; "Hey Mercy" by Pierce Murphy is licensed under BY 4.0; "The Valley" by Dee Yan-Key is licensed under BY-NC-SA 4.0; "'Steve Combs Through' Theme" by Steve Combs is licensed under BY 4.0

Links and further resources

Matisse and Picasso: The Story of Their Rivalry and Friendship, Jack Flam

The Art of Rivalry: Four Friendships, Betrayals, and Breakthroughs in Modern Art, Sebastian Smee

In Montmartre: Picasso, Matisse and the Birth of Modernist Art, Sue Roe

Smithsonian Magazine: "Matisse & Picasso"

The Art Story: Pablo Picasso

PabloPicasso.org: Picasso and Matisse

Slate: Matisse vs. Picasso

The Art Story: Henri Matisse

The Guardian: Quiz: Are You a Picasso or a Matisse?

Pablo Picasso, Self-Portrait, 1907

Henri Matisse, Self-Portrait, 1906

Pablo Picasso, Guernica, 1937

Henri Matisse, Woman with a Hat, 1905

Pablo Picasso, Les Demoiselles d'Avignon, 1907

Henri Matisse, Le Dessert (Harmony in Red), 1908

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Jul 23 2018

30mins

Play

Rank #5: Episode #22: Hitler the (Failed) Artist (Season 2, Episode 2)

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In this episode, we contemplate the way that fine art inspired, affected, and ultimately molded the man who would become the biggest architect of terror in the 20th century. LEARN MORE: Artcuriouspodcast.com SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/artcurious-podcast/id1142736861 INSTAGRAM: www.instagram.com/artcuriouspod/ TWITTER: https://twitter.com/artcuriouspod

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Aug 14 2017

29mins

Play

Rank #6: Episode #33: Rivals- Raphael vs. Michelangelo (Season 3, Episode 2)

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One pair of incredible Renaissance artists experienced a particularly epic rivalry. Both were vying for the same patrons, and their professional contempt very quickly got ultra-personal. Today, explore the intense conflict between Michelangelo and Raphael, both seeking approval and projects from one of the most innovative patrons: Pope Julius II.

This episode is sponsored by The Great Courses Plus. Get a FREE month of unlimited access to over 9,000 lectures presented by engaging, award-winning experts on everything from art to physics, interior design and world languages. Sign up today at thegreatcoursesplus.com/ART

// Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts

Twitter

Facebook

Instagram

Episode Credits

Production and Editing by Kaboonki.  Theme music by Alex Davis.  Social media assistance by Emily Crockett.

Additional music credits may be found on our website

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Apr 30 2018

34mins

Play

Rank #7: Episode #31: Season Finale, Art and WWII- The Long Shadow (Season 2, Episode 11)

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World War Two was the bloodiest, biggest, and most destructive war of all time, decimating entire countries and taking the lives of millions. And as we have learned over the last 10 episodes of the ArtCurious Podcast this season, art was affected in many different ways due to the impact of the war. Art was used to document the experience of soldiers in battle; created to shape public opinion, values, and inspire the war effort; and to fight the enemy. It was a failed dream of Adolf Hitler, leading us to ask

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Dec 25 2017

24mins

Play

Rank #8: Bonus Episode: When Disney Met Dalí

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Today, we’re uncovering the bizarre artistic love child of Walt Disney and Salvador Dali with their incredible short film, Destino. This is a special bonus episode of the ArtCurious Podcast, exploring the unexpected, the slightly odd, and the strangely wonderful in Art History. Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts! Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram

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Sep 09 2018

19mins

Play

Rank #9: Episode #51: Shock Art: Gericault's The Raft of the Medusa (Season 5, Episode 5)

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Works that we take for granted today as masterpieces, or as epitomes of the finest of fine art, could also have been considered ugly, of poor quality, or just bad when they were first made. With the passage of time comes a calm and an acceptance. But that doesn’t change the fact that there are many works peppered throughout art history that were straight-up shocking to the public when they were first presented decades, or even hundreds of years ago.

Today's work of "shock art:" Gericault’s The Raft of the Medusa.

Please  SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts!

