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Rank #192 in Visual Arts category

Arts
Education
Visual Arts

Your Creative Push

Updated 7 days ago

Rank #192 in Visual Arts category

Arts
Education
Visual Arts
Read more

Your Creative Push is the daily podcast that pushes YOU to pursue your creative passion. Every week, Youngman Brown interviews artists, musicians, writers, photographers, graphic designers, and other inspirational creative individuals in an attempt to get them to inspire you to put aside your excuses and START DOING WORK. Each artist opens up to YOU, revealing the things that hold THEM back on a daily basis, and how they FIGHT THROUGH IT. They then give you one final push, in an attempt to motivate you to start doing work as soon as the episode is over. If you have a full-time job or full-time responsibilities and WISH that you had the COURAGE and MOTIVATION to FINALLY do that thing that has been on your mind, this podcast is for you!

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Your Creative Push is the daily podcast that pushes YOU to pursue your creative passion. Every week, Youngman Brown interviews artists, musicians, writers, photographers, graphic designers, and other inspirational creative individuals in an attempt to get them to inspire you to put aside your excuses and START DOING WORK. Each artist opens up to YOU, revealing the things that hold THEM back on a daily basis, and how they FIGHT THROUGH IT. They then give you one final push, in an attempt to motivate you to start doing work as soon as the episode is over. If you have a full-time job or full-time responsibilities and WISH that you had the COURAGE and MOTIVATION to FINALLY do that thing that has been on your mind, this podcast is for you!

iTunes Ratings

260 Ratings
Average Ratings
252
5
2
0
1

It's always good for a little extra motivation

By Abigailpdiddy - Jun 30 2017
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Your Creative Push helps to give me a little extra motivation. Love it!

Who doesn't need a push?

By Fit 2 Love JJ - Mar 08 2017
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Youngman, you are funny! Thank you for the Creative Push. We all need it!

iTunes Ratings

260 Ratings
Average Ratings
252
5
2
0
1

It's always good for a little extra motivation

By Abigailpdiddy - Jun 30 2017
Read more
Your Creative Push helps to give me a little extra motivation. Love it!

Who doesn't need a push?

By Fit 2 Love JJ - Mar 08 2017
Read more
Youngman, you are funny! Thank you for the Creative Push. We all need it!
Cover image of Your Creative Push

Your Creative Push

Updated 7 days ago

Read more

Your Creative Push is the daily podcast that pushes YOU to pursue your creative passion. Every week, Youngman Brown interviews artists, musicians, writers, photographers, graphic designers, and other inspirational creative individuals in an attempt to get them to inspire you to put aside your excuses and START DOING WORK. Each artist opens up to YOU, revealing the things that hold THEM back on a daily basis, and how they FIGHT THROUGH IT. They then give you one final push, in an attempt to motivate you to start doing work as soon as the episode is over. If you have a full-time job or full-time responsibilities and WISH that you had the COURAGE and MOTIVATION to FINALLY do that thing that has been on your mind, this podcast is for you!

Rank #1: 311: How to MAKE FRIENDS with yourself, your art and other adults (w/ Frannerd)

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Fran Meneses aka Frannerd is a self-taught Chilean freelance illustrator who recently moved from Hastings, United Kingdom to New York City.  She takes a deep interest in her followers and patrons and her work often reflects the things that they want to see.

She also has a popular YouTube channel in which she talks about pencils, paper, illustration and her daily life.

Full shownotes: http://yourcreativepush.com/frannerd

In this episode, Frannerd discusses:

-Her recent move from the United Kingdom to the United States.

-The way in which she burns herself out before drawing the line and allowing herself to rest.

-Her constant battle with feelings of guilt for working too much or too little.

-How she needs to give herself more self-love and treat herself and talk to herself the way she would treat her best friend.

-How to know the difference between “urgent” and “important.”

-The way in which ideas go from one person to another.

-How her graphic novel About to Leave came to be.

-The way in which the big projects such as graphic novels force you to face the things that you don’t know how to do and also to emerge at the end as a new person.

-Taking notes as she is out in the world and cherishing the things that resonates with her at a deeper level as well as the things that make her feel awkward.

-Her thoughts, studies and art about friendship as adults.

-Balancing her work and projects amongst Instagram, YouTube and Patreon.

-The gratitude she feels for her patrons.

-The rules we make up in our own head about social media.

-How and why she made her YouTube channel (including inspiration from Art Attack).

Frannerd's Final Push will remind you that life is fleeting, so don’t waste that time.  Get to your creative passion today! Quotes:

“Since I love what I do so much, sometimes I’m not very respectful of myself and where I draw the line and let myself rest.”

“A graphic novel is a test to yourself.”

“Having Patreon and having my online shop changed the way I approached creativity and my working life completely.”

Links mentioned:

Art Attack

Connect with Frannerd:

Instagram / YouTube / Etsy / Patreon

On the next episode:

Marco Bucci : Website / Instagram / YouTube

Join the discussion in the Facebook group!

Nov 05 2018

1hr 8mins

Play

Rank #2: 068: Go forth on your HERO'S JOURNEY! (Philip Ruddy Part 2)

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Philip Ruddy is a Los Angeles-based depth psychotherapist, who previously spent fifteen years as a writer, producer and development executive in Hollywood.   He now works with writers, artists and performers, helping them explore and transcend creative blocks, anxiety, depression, and the unique stressors of the film and television industry.  He can be reached via his website ActivelyImagine.com.

If you missed Part 1, you can listen here.

Full shownotes: http://yourcreativepush.com/philipruddy2

In this episode, Philip discusses:

-The importance of his clients being sober when coming in for treatment so that they aren't "unconscious" during the process.

-Why creative people rely on drugs or alcohol to subdue their minds from the constant thoughts, and healthier ways for them to disengage.

-An extremely disheartening experience that he went through in the past, which helps him to relate to his clients today.

-The journey that he took after having his original screenplay taken, which led him to becoming a psychotherapist.

-His masters thesis on transcending writer's block based on Active Imagination.

-The concept of the "wounded healer."

-His advice for someone who wants to open a dialogue with his or her blocks.

-How the subconscious part of your psyche that will hold you back from doing work will often have insights that your conscious mind isn't aware of.

-The importance of creating a friendly and welcoming dialogue with your block and treating it like a guest in your house.

Philip's Final Push will inspire you to go forth on your Hero's Journey!
 
Quotes:

"I found that after that experience, I really began to shut down as a writer."

"I just looked around and I thought I have found my tribe."

"Going into film production is kind of like the French Foreign Legion.  You can literally work 24/7.  That job is never over."

"I went through it myself -- that is why I'm able to help others."

"Sometimes the most effective healers are the ones that have been injured themselves."

"Don't invite your critic in while you're creating."

