Cover image of STUFF FROM THE LOFT - Dave Dye
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Business
Management

STUFF FROM THE LOFT - Dave Dye

Updated 11 days ago

Business
Management
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Interviews with the best advertising, design, photographic, typographic, illustration and film directing talent that are still alive*. (*It's just easier.)

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Interviews with the best advertising, design, photographic, typographic, illustration and film directing talent that are still alive*. (*It's just easier.)

iTunes Ratings

4 Ratings
Average Ratings
4
0
0
0
0

iTunes Ratings

4 Ratings
Average Ratings
4
0
0
0
0
Cover image of STUFF FROM THE LOFT - Dave Dye

STUFF FROM THE LOFT - Dave Dye

Latest release on Apr 23, 2020

The Best Episodes Ranked Using User Listens

Updated by OwlTail 11 days ago

Rank #1: Nick Gill.

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He’s never tried to become his own brand, hang out at the right clubs or promote himself. He doesn’t bounce from jury to jury, job to job or club to club. And you’ll never read his latest theory on marketing in the trade mags. Nick Gill is currently Chief Creative Officer of BBH, his third agency in 30 years. We had a great chat, hope you enjoy.

May 21 2019

1hr 30mins

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Rank #2: Richard Shotton.

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One of my favourite tweeters. Always insightful, but more than that, Richard always seems so excited to share each idea or thought. He writes his tweets like they're Breaking News. Richard, like all of my favourite tweeters nowadays share the same job title; Behavioural Insight Bod. (Or some version of.) Traditionally, planners looked at behaviour, but not in the same way, not with such insight and usefulness. Which is weird. Why, when your whole business is built around communicating with human beings would you not have a whole department set up to understand human beings? Well now they're out on the net, sharing observations on how humans work for free, just check out Richard at https://twitter.com/rshotton...Hang on! Hang on! Not now, listen to this first. It’s different from my usual, chronologically structured podcasts, this one's all over the map. You can hear in real time as Richard and I try to get our heads around what's happening with humans and ad agencies today. The result is that there are: a) Far more thoughtful pauses than usual. b) The number of 'Mmmms' is off the charts. c) Julius Caeser features more than Bill Bernbach. d) If you're in the creative department, I'm afraid there's a whole bunch of difficult to pronounce European philosopher's names you'll need to google. But on a lighter note, listen out for Richard crunching his way through a Bourbon biscuit about halfway through. Enjoy.

Jun 24 2019

1hr 39mins

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Rank #3: Adrian Holmes.

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One of the nice things about doing these interviews is getting to know people who you’ve only previously knew though their work. So, when I write one of these intros I try to reflect on what I’ve learnt about the interviewee, to capture the characteristics that have helped them create such great work and succeed in such a competitive business. But as different as they all are, they all share the same characteristic; They care. When they commit, they’re all in. Whether making an ad or a cup of tea they want it to be as good as possible. They keep pushing when others decide ‘that’ll do’. A few years back, a friend of mine wandered into Adrian’s office to leave a message, he found that the desk was filled with random sets of letters and numbers. Some were ticked, some crossed and one had a question mark. He stood there looking at them trying to figure out what fiendish creativity was going on. Until, a few weeks later, when he bumped into Adrian, who’d just taken delivery of his new BMW, it turned out that Adrian had been trying to pick the most visually pleasing arrangement of letters and numbers before committing to a number plate. Then there was the time that Adrian, irritated at having to fold his copy of Campaign to fit into his briefcase, found someone to make him a new, bespoke briefcase, unfolded Campaign size. Also, you’ll notice something different when you look through Adrian’s work, along with the names of the agencies and clients, you’ll also see the year it ran, the art director, director, illustrator, photographer and typographer. You’ll see subheads. You won’t hear the sound of my phone beeping or Adrian not being able to recall a Creative Directors name. (It was edited, re-recorded and fixed.) And at the end of this post you’ll see an article titled ‘My Portfolio’, look closely at the first line and you’ll notice that the word firing’ is fractionally bolder than the rest, that’s because underneath is the word ‘giving’, Campaign had misquoted him, Adrian and his scalpel fixed it. I’m not sure you can learn to care passionately about the details, but if you do, your work be better for it.

May 23 2019

2hr 10mins

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Rank #4: Mark Reddy.

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‘Art Director’ is an unhelpful title. It has nothing to do with Art and very little to do with directing. Some think it’s about making stuff look cool, I think it’s about communicating at speed. We work in a medium people are actively trying to ignore, so we can’t hang around. Art Director’s can only communicate quickly if the understand: a) Their basic toolkit; photography, film, illustration, editing, cropping, fonts, colours and the rest. b) The world around them: how humans behave, the meaning of gestures, what’s fashionable, what’s unfashionable, the difference between someone looking excited and crazed, whether to it’s funnier to cast the tall skinny guy or the short fat guy, whether it would be more dramatic to fill the frame with sea and have a thin strip of sky or vice-versa? I don’t know an Art Director who understands both better than Mark Reddy.

Apr 03 2019

1hr 46mins

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Rank #5: RADIO: Paul Burke interviews Nick Angell.