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SPONSORS

Skillshare (get two months of unlimited courses FREE with our link)

ThirdLove (get 15% off your first order with our link)

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May 27 2019

28mins

Play

Rank #10: Episode #24: American Propaganda Posters of WWII (Season 2, Episode 4)

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This episode is all about American World War Two propaganda posters: what they were, who created them, and how America was fighting the war via words and pictures. It wasn’t all about manpower and military might: the U.S. fought with art, too. LEARN MORE: Artcuriouspodcast.com SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/artcurious-podcast/id1142736861 INSTAGRAM: www.instagram.com/artcuriouspod/ TWITTER: https://twitter.com/artcuriouspod

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Sep 11 2017

30mins

Play

Rank #11: Episode #21: Season Prologue- The Relationship Between Art and War (Season 2, Episode 1)

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Season Two of ArtCurious begins now! It was the most widespread war in history, involving the participation of more than one hundred million people from around the world, including the greatest powers across the globe. It affected life in myriad ways, and its reach was one of the most horrible. Between the deaths on the battlefield and the mass killings of civilians, an estimated 50 to 85 million fatalities occurred, making it the deadliest conflict in all of recorded human history. And yet, at the same t

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Jul 31 2017

23mins

Play

Rank #12: CURIOUS CALLBACK: Episode #2: Was Van Gogh Accidentally Murdered? (PART ONE)

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This is a rebroadcast of our first episode, which originally aired on August 29, 2016. We’ve updated it with new details, music, and our beloved ArtCurious theme— and, per your suggestion, we have split it into two parts for easier listening. Enjoy!

Vincent Van Gogh's suicide is a huge part of the mythology surrounding him: as much as the famous tale of the cut-off ear is. This so-called "tortured genius," it is said, was so broken down by life and failure that he had no choice but to end his life. Right? But in 2011, two Pulitzer Prize-winning authors published a book titled Van Gogh: The Life that stunned the art world. Therein, Gregory White Smith and Stephen Naifeh state that the artist didn't actually commit suicide.

No, they say: he was actually murdered.

Please  SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts!

Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram

SPONSORS:

The Great Courses Plus —for a free 30-day trial

Care/Of — Use promo code “ARTCURIOUS50” for 50% off your first month’s purchase

Curiosity Stream — Use promo code “ARTCURIOUS” for your free 30-day trial

SimpleHealth —Use promo code “ARTCURIOUS” for your first prescription free

Shout-out to Art and Object

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Feb 04 2019

31mins

Play

Rank #13: Episode #40: Shock Art: Sargent's Madame X (Season 4, Episode 1)

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Works that we take for granted today as masterpieces, or as epitomes of the finest of fine art, could also have been considered ugly, of poor quality, or just bad when they were first made. With the passage of time comes a calm and an acceptance. But that doesn’t change the fact that there are many works peppered throughout art history that were straight-up shocking to the public when they were first presented decades, or even hundreds of years ago.

Today's work of "shock art:" Sargent's Madame X.

Please  SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts!

Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram

Sponsors:

The Great Courses Plus

Rx Bar Promo code: ARTCURIOUS

Bumblejax Promo code: CURIOUS

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Oct 01 2018

28mins

Play

Rank #14: Episode #53: Shock Art: Courbet's The Origin of the World (Season 5, Episode 7)

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Works that we take for granted today as masterpieces, or as epitomes of the finest of fine art, could also have been considered ugly, of poor quality, or just bad when they were first made. With the passage of time comes a calm and an acceptance. But that doesn’t change the fact that there are many works peppered throughout art history that were straight-up shocking to the public when they were first presented decades, or even hundreds of years ago.

Today's work of "shock art:" Courbet’s The Origin of the World.

Please  SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts!

Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram

SPONSORS

The Great Courses (85% off digital course Leonardo da Vinci and the Italian High Renaissance, and more)

Skillshare (get two months of unlimited courses FREE with our link)

ThirdLove (get 15% off your first order with our link)

The Citizenry (get a $50 gift voucher for any purchase of $200 or more with promo code ARTCURIOUS)

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Jun 24 2019

37mins

Play

Rank #15: Episode #46: Shock Art: Picasso's Les Demoiselles d'Avignon (Season 4, Episode 7)

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Works that we take for granted today as masterpieces, or as epitomes of the finest of fine art, could also have been considered ugly, of poor quality, or just bad when they were first made. With the passage of time comes a calm and an acceptance. But that doesn’t change the fact that there are many works peppered throughout art history that were straight-up shocking to the public when they were first presented decades, or even hundreds of years ago.

Today's work of "shock art:" Picasso's Les Demoiselles d'Avignon.

Please  SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts!

Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram

Sponsors

Art and Object

The Great Courses Plus

Kaboonki

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Dec 24 2018

24mins

Play

Rank #16: Episode #42: Shock Art: Gentileschi's Judith Slaying Holofernes (Season 4, Episode 3)

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Works that we take for granted today as masterpieces, or as epitomes of the finest of fine art, could also have been considered ugly, of poor quality, or just bad when they were first made. With the passage of time comes a calm and an acceptance. But that doesn’t change the fact that there are many works peppered throughout art history that were straight-up shocking to the public when they were first presented decades, or even hundreds of years ago.