 

Links mentioned:

"The Artist's Way" by Julia Cameron

"The Red Book" by Carl Jung

"Finding Meaning in the Second Half of Life: How to Finally, Really Grow Up" by James Hollis

"An Evening with Ray Bradbury - 2001" (YouTube)

"The Hero's Journey... For Writers, Artists & Performers" (from Philip's blog)

Connect with Philip:

Website / Blog

Apr 14 2016

33mins

Play

Rank #3: 335: How to become ADDICTED to your art (w/ Nick Runge)

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Nick Runge grew up in Colorado. Coming from a creative family of professional artists, he was always interested in drawing and imagining ideas visually. After working as an illustrator full time from 2004-2015 he shifted focus to more personal work using oils and watercolor.

As a portrait/figurative painter, Nick works from life as well as photography, describing his art as something close to “abstracted realism”, with an objective of expressing as much of the realistic human element of life as possible through a limited and often simplified approach to his rendering or brushwork, giving an illusion of realism while, at the same time, breaking shapes and form down enough to have a close balance with abstraction.

Full shownotes: http://yourcreativepush.com/335

In this episode, Nick discusses:

-Why he came back to drawing and painting.

-Balancing personal work vs. client/commission work.

-Finding a love for painting with oils and watercolor.

-The experience of making the movie poster for “The Death of Superman Lives.”

-His advice to become obsessed with things that you enjoy doing.

-His advice for selling your work on social media without feeling slimey.

-What a typical day looks like for him.

-The fear of showing old work or failures.

-Getting past ruts.

-The power of secret sketchbooks.

-Putting aside your five favorite pieces of art to open your mind to making new “favorites.”

-Dealing with shyness.

Nick's Final Push will inspire you to be impulsive and get moving this very second!   Quotes:

“You have to hold that initial excitement for art like a fuel through all of the tough times.”

“Drawing has felt like I’ve been cheating on normal life.  That’s why I love it.  It seems forbidden -- especially in America – to draw or create.  It’s seems great, but how do you make money at it?”

“If you find a specific painting or a subject matter that you really do just enjoy, maybe just obsess over it a little bit more.”

“I find that any time I think ‘I need money right now so I’m going to paint this thing,’ it almost never works.”

“If you want to paint or draw, do just a little bit every day and it really will get to be more of an addiction.”

Links mentioned:

“Start” – Nick's piece that was unfinished

Marie-Noelle Wurm on Your Creative Push Ep. 320

Watercolor Workshop in Seville Spain (May 16-19 2019)

NOH/WAVE course

Alatar on Your Creative Push Ep. 232

Alatar on Your Creative Push Ep. 296

Connect with Nick:

Website / Shop / Instagram

On the next episode:

Alatar : Newgrounds / Podcast / Instagram

Join the discussion in the Facebook group!

May 08 2019

55mins

Play

Rank #4: 281: Train yourself to enjoy the difficult work (w/ Alex Strohl)

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Alex Strohl is a Madrid-born, French adventure photographer whose work is characterized by his extraordinary existence. Instead of creating contrived scenes, Strohl creates authentic moments and captures them as they unfold before him— continually blurring the lines between work and life.

Strohl’s photography has been featured in prestigious publications such as Forbes, Vanity Fair, and Gentleman’s Journal and his client list includes dozens of household names. He is based in Whitefish, Montana—but spends the vast majority of his time on the road with his partner Andrea Dabene; they often journey to the most remote reaches of the world.

His new course, The Adventure Photography Workshop offers an in-depth look into his mindset, methodology, and strategy, not just as a photographer, but as a creative thinker.

Full shownotes: http://yourcreativepush.com/281

In this episode, Alex discusses:

-His recent traveling, including his recent trips to the Pyrenees and Iceland.

-How he plans his trips and his shoots.

-The reason he created the Adventure Photography Workshop.

-Training yourself to enjoy doing the difficult work, and some of the tips he has for getting yourself in that mindset, like taking cold showers.

-Finding motivation in previous successes.

-Some of the things that he didn’t expect about creating a course.

-Deconstructing his methods and what that did for his mindset and strategy as a photographer.

-How investing in knowledge up front can save you time later.

-Splitting up large projects into more manageable pieces.

-Dealing with uncertainty as a creative person and developing certainty by creating a system for yourself.

Alex's Final Push will inspire you to expose yourself to as many things as you can!   Quotes:

“When you’re a freelancer, you’re the asset.  You’re the business.”

“It’s all about drawing energy from our high moments.”

“You can’t be someone else.  People are going to see right through that.”

“The value is in the implementation, not the idea.”

Links mentioned:

The Adventure Photography Workshop (Use Coupon Code CREATIVEPUSH at checkout to get $100 off (Limited to 25 orders))

Alex Strohl on Your Creative Push Episode 180

Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance by Angela Duckworth

Get Out of a Creative Rut - Woody Allen's Shower Hack to Master Creativity

Connect with Alex:

Website / Facebook / Instagram / Tumblr / Twitter

On the next episode:

Heidi Gustad : Website / Instagram

Want Alex's course for free?  Join the discussion in the Facebook group!

Mar 12 2018

47mins

Play

Rank #5: 196: Take that DIFFICULT FIRST STEP past fundamentals (w/ Nicolás Uribe)

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Nicolás Uribe is a painter born in Madison, WI, currently based in Bogotá, Colombia. He graduated with Honors as an Illustration Major from School of Visual Arts in NY. Nicolás has had numerous solo exhibitions both in the US and South America, and has exhibited his work in Mexico, Spain, and Egypt, among other countries. He splits his time between preparing works for upcoming projects and teaching Life Drawing and Painting at the Fine Arts Faculty of the Pontifical Xavierian University in Bogotá.  Nicolás is also part of the team at Blank Atelier in Bogotá, where he teaches workshops privately.

Full shownotes: http://yourcreativepush.com/nicolas

In this episode, Nicolás discusses:

-Some of his earliest artistic influences.

-The realization that he wasn’t good at creating comic books and the shift that he made as a result.

-The influence that his teachers have had on him, especially Steven Assael.

-How the fundamentals of painting are the same, no matter who is teaching them.

-The idea that art is taught within art and the problems that sometimes arise because of it.

-How to escape the influences of your teachers in order to develop your own style.

-The way that art is based on the things that YOU care about, and much less on the technical skills of making a piece of art.

-His advice for discovering your own true voice or style.

-Being able to be appreciative of other artists’ work instead of being envious.

-Taking inspiration from another artist’s journey, rather than their individual works.

-How your art doesn’t have to be larger than you think it has to be – it doesn’t have to make the world better or change the universe.

-His opinion on the “next Rembrandt” and trying to copy art.

-How human experience is what drives a great painting.

-The fear that comes from taking the first step in many of the things we do.

-His Kickstarter project and the vulnerability involved with it.

-How the projects that we do don’t have to be about making money, but about sharing, giving back, and creating something memorable.

 

Quotes:

“My one doubt, always, is to know if I have the same effect as my teachers had on me.”

“The effect my students have on me is probably far larger than the one I hope to have on them.”

“You can go to twenty workshops of twenty different artists and honestly, you’re going to hear the same exact thing.”

“That thing you’re feeling, that little thing in the pit of your stomach where you know that you’re suffering while you’re learning?  We’ve all been through it.”

“Art is amazing because it’s about so much more – so many other things that are not really even dependent on those skills.”

