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News & Politics

The Takeaway

Updated 13 days ago

News & Politics
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A fresh alternative in daily news featuring critical conversations, live reports from the field, and listener participation. The Takeaway provides a breadth and depth of world, national, and regional news coverage that is unprecedented in public media.

Read more

A fresh alternative in daily news featuring critical conversations, live reports from the field, and listener participation. The Takeaway provides a breadth and depth of world, national, and regional news coverage that is unprecedented in public media.

iTunes Ratings

294 Ratings
Average Ratings
221
26
15
14
18

Positive take on current topics

By avirrr - May 22 2019
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Interesting interviews and information

Keep Tanzina Vega

By Carolsummit - Jan 22 2019
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An outstanding commentator and interviewer.

iTunes Ratings

294 Ratings
Average Ratings
221
26
15
14
18

Positive take on current topics

By avirrr - May 22 2019
Read more
Interesting interviews and information

Keep Tanzina Vega

By Carolsummit - Jan 22 2019
Read more
An outstanding commentator and interviewer.
Cover image of The Takeaway

The Takeaway

Updated 13 days ago

Read more

A fresh alternative in daily news featuring critical conversations, live reports from the field, and listener participation. The Takeaway provides a breadth and depth of world, national, and regional news coverage that is unprecedented in public media.

Rank #1: Politics with Amy Walter: the Upcoming 2020 Elections in the Battleground State

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This week, Politics with Amy Walter is coming to you from Detroit.

The city has gotten a lot of attention over the course of the week as it hosted the latest round of democratic debates. But why Detroit? Because — Michigan.

President Donald Trump won Michigan by just over 10,000 votes in 2016. But Democrats are hoping to put the state firmly back in their column. After a strong showing in the 2018 midterms, Democrats are feeling hopeful. Republicans say there's still a lot of support for President Trump — even in the counties, the Democrats were able to flip. 

Guests:

Congresswoman Debbie Dingell (D), representing Michigan's 12th District

Lavora Barnes, Chair of the Michigan Democratic Party

Congresswoman Haley Stevens (D), representing Michigan's 11th District

Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer (D)

Dr. Abdul El-Sayed, a progressive activist who ran against Whitmer in the primary

Congressman Paul Mitchell (R), representing Michigan's 10th District

Jamie Roe, a Michigan-based Republican strategist

Aug 02 2019
45 mins
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Rank #2: The Juggle Is Real: Navigating Life In Your 40s

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 If you're in your 40s and more tired than you've ever been because you are juggling life, money, aging parents, aging yourself, not wanting to play games any more etc. raise your hand. 🖐🏼 How are you coping?

— Tanzina Vega (@tanzinavega) May 9, 2019

After a tweet from host Tanzina Vega about coping with life in your 40s went viral, we kicked off a series exploring the challenges and opportunities of life in your 40s. We've brought all those conversations together in this special podcast episode called "The Juggle Is Real: Navigating Life in Your Forties." 

May 25 2019
43 mins
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Rank #3: Trump's Investigatory Troubles Extend Far Beyond Robert Mueller

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Trump's Investigatory Troubles Extend Far Beyond Robert Mueller

The Southern District of New York is pursuing criminal charges against the President's inaugural committee.

For Some Saudis Accused of Crimes in US, the Kingdom Helps Those Charged Evade Justice

Senator Ron Wyden of Oregon joins the show to discuss his proposed bill to make this more difficult.

'High Flying Bird' is a Sports Movie That Wants to Disrupt the System

The Takeaway sits down with screenwriter Tarell Alvin McCraney and actor André Holland, to discuss their new movie, “High Flying Bird,” which was shot on an iPhone in just 13 days.

Guests:

Ilya Marritz

Jessica Roth

Shane Dixon Kavanaugh

Senator Ron Wyden

André Holland

Tarell Alvin McCraney

You can connect with The Takeaway on TwitterFacebookInstagram or on our show page at TheTakeaway.org.

