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Bio-Ethics Bites

Updated about 11 hours ago

Education
Society & Culture
Philosophy
Courses
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Bioethics is the study of the moral implications of new and emerging medical technologies and looks to answer questions such as selling organs, euthanasia and whether should we clone people. The series consists of a series of interviews by leading bioethics academics and is aimed at individuals looking to explore often difficult and confusing questions surrounding medical ethics. The series lays out the issue in a clear and precise way and looks to show all sides of the debate.

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Bioethics is the study of the moral implications of new and emerging medical technologies and looks to answer questions such as selling organs, euthanasia and whether should we clone people. The series consists of a series of interviews by leading bioethics academics and is aimed at individuals looking to explore often difficult and confusing questions surrounding medical ethics. The series lays out the issue in a clear and precise way and looks to show all sides of the debate.

iTunes Ratings

13 Ratings
Average Ratings
7
1
0
2
3

Platinum

By Analyzed objectively - Sep 26 2017
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We need this kind of exploration of ethics and morality done with the structure of logic and science. When intellectually gifted scientists make an effort like this - to share their work with the public in everyday language - we should be thankful. I appreciate this podcast very much.

Extremely fascinating!!!!!!

By Chadlysaurus - Jun 18 2011
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First time checking out iTunes U and I am beyond satisfied. The Moral Status interview was incredible. Really makes you reconsider how and why you value others. CAN'T WAIT FOR MORE!!!!

iTunes Ratings

13 Ratings
Average Ratings
7
1
0
2
3

Platinum

By Analyzed objectively - Sep 26 2017
Read more
We need this kind of exploration of ethics and morality done with the structure of logic and science. When intellectually gifted scientists make an effort like this - to share their work with the public in everyday language - we should be thankful. I appreciate this podcast very much.

Extremely fascinating!!!!!!

By Chadlysaurus - Jun 18 2011
Read more
First time checking out iTunes U and I am beyond satisfied. The Moral Status interview was incredible. Really makes you reconsider how and why you value others. CAN'T WAIT FOR MORE!!!!
Cover image of Bio-Ethics Bites

Bio-Ethics Bites

Updated about 11 hours ago

Read more

Bioethics is the study of the moral implications of new and emerging medical technologies and looks to answer questions such as selling organs, euthanasia and whether should we clone people. The series consists of a series of interviews by leading bioethics academics and is aimed at individuals looking to explore often difficult and confusing questions surrounding medical ethics. The series lays out the issue in a clear and precise way and looks to show all sides of the debate.

Rank #1: Life and Death

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If a patient decides she doesn't want to live any longer, should she be allowed to die? Should she be allowed to kill herself? If a patient is in no position to decide - perhaps she's in a coma - then should somebody else be able to decide to kill her? Who? Is there a moral difference between killing and allowing someone to die? And is the role of the doctor always to prolong life? Peter Singer, of Princeton University, is one of the world's leading bio-ethicists, and has been reflecting on life and death issues for four decades.

Jul 04 2011

16mins

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Rank #2: Status Quo Bias

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Suppose a genetic engineering breakthrough made it simple, safe and cheap to increase people's intelligence. Nonetheless, if you asked the averagely-intelligent person on the Clapham Omnibus whether we should tamper with our genes to boost our brains, he or she might recoil at the notion. Nick Bostrom, director of the Future of Humanity Institute at Oxford University, suspects that this reaction may be a result of what he calls 'status-quo bias'.

Aug 01 2011

19mins

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Rank #3: Trust

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Radically new techniques are opening up exciting possibilities for those working in health care - for psychiatrists, doctors, surgeons; the option to clone human beings, to give just one example. Who should determine what is allowed and what prohibited? And what sort of consent should doctors have to have from patients before treatment. Is the trend towards consent forms helpful? Or should we trust doctors to make good decisions for us. For many years now, philosopher Onora O'neill, formerly principal of Newnham College, Cambridge, has been thinking about the issue of 'trust': trust is vital in most areas of human interaction - but nowhere more so than in health and medicine.

Sep 01 2011

18mins

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Rank #4: Neuroscience Can Tell Us About Morality

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What can science tell us about morality? Many philosophers would say, 'nothing at all'. Facts don't imply values, they say. you need further argument to move from facts about us and about the world to conclusions about what we ought to do. For example, most humans are altruistic - they genuinely care about the well-being of friends and family and to a lesser extent even of strangers - they'll give money to charity to help people they've never even met. Suppose science gives us a compelling scientific explanation for why we're altruistic. Does that tell us whether we should be altruistic?

Feb 03 2012

19mins

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Rank #5: Brain Chemistry and Moral Decision-Making

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Answers to moral questions, it seems, depend on how much serotonin there is flowing through your brain. In the future might we be able to alter people's moral behaviour with concoctions of chemicals? A train is hurtling towards five people; it's out of control. You are standing on a footbridge, standing next to a very obese man. The only way to save the five is to push the man over the footbridge to his certain death: his bulk would stop the train and save five lives. Should you do it? Should you give him a shove? Most people would say no. Utilitarians say yes, you should take one life to save five. Now it turns out that the answer you give will depend on how much serotonin there is flowing through your brain. This raises an intriguing possibility: in the future might we be able to alter people's moral behaviour with concoctions of chemicals? That's been the research focus of Molly Crockett, now based in Zurich, but formerly of Cambridge University

Jan 04 2012

16mins

Play