“Let’s try to figure out why you like something, and in trying to figure out why you like something, you’re going to learn something about yourself that is far more useful than knowing how to paint an apple.”

“You have to get to a point where you face yourself and you’re vulnerable.”

“When you’re moved by something, don’t walk away from it.”

“That first step, that’s what exceptional people do.  They take that huge first step.”

“This is measurable.  I’m going to do this and if nobody cares, it’s like the world telling me that nobody cares about my work.  That is horrifying.”

“I could care less what people will tell me about my painting.  I would still go back and paint.”

Links mentioned:

Nicolás's Kickstarter

Connect with Nicolás:

Website / Facebook / Instagram

On the next episode:

Nukazooka: YouTube / Facebook

Feb 16 2017

1hr 3mins

Play

Rank #6: 213: Don't get crushed by the TIDAL WAVE OF LIFE. Ride it! (w/ Martha Beck)

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Martha Beck is an American sociologist, life coach, best-selling author, and speaker who specializes in helping individuals and groups achieve personal and professional goals. 

Her books include Expecting Adam, Leaving the Saints, Finding Your own North Star, The Joy Diet, and her newest book, Diana, Herself: An Allegory of Awakening.  She has also been a columnist for O, The Oprah Magazine since its inception in 2001.

Her newest project is a revolutionary writing workshop called Write into Light.

Full shownotes: http://yourcreativepush.com/marthabeck

In this episode, Martha discusses:

-The birth of her son and her decision to pursue joy no matter what the circumstances and no matter what anyone else thought.

-The comparison between a destructive tsunami destroying long-standing buildings and structures and a surfer taking the ride of his life.

-The frightening, but profound decision that people can make to take risks by following their joy.

-The “Man Cage” and how men are heavily socially pressured to do what worked before.

-The importance of finding balance through joy.

-How difficult it can be to let go of the “factory mindset” of society and to trust that magic will guide you.

-Making sure to rest your body, otherwise you will lose touch with it.

-Why she started Write into Light.

-The responsibility that artists have to change culture when the culture they are living in is unsatisfactory.

-The idea of using writing to heal yourself, and then to spread that healing power to the rest of the world.

-Her newest book,

-How she spent all of her money on a ranch in California and became immersed in nature.

-To prepare yourself for criticism from the people around you when you go against culture, and to try to surround yourself with supportive people who understand where you are coming from and what you are trying to tap into.

Martha's Final Push will inspire you to ask yourself (without judgment) what you were meant to do with your life and then find a way to do that thing.   Quotes:

“It unfolded because I was on this hell-bent path of pursuing joy.”

“There is a magic in the world, and I found that when my son was born.”

“If you can align yourself with what wants to happen, things will be done through you that you cannot do yourself.”

“It’s freaking scary.  What we are basing our cultural models on is a factory that never stops working.  To let that go and say that I’m going to trust that magic will do things through me if I just relax…. Phew, that is not for the faint of heart.”

“Culture doesn’t actually come from laws.  Laws may reflect culture but they rarely create culture.  What creates healing in cultures is new idioms, new language, new ways to talk about what’s happening to us, new perceptions, new insights, and new ideas.  And those come from creativity.”

“It’s not easy because we have to go beyond culture because our culture is screwing us up big time.  It’s not a recipe for happiness.”

“Ask yourself two questions: How do I want to be different because I lived on this Earth, and how do I want the Earth to be different because I’ve lived on it?

“Your people are here.  We may be in virtual space but we are all around you and we all feel it.  There is something moving and changing in the world and you are meant to be part of it.  So jump.”

Links mentioned:

Write into Light

Diana, Herself: An Allegory of Awakening (Bewilderment Chronicles) by Martha Beck

Martha’s Ted Talk: "The Four Technologies of Magic"

The Leap Retreat

Connect with Martha:

Website / Facebook / Vimeo / Twitter / Books

On the next episode:

David Luong : Website / Instagram / Vimeo

Join our community on our Facebook group!

Apr 24 2017

38mins

Play

Rank #7: 039: Don't get it drawn, get it DOODLED (w/ Martin Aveling)

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Martin is an English artist with an African heart. Born into a family of zoologists in 1982, he grew up amidst forest and savannah creatures of central and eastern Africa. He has held successful solo exhibitions in Africa, Europe, and the United States and has exhibited with the Society of Wildlife Artists and at the David Shepherd Foundation's Wildlife Artist of the Year event. A driving force for Martin's work is his commitment to conservation efforts for endangered wildlife, and through his art he continues to support the work of selected wildlife charities.

Full shownotes: http://yourcreativepush.com/martinaveling

In this episode, Martin discusses:

-His upbringing in Africa, how his parents were young zoologists, and what that meant for his life.

-Why he draws detailed portraits of the animals on very clear white backgrounds, so that it doesn't detract from the animal.

-How he became obsessed with detail but tried to hone that throughout his career.

-How he likes to play around with composition, and push the boundaries with negative space, as it helps to engage the viewer.

-His ability to not just draw animals, but to draw animals in a moment in time, and how long that took him to figure out.

-How he was most creative when he was younger because he just dove into it without thinking.

-His advice for people who might be discouraged by their gap in skill in comparison to his.

-The importance of doing art because you enjoy it, and not comparing yourself to other people or worrying about what other people think.

-How to deal with fear.

-How mistakes are good and help you to evolve.

-His charity work for wildlife conservation.

Martin's Final Push will inspire you to put in the time and GET IT DOODLED!
Quotes:

"It wasn't until much later on in life that I realized just how privileged I was to spend time amongst those animals."

"They are the stars of the show.  It's the animals.  It's not me.  My first passion was wildlife, and then I discovered I could draw them."

"I like to push the boundaries with negative space.  That helps to engage the viewer more."

"If you try to use the negative space in a creative way, it invites people to engage with it more and be a part of creating that environment in which it is sitting."

"It's all about the hours that you put in.  You do improve even if you're not seeing it real time."

"I always start at the eye.  It's the window to the soul.  It's where all the emotion is conveyed."

"It's not just for me, the art.  It's for everyone."

"You put the time in, and you will improve."

"Don't compare yourself to people.  If you enjoy drawing, you just just be drawing and not be worrying too much about what other people are thinking.

"There's nothing really to be scared of.  You love doing it, so just do it."

"You sleep better at night if you've done something a little bit creative during the day.

Connect with Martin:

Website / Facebook / Instagram / Twitter

Mar 04 2016

30mins

Play

Rank #8: 261: Escape the golden handcuffs of a job you hate (w/ Joanna Penn)

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Joanna Penn is an award-nominated, New York Times and USA Today bestselling thriller author who has written 23 books and sold over 500,000 books in 84 countries and 5 languages.  She is an independent (indie) author who also runs a small press, Curl Up Press, with her husband.

She also writes non-fiction for authors and is the creator of The Creative Penn, which offers information and inspiration on writing, self-publishing, book marketing and how to make a living with your writing through articles, podcast episodes, videos, books and courses.