Feb 07 2019
39 mins
Play

Rank #4: Podcast: Tragedy Strikes in El Paso and Dayton 2019-08-05

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Tragedy Strikes in El Paso and Dayton 

Over the weekend, two mass shootings marked a week full of domestic terrorism in the country.  

"Erased from Public Memory": The History of Anti-Latino Violence in the U.S.

There is a historical precedent to the shooting in El Paso and people living in the border.

Black Homeownership Drops to Lowest Level in 50 Years

At the same time, the Trump administration is trying to weaken the 1968 Fair Housing Act.

Other news: 

Why Aren't There More Female Esports Competitors?

As esports becomes more popular, the gender divide amongst its competitors is becoming more apparent.

The Political Future of Puerto Rico

Today marks the first week of a new era for Puerto Rico without Ricardo Roselló as its leader, following his resignation on Friday.

Aug 05 2019
30 mins
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Rank #5: Podcast: 2019-05-14 Hospitals in Rural America are Closing, Leading to Devastating Consequences

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Hospitals in Rural America are Closing, Leading to Devastating Consequences

Patients are having to travel long distances to access the care they need.

China Strikes Back: Trade War Escalation Spooks Global Markets

China announced retaliatory tariffs on Monday, promising to "never surrender" in the trade war with the US.

Pompeo Cancels Trip to Moscow to Meet with E.U. Diplomats About Iran

On Monday, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo canceled a planned trip to Moscow and instead met With E.U. diplomats, with hopes of finding common ground over Iran.

Other segments:

A Rhode Island School Districts "Lunch Shaming" Policy Renews Conversation Over School Lunch Debt

Students in Warwick, RI who owed money for past meals were to be served cold sunflower butter and jelly sandwiches until a national backlash caused the district to scrap its plan.

May 14 2019
38 mins
Play

Rank #6: Politics with Amy Walter: The Mueller Report is Not the End, It's Just the Beginning

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It’s been a long (almost) two years but the Special Counsel’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election, possible coordination between the Trump Campaign and Russia, and obstruction of justice has reached its final culmination. The redacted report was released on Thursday. The end.

Or is it just the beginning?

Well, like a lot of things...it’s both.

Katie Benner, a Justice Department reporter at The New York Times, discusses the new and revealing pieces of the redacted Mueller report and if Robert Mueller did anything that sets precedent for the next special counsel. Nicholas Fandos, who covers Congress for the New York Times, brings us up to speed on the investigations that are being conducted by several congressional committees. 

Congressman Raja Krishnamoorthi is the Democratic representative from Illinois’s 8th congressional district. He also serves on two key congressional committees with their own investigations into President Donald Trump: The Committee on Oversight and Reform and the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence. We talk to him about how those investigations will or won’t change now that we have the redacted Mueller report. 

For a conservative take on the redacted Mueller report, we speak to Noah Rothman, a political commentator, and editor at Commentary.

Finally, what impact could the release of the redacted Mueller report have on Donald Trump and his presidency? We talk to Carrie Dann, a politics editor at NBC, who has been analyzing what impact the Mueller investigation has had on public opinion. 

Apr 19 2019
46 mins
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Rank #7: Politics with Amy Walter: "The World's Most Exclusive Club"

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In his 1957 book, Citadel, journalist William White refers to the Senate as “the world’s most exclusive club.” But for many high-profile Democrats, it's a club that seems to have gone out of style. In April, Stacey Abrams, the Democrat who narrowly lost the race for governor of Georgia in 2018, announced that she is not running for Senate. Joaquin Castro in Texas, Ambassador Susan Rice in Maine, Congresswoman Cindy Axne and former Governor Tom Vilsack of Iowa have all made the same decision. Then, there's the Democrats who have decided to run for president instead: John Hickenlooper, the former governor of Colorado, and Beto O’Rourke who rose to prominence in 2018 when he challenged Texas Senator Ted Cruz.  What's going on here? 

