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Cover image of BURCH HYPER FITNESS SYSTEMS (BHS)

BURCH HYPER FITNESS SYSTEMS (BHS)

Sean Burch started out with a lofty goal: to climb Mount Everest solo and without supplementary oxygen. To accomplish this, Sean developed a training regimen that incorporated cardio and strength elements, nutrition, and mental conditioning. That program took him to Everest's summit and helped launch his career as one of the world's premier athletes. He is now considered an "American Fitness Guru" (Men's Journal) and sought after for his unique techniques and his contagious enthusiasm.Hyperfitness means learning to test and challenge yourself every day. It means setting short-term and long-range goals and achieving them. It means pushing yourself and discovering that you are stronger, tougher, and more capable than you ever dreamed. With Sean's three building blocks to success-hyperstrength (exercise), hyperfare (nutrition), and hypermind (mental conditioning)-you can accomplish any physical and mental goal you can imagine in twelve short weeks.But what sets this fitness book apart is Sean Burch's incredible personal story and his encouraging, no-holds-barred motivational approach. With such creative daily exercises as speed skater drills, aerial spins, scale the whale, and ski-mogul master jumps clearly illustrated throughout, the workouts are more like obstacle courses-challenging, varied, and fun. Whether you are preparing for a marathon or another event, or are just ready to dedicate yourself to getting in the best shape of your life physically and mentally, Hyperfitness will inspire you to reach the highest level of yourself possible.WWW.SEANBURCH.COM | WWW.HYPERFITNESSLIVING.COM

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National Geopgrahic World Talk Interview

15mins

6 May 2009

Rank #1

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Bob & Sheri Show - Interview

5mins

6 May 2009

Rank #2

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Burch Hyperfitness Systems - Sessions

Hyperfitness means learning to test and challenge yourself every day. It means setting short-term and long-range goals and achieving them. It means pushing yourself and discovering that you are stronger, tougher, and more capable than you ever dreamed. With Sean's three building blocks to success-hyperstrength (exercise), hyperfare (nutrition), and hypermind (mental conditioning)-you can accomplish any physical and mental goal you can imagine in twelve short weeks.But what sets this fitness book apart is Sean Burch's incredible personal story and his encouraging, no-holds-barred motivational approach. With such creative daily exercises as speed skater drills, aerial spins, scale the whale, and ski-mogul master jumps clearly illustrated throughout, the workouts are more like obstacle courses-challenging, varied, and fun. Whether you are preparing for a marathon or another event, or are just ready to dedicate yourself to getting in the best shape of your life physically and mentally, Hyperfitness will inspire you to reach the highest level of yourself possible.

2mins

5 May 2007

Rank #3

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63 Unclimbed Tibetan Peaks in 23 days

Washington, DC... World recorder holder and fitness expert Sean Burch returned to the U.S. yesterday from Tibet where he reached a record 63 summits of previously unexplored and unclimbed high-altitude peaks in 23 days. Burch netted over 100,000 ft. of vertical gain in the midst of facing mountaineering hazards such as avalanches, crevasses, weather, and rockslides. Burch also confronted unforeseen obstacles as dremo (wild bears), wild dogs, and a botched robbery attempt at knifepoint by nomads. The peaks ranged in altitude from 16 - 19,000ft, and Burch spent an average 16 hours a day climbing for the 23 days.

3mins

5 Nov 2006

Rank #4

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Mt. Kilimanjaro, Speed Ascent World Record

June 14, 2005 Sean Burch battled hypothermia, a blinding windstorm, pouring rain, sleet, and snow for five hours, 28 minutes, and 48 seconds to capture the new world record for the fastest ascent of 19,340-foot Mount Kilimanjaro, Africa's highest peak.