Full shownotes: http://yourcreativepush.com/joannapenn

In this episode, Joanna discusses:

-How she felt spiritually empty and creatively dead from her job, yet stuck in the “golden handcuffs” of a job that pays the bills.

-The importance of taking action after you have determined what you want out of life.

-Determining the things that you are going to give up in order to achieve your dreams.

-The experience of writing her first book.

-How she used to think that the only thing worth writing was something that would win an award.

-Doing NaNoWriMo for the first time and how it changed her life.

-Her take on getting ideas.

-Her advice for anyone who is considering doing NaNoWriMo.

-How something good can come out of a writing challenge, even if you fall short of your initial goal.

-Being able to meet other people who are doing NaNoWriMo.

-Some of the struggles she initially had with dictation and her advice for writers who want to try it.

-How your first draft is like producing a block of marble, and the later drafts allow you to chisel away at it to make a sculpture.

-Self-censorship and fear of judgment.

Joanna's Final Push will make you realize how much time you might have wasted and get moving in order to achieve your dreams!   Quotes:

“If you set your mind to it and then take action, you can live the life of your dreams.”

“There are lots of ways to get information and ideas.  You just have to tune into the things that are most interesting to you.”

“The temptation for creative people is to do those practical things.  It’s much easier to maintain your website or blog or do social media than it is to sit down and do something new.”

“Take that creative push and go create!  Make the time and do it because you can absolutely change your life.”

Links mentioned:

On Writing My First Novel -- The Creative Penn

NaNoWriMo

Dragon Dictation

Writeordie.com

Connect with Joanna:

Website / The Creative Penn / Books / Facebook / Instagram / Twitter

On the next episode:

Carrie Waller : Website / Instagram

Join the discussion in the Facebook group!

Oct 23 2017

44mins

Play

Rank #9: 239: SUCCESS LOVES SPEED (w/ Maria Brophy)

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Maria Brophy has been an art agent to her husband Drew Brophy since 2001, and a business consultant to creative entrepreneurs since 2009. In her former life, Maria worked in the corporate world for two agonizing decades before she escaped the 9 to 5 grind. Since then, she’s deliberately designed her life as a non-stop adventure, traveling extensively with her husband and two kids while surfing and backpacking some of the most magical places in the world.

Her new book, Art, Money & Success is a workbook of strategies for the full-time artist.

Full shownotes: http://yourcreativepush.com/mariabrophy

In this episode, Maria discusses:

-The experience of leaving her full-time job to help her husband, Drew Brophy, with his art career.

-How you can make a slow transition into a new creative career by cutting back your work week to three or four days.

-What led her to create her book, Art, Money & Success.

-Why it took her so long to start writing her book and why it took her so long to finish after she started.

-The procrastination (due to fear) that can come when we get close to finishing a project.

-The value in seeing it as a numbers game.

-Her advice to keep creating things without thinking about the reaction that people will have to it.

-The notion that success loves speed and how ideas have the best chance for success if they are explored right away.

-The power in writing down your goals, not only for your life, but for your day.

-Making monetary goals for yourself and then making the daily decisions that will lead you closer to them, as opposed to farther away.

-Knowing your value and asking to get paid.

-Ways that she and Drew have been unconventional in their approach to licensing and selling art.

Maria's Final Push will inspire you to realize that you are on your own unique path, and you shouldn’t worry about the road that other artists went down.   Quotes:

“It wasn’t that easy in the beginning, but it worked.  And I think being stubborn, hardheaded, and determined really helped.”

“You can transition your way into a creative career.  You don’t have to do it all at once.”

“Create every day without thinking about who’s going to buy it or who’s going to want it.  Because when you’re thinking that, it restricts your flow of creativity.”

“You have to take action on things quickly.  You can’t sit around.”

“Often times those inspired ideas come within days or even hours of you making a declaration of something you’re going to make happen.”

“If you don’t ask, you won’t get paid.”

“Your path is your own path.  Don’t look at what other artists are doing.”

Links mentioned:

Art, Money & Success: A complete and easy-to-follow system for the artist who wasn't born with a business mind by Maria Brophy

Drew Brophy

Amanda Giacomini's 10,000 Buddhas

Connect with Maria:

Website / Book / Facebook / Instagram / Twitter / YouTube

 

Share what you've created this week in the Facebook group!

Jul 27 2017

56mins

Play

Rank #10: 264: Wish upon your creative star (w/ Megan Carty)

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Megan Carty is a New England-based artist who makes cheerful abstract floral paintings that are uplifting and color-drenched for people who have a flair for bold statements and tailored style.

Full shownotes: http://yourcreativepush.com/megancarty

In this episode, Megan discusses:

-How she always knew that she wanted to be an artist or an art teacher when she grew up.

-The seed that was planted in her at a young age to seek praise or to do what her teacher liked rather than what she wanted to create.

-The dangers of comparing yourself to others.

-Some of the trials and tribulations she went through after college, including sexism, 9/11, depression, layoffs, breakups, and struggling to find the right fit career-wise.

-Being appreciative of the negative experiences while you don’t know what brings you joy, because they inform you of what does bring you joy.

-Getting involved with Etsy and the double-edged sword of being able to do anything, but also getting frozen by being able to do anything.

-The important decision to not wait until you reach Point B to be happy, but to attempt to experience happiness today and throughout your entire journey.

-How following your joy leads to finding more joy (and also spreading it to others).

-How she battles negative thoughts and even depression.

-How wishing on a star is a skill we have as children that we gradually lose.

-How artists need to take their creative “medicine” or else they start to feel ill.

-Donald Trump in relation to creativity.

Megan's Final Push will remind you to stop fretting and realize that people are looking for your creativity!   Quotes:

“I just let all of the roadblocks overcome me.”

“I was on the wrong path and I was doing all the wrong things.  Everything had to blow up in order for me to get on the right path.”

“I had lost the sense of joy of creating.”

“What is it I want to make, and what is it that makes me the most happy while I’m making it?”

“If you have a creative passion that you’re not pursuing, chances are you’re feeling a little bit negative and sad about it.”

“There’s nothing that can stop me except for my own thoughts.”

“If it’s tickling your heart, then that’s the right thing.  Do more of that.”

Links mentioned:

Matthew Miller on Your Creative Push

Ask and It Is Given: Learning to Manifest Your Desires by Esther Hicks and Jerry Hicks

Paul Selig on The Duncan Trussell Family Hour Podcast

Connect with Megan:

Website / Facebook / Instagram / Twitter

On the next episode:

Nikki Rae : Website / Twitter

Join the discussion in the Facebook group!

Nov 06 2017

1hr 18mins

Play

Rank #11: 278: QUIT F*ING AROUND! (w/ Jeff Leisawitz)

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Jeff Leisawitz is an award-winning musician/producer, a critically acclaimed author and internationally distributed filmmaker who has devoted his life to creativity.  He burns with a mission -- to inspire writers, artists, musicians, filmmakers, entrepreneurs (and everyone else) to amp up their creativity, heal their hearts and shine in the world.

Not F*ing Around: The No Bullsh*t Guide for Getting Your Creative Dreams Off the Ground is Jeff's first book.