Jennifer Duffy, a political analyst covering US Senate and Governor's races for the Cook Political Report, explains why for some Democrats the Senate seems to have lost its allure.

Frances Lee, a political science professor at the University of Maryland, tells us how we got a Senate in the first place. 

Osita Nwanevu, a staff writer at the New Yorker covering politics and policy in Washington, D.C., and Logan Dobson, a Republican strategist and the former director of Data and Analytics for the National Republican Senatorial Committee, debate equal state representation in the U.S Senate.

Alan Frumin, the Senate Parliamentarian from 1987 to 1995 and again from 2001 to 2012, answers questions from our listeners about Senate rules and procedures. 

Amy's Final Take:

The debate about how the Senate works - or doesn’t - is part of a bigger debate and a bigger issue that I’ve talked about a lot on this show; the breakdown of trust and faith in institutions. The whole deal in politics is that winners treat the losers fairly because they know that someday they will be on the losing side and want to be treated with respect and fairness. But, that’s not where we are now. Americans are more distrustful of the other party than ever before. But, changing the underlying structures of the system creates all kinds of unintended consequences that may only exacerbate the problems they are trying to fix.  Blowing up or reconstructing institutions like the Senate may solve a short-term problem, but in the long term our bigger problem that needs fixing is to find faith and trust in one another.

May 10 2019
47 mins
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Rank #8: Politics with Amy Walter: Democratic Socialism is Having a Moment; Will Voters be Receptive to its Message?

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Throughout most of the 20th century and beyond, the term "socialism" has carried a lot of baggage in U.S. political history. Socialism itself has deep historical roots in the U.S. But the ideology became a toxic brand thanks in part to the Cold War, as Soviet republics and their imitators around the world saw authoritarians seize power under the guise of socialism.

But almost 30 years after the fall of the Soviet Union, socialism is once again having a moment in mainstream U.S. politics. As politicians like Senator Bernie Sanders and Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez pitch their Democratic Socialism to a generation not familiar with Cold War rhetoric, skeptics remain unconvinced about the promise of sweeping social reform.

Guests:

Bernie Sanders, United States Senator from Vermont, Democratic presidential candidate

Peter Beinart, contributing editor for The Atlantic and professor at the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism

Sheryl Gay Stolberg, Congressional Correspondent for The New York Times

Ilya Somin, Professor of Law at George Mason University

Jun 14 2019
44 mins
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Rank #9: Politics with Amy Walter: Unpacking the Democratic Debates from the Aspen Ideas Festival

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At this year's Aspen Ideas Festival, Amy hosted back-to-back post-debate discussions with a panel of influential writers. We'll hear excerpts from the conversation, in an effort to provide analysis of the first Democratic debates of the 2020 presidential campaign.

We also talk with two academics to discuss how their policy work could be used in tandem with politics to bring about change in areas of technology and inequality.

Finally, Amy reflects on the LGBTQ movement, on the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising.

Guests:

Kristen Soltis Anderson, co-founder of Echelon Insights and author of The Selfie Vote: Where Millennials Are Leading America (and How Republicans Can Keep Up)

Rich Lowry, editor-in-chief of National Review

Jonathan Capehart, opinion writer for The Washington Post and a member of its editorial board; he also hosts the “Cape Up” podcast

Raj Chetty, professor of economics at Harvard University, and the director of Opportunity Insights

Ramesh Srinivasan, professor and director of the Digital Cultures Lab at UCLA

Ilene Chaiken, co-creator of The L Word and executive producer of Empire

Jun 28 2019
46 mins
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Rank #10: Podcast: Coal Miners, Protesting Unpaid Wages, Block Train Tracks 2019-08-01

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Coal Miners, Protesting Unpaid Wages, Block Train Tracks

On July 1st, the mining company BlackJewel LLC, the 6th largest coal producer in the country, filed for bankruptcy, and the fate of its 1,700 employees remains unclear.