14 Jun 2005

Rank #5

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East Greenland Expedition

Gronau Nunatakker Range, First Ascents. On the 4th of July, British climbers (Euan Lawson, Stephen Phillips, John Starbuck, and Owain Jones), British/American Will Cross, and myself flew from Reykjavik, Iceland to Constable Pynt, Greenland, before continuing on to Gronau Nunatakker (N69'28, W30'13), an unmapped and unchartered region in Greenland which lies 60km to the north of Gunnbjornsfjeld. The first evening out on 7 Jul our group reached the summit of a 2010m peak. The next evening Owain, John, and myself darted up a knife-edge ridge to the summit of a 2650m beauty. On 10 Jul, after a failed attempt to reach the summit of a peak parallel to 2650m on the periphery of Gronau Gletscher, I soloed a 2800m peak west of the team's failed attempt, heading up the mountain's East ridge zigzagging around bergshrunds and dicey cracks. I reached the summit at 3am just in time to enjoy the sun's pale orange color spread across the horizon.Two days later, our team headed north and placed camp on an upper plateau, setting our eyes on new objectives among the Gronau Nunatakker and Gronlands Styrelsens Gletscher expanses. After several days of heavy winds and blinding snow, leaving four feet of fresh powder, Will, myself, Owain, and John emerged from our tents and hiked to a summit of a small hump peak facing just south of camp. That evening the four of us reached the summit of a 2900m peak to the northeast of camp traversing several icy patches along it's west face and then straight up the south ridge. On the 18th of July our team made it's second and last summit as a group reaching a domed peak in the far northwest corridor of the plateau.Will and I decided to break off from the group and climbed on our own for the remainder of the expedition. We reached the summits of 2 beautiful virgins (Hhass Peak and Hans Schou Peak), with a gloriously fulfilling ten-hour ski and climb. After another 2 days stuck in our tent due to blizzard conditions, Will and I surfaced for a fourteen-hour, five-summit blitz of peaks (rated alpine PD+), traversing an entire range in the northeast corridor. Back at camp, I decided to make one more solo endeavor, and scaled "Schou Deux" by frontpointing up its south ridge, (1500-meter, alpine AD+) before traversing the western face to the summit. On the summit the wind had died, the air was crisp, and I was alone within the vast polar icecap of the Arctic circle viewing what no man's eyes had ever seen before, an untouched and unscathed part of our world.A day later Will and I managed to ski back with our sleds to the British base camp just before our Twin Otter arrived to fly us out. The exploration had ended as abruptly as it started, and as usual, I wished I could have stayed behind within the natural world.

14 Jun 2005

Rank #6

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North Pole Marthon - World Record