Full shownotes: http://yourcreativepush.com/jeffl

In this episode, Jeff discusses:

-His early interest in music, photography, and writing.

-The importance of focus when you have many creative impulses.

-NLP and how it can aid creative people.

-How creativity is a way for us to be seen, expressed and healed.

-How to get past your inner critic.

-Seeing your art as ephemeral and being willing to destroy it.

-How the movie, Patterson inspired him to take up the daily practice of writing a poem.

-The notion of building up resiliency to rejection.

-The lessons that he learned from improve comedy such as “Yes, and….”

-His advice for people to shift from the fucking around mindset to the not fucking around mindset.

Jeff's Final Push will inspire you to create a habit, even if it is just five minutes a day.   Quotes:

“If you don’t focus on something, you’re never going to get very far in anything.”

“Creativity is a way for us to be seen, expressed and healed in our lives.”

“The inner critic is the super villain of the creative self.”

“If you’re going to step out into the world as any kind of artist, you will be rejected most of the time.  And that’s okay.  The trick is to remember that you are not your creation.”

Links mentioned:

Not F*ing Around: The No Bullsh*t Guide for Getting Your Creative Dreams Off the Ground by Jeff Leisawitz

What I learned from 100 days of rejection | Jia Jiang's TED Talk

Connect with Jeff:

Website / Book / Facebook / Instagram / Twitter

On the next episode:

Jennie Nash : Website / Author Accelerator

Join the discussion in the Facebook group!

Feb 19 2018

46mins

Play

Rank #12: 117: Use ATTAINABLE GOALS to find your own way (w/ Lois van Baarle aka Loish)

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Lois van Baarle is a freelance illustrator and animator living in Utrecht (the Netherlands).  She has lived all over the world, including the United States, Indonesia, France, and Belgium.  She is widely known online as Loish, and has become a sensation in the digital art world.  Her first published collection of her works is called “The Art of Loish” and was successfully funded on Kickstarter in 2 hours.

Full shownotes: http://yourcreativepush.com/loish

In this episode, Lois discusses:

-What it was like to sell out her Kickstarter campaign in such a short period of time.

-What the positive feedback and the support of her fans means to her.

-One of her early memories of drawing in kindergarten, and an important lesson that she learned as a result.

-Manipulating your lucky mistakes in your favor.

-The notion of getting distance from your work and also sharing it out into the world.

-How some of the pieces that she thinks will do the best end up not receiving as much attention and vice versa.

-Her repetitive strain injury -- how it affected her life and how she deals with it moving forward.

-Her advice for people to avoid a repetitive strain injury.

-Her first year of animation college and how it was one of the darkest times of her life (and what she learned from it).

-The connections that you can make on the internet and how those connections can sometimes change your life.

-The value of making attainable goals and not putting too much pressure on yourself for amazing end results.

-How and why she started her mini-tutorials.

-Her formula for balancing her time.

-How you need to have a good read on yourself and how much time you are spending on a particular project or portion of a project and have the wherewithal to call it quits and save the rest for tomorrow if you aren't putting in your best work.

-The freedom that her art and creativity has brought to her life.

-Some of her varied inspirations, including Alphonse Mucha, Grimes, and The Wire.

Lois's Final Push will inspire you to find your own way of doing things.   Quotes:

"If you like to draw rough and you like to sketch, you get a lot of lucky mistakes."

"It's not just skill.  It's also how you present your work and talk about your work that adds to your creativity."

"Taking it away from my computer and putting it into the world always helps me contextualize what I do and to see what it means to others and understand how that work is received outside of my own little bubble."

"I've actually learned to turn off that part of my brain to not think too much about how something will be received because you never really know."

"What I would tell myself if I could go back in time is to just not draw for really really long periods of time in a stressed-out manner."

"Sometimes it's better to just not meet that deadline if it means your mental or physical health."

"Drawing is just like everything I do -- I didn't even realize how important it was to me until I had to stop doing it."

"I really felt like I had nothing to say artistically, because I just didn't fit what the teachers wanted.  I felt like my ideas were useless."

"If you have attainable goals then you can really start enjoying what you do.  Just enjoying the feeling of being in a creative flow."

"If you say 'I'm going to sketch for an hour,' that's attainable.  You're not saying what you're going to sketch.  You're not saying how good your sketches have to be.  You're just saying that it's going to be for an hour."

"When you're just practicing, you don't know where it's going to lead and you shouldn't think too much about where it's going to lead.  You should just be in the moment."

"My work has become a way for me to express myself and I feel so lucky to be able to do that as my job."

"There was a certain level of self-acceptance needed for me to understand what was right for me."

"Everybody's got their own way.  And I think if you search for your own way and you eventually find it, you get so much fulfillment out of it."

Links mentioned:

Lois's book

Alphonse Mucha

Grimes

The Wire

Connect with Lois:

Website / Facebook / DeviantArt / Instagram / Twitter

Jul 06 2016

38mins

Play

Rank #13: 293: EAT YOUR CREATIVE VEGETABLES (w/ Danny Gregory)

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Danny Gregory is an artist, author, teacher and co-founder of Sketchbook Skool. He taught himself to draw in his mid-thirties after a tragic accident changed his life, bringing with it a new peace and perspective. One that informs his creative habit everyday.

Danny has written nearly a dozen internationally best-selling books on art and creativity including Art Before Breakfast, Everyday Matters, The Creative License, Shut Your Monkey, An Illustrated Life and many more.

Before starting Sketchbook Skool, he spent three decades as one of New York’s leading advertising creative directors and has created award-winning, global campaigns for such clients as Chase, JPMorgan, American Express, IBM, Burger King, Ford and Chevron amongst others.

Danny resides in New York City.

Full shownotes: http://yourcreativepush.com/293

In this episode, Danny discusses:

-The importance of your partner understanding your creative needs.

-Creative postpartum depression that often occurs when we are finished with a project.

-Why he left the advertising industry.

-Meeting Koosje Koene and how Sketchbook Skool started.

-The value in seeing how many different artists make art as well as seeing where they make it.

-The role that community plays in developing as an artist.

-The difference in motivation when you are paying for something as opposed to getting it for free.

-Going to clown school.

-Giving yourself constraints or challenges.

-What it means to clear space in order to start new things (or finish old things).

-How he got past imposter syndrome (and his advice for Youngman in getting past his).

Danny's Final Push will inspire you to stop listening to podcasts and start creating something new!   Quotes:

“I think that having a partner that understands you and your creative needs is essential to be able to focus on your work.”

“If you want to start something new, you need to clear some space for it to happen.”

“Thinking you know yourself too well can be limiting.  Sometimes you’ve got to just jump off the cliff and see what happens.”

“I think it’s really important to have skin in the game.  If it’s too easy to walk away from, you will.”

“I always find that if I have that glimmer of an idea, if I have that grain of sand to put in the oyster, I’m on the way.  I’m going to get to the end just by having a beginning.”

“There are people out there waiting for your art.  Give it to them.”

“Every time you have the impulse to distract yourself, instead try to focus that energy into making something new.”

