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Arts
Performing Arts

Sunday Baroque Conversations

Updated about 12 hours ago

Arts
Performing Arts
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Interviews with classical musicians and music enthusiasts.

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Interviews with classical musicians and music enthusiasts.

iTunes Ratings

3 Ratings
Average Ratings
2
0
1
0
0

iTunes Ratings

3 Ratings
Average Ratings
2
0
1
0
0
Cover image of Sunday Baroque Conversations

Sunday Baroque Conversations

Updated about 12 hours ago

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Interviews with classical musicians and music enthusiasts.

Rank #1: Sunday Baroque Conversations 34: Thomas Demenga

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Cellist Thomas Demenga is a renowned soloist, composer and teacher, whose own teachers and mentors include acclaimed musicians such as Leonard Rose and Mstislav Rostropovich. His repertory includes a full range of historical eras and styles of interpretation and composition, and he is an advocate for New Music. He is also passionate about historical performance practice of baroque music, and a virtuoso performer of the classical and romantic repertory for cello. Suzanne speaks with him about his broad ranging career.
Nov 02 2017
31 mins
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Rank #2: Sunday Baroque Conversations 33: Michelle Ross

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For 33 days, violinist Michelle Ross visited 33 public locations in NYC, performing Bach's Complete Sonatas and Partitas. Suzanne talked with Michelle about that project, her CD Discovering Bach, and her optimism and passion for the future of classical music.
Jul 18 2017
31 mins
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Rank #3: Sunday Baroque Conversations 20: Richard Savino

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Guitarist Richard Savino and his group, El Mundo, were nominated for a Grammy Award for Best Small Ensemble Performance for their 2011 recording The Kingdoms of Castille. Sunday Baroque contributor Amanda Pond interviewed him about the interesting variety of music on the recording, special considerations for performing it, and what it's like to receive a Grammy nomination.
Feb 06 2012
34 mins
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Rank #4: Sunday Baroque Conversations 12: Jose Serebrier

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Jose Serebrier began his life long love affair with music as a child in Uruguay.
He began composing as a teenager, and was just 17 when his first Symphony was
premiered by the legendary Leopold Stokowski in New York. Soon after, Serebrier
became Stokowski's assistant, and later learned from mentors and teachers
including conductors George Szell and Antal Dorati, and composer Aaron Copland.
Jose Serebrier has conducted many of the world's great orchestras, and recently
released a recording of Stokowski's Orchestral Transcriptions with the
Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra (Naxos 8.572050). Suzanne spoke with him about
his music, his new CD, and why he is optimistic about the future of classical
music.
Feb 26 2009
24 mins
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Rank #5: Sunday Baroque Conversations 9: Simone Dinnerstein

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American pianist Simone Dinnerstein has fast been gaining international attention as a commanding and charismatic artist, and as one of the most compelling women pianists performing today. Suzanne talked with her about her new CD, her career and how motherhood has influenced her art.
Sep 21 2007
26 mins
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Rank #6: Sunday Baroque Conversations 6: Sting and Edin Karamazov

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Rock musician Sting has a fervent love and curiosity for a wide variety of musical genres. He practices his craft playing Johann Sebastian Bach's Cello Suites and he learned to play the lute when a friend gave him one as a gift. Sting was so haunted by the life and music of 16th century "alienated singer-songwriter" John Dowland that he finally heeded his friends' urging and recorded some of Dowland's lute songs. Suzanne spoke with Sting and lutenist Edin Karamazov about their collaboration on SONGS FROM THE LABYRINTH, which features Dowland's lute solos, songs, and readings from one of the composer's letters.
Oct 13 2006
20 mins
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Rank #7: Sunday Baroque Conversations 17: Nicholas McGegan

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Nicholas McGegan is a man of many talents and interests: an art aficionado, avid gardener and epicure, to name just a few. He's also one of the most sought-after experts in baroque and early music - a conductor, harpsichordist and scholar. His zest for life is evident in everything he does, especially when he's leading an ensemble in music he knows and loves as much as George Frideric Handel's oratorio MESSIAH. Nicholas McGegan guest conducted the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra and May Festival Chorus in Handel's beloved masterpiece, and joined Sunday Baroque host Suzanne Bona in the studios of WGUC Cincinnati to discuss his work and Handel's genius.
Jan 06 2010
36 mins
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Rank #8: Sunday Baroque Conversations 19: Dennis Keene