Dispatch #3April 12, 2004, Oslo, NorwayWell, I'm back in Oslo now, safe and sound. I hope you have had a chance to read the press release regarding the marathon. I'm still a bit in shock to have won the race. This was my first marathon, so I really didn't know much about what to expect. Also, I didn't know much about the other competitors. Well, I certainly knew of Sir Ranulph Fiennes, as an Arctic explorer, but I didn't know anything about his marathoning skill. And, of course, no one knew about me as a runner! In all fairness, the conditions were a great equalizer.The most nerve-wracking part of the whole expedition was using the Russian cargo plane and helicopter. Since the site of the race was the Russian research station ("Ice Station Borneo"), the Russians were in charge of ferrying us all out to their place on the floating ice pack. Their planes are so OLD. It didn't look like they spend much time on maintenance and repair.The funny part (or not so funny part) about the race was when I couldn't see anyone on the course. There are pressure ridges throughout the ice, so I would be going up and down little hills. At the far end of the course, I'd always be looking over my shoulder, waiting to see if a polar bear was stalking me. They blend in with the snow so that you can hardly see them until they're right on top of you.Hypothermia was a factor in the race. Noel, a UK athlete, came into our hut frozen to the bone after he finished. Layers of ice were within each layer of his clothing. It took him a good hour to defrost, and even then, he didn't look happy. He was shaking terribly, but managed to pull through. All the runners endured some pretty amazing conditions, and I was just happy everyone made it out alive with no life-threatening injuries or frostbite.I am having trouble with my left thumb and the ligaments connected to it. I could not feel my thumb after lap 2, and now it aches and goes numb at times. That seems to be the only injury I sustained; the rest of me feels great.Press is already starting to leak out to the rest of the world. England's largest newspaper, "The Times", ran a story on the marathon with a photograph of me running during it. This morning I had the pleasure to be on "Good Morning Norway", the Norwegian version of America's "Today Show". Half of the interview I just sat there while the host translated my answers to his questions, but it was still grand.Tomorrow I head home. It was short trip this time, much shorter than any of my other expeditions. Of course, this does not count as my official North Pole trip; that will come later. I already have more expeditions in the planning stages, so stay tuned. As for my foray into the world of long distance running, I will be putting video and pictures taken during the race by UK Sports photographer of the year, Mike King, on the site, as well as all upcoming news media. Hope you'll check it out. Cheers. SeanDispatch #2April 7, 2004, Svalbad, NorwayI left Oslo this morning and had a stopover in Thomso before continuing on to Svalbard. I met some guys out in the lobby from Holland and Australia, who will be with a group skiing to the last degree of the Pole. Super chaps, great attitude. This is a major part of each expedition I go on...meeting people from all over the world, sharing stories...some are pleasant, some aren't, but all are interesting.When the plane descended into Svalbard, the winds picked up considerably, some of the worst bashing I have ever been in on a commercial airline. The plane was landing on an airstrip the farthest point north a commercial flight can land, in the high arctic, at 78.56 degrees north latitude. I did not realize how strong the wind was until we touched down on the runway and the plane tossed and turned back and forth like a rag doll. A rough landing and taxi that eventually put us just several yards off the entrance to the one terminal at the airport. We had to exit down the plane's steps and then walk the short distance across the tarmac to the terminal. As I got up to gather my carry-on and put on my down winter gear, the steward came on over the loudspeaker and announced, "Grab a partner when exiting the aircraft, otherwise you will be blown over!"I walked down the stairs filming with my camcorder and screamed into its microphone trying to narrate, slipping and being blown away from the terminal entrance. I managed to get back on track and slipped in the doorway. I just found out the winds have been exceeding 60 mph here today. The arctic north adventure has truly begun!Richard Donovan, the marathon organizer, picked up Ran, Stevie, and I, and we were off to the Hotel Radisson. Stevie will be the only woman runner, and currently trains 5 days a week, with 50 to 60 mile runs on the weekend. How does she do it? Sir Ranulph Fiennes, dubbed by the Guinness Book of World Records as "U.K.'s most successful explorer in the world", did not say anything and kept to himself. I hope he opens up; it would be great to swap stories.On my way up to my room, I passed several people who were setting off for various winter adventures...caving, dog-sledding, etc., even with this intense weather.Richard has informed me that the French company, Ceroplex, which is organizing logistics, says the weather may be stable by tomorrow night. If so, we will fly to the Russian base, Borneo, tomorrow mid-day and then run the marathon that night!This would not be an ideal situation, especially since I am still trying to catch up on the time change and sleep deprivation. But then again, this is what makes this marathon so enticing. I am thinking of taking a stroll around outside the hotel in the blustery conditions before our briefing this evening - the sub-zero temperatures will do me good. I'm told that it's best not to venture off too far from the hotel on your own because polar bears are in town, but with this weather, I think even they may be seeking shelter. One quarter of the world's polar bears reside in Svalbard area.That's all for now. Thanks for joining me here in Svalbard.Dispatch #1April 7, 2004, Oslo, NorwayI knew everything was changing as the plane broke through the clouds making its descent into Oslo. It was raining, windy, and snow was on the rolling hills near the coast. Ah yes, to be home again.It's been 5 years since I've been to Oslo. I'm staying with family at the moment...my cousin Eli Anne and her husband Jan's house. It is so very nice to see them again and my Norwegian side of the family. I met my godchild, Caroline, for the first time. Such a sweet, beautiful, and happy baby with incredibly good manners, and at only 18 months. She already says "thank you". Eli and Jan are wonderful parents...they eat breakfast and dinner together as a family each night...very important and something our family will follow when our baby arrives this year. Tonight everyone (my other cousin Helene, her husband, and folks) are gathering together for a traditional Norwegian meal of various types of smoked fish, cheeses, bread, and other delicious delights.Eli Anne is like an older sister to me, and has already stated several times how crazy it is to be running a marathon at the North Pole, warning me of the dangers and insanity. Helene, however, is the exact opposite, excited for the adventure and thinks I am pleasantly psycho. Family, they do tell you like it is and hold no punches, and that's why I love them!I am trying to quickly adjust to the time change and catch up on some much needed rest. I need to be physically and mentally rested for the marathon. This afternoon, I will take a little run at a nearby park to wear in my new "ice bug" shoes, which I will be wearing for the race. They look like trail runners, except that they have little spikes on the tread and are waterproof. These shoes were specifically designed for winter running. I think the conditions will test them pretty thoroughly.I plan to go through my gear tonight, leaving some here and taking the rest up with me tomorrow to Svalbard, Norway, which is the northernmost airport in the world serviced by regular commercial flights.Last night on the news, they were covering the story of an officer that had been shot and killed in Stavanger after a botched robbery at a bank. This is EXTREMELY rare in Norway, where police officers do not carry sidearms. Everyone is here is shocked. In America, unfortunately, it is a much more common occurrence. I wonder what America would be like if handguns were outlawed and cops did not carry sidearms?The world can be a dangerous place, whether it's at the North Pole, in Stavanger, or taking a stroll through Georgetown in Washington, D.C. I prefer remote, far off places to the crowded cities; they are my safe havens.The plane leaves at 9am tomorrow, so I will send my next update from the winter tundra of the mining town, Spitsbergen. I heard that polar bears occasionally stroll through town. I'll give them your regards.

7 Apr 2004

Rank #7