Links mentioned:

Sketchbook Skool (Use offer code SBSPUSH to get 10% off!)

Danny Gregory on Your Creative Push Ep. 50

Connect with Danny:

Website / Facebook / Instagram / Twitter / Blog

Join the discussion in the Facebook group!

Jun 18 2018

47mins

Play

Rank #14: How to talk to your creative blocks (Best of YCP: Philip Ruddy)

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Philip Ruddy is a Los Angeles-based depth psychotherapist, who previously spent fifteen years as a writer, producer and development executive in Hollywood.   He now works with writers, artists and performers, helping them explore and transcend creative blocks, anxiety, depression, and the unique stressors of the film and television industry.  He can be reached via his website ActivelyImagine.com.

Full shownotes: http://yourcreativepush.com/bestof12

In this episode, Philip discusses:

-His journey getting to the point he is now as a depth psychotherapist.

-His explanation of what depth psychology is.

-How he is able to tap into his experience as a development executive, screenwriter, and a short story writer in order to understand what other creative people are going through.

-How writer’s block is a personal thing that differs for every person that he works with.

-The notion of befriending your creative blocks.

-The idea of Active Imagination.

-How we imagine the harshest of critics will judge our work, but in reality, if someone doesn’t like your work, they typically just move on.

-The traumatic effect that negative comments from teachers can have, especially at an early age.

-The importance of seeking out a tribe and a group of peers, and not necessarily rely on the influences that your school district had as art teachers.

-Creating a new persona.

-The interplay that happens between your persona and your “true self,” both positive and negative.

-The importance of his clients being sober when coming in for treatment so that they aren’t “unconscious” during the process.

-Why creative people rely on drugs or alcohol to subdue their minds from the constant thoughts, and healthier ways for them to disengage.

-An extremely disheartening experience that he went through in the past, which helps him to relate to his clients today.

-The journey that he took after having his original screenplay taken, which led him to becoming a psychotherapist.

-His masters thesis on transcending writer’s block based on Active Imagination.

-The concept of the “wounded healer.”

-His advice for someone who wants to open a dialogue with his or her blocks.

-How the subconscious part of your psyche that will hold you back from doing work will often have insights that your conscious mind isn’t aware of.

-The importance of creating a friendly and welcoming dialogue with your block and treating it like a guest in your house.

Philip's Final Push will inspire you to go forth on your Hero’s Journey! Quotes:

“What’s the personal myth that you are leading your life by?”

“Writer’s block is something that you’re probably going to wrestle with for many years to come if you don’t make a decision to focus on it now and come up with some ways to navigate it.”

“Befriend it so that you can transcend it.”

“The idea is not just to exterminate this writer’s block but to engage it in dialogue. I actually mean that quite literally.”

“Write out a dialogue with this writer’s block and see what it has to say.”

“Writer’s block is often an unexpressed part of ourselves that wants to be heard, so if you actually give it some time and engage it, it will often tell you what it wants of you.”

“We’re often far worse critics than the real flesh-and-blood critics that we encounter.”

“The first creative act is reinventing yourself. Creating your new self as an artist.”

“To reinvent ourselves, to become who we are destined to be, takes an incredible amount of strength.”

“I found that after that experience, I really began to shut down as a writer.”

“I just looked around and I thought I have found my tribe.”

“Going into film production is kind of like the French Foreign Legion.  You can literally work 24/7.  That job is never over.”

“I went through it myself — that is why I’m able to help others.”

“Sometimes the most effective healers are the ones that have been injured themselves.”

“Don’t invite your critic in while you’re creating.”

Links mentioned:

The Artist’s Way” by Julia Cameron

The Red Book” by Carl Jung

Finding Meaning in the Second Half of Life: How to Finally, Really Grow Up” by James Hollis

An Evening with Ray Bradbury – 2001” (YouTube)

The Hero’s Journey… For Writers, Artists & Performers” (from Philip’s blog)

Sandra Busby on Your Creative Push Ep. 220

Tara Roskell on Your Creative Push Ep. 247

Connect with Philip:

Website / Blog

On the next episode:

Sandra Busby & Tara Roskell : Website / Sandra's Instagram / Tara's Instagram

Join the discussion in the Facebook group!

Dec 24 2018

1hr 1min

Play

Rank #15: 035: Be prepared to POUNCE on your lucky breaks (w/ Marc Allante)

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Marc is an artist whose work is inspired in both form and style by western and eastern influences. He was born in Hong Kong, but has also lived in Sydney and London. He merges traditional Chinese inks with European watercolour and pen techniques in a contemporary style. He is self-taught, and utilizes many different techniques and subject matters to expand his work. Marc also runs the blog www.redinkstone.com – a website dedicated to helping aspiring artists achieve successful and sustainable careers in the art world.

Full shownotes: http://yourcreativepush.com/marcallante

In this episode, Marc discusses:

-How his art career was jump started when his friend posted one of his pieces on Reddit and the thread went viral.

-How he utilized that "break" to make another post on Reddit, showcasing pieces of art he did throughout his childhood and life, and how that post went even more viral.

-How he worked in financial risk at that time, and art was a hobby for him until that point.

-The tough times that he was going through at the moment, with his mother being diagnosed with terminal cancer.

-How he calculated whether or not he could quit his job before he jumped into being a full-time artist.

-What it has been like in his first year as a full-time artist.

-His advice to people with full-time jobs who want to still do their creative passion: dedicate some time every day, and you will see improvement and results.

-The importance of developing a style with which you can differentiate yourself from other artists.

-There are always valuable lessons to be learned in trying something new.

-How art school has many things that it can teach you, but in today's world you can find out how to draw or paint in any style for free on the internet (or do anything creative, really).

-About why he started redinkstone.com and how it can help expose artists to information about effectively marketing your work via social media, understanding contracts, and so much more.

Marc's Final Push will inspire you to dedicate whatever free time you can find to furthering your realization of your dream.
Quotes:

"It does require a lot of effort and a lot of work to ensure that you properly utilize that momentum."

"What am I going to regret more in life?  Am I going to regret a job that I'm kind of okay with or following through with a passion that is clearly working at this point?"

"Even struggling for a few years would be a much more satisfying experience than cruising in a job that I didn't particularly enjoy."

"Even if you are dedicating a half-hour or an hour every day it is going to improve that process and the skills that you are using."

"The more that you practice and the more that you dedicate yourself to that subject or skill, you will see improvement and you will see results."

"There's luck and there's also manufactured luck.  There's definitely ways that you can help it along."

"It's good to be prepared and have the right tools in place so that if and when it does happen, you are ready for it."

"Whatever time I could spare was to realize this dream."

Links mentioned:

"How I quit my corporate job to become a professional artist"

Connect with Marc:

Website / Facebook / Instagram / Twitter / Prints / Redinkstone

Feb 29 2016

29mins

Play

Rank #16: 195: JUMP! Get in OVER YOUR HEAD (w/ Matt Kohr)

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Matt Kohr is a concept artist in the game industry and has worked at Motiga Games, Vicious Cycle Software, and Hi-Rez Studios.  He is also the creator of the digital painting resource CtrlPaint.com.