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Back in the seventies there was a tv show called The Waltons. A depression era family mooched about Virginia's Blue Ridge Mountains dealing with various social and moral issues, it was all very wholesome. At the end, after some member of the family had realised the error of their ways, they'd cut to the usual end device: A shot of their quaint wooden house at the night. We’d hear a voice ‘Goodnight Jon Boy’, gradually we'd hear all the other members of the family shout their goodnights. It was slightly chaotic and you were reminded that there were a lot of Waltons living cheek by jowl in that house. A decade later I was given a brief for The Observer Newspaper - a 48 sheet poster to promote their property section. Bingo! Show that end shot with ‘Goodnight Jon Boy’, ‘Goodnight Mary Lou’ plus another fifty goodnights and names in text, underneath was ‘If you’re looking for a bigger home, take a look in The Observer.’ The Creative Directors loved. The Account team presented it. The client bought it. Kind of. They thought it would make a better radio ad. Heartbreaking. Rather than have a big, glorious proof to put in my book, I’d have a little cassette. It got made. It got into D&AD, my first entry. It won gold at Creative Circle, my first award. Maybe it'd worked out best after all? I placed that little cassette in my book. It was the only thing in there that had won an award. I’d show my book to the great and the good at the agencies I hoped to graduate to, without exception they’d get to the end, see the cassette and start zipping the book up. ‘I have a radio ad…it’s won an award’ I’d say. 'Great' they'd say, continuing to zip. I’d push a bit further ‘Would you like to hear it?’ The answers would range from ‘I’ve got a meeting I have to be at’ to ‘No...I’m sure it’s pretty good if it’s won an award.’ No fucker would listen to it. My only award winning piece of work. What is it with radio? Why do we treat it like the runt of the media litter? A few months ago I thought it would be good to post something on radio advertising. Partly because I think it'll start to grow due to the booming podcast world, partly because it's the perfect subject matter for a podcast. Whilst thinking about how to go about it, I noticed that one of the best producers of radio ads had just closed up shop; Angell Sound. Owner, Nick Angell, had consistently produced some of our country's best radio ads over the last thirty or so years. But for a decade or so after the whole Walton’s episode (or ‘Waltongate’ as I call it), I’d avoided radio briefs whenever possible, so didn’t feel sufficiently knowledgeable to grill Nick. Fortunately, I have a mate who's more than qualified, Paul Burke, copywriter at BMP/DDB, JWT & AMV/BBDO. I was going to say he's one of the few to truly embrace the possibilities of radio, but I can't think of who the others would be? So maybe he's the only creative to truly embrace the possibilities of radio. It's lead him to set up his own radio production company, teach and promote the joys of radio. Not only that, like the man from Delmonte 'He say yes!'. So here they are. Enjoy.

Oct 06 2019

1hr 26mins

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Rank #6: Graham Fink. (Pt. 1)

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Context. It’s the word that comes to mind every time I think about writing one of these intros. What seems familiar today was once considered very left-field, risky or just plain crazy. Each pushes the peanut along for the next generation. Take the 1988 D&AD Annual, it’s hard to believe now, but all but one ad in the press and poster section had black headlines, the one that didn’t was Graham Fink’s Metropolitan Police campaign. I was a generation behind Graham, so watched from afar as he and his writer Jeremy Clarke tried to push the peanut forward. They made ads taking the piss out of other ads, (Hamlet), they got England’s Cricket Captain to stick two fingers up to the establishment after being arrested for smoking dope, (Hamlet again), and they were the first to blow a million pounds on the production of a single tv ad, (B.A.). I had a great chat with ‘Finky’, hope you enjoy it.

May 22 2019

1hr 40mins

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Rank #7: Neil French.

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Former rent collector, bull-fighter, porn director, klacker salesman, Judas Priest manager, account man, copywriter, art director and Chief Creative Officer of Ogilvy Worldwide. Warning: Some areas of the recording may have been adversely effected by a Rioja. (See above for only known picture of Neil without a cigar.)

May 21 2019

1hr 6mins

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Rank #8: Chris Palmer (Pt. 1: Advertising)

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Chris Palmer. My 5th boss. His 1st job was as John Hegarty’s writer. He won 5 D&AD silvers in his first in his first year. Set up and agency in his 4th year. Become one the most in demand directors of the last 25 years. Launched, arguably, London’s No 1 production company over over the last two decades; Gorgeous. Also, Mark Denton says Chris can draw better than him. Annoying isn’t it? We had a great chat, hope you enjoy it.

May 21 2019

2hr 20mins

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Rank #9: Ton McElligott

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After years of being amazed at what was on the net, I’m now increasingly surprised at what’s not. Three years ago I was trawling for a particular ad of Tom’s, not only couldn’t I find it I could barely find any of his work. Outraged, I gathered together as much of his work as I could lay my hands on and put out a post called ‘Hands Up Who’s Heard Of Tom McElligott’. I was trying to be snarky and ironic, like you may write ‘Hands Up Who’s Heard Of John Lennon?’. Two things happened: 1. An enormous amount of people checked it out, 65k. Most had never heard of him, he was being shared and referred to on Twitter and Facebook a ‘really cool pre-internet guy’. 2. A few members of his department got in touch to point out that some of the ads featured were not under Tom’s watch, they were overseen by Pat Burnham. Then Pat Burnham emailed me; I opened it cautiously. ‘Just wanted to get in touch to say thank you, I really enjoyed your blog post, best, Pat.’ It made me feel bad. What can I do to make amends? Interview him, I’d never done it before but it seemed like a good thing to do. I’ve now posted about 50 interviews. So it feels appropriate that Tom is my first podcast interview. He hasn’t given an interview for 25 years and said he doesn’t plan on giving one on the next 25. I Hope you enjoy listening to Tom as much as I did.

May 21 2019

2hr 21mins

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Rank #10: Tony Davidson.

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It’s weird, I only interview people whose work I really like, but whenever I lay their work out end-to-end, I’m always surprised at how much better it is than I’d remembered. It could be that there’s much more of it, the sheer consistency of it or that it appears better with the benefit of time and a bit of distance. All three are true of the work in this post. Tony does a good job of shining a light onto how he produced it, hope you enjoy it.

Apr 03 2019

3hr 18mins

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