Remembering the Red Summer, 100 Years Later

Black communities faced unprecedented violence during the Red Summer of 1919, and responded with activism that laid the groundwork for modern protest movements. 

Hannah Gadsby on Breaking Comedy Rules and Creating New Ones in "Douglas"

Hannah Gadsby sits down with The Takeaway to talk about managing audience expectations, discussing her recent autism diagnosis on stage, and channeling anger through her work.

Other segments:

Both Police and Protesters are Grappling with Technology Amid Hong Kong Protests

After weeks of demonstrations, tension is escalating.

How Did the CNN Debates Address Race and Inequality?

CNN held the second of two Democratic presidential debates in Detroit Wednesday night.

Aug 01 2019
38 mins
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Rank #11: Politics with Amy Walter: Digital Ads and the Wild West of Political Campaigning

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As U.S. voters increasingly spend more of their lives online, political campaigns and other outside groups are trying to figure out how best to meet them on these digital spaces.

But in the rush to perfect the effectiveness of digital ads, regulators have been slow to catch up. Will the lessons of 2016, and what can happen when nefarious actors hijack those platforms to spread disinformation, prove an effective warning for 2020 and beyond? And will Democrats be able to catch up to the Trump campaign's robust online operation?

Also, continuing with our "Candidate Talk" series, Amy talks with Senator Michael Bennet about trying to break out in a crowded Democratic field.

Guests:

Patrick Ruffini, Republican digital strategist, partner and co-founder of Echelon Insights, a polling and data analytics firm

Guy Cecil, Chairman of Priorities USA, a Democratic super PAC

Kevin Roose, tech columnist for Business Day at The New York Times

Young Mie Kim, professor at the school of journalism and mass communication at the University of Wisconsin-Madison

Ellen Weintraub, Chair of the Federal Election Commission

Michael Bennet, United States Senator from Colorado, Democratic Presidential candidate

Jun 23 2019
46 mins
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Rank #12: Polar Vortex Has Midwest Temperatures Plunging to Near Record Lows

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Polar Vortex Has Midwest Temperatures Plunging to Near Record Lows

Cold snaps like this were more common in generations past, but climate change is making these events rarer.

What Does it Mean to Assimilate in a Nation of Immigrants?

"Hispanics should work harder at assimilation," said former NBC News anchor Tom Brokaw. But assimilate to what, exactly?

Not a Telenovela: Recapping Outrageous Revelations from El Chapo's Trial

As the trial draws to a close, we recap various anecdotes from the trial.

Guests:

Eric Holthaus

Elizabeth Shockman

Mariah Woelfel

Mary C. Waters

Daniel José Older

Keegan Hamilton

You can connect with The Takeaway on TwitterFacebookInstagram or on our show page at TheTakeaway.org.

Jan 30 2019
28 mins
Play

Rank #13: Podcast: 2019-05-21 Insurance Companies Continue to Deny Mental Health and Addiction Treatment Despite Law Guaranteeing Coverage

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Insurance Companies Continue to Deny Mental Health and Addiction Treatment Despite Law Guaranteeing Coverage

When the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act was passed in 2008, it supposed to guarantee insurance coverage of mental health and substance abuse disorders, it didn't. 

Backlogs, Quotas and Rushed Cases: The Pressures Immigration Judges Face

Immigration judges throughout the country ultimately decide the fate of migrants.

The Juggle: Working In Your 40s

The Takeaway is tackling life your 40s and what makes this decade so unique. Next up: work.

Other segments: 

One Year After Sexual Assault Accusations Against Steve Wynn, RNC Continues Accepting His Donations

Over a year ago, the #MeToo movement caught up with casino mogul Steve Wynn. Today, the organization that cast him out in response to those allegations is continuing to accept his cash.