Full shownotes: http://yourcreativepush.com/mattkohr

In this episode, Matt discusses:

-How his path was much less linear than it might seem on paper, and more of jumping in and getting in over his head and figuring it out as he went.

-The idea of setting a major goal and working towards it every day, and then being okay if the goal changes over time.

-The difficulty that he sometimes has identifying as a teacher.

-The value of communication.

-How learning to digitally paint for beginners can be difficult even though there is a lot of free information and tutorials out there.  It’s a matter of where to start and in what order to consume things.

-Using your frustration for something that isn’t working as permission for you to do it yourself.

-How sometimes ignorance is bliss, and how sometimes it is better to not know how long and difficult a pursuit really will be.

-The approach that he takes with Ctrl+Paint to make the scary goal of learning to paint much more manageable for beginners.

-How beginner painters are in much more danger than intermediate painters.

-The idea of being working for someone else towards a goal that isn’t yours and that you don’t have complete control over.

-Maintaining focus on a central thesis that you set out for yourself and working towards it on a daily basis.

-Pewdiepie as an example of a rare case of personality overcoming an original thesis.

-His advice for people with no followers or few followers.

-The power in having a small, loyal following.

-The danger in using the amount of likes you get as a test for whether or not something was a terrible idea.

-His hesitancy to post his latest personal work online and why he chose to do it.

-Some of the day-to-day struggles of running Ctrl+Paint.

-How hard it is to start something and to get that momentum rolling.

Matt's Final Push will inspire you to just jump in and do it, even if you don’t have all the pieces lined up yet!   Quotes:

“It was really a series of me being overconfident and jumping into something, getting in over my head and then scrambling to make it work over and over and over.”

“Have one really strong goal and work towards it, but don’t expect to actually hit that precise thing.  Art is so unpredictable and things are changing.  It’s okay if that goal changes, because whatever it changes to could also be really exciting.”

“I’m not by any means the best painter, but I have been the most annoyed audience member.”

“That sense that something is wrong in the world and you could do it better is a really good feeling to act on.  Because you’ve got the taste.  Follow that hunch.”

“I think the beginner is in the most danger.”

“If you have a small audience that is dedicated to whatever you’re putting out into the world, you can totally make it work financially.”

“I think there really is something to having a vision and sticking to it and not overly relying on the popular feedback immediately.”

Links mentioned:

Ctrl+Paint

Pewdiepie

Connect with Matt:

Website / LinkedIn / Twitter / ArtStation

On the next episode:

Nicolás Uribe: Website / Instagram

Feb 13 2017

50mins

Play

Rank #17: 241: Find your gift and then give it away! (w/ Andy J. Pizza)

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Andy J. Miller is an American full time freelance illustrator with a background in graphic design, currently living and working in Columbus, OH.

Andy was born in Indiana, went to middle school in Western New York, to high school in Indiana, and to the University of Huddersfield in the United Kingdom. He teaches a self promotion for illustrators class to senior level students at the Columbus College of Art & Design. He is most known for his side projects and books; The Indie Rock Coloring Book, the collaborative Color Me _____ exhibit with Andrew Neyer, the daily drawing project NOD and his Creative Pep Talk Podcast.

Full shownotes: http://yourcreativepush.com/andyjpizza

In this episode, Andy discusses:

-Where the “pizza” part of his name came from and how he has embraced it as a part of his identity.

-His history as an illustrator and how the Creative Pep Talk Podcast started.

-The value of teaching and mentorship, no matter how much experience you have.

-The importance of thinking!

-Dealing with critics.

-The purpose of his recent “Creative Destiny” series on Creative Pep Talk.

-The hero’s journey and the role that it can play in any type of creative career that you have.

-Finding your gift and then giving it away.

-How, like in Harry Potter, sometimes our own worst enemy is living inside of ourselves.

-How political correctness sometimes holds people back from creating because they don’t want to make a mistake and then get attacked for it.

-Thinking about 11 dimensions and how our intuition might be tuned into a higher frequency that our animal instincts might be trying to protect us from.

-The idea of “gut churn” and forcing yourself to sit in the uncomfortable unknown.

Andy's Final Push will encourage you to stop looking for shortcuts and start looking for “sure-cuts.”   Quotes:

“You can reinvent yourself, and you don’t have to be owned by the person that you used to be.”

“I got obsessed with this idea of drawing invisible things.”

“I found teaching to be the ultimate growth hack because when you have to systematically boil down your truths, all the sudden they become so much more potent in your own life.”

“What is the true, unique cocktail that you have going on inside of you?  What is that work that just explodes and radiates from your very being?”

“All I’m looking for in my creative career is to find my gift and to find who needs it.”

“You need to be willing to make mistakes.  Always have the best intentions but don’t stop yourself before you get started.”

“In my own experience, the biggest breakthroughs come from sitting in that uncomfortable place.”

“Quit trying to go viral.  Quit trying to have overnight success.  Quit looking for shortcuts.  And just get on the journey.”

Links mentioned:

Jad Abumrad: Embrace the "Gut Churn" of the Creative Process

Deep Work: Rules for Success in a Distracted World by Cal Newport

Connect with Andy:

Website / Instagram / Twitter

Creative Pep Talk:

Website / Soundcloud / iTunes

On the next episode:

Matthew Quick : Website / Instagram

Join the discussion in the Facebook group!

Aug 07 2017

1hr 7mins

Play

Rank #18: 072: The more you FAIL, the more you LEARN (w/ Clay Cook)

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Clay Cook began his creative career in the music industry, and after 10 years, his passion had leaned towards photography, cinematography and graphic design.

Constantly collaborating with fresh designers, national models, filmmakers and other photographers, Clay has built a reputable name as an award-winning internationally published photographer and filmmaker, specializing in editorial and advertising photography.

Full shownotes: http://yourcreativepush.com/claycook

In this episode, Clay discusses:

-How he got started with photography, transitioning from his music career.

-The importance of having a good logo and good flyers for bands, as perception is reality.

-His suggestion for any creative person who is looking to dabble in other creative fields as well as the field they are already pursuing.

-How "playing around" or investigating other creative pursuits can really help to prevent burnout.

-How the pre-production elements that come into play end up taking so much time away from the actual act of taking photographs.

-The parties that he threw when he was just starting out, where he would shoot his friends on a cloth background.

-How the impressive quality of images that he was able to capture with the DLSR got him excited to keep shooting.

-When he started "going for it" with photography, he wasn't completely sure of the exact path he would be taking, only that he would find a way to be successful.

-His advice to just keep shooting, because the more you shoot, the more you fail.  And we learn by failing.

-The importance of stepping outside of your comfort zone, because if you are comfortable, you are most likely not growing.

-How he used to immerse himself in YouTube videos and tutorials in order to learn everything he could about photography.

-How to balance a job that you hate with your creative passion.

-His unwavering desire to be his own boss and the sacrifices that came with making that decision a reality.

Clay's Final Push will inspire you to be obsessed with your work and never give up.
 