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With its 6,183 pipes, 95 stops, 111 ranks, 2 consoles and 7 keyboards, installation of the new French organ at New York City's Church of the Ascension was completed in early 2011. Master builder Pascal Quoirin was chosen to design the instrument by the Church's Music Director, distinguished organist and conductor Dennis Keene. Suzanne Bona visited Dr. Keene to discuss the magnificent new instrument, what makes it so special and his plans to introduce it to the musical community.
May 23 2011
23 mins
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Rank #9: Sunday Baroque Conversations 13: Nicholas McGegan

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When renowned conductor Nicholas McGegan spoke with Suzanne Bona, he shared his thoughts about how and why artificial barriers went up between baroque & early music and other kinds of music, and he offered suggestions for making the concert-going experience more enjoyable and popular. He also shared his fondness for Oregon pinot noirs and advice on growing roses when one is always traveling, and he admitted to a naughty musical passion.
Mar 17 2009
18 mins
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Rank #10: Sunday Baroque Conversations 7: John Holloway

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John Holloway plays "baroque violin" with gut strings and a special bow. He also prefers to use autograph manuscripts of the music he plays so he can learn from the composer's notations and handwriting, and he researches the historic context so they will inform and influence his playing. He's a fan and champion of music by Johann Sebastian Bach, Heinrich Biber, and other 17th and 18th century composers, and has made recordings of their music that are both enjoyable and illuminating. John Holloway chatted with Suzanne about his meticulous and scholarly approach.
Nov 13 2006
38 mins
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Rank #11: Sunday Baroque Conversations 5: Tim Barringer and Eleanor Hughes

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Tim Barringer, Paul Mellon Professor of the History of Art at Yale University, and Eleanor Hughes, a Post-doctoral Research Associate at the Yale Center for British Art, collaborated on a comprehensive interdisciplinary project called ART & MUSIC IN BRITAIN: FOUR ENCOUNTERS 1730 TO 1900. The exhibition combines music, scores, instruments and paintings from various Yale collections, and is on view until December 31, 2006 at the Yale Center for British Art in New Haven, CT. They talked with Suzanne about this unique project, and especially about the first of the four "encounters," which deals with George Frideric Handel's London from the 1730s to the 1750s.
Oct 06 2006
20 mins
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Rank #12: Sunday Baroque Conversations 30: Ronn McFarlane

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The lute enjoyed its greatest popularity from the late 15th through late 17th centuries, when many people played the instrument and composed music for it. But thanks to a handful of masterful contemporary lutenists, such as Ronn McFarlane, the instrument continues to thrive in the 21st century. Suzanne spoke with the versatile musician about the lute's history, and his passion for the instrument and its varied repertory.
Dec 14 2016
27 mins
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Rank #13: Sunday Baroque Conversations 27: Richard Savino

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The visual arts and artists of the 17th century are much better known than the music and composers of that same time period, and guitarist Richard Savino wanted to address that oversight. He embarked on a comprehensive project to integrate the paintings of artists such as Artemisia Gentileschi and her contemporaries with music by composers such as Andrea Falconieri, Dario Castello, Giovanni Kapsberger and others. The result is the 2015 recording What Artemesia Heard featuring Richard Savino and his group El Mundo, and he spoke with Sunday Baroque host Suzanne Bona about it.
Mar 09 2016
19 mins
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Rank #14: Sunday Baroque Conversations 18: Simone Dinnerstein

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Pianist Simone Dinnerstein made a big splash in 2007 with her recording of Johann Sebastian Bach's Goldberg Variations. Jan. 2011 brings her first recording for the Sony label, BACH: A Strange Beauty. The all-Bach recording includes the English Suite #3, transcriptions of three Chorale Preludes, and Keyboard Concertos #1 and #5. Once again, she demonstrates her artistry and her sensitivity to Bach's musical line and harmonic genius. Dinnerstein invited Suzanne Bona for a conversation in her parents' Brooklyn home, where she talked about her passion for Bach's music, her newest recording and her upcoming projects.
Jan 14 2011
29 mins
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Rank #15: Sunday Baroque Conversations 10: Myron Rosenblum

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The first use of the term viol d'amore is believed to be in John Evelyn's diary of 1679. He described it by saying of it, "I never heard a sweeter Instrument or more surprising..." Frequently heard in baroque music, viola d'amore resembles a violin, but it has extra resonating strings - sympathetic strings - which give it a rich, sonorous and unusual tone. It's also very hard to play, which explains why the specialized instrument isn't more commonly heard. Suzanne Bona spoke with one of the world's viola d'amore experts, Myron Rosenblum, about the instrument, its history, and why he's such a passionate and enthusiastic advocate.
Oct 10 2007
28 mins
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