The Need for Wealthy Benefactors Creates an Ethical Dilemma for Museums 

The Met announced they'd no longer be accepting money from the Sackler family, but the Sackler's aren't the only donors creating problems in the art world.

May 21 2019
29 mins
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Rank #14: Politics with Amy Walter: There's a Generational Divide Upending U.S. Politics

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After a bruising political week in which President Trump's feud with "The Squad" reached a fever pitch, Amy Walter reflects on how both Republicans and Democrats could be alienating crucial voters ahead of the 2020 elections.

Plus, we look at the yawning generation gap, as voters from different eras compete for political relevance.

With the U.S. electorate divided along generational lines, there are transformational demographic trends already having clear impacts on the way 2020 presidential candidates are trying to appeal to voters. But while the Baby Boomer bloc is increasingly eclipsed by the combined numbers of Generation X, Millennials, and Generation Z, so far it's an open question whether or not the influence of younger voters will have the final say in determining the results of the Democratic primary, or the general election.

This week, we look at the different generations active in U.S. politics, and try to figure out the forces at play in deciding the country's future.

Guests:

Dave Weigel, national political reporter for The Washington Post

Paul Taylor, author of The Next America: Boomers, Millennials, and the Looming Generational Showdown

Clare Malone, senior political writer at FiveThirtyEight

Manuel Pastor, professor of sociology and American Studies & Ethnicity at the University of Southern California

Jul 19 2019
47 mins
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Rank #15: Making Reparations Work in America

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Making Reparations Work in America

2020 candidates are speaking up about reparations. But this debate goes far beyond being a political talking point.

Congressional Failure to Approve Puerto Rico Recovery Aid Reflects Long History of Bipartisan Neglect

Puerto Rico's government recently had to cut food stamp benefits, adding further insecurity to an already vulnerable population.

McConnell Moves To Limit Debates Over Judges To Two Hours

Mitch McConnell’s latest push to fill the courts with young conservative judges involves a rule change that would limit floor debate over nominations to two hours total.

Lori Lightfoot Voted in as Chicago's First African American Woman Mayor

On Tuesday, Chicago became the largest U.S. city to elect an African American woman as mayor. Now, all eyes are on how Lori Lightfoot will address issues from gun violence to policing.

Lesley McSpadden, Michael Brown's Mother, Loses Ferguson City Council Race

The election of Fran Griffin means that the city council now has an even split between black and white representatives for a majority black city that’s rife with racial tension.

Guests:

Maxine Crump

Katherine Franke

Nkechi Taifa

Dánica Coto

Andrea González-Ramírez

Lawrence Hurley

Apr 03 2019
37 mins
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Rank #16: Politics with Amy Walter: Those Who Draw the Lines...Have the Power

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On this week's Politics with Amy Walter: The fight over redistricting and who gets to wield the pen.

Slay the Dragon,” chronicles the challenges to congressional maps in several states that have been accused of partisan gerrymandering including Michigan and Wisconsin. In Michigan, voters approved a ballot measure in 2018 to take map-drawing power out of the hands of the legislature and put it into the hands of an independent commission. The film also follows the legal team involved in Gill v. Whitford as that case from Wisconsin makes its way to the Supreme Court of the United States. 

Barak Goodman is the co-director of Slay the Dragon. The film will premiere later this month at The Tribeca Film Festival.

Scott Walker was the governor of Wisconsin from 2011 to 2019. During his tenure, Republican lawmakers created new congressional districts which he then signed into law. Walker is now the Finance Chairman of The National Republican Redistricting Trust, but he's also been accused by critics of partisan gerrymandering. Amy Walter speaks to Walker about why he decided to continue to focus on an issue that has embroiled him in so much controversy.

Eric Holder, the Attorney General under President Obama, recently wrote an editorial for The Washington Post in which he announced that he will not be running for president, and instead will focus his energies on the “fight to end gerrymandering.”

We talk to Holder about why he thinks this is a such an important issue for Democrats to combat right now. 