Quotes:

"Perception is reality in the music business."

"The beauty in creativity is that it covers a whole wide umbrella of different topics."

"For me, photography was just as fulfilling and rewarding as music was."

"I think you have to stick to your passion, but dabbling in those other areas doesn't hurt at all.  And it will only improve your self-satisfaction."

"I spend more time in a pre-production state than I do in a production state or a post-process production state."

"I would throw parties just to shoot friends on a cloth background in my little office that was a 5x5 room.  It was almost a closet that I was sticking these people in and photographing them."

"I didn't care who I shot or what I shot.  It was just so exciting for me."

"The biggest piece of advice I can give to someone just starting out in photography is just to shoot.  Because the more you shoot, the more you're going to fail, and the more you fail, the more you're going to learn."

"You have to really be obsessed with your craft."

"I always want to be outside of my comfort zone."

"I've seen a lot of photographers get worse over the years because of the fact that they never truly step outside their comfort zone."

Connect with Clay:

Website / Blog / Facebook / Instagram / Twitter / YouTube

Apr 20 2016

35mins

Play

Rank #19: 288: Treat your ART like a PLAYGROUND (w/ Iris Compiet)

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Iris Compiet is an artist and Illustrator living and working in the Netherlands.  She worked as a graphic designer for 16 years before making the decision to become a full-time freelance artist and illustrator.

She draws inspiration from European folklore, mythology, fairytales, ghost stories and anything from tombstones, Victorian photography to popular movies and music.  She explores the depths of darkness to find the light.

Iris used Kickstarter to successfully fund her book, Fairies of the Faultlines, a collection of drawings that she started in May and June of 2016 when she participated in the #mermay and #junefae challenges on Instagram.

Full shownotes: http://yourcreativepush.com/iris

In this episode, Iris discusses:

-Her experience of going to school in the Netherlands and working as a graphic designer for 16 years.

-How the Kickstarter for her book, Faeries of the Faultlines torpedoed her to become a full-time artist and illustrator.

-How and why she decided to go full-time as an illustrator.

-Dealing with imposter syndrome and the fact that we all have it and should talk about it more.

-Defining “fame.”

-How she wanted her faerie art to have more grit.

-How she handled her battle with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

-Doing the #mermay and #junefae challenges.

-How she grew her Instagram followers from 1,000 to 50,000.

-Treating her sketchbook like a playground and always saving her old ones so that she can look back and get new ideas.

-Sharing your rough drafts, sketches and mistakes.

-Finding time throughout your day that you are normally wasting in order to create your art.

-Continuing to sculpt and how it has helped her see things in a new way.

-The triumph of her Kickstarter for Faeries of the Faultlines and some of the pitfalls that she encountered along the way.

Iris' Final Push will inspire you to stop caring about what other people want you to do!   Quotes:

“People always think that you need to be successful before a certain age, and I think that is a load of BS.”

“It’s very important to talk about imposter syndrome and acknowledge that it is there.  It’s not a problem that it’s there.  Just know how to deal with it.  We all have it.”

“It sucks that you second guess everything you do.  But that’s just your mind telling you things that aren’t true.”

“All of these influences and inspirations I had as a child are finally finding their way into this world.  I’m painting faeries now!”

“My Instagram exploded, just by daily posting.”

“I don’t believe there are failures.  I believe that there are tries.  Your ‘failure’ might be a trial for a new piece or the first version of something else.”

“I took away the expectations that I thought people were having, and I just had fun.”

“I call my sketchbook my playground.  I can do anything I want.  There’s no restrictions, there’s no laws.  It’s just me, the paper, my pencil and an eraser.  I just have fun.”

“Art is life.  It’s like breathing and eating.  I need it.”

Links mentioned:

Faeries of the Faultlines Kickstarter

Connect with Iris:

Website / Facebook / Instagram / Twitter / Tumlbr

On the next episode:

Amber Rae : Website / Instagram

How can we share more imperfections?  Join the discussion in the Facebook group!

May 07 2018

1hr 1min

Play

Rank #20: 220: You only get better by SPOILING THE PAGES (w/ Sandra Busby)

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Sandra Busby is a still life artist who paints in a contemporary style using traditional methods.  Inspired by the ordinary, she strives to capture the playful light in glass and other still life with her paints.

Feeling stifled by the modern way of teaching, Sandra turned her back on art school, shut herself away and studied the traditional methods of painting.

Her work has since been published multiple times, she won her first award in 2016 and her paintings can now be found hanging in private collections around the world.

Full shownotes: http://yourcreativepush.com/sandrabusby

In this episode, Sandra discusses:

-Her creative history, including a long gap in drawing and painting.

-The idea of not drawing in your sketchbook because you are afraid of spoiling the pages.

-How 100 pages of doodles or bad drawings is much better than 100 blank pages.

-How she is able to “scratch her creative itch” before she starts her work day, and how productive that time ends up being.

-Finding a slot of time that works best for when you are most creative.

-How starting is often the hardest thing to do, but once you do, how fast and smoothly things can go.

-The idea of having a white board or something similar to write down all of the ideas that come into your head so that they are in plain view.

-Her experience at art school and what led her to decide that art college was not for her.

-How she eventually developed her style by ignoring everybody else.

-Some of the resistances that she faces on a daily basis, including self doubt, procrastination, and guilt.

-How difficult it can be to get to your creative passion when you are in love with your partner and just want to spend time with them.

-How to strike a balance between the love for your family and the love for your art.

-“The Skanky Teenage Stage” of a painting and how to get through it.

-The power in approaching your art with the simple intention of making it just a little bit better.

-Some of the people that she draws inspiration from, such as Danny Gregory, other bloggers, and her Uncle Danny.

Sandra's Final Push will remind you that in order to become good at something, you have to be willing to be bad at it first.   Quotes:

“Trying to write a novel with one child attached to your leg and the other attached to your boob is quite distracting.  It was never going to work.”

“It was six months before I opened that sketchbook because I was absolutely terrified to spoil the pages.”

“It made me realize that I could paint the world however I wanted to paint it.”

“You don’t have to show anyone.  If you’re that worried, get a ring binder.  You can pull the pages out.”

“You do need to forget about perfection and the end result.  You’ve got to just make marks and see where it takes you.”

“I thought that to be a real artist, you must have this piece of paper to tell you that.”

“Procrastination is a great way of avoiding failure, isn’t it?”

“To be good at something, the first thing you’ve got to be willing to do is be bad at it.”

Links mentioned:

What Beginner Artists Need to Know about Painting [From Sandra's blog]

The Six Secret Stages of Painting [From Sandra's blog]

"Pep Talk" by Danny Gregory [Vimeo]

Danny Gregory interview on Your Creative Push

Ignore Everybody: and 39 Other Keys to Creativity by Hugh Macleod

SemiSkimmedMin (Minnie Small's Youtube channel)

Connect with Sandra:

Website / Blog / Facebook / Instagram / Twitter

On the next episode:

Andreas Preis : Website / Instagram

Be like Sandra and become a part of the YCP Facebook group!

May 18 2017

1hr 3mins

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