Today's work of "shock art:" Gentileschi's Judith Slaying Holofernes.

Please  SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts!

Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram

Sponsors:

 The Great Courses Plus: thegreatcoursesplus.com/art

Poshmark: invite code "ARTCURIOUS"

Green Chef: greenchef.us/artcurious

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Oct 29 2018

29mins

Play

Rank #17: Episode #38- Rivals: Manet vs. Degas (Season 3, Episode 7)

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This episode receives additional support from Reynolda House Museum of American Art, where you can find one of the nation's most highly regarded collections of American art on view in a unique domestic setting - the restored 1917 mansion of R. J. and Katharine Reynolds surrounded by beautiful gardens and peaceful walking trails. You can browse Reynolda's art and decorative arts collections and see what's coming next at their website,  reynoldahouse.org

Gift-giving: it’s one of the primary ways to solidify a relationship. But what happens when gifting goes suddenly wrong, and alters a friendship for good?

Please  SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts!

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Episode Credits

This is the third  of three episodes in collaboration with Sartle. Sartle encourages you to see art history differently, and they have a plethora of incredibly fun and informative videos, blog posts, and articles on their website.

Production and Editing by Kaboonki. Theme music by Alex Davis.  Social media assistance by Emily Crockett.

ArtCurious is sponsored by Anchorlight, an interdisciplinary creative space, founded with the intent of fostering artists, designers, and craftspeople at varying stages of their development. Home to artist studios, residency opportunities, and exhibition space Anchorlight encourages mentorship and the cross-pollination of skills among creatives in the Triangle.

Additional music credits

"Misterioso" by Dee Yan-Key is licensed under BY-NC-SA 4.0; "Turkey Vulture" by Chad Crouch is licensed under BY-NC 3.0 ; "Bond Band" by Yan Terrian is licensed under BY-SA 4.0; "Galamus (piano solo)" by Circus Marcus is licensed under BY-NC 3.0; "Simple Life" by Anton Khoryukov is licensed under BY-NC-SA 4.0; "Facing It" by Komiku is licensed under CC0 1.0. Ad Music: "Lonely Chicken Inside Shopping Mall (ID 122)" by KieLoKaz is licensed under BY-NC-ND 4.0; "The Valley" by Dee Yan-Key is licensed under BY-NC-SA 4.0; "Pillow Tree: Version 2" by UncleBibby is licensed under BY 4.0

Links and further resources

Manet and the Family Romance, Nancy Locke

Olympia: Paris in the Age of Manet, Otto Friedrich

The Art of Rivalry: Four Friendships, Betrayals, and Breakthroughs in Modern Art, Sebastian Smee

The Telegraph: "Did Manet Have a Secret Son?"

The Art Story: Edgar Degas

The New York Times: "Degas and Mrs. Manet"

Edouard Manet, Self-Portrait with Palette, 1878–1879

Edgar Degas, Self-Portrait, 1855 (detail)

Edouard Manet, Le Déjeuner sur l’herbe (Luncheon on the Grass), 1862-1863

Edgar Degas, The Rehearsal of the Ballet Onstage, 1874

Edouard Manet, The Absinthe Drinker, 1859 (detail)

Edgar Degas, Édouard Manet and Mme. Manet, 1868-69

Edouard Manet, Olympia, 1863

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Jul 09 2018

33mins

Play

Rank #18: CURIOUS CALLBACK: Episode #2: Was Van Gogh Accidentally Murdered? (PART TWO)

Podcast cover
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This is a rebroadcast of our first episode, which originally aired on August 29, 2016. We’ve updated it with new details, music, and our beloved ArtCurious theme— and, per your suggestion, we have split it into two parts for easier listening. If you haven't listened to part one, please go back and do so. Enjoy!

Vincent Van Gogh's suicide is a huge part of the mythology surrounding him: as much as the famous tale of the cut-off ear is. This so-called "tortured genius," it is said, was so broken down by life and failure that he had no choice but to end his life. Right? But in 2011, two Pulitzer Prize-winning authors published a book titled Van Gogh: The Life that stunned the art world. Therein, Gregory White Smith and Stephen Naifeh state that the artist didn't actually commit suicide.

No, they say: he was actually murdered.

Please  SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts!

Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram

SPONSORS:

The Great Courses Plus

Shout-out to Art and Object

Zola - get $50 off your registry and your free wedding website

Perfect Keto - use promo code "art" at checkout for 30% off sitewide

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Feb 18 2019

35mins

Play

Rank #19: Episode #34: Rivals- Pollock vs. de Kooning (Season 3, Episode 3)

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This episode is sponsored by The Great Courses Plus. Get a FREE month of unlimited access to over 9,000 lectures presented by engaging, award-winning experts on everything from art to physics, interior design and world languages. Sign up today at thegreatcoursesplus.com/ART

This episode receives additional support from Reynolda House Museum of American Art, where you can find one of the nation's most highly regarded collections of American art on view in a unique domestic setting - the restored 1917 mansion of R. J. and Katharine Reynolds surrounded by beautiful gardens and peaceful walking trails. You can browse Reynolda's art and decorative arts collections and see what's coming next at their website,  reynoldahouse.org.

The art world is a man’s world- or, at least, it used to be entirely one. This shouldn’t be surprising to anyone who is a longtime listener of the ArtCurious Podcast, because we’ve touched multiple times on the difficulties that have faced women who have sought careers as artists.  Now, thankfully, in the age of #metoo, the male-heaviness of the art world is changing a bit, as it is in other facets of society. But turning back the clock to any other era in history, and the reality is that it was totally a man’s game. And the absolute manliness of it all was compounded intensely in one particular time and place: post-war America, where it was all about brusque machismo, the biggest innovations, and the biggest splash. It was a measuring contest like none other, and two larger-than-life characters were at the center of it all.

Please SUBSCRIBE and REVIEW our show on Apple Podcasts!

Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram

Episode Credits

Production and Editing by Kaboonki. Theme music by Alex Davis.  Social media assistance by Emily Crockett. Additional research and writing for this episode by Stephanie Pryor.

ArtCurious is sponsored by Anchorlight, an interdisciplinary creative space, founded with the intent of fostering artists, designers, and craftspeople at varying stages of their development. Home to artist studios, residency opportunities, and exhibition space Anchorlight encourages mentorship and the cross-pollination of skills among creatives in the Triangle.

Additional music credits

"The Walk" by Dee Yan-Key is licensed under BY-NC-SA 4.0; "Catching Glitter" by Split Phase is licensed under BY-NC-SA 3.0 US; "Aquasigns" by Tagirijus  is licensed under BY-NC-SA 4.0; "You know why" by Loyalty Freak Music is licensed under CC0 1.0 Universal License; "Tethered" by Nctrnm  is licensed under BY 4.0. Based on a work at https://soundcloud.com/nctrnm/; "Dancing on the Seafloor (KieLoKaz ID 110)" by KieLoBot  is licensed under BY-NC-ND 4.0; "Attempt 7" by Jared C. Balogh is licensed under BY-NC-SA 3.0

Ad music: "Ground Cayenne" by The Good Lawdz is licensed under BY-SA 3.0

Links and further resources

The Art of Rivalry: Four Friendships, Betrayals, and Breakthroughs in Modern Art, Sebastian Smee

The New York Times: "Ruth Kligman, Muse and Artist, Dies at 80"

Jackson Pollock: An American Saga, Steven Naifeh and Gregory Smith

De Kooning: A Retrospective, John Elderfield

Willem de Kooning and his wife, Elaine, photograph by Hans Namuth, 1952.

Jackson Pollock and his wife, Lee Krasner, photograph by Hans Namuth, 1950.

Willem de Kooning, Excavation, 1950

Jackson Pollock, Stenographic Figure, c. 1942

Willem de Kooning, Woman I, 1950-1952

Jackson Pollock, Autumn Rhythm (Number 30), 1950

Jackson Pollock painting on panes of glass, Hans Namuth documentary stills, 1950.

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May 14 2018

31mins

Play

Rank #20: Episode #44: Shock Art: Goya's Saturn Devouring His Son (Season 4, Episode 5)

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Works that we take for granted today as masterpieces, or as epitomes of the finest of fine art, could also have been considered ugly, of poor quality, or just bad when they were first made. With the passage of time comes a calm and an acceptance. But that doesn’t change the fact that there are many works peppered throughout art history that were straight-up shocking to the public when they were first presented decades, or even hundreds of years ago.

Today's work of "shock art:" Goya's Saturn Devouring His Son.

Sponsors

The Great Courses Plus

Kaboonki

Shout out to Art and Object

Shout out to The Simple Sophisticate

Twitter / Facebook/ Instagram

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Nov 26 2018

23mins

Play