On March 26th, the Supreme Court of the United States heard oral arguments in this term’s gerrymandering case. Amy Howe, the co-founder of SCOTUSblog, brings us up to speed on what happened and what to watch for. 

Apr 05 2019
45 mins
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Rank #17: Vote, But Your Civic Engagement Doesn't End There

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Millions of Americans voted last Election Day. But millions of others participate in our democracy every day in small ways. While 7 in 10 Americans report feeling generally negative about what is going on in the country today, Americans are also more hopeful about solving problems locally. According to the 2018 Civic Engagement Survey by the Public Religion Research Institute and The Atlantic, a majority of Americans say they are optimistic that people in their communities who hold different political views can come together to solve problems.

We explore that problem solving on this hour all about civic engagement. We begin by explaining exactly what civic engagement is, how it works, and where it happens. Priya Parker is a conflict resolution facilitator, author of "The Art of Gathering: How We Meet and Why it Matters" and Hollie Russon Gilman is a lecturer at Columbia University and co-author of "Civic Power: Rebuilding American Democracy in an Era of Crisis."

The Takeaway is then joined by Mamaroneck High School government teacher Joseph Liberti, who started a new program to get his students civically engaged in their local community. One of his students, 15-year-old sophomore Simon Worth, also speaks about his experience with the hands-on program.

Then we turn and look at the Congressional Management Foundation. For decades, the CMF has researched citizen engagement with Congress. We talk to Bradford Fitch, the President, and CEO of CMF, about the huge increase in communications volume being reported by Congressional offices and in town hall meetings in the year after the election, and whether that enthusiasm and engagement persist today.

Librarians across the country strive to serve the needs of their communities, but from city to city, those needs don’t always look the same.

In Nashville, Tennessee, as the Black Lives Matter movement was growing across the country, librarians noticed a growing demand within their community to have honest conversations around issues of race. Since then, the library has facilitated discussions for a variety of different groups including local law enforcement, college students, and corporations.

Two students from a local middle school sit at a replica lunch counter, similar to the ones where college students like Diane Nash and John Lewis would “sit in” to peacefully protest against segregation at downtown restaurants. 
(Nashville Public Library )

Andrea Blackman is the director of the Civil Rights Room at the Nashville Public Library. She joins The Takeaway to explain how her library has started conversations on racial justice within the Nashville community.

Does this moment of vigorous civic engagement extend to giving and philanthropy, too? In 2017, Americans gave more than four hundred billion dollars to charity. But exactly who is giving that money, where they are donating, and why they choose to give -- that’s all been changing, in recent years. Stacy Palmer, the editor of the Chronicle of Philanthropy, brings us through what we know about American charitable giving today.

In practice, all this civic engagement can become pretty difficult if people can’t find common ground. And who steps in when the government can’t bridge the gap? Sometimes -- it’s religion.

Alan Yarborough, the Communications Coordinator for the Episcopal Church’s Office of Government Relations, also created a 5-week curriculum on civil discourse for churches to use.

Bill Steverson, is a member of St. Timothy’s Episcopal Church in Signal Mountain, Tennessee near Chattanooga.

Note: This segment originally aired on November 6, 2018.

Click on the 'Listen' button above to hear this segment. Don't have time to listen right now? Subscribe to our podcast via iTunesTuneInStitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts to take this segment with you on the go.

Want to comment on this story? Share your thoughts on our Facebook page or Twitter.

Jan 21 2019
46 mins
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Rank #18: Politics with Amy Walter: Democrats Divided

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The ongoing migrant crisis is getting worse, as the Department of Homeland Security is running out of room to house the increasing number of migrants detained at the border. And when evidence of the conditions dominated the news cycle earlier this month, the outrage prompted lawmakers to get involved. But how that involvement played out became the latest point of contention between factions within the Democratic Party.

The Senate passed a spending bill aimed at alleviating what the Trump administration said was a lack of funding to properly house detained migrants. But the Democratic-controlled House, wary of writing a blank check without strict limits on how that money would be spent, sent a revised bill back to the Senate. But when that bill died with Mitch McConnell, the conservative-leaning "Problem Solvers" caucus of the House Democrats signaled that they were willing to pass the Senate's no-strings-attached bill, with or without the support of Speaker Pelosi.

When Pelosi ultimately sided with the Problem Solvers, it set off a backlash among the party's progressive wing, most notably Congresswomen Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Ayanna Pressley, Rashida Tlaib, and Ilhan Omar, known collectively as "The Squad." And the outrage breathed new life into a long-simmering division between The Squad and Party leadership.

This week, Amy examines how deep these divisions go, and whether or not party unity is possible heading into 2020.

Also, Representative Seth Moulton from Massachusetts, who's running for the Democratic presidential nomination, joins Amy for her Candidate Talk series.

Guests:

Ryan Grim, the DC bureau chief at The Intercept, and the author of We’ve Got People: From Jesse Jackson to AOC, the End of Big Money and the Rise of a Movement

Seth Moulton, Represents Massachusetts's Sixth District in the House of Representatives, Democratic presidential candidate

Heidi Heitkamp, former Senator from North Dakota

Steve Kornacki, National Political Correspondent for NBC News and MSNBC, author of the book The Red and the Blue

Eric Liu, CEO of Citizen University and executive director of the Aspen Institute’s Citizenship and American Identity Program, author of Become America: Civic Sermons on Love, Responsibility, and Democracy

Jul 13 2019
47 mins
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Rank #19: ICE Force-Feeding Immigrant Detainees, In Seemingly Unprecedented Move

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ICE Force-Feeding Immigrant Detainees, In Seemingly Unprecedented Move

Last week, ICE confirmed that their agency is force-feeding nine detainees in El Paso, as a result of a hunger strike to protest conditions and treatment inside the facility.

El Salvador Elects Nayib Bukele as President

37-year-old Nayib Bukele the former mayor of San Salvador, the country’s capital city, won the election in a landslide.

U.S. Weapons are Ending Up in the Hands of Al Qaeda and Other Proxy Fighters Across Yemen

Nima Elbagir recently spent 11 days in Yemen, and her reporting reveals how UAE and Saudi Arabia, both US allies, are enabling arms to wind up in the hands of Iranian backed militias.

Nickel and Dimed...for Federal Government Court Documents

The going rate is $0.10 a page but some experts estimate it costs only half of one ten-thousandth of a penny to send out a page. 

Guests:

Garance Burke

Grace Meng

Heather Gies

Nima Elbagir

Shira Scheindlin

Matt Ford

You can connect with The Takeaway on TwitterFacebookInstagram or on our show page at TheTakeaway.org.

Feb 05 2019
38 mins
Play

Rank #20: Podcast: 2019-05-16 School Segregation is Getting Worse 65 Years After Brown v. Board of Education

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School Segregation is Getting Worse 65 Years After Brown v. Board of Education 

The number of intensely segregated minority schools has tripled since 1988 with New York and California having some of the highest rates of school segregation. 

'The Unsung Heroes:' Military Kids Resilient, but Face Extra Challenges

Common realities of being in a military family, like having a parent deployed or moving around a lot, can be stressors for children. 

Creating an Advice Show By and For People of Color

KQED's podcast "Truth Be Told" is an advice show designed to give people of color a space to talk among themselves that’s not framed through whiteness.

Other segments: 

Disney Is Extending Its Reach to Infinity and Beyond

Disney announced Tuesday that they will be taking Comcast's stake in Hulu, adding another property to what is quickly becoming the most powerful entertainment company in history.

San Francisco Bans Facial Recognition in a Move to Democratize Surveillance Technology

The federal government can still use facial recognition technology in the jurisdiction.

May 16 2019
